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MAESTRO

Fresh from the release of her debut single, 18-year old Claire Wilkinson a.k.a. CLAIRITY clears the airwaves for her EP Alienation with her synthpop songs of isolation that make listeners fall in love at first sound.

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n a suburban town in White House, Tennessee, 8-year old Claire Wilkinson took singing lessons and taught herself how to play the keyboard by watching videos on YouTube. The aspiring artist eventually caught the attention of Pebe Seberton, more known as pop star Kesha’s mom, who then introduced her to hitmaker Kara DioGuardi. A decade later, the singer-songwriter is introduced to the crowd of South By Southwest by her stage name Clairity. More recently, she released a fourtrack EP entitled Alienation, where she talks about her past, as well as what else she sees in her future. Describing her sound as “within the parameters of ambient pop,” she says she achieved what she intended to sonically create for her EP. “The new music has a more urban leaning vibe with some organic textures, like effected guitar, piano, and real drums, but it still feels like a Clairity record.” Owning up to a distinct style when it comes to her songs, she gets inspiration from a lot of other artists. “Fiona Apple, Björk, Imogen Heap, and Sia are all massive influences in both my writing and my aesthetic. Their intensity visually is

58 - statusmagonline.com

By Ida Aldana something I definitely aim to channel in my own way. They’re all such badass femme musical pioneers.” Aside from the influence of strong women in the industry, she’s also a big fan of Coldplay. “I look up to Chris [Martin] in so many ways. When he performs, I get the feeling that music is deeply spiritual for him, which is so cool to me. I’m obsessed.” Proving she’s wise beyond her age, she uses her past experiences of feeling like a social misfit as a drawing board for her music. “When I was younger, I felt like a total outcast, but I also felt guilty in some strange way for feeling those emotions. Feeling like a freak is, for lack of a better term, normal,” she shares. But sharing her personal struggles is more than just about telling her story. “My EP is meant to validate every imperfect emotion associated with the feeling of alienation. I want to reassure listeners that what they’re going through is real and human; we’re a nation of aliens, in some way. We all know what it’s like to be the weirdo in the room.” As comfortable as she

is now talking about feeling left out, she admits that there were times that she didn’t feel this way while growing up. “I recall walking into our gymnasium before class in the morning to see everyone staring back at me from the bleachers. I remember getting this very heavy, visceral sense of being judged and sized up,” she says. But this experience wasn’t for nothing. It made her set her sights on being an artist. “In that moment, I came to the conclusion that the only thing I ever wanted to be judged for was my art. It was the only way I believed I could communicate my truth as a person. I didn’t know how, but I had to show everyone.” Aside from finding a way to channel her feelings and reach out to people through her EP, she also developed her artistry. “I feel like I’ve learned a lot about what kind of records I want to make and what I want to say as an artist while writing this EP.” She also talks about how

STATUS Magazine November 2015 feat Lucky Blue Smith  

STATUS Magazine November 2015 feat Lucky Blue Smith Plus: Teresa Oman Nick Brewer Mija Clairity Oh, Flamingo! Jerrold Tarog Keiynan Lonsdal...

STATUS Magazine November 2015 feat Lucky Blue Smith  

STATUS Magazine November 2015 feat Lucky Blue Smith Plus: Teresa Oman Nick Brewer Mija Clairity Oh, Flamingo! Jerrold Tarog Keiynan Lonsdal...

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