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2012-2013

Education Annual Report


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Inside This Report Overview ............................................................................................3 Commitment to Our Community ........................................................4 Geographic Impact ............................................................................5 Performances for Schools....................................................................6 Artist-in-Residence ..............................................................................7 Two Poems from Our Artist-in-Residence Program..............................8 Programs for Families ........................................................................9 Pre-Performance Insights / Scientists Exploring the Arts....................10 Donors and Sponsors ........................................................................11

“We look  forward every year to what you will offer like a child before Christmas!” —Shelly Remaly, Newark Christian School

Cover: Milk & Cookies (photo: Kyle D. Barker); below: students from Douglass Child Study Center at a State Theatre school-day performance


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Overview

“These are the

types of experiences that help us grow and inspire us to learn and do.” —Michele Miller Emily Fisher Charter School, Trenton

Rennie Harris RHAW

Education and outreach, a cornerstone of the State

Of particular note in 2012-2013 was the expansion of the

Theatre’s mission, make the performing arts accessible and

State Theatre’s artist residency with performance poet

rewarding for approximately 30,000 people each year. The

Glenis Redmond. Extending the program an additional two

programs serve a wide demographic, from preschoolers to

weeks enabled us to reach out to more people in more

seniors, corporate employees, people in recovery, families,

places, to devote more time to in-depth integration of the

and the homeless. They embrace people of all cultural

arts, and to develop exciting intergenerational partnerships.

backgrounds and every socioeconomic status. The geographical impact is equally broad, reaching audiences from across the state and even beyond New Jersey’s borders.

Teachers, students, and the general public continued to laud the quality and relevance of the theater’s education programs. On average, 95 percent of participants rated these programs “good,” “terrific,” or “fantastic.” An equal

In 2012-2013, the State Theatre presented 175 education

number told us they “probably” or “definitely” would return

events, representing an increase of nearly 35 percent over

to the theater next season to participate in the program

the previous season. Our patrons engaged with the arts

again.

through a variety of programs, including performances, workshops, lectures, and master classes. Half of the 30,000 people served participated for free; the other half at a heavily subsidized cost—all part of the State Theatre’s commitment to making our programs accessible to the entire community.

This report presents an overview of the State Theatre’s education and outreach programs, highlighting the challenges and achievements of the past season. We are proud to serve the people of New Jersey.


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Commitment to Our Community The State Theatre has a strong commitment to our community, donating nearly $150,000 in free programs to 15,600 disadvantaged children and adults. Approximately 2,300 schoolchildren in New Jersey’s most underserved districts attended the theater at no cost, a gift worth close to $19,000. Partnerships with local and regional not-for-profit cultural and service organizations are another way in which the State Theatre supports the community. Working cooperatively and sharing resources helped each organization fulfill its mission, extend its reach, and create greater public awareness of its programs.

Program Partners Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity, Rutgers University American Repertory Ballet Crossroads Theatre Company Delta Phi Omega Sorority, Rutgers University Elijah’s Promise George Street Playhouse Middlesex County College EMPOWER Program

New Brunswick Cultural Center New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School New Brunswick Police Department New Jersey Tap Dance Ensemble Philadelphia Zoo Princeton Symphony Orchestra Rutgers Preparatory School United Methodist Church, New Brunswick Zimmerli Art Museum

“A community without cultural resources does not properly address the needs of its citizenry. The State Theatre, staffed by professional and caring individuals, serves its community well.”

—Dr. Deborah Alexander Principal, New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School

Organizations Receiving Free Programs Act-So New Jersey Anderson House, Whitehouse Station Brandywine Senior Living, Wall The Center for Great Expectations, Somerset The College of St. Elizabeth Damon House, New Brunswick East Brunswick Public Library East Brunswick Senior Center Fairleigh Dickinson University Good News Home for Women, Flemington Greater Brunswick Charter School Highland Park Public Library Imani Park Transitional Housing, Edison Joseph Kohn Rehabilitation Center Marlboro Memorial Middle School Meadow Lakes, Hightstown Middlesex County Academy Middlesex County Adult Corrections Center Middlesex County College

Middlesex County Vocational & Technical School Middlesex County Youth Shelter Monroe Village Newark Christian School New Brunswick Public Schools New Brunswick Senior Citizens Resource Center New Brunswick Youth Services System New Hope Foundation, Marlboro New Jersey Institute of Technology Nu-View Academy, Piscataway Piscataway Public Schools Rider University Rutgers African American Alumni Association Rutgers University Stockton State College Stonebridge at Montgomery Union County TEAMS Charter School

Above: Family Day crafts workshop (photo: Nancy Swolensky). Bottom: Artist-in-Residence Glenis Redmond and her poetry students from Damon House, a residential facility for adults recovering from addiction.


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Geographic Impact In 2012-2013, the State Theatre’s education programs reached 30,200 people, including:

 15,600 students at 165 schools in 95 districts in 3 states in 20 counties 

nearly



over 6,250 children and their families

ATLANTIC Galloway Township BERGEN Fair Lawn Hackensack Lyndhurst Teaneck Westwood BURLINGTON Bordentown Burlington Columbus Fort Dix CAPE MAY Wildwood Crest ESSEX Bloomfield Caldwell Fairfield Irvington Livingston Maplewood Newark North Caldwell Orange West Caldwell HUDSON Jersey City Union City HUNTERDON Califon Clinton Flemington High Bridge Lebanon Milford Whitehouse Station MERCER East Windsor Hamilton Hightstown

4,500 university students

Lawrence Township Pennington Princeton Princeton Junction Trenton West Windsor

Matawan Middletown Neptune City Oakhurst Roosevelt Tinton Falls Wall

MIDDLESEX Carteret Cranbury Dunellen East Brunswick Edison Highland Park Jamesburg Metuchen Middlesex Milltown Monroe New Brunswick North Brunswick Old Bridge Perth Amboy Piscataway Plainsboro Sayreville South Amboy South Brunswick South Plainfield South River Spotswood Woodbridge

MORRIS Budd Lake Chester Denville Florham Park Lincoln Park Madison Millington Morristown Pompton Plains Riverdale

MONMOUTH Asbury Park Belmar Colts Neck Englishtown Freehold Hazlet Holmdel Howell Keyport Long Branch Manalapan Marlboro

OCEAN Bayville Lakewood Seaside Heights Toms River PASSAIC Hawthorne Little Falls Oak Ridge Wayne SOMERSET Basking Ridge Bedminster Bernardsville Bound Brook Branchburg Bridgewater Hillsborough Manville North Plainfield Raritan Skillman Somerset South Bound Brook Warren

SUSSEX Newton UNION Clark Cranford Elizabeth Fanwood Garwood Hillside Linden Mountainside Plainfield Roselle Scotch Plains Springfield Westfield WARREN Asbury Great Meadows Stewartsville NEW YORK (NY) Manhattan RICHMOND (NY) Staten Island NORTHAMPTON (PA) Easton


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Performances for Schools

“My students and I

During the 2012-2013 season, 15,600 students and teachers attended the State Theatre’s 2012-2013 school-day performances. The series comprised 29 performances of 11 different productions by acclaimed artists from the U.S.,

thoroughly enjoyed the performance. It made my day to hear them chatting about their favorite parts and hearing one boy in particular say, ‘That was the BEST show I’ve ever seen!’” —Keri Krawski, Hillsborough Elementary School

Great Britain, Spain, and Australia. The season featured performances for all grades (Pre-K-12), with connections to all subject areas: not only the visual and performing arts, but also math, science, social studies, world languages, and life skills. The shows represented a variety of cultural traditions—from Shakespeare to hip-hop, flamenco to fairy tales. The State Theatre’s student performances drew schools from 92 districts, encompassing 17 of the state’s 21 counties. Seats for nearly all shows, priced just $8, remained affordable to most schools, while over 2,000 students from New Brunswick and other disadvantaged districts attended free of charge. The 1,850-seat State Theatre was the venue for large-scale productions such as The Nutcracker and Soledad Barrio and Noche Flamenca. The 300-seat Crossroads Theatre afforded the opportunity to present shows in a more intimate setting, including The Man Who Planted Trees, Paige in Full, and Grug. For every show, the State Theatre Education Department created Keynotes, detailed performance guides packed with information about the art form and performers, background information to provide context for the show, pre- and post-performance activities, and resources for further study. Keynotes are available for free download on the theater’s website.

Keynotes performance guides help teachers connect performances to school curriculum.


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Artist-in-Residence No State Theatre initiative has a greater impact on our community than the annual artist residency. Since its inception in 1992, this free program has reached over 55,000 people in a wide range of settings throughout central New Jersey and beyond—from urban and suburban schools, universities, libraries, and corporate offices to senior centers, youth shelters, detention centers, and residential treatment facilities. For many, the residency has provided a first encounter with live performance, and the first opportunity to engage with an artist in person. In 2012-2013, performance poet Glenis Redmond returned for her fifth consecutive year as the State Theatre artist-in-residence. The South Carolina native is known for her deeply moving ‘praise poems’ that pay tribute to the friends, family, and places that have helped shape her life. During the residency, she presented both one-time “Informances” for large audiences as well as in-depth poetry workshop series for small groups. In her writing workshops, Glenis gave participants a creative outlet for selfexploration and for confronting painful personal issues by giving voice to powerful emotions in a positive way. At a free public performance at the end of the residency, participants from the diverse groups came together to share their poems, celebrating the human spirit and triumph over adversity. With each successive year that Glenis has worked with the State Theatre, the program has taken on new partners, added new components, and deepened the focus on the writing process. In 2012-2013, the residency expanded from three weeks to five, comprising 68 events serving 2,250 people. Most significantly, the program began a new partnership between New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School and the New Brunswick Senior Center that created an intergenerational conversation through poetry.

“Glenis’ ability to

captivate an audience and then engage them in participating, writing, and sharing is awe-inspiring.” —Linda Ashforth, New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School

Above: Glenis Redmond leading a writing workshop at New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School; an Informance at the Highland Park Public Library. Left: a senior at New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School, embraces his ‘super-senior.’


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Poems From Our Artist-in-Residence Program A Thousand Pieces by Brandon Diaz-Abreu, New Brunswick Health Sciences Technology High School from his interview with Ms. Deloatch at the New Brunswick Senior Citizen Resource Center “The world don’t owe me nothing! Yeah, I said it. I said it ‘cause I meant it. A woman like me don’t wait on the world. I walk my own path; I carve my own destiny. I can’t say the same for some of these young people. They done gone senseless some of them! If they can’t be a super-stah, they’ll be a gang-stah. Just point and shoot till they get what’s coming to ‘em. Putting everybody else in jeopardy. And everybody done changed too. I can remember back in the day When a boy listened to his mama and The girls wore clothes with dignity. I can remember those hot Summer days. Those days when you couldn’t do nothing but keep inside to hide from the heat riding on the waves of the wind.

I didn’t mind much since I’m a indoors girl anyway. I slipped into my only pink dress, turned up the music, and danced like no one was watching, even though they probably was. And people was different back then too. Growing up in North Carolina, everybody was either black or white. Today you’ll find the whole world waiting at the bus stop. But I can’t complain. I’m a quality woman. I do my best to support my lot and I hold my head up high. I’ll make time for sorrow tomorrow. Today, I kick back, listen to my records, and continue my new puzzle. A thousand pieces may seem like a lot, But you know what they say: The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” She lifts a piece of the puzzle and begins her next journey.

Untitled by David Bucci, Damon House, New Brunswick I am from a place that I call the burbs. The soft green grass, white picket fence, and a sense of hope. I am from a place with no cares in the world. Can I have it? Yes, you may. Do I deserve it? That never mattered. Where I’m from the definition of family is Sunday dinners. The aroma of homemade gravy my nana cooked put us all in good spirits. Me, the mischievous one, would always steal the end piece of bread to get a taste. Meanwhile, big brother would throw spaghetti to the ceiling; if it sticks, its done—al dente. On top of 999 a full stomach always came the pastries and espresso. I am from a place within myself where things would suddenly flip.

It was like having those sweet pancakes my mom made every weekend just to be spoiled by that sour milk in my father’s fridge. Where I’m from high school wasn’t about good grades, it was a popularity contest. Class clown king, I took that throne. All the handshakes and dap hugs and kisses. Wasn't I the man? So I thought! I am from a place that eventually became a gray cloud in a stormy night. War stories of hurt and pain fused together with commotion and chaos. That devastating sound of keys against bars. Lights out! Where I’m from today nightmares drift and vanish but tomorrow’s dreams now became true. I have found all the antidotes for the poisons that I once knew.


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Programs for Families Family Day The State Theatre’s annual Family Day festival is a popular Presidents’ Day holiday destination for families from across New Jersey and beyond. The event features performances, games, workshops, the Philadelphia Zoo on Wheels, and more, spread across New Brunswick’s cultural hub: the State Theatre, George Street Playhouse, Crossroads Theatre, and United Methodist Church. An additional venue is the Hub City Big Top, a huge heated tent set up in front of the State Theatre. Many Family Day events are free of charge to the public. Hurricane Sandy put a damper on Family Day 2013 attendance, as many school districts were in session that day to make up for days lost to the storm. Still, a crowd of nearly 2,500 enjoyed a full day of fun, engaging activities. The participation of local organizations (including Elijah’s Promise, the United Methodist Church, the New Brunswick Police and Fire Departments, American Repertory Ballet, and the George Street Playhouse) made it truly a community celebration.

Milk & Cookies Designed to introduce young children to live performances, Milk & Cookies is the State Theatre’s free music and storytelling series. The six events—three each in the fall and spring—are held in the Heldrich Room (the theater’s upstairs lobby), an intimate space that allows young audiences to get up close to the performers. True to its name, the program treats the children in attendance to free milk and cookies. More than 1,900 people attended Milk & Cookies events in 2012-2013, an increase of 35 percent over the previous season.

Family Day activities (from top): Philadelphia Zoo on Wheels (photo: Jason Paddock), face painting; New Jersey Tap Dance Ensemble (photo: William Yen). Left: Milk & Cookies (photo: Kyle D. Barker)


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Pre-Performance Insights

“The presentation was an

added bonus to the performance. Delightful and informative!” —Adriana Lecouvreur in HD Insights attendee

The State Theatre’s Pre-Performance Insights encourage audiences to “know the show before you go.” True to the name, the lectures offer interesting and informative insights into the theater’s classical music, dance, musical theater, and HD opera and ballet performances. Led by experts in the field—either members of the performing groups themselves or local artists and educators—Insights present background on the artists and the art form, providing context and analysis that add to patrons’ understanding and enjoyment of the performance.

Composer, conductor, and music educator Raymond Wojcik was the Pre-Performance Insights speaker for the State Theatre’s symphony orchestra concerts. (photo: Kyle D. Barker)

In 2012-2013, the company presented Insights for 32 performances, the highest single-season total in the program’s history. More than 3,200 patrons took advantage of this free program.

Scientists Exploring the Arts Scientists Exploring the Arts (SEA) is a unique combination of audience development, career development, and employee recruitment. Celebrating the connections between science and the arts—creative thinking, innovation, problem-solving, teamwork—the program brings together university students majoring in science and technology fields and a potential employer. Student participants enjoy dinner and networking with staff from the program’s sponsor, Ingredion, Inc., followed by an artist talk and State Theatre performance. SEA is offered at no cost to eligible students. The theater presented two SEA events in 2012-2013, the program’s tenth season. Among the 85 participants were students from Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, the College of St. Elizabeth, Rider University, Stockton College, and Fairleigh Dickinson University.

”I thought

everything about this program was great and informative. I would attend one once a week if you had it! ” —SEA participant


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2012-2013 Donors and Sponsors

“Please make sure

your sponsors know they are contributing to a phenomenal program that is worth at least twice what they donate.” —Leslie Klieger, parent

Glenis Redmond, State Theatre Artist-in-Residence

The State Theatre gratefully acknowledges the following organizations, whose generous support makes our education and outreach programs possible. • Frank and Lydia Bergen Foundation Education Support

• McCrane Foundation Education Support

• Colgate-Palmolive Performances for Schools, Family Day

• MetLife Foundation Kids Meet the Arts

• The Horizon Foundation for New Jersey Artist-in-Residence Program • Ingredion Scientists Exploring the Arts • Johnson and Johnson Family of Companies Education Support • J. Seward Johnson, Sr. 1963 Charitable Trust Education Support • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Education Support

• The Provident Bank Foundation Milk & Cookies Series

Additional support for the State Theatre’s education program is provided by Cream-O-Land Dairy, E & G Foundation, Great-West Financial, The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, and Miller’s Rentals. Their support is gratefully acknowledged. The presentation of Limón Dance Company was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Funding has been made possible in part by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts.


State Theatre Education 2012-2013 Annual Report