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Sunday April 23, 2017

Race Guide

BENEFITING


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FROM THE START… The Statesman Capitol 10,000 salutes the noteworthy endurance of 31 runners who have participated in every race since 1978. We’re honored to have you back for the 40th. Mark Adams William Bard Gerre Boardman James Braddock Jeff Brower Fred Fuchs Kenneth Hausmann Wayne Huffman Oscar B. Jackson, Jr. Danny Krause

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Bruce Latour Art Lavalle Ken Lerner Don Lujan Mike McShane Eddie Mixon James Nance Debbie Norman Steve Parker Tinsley Penick Bill Pfaff

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Doug Phelan Bradley Price David Ray Leon Rosen Charles Scheibe James Smith Patrick Smith Richard Wiggans Bruce Wiland Donnie Williamson


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“For decades, race day is always a great day for people watching and making pictures. My kids also look forward to running the Cap10K every year, and I think the community feels the same way. It’s become a tradition and a family affair.”

Ralph Barrera, Statesman photographer, 1982-present The Statesman Capitol 10,000—known as the Cap10K— is the largest 10K race in Texas and one of the top 10 in the nation. In its 40th running, the Cap10K takes place on April 23, 2017 in downtown Austin. The race is both scenic and iconic – starting on Congress Avenue Bridge, heading straight for the Texas State Capitol and passing through neighborhoods and hills before ending at a beautiful lakeside park. Whether you’re a seasoned runner or a beginner, you’re invited to experience the fun this year, and see why Cap10K is a rite of spring in Austin.

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Capital Metro Park & Ride For public transportation travel plans on race day, visit Capital Metro at capmetro.org/planner. 1-Day Local Pass: $2.50 Route info: (512) 4741200 PARKING DOWNTOWN FREE Parking locations on Sunday 4/23/17 TxDot Riverside Lots (118, 150 & 200 E. Riverside Dr.) For all approved parking locations, visit Race Weekend, Parking at Cap10K.com. City of Austin Parking Meters & Pay Stations are FREE on Sundays.

PACKET PICK-UP & REGISTRATION Statesman Cap10K Health & Fitness Expo Location: Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Road, Exhibit Hall 2 Friday, April 21: Noon - 7p.m. Saturday, April 22: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. There is NO RACE DAY packet pick-up or registration. See race website for parking information. STARTING LINE & STARTING TIMES Location: Intersection of South Congress Avenue & Barton Springs Road 7:30 a.m. Wheelchair Athletes 8:00 a.m. Corrals A & B 8:15 a.m. Corral C 8:25 a.m. Corral D 8:35 a.m. Corrals E & F 8:45 a.m. Start Line Closes 11:00 a.m. Course Closes 6

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• • •

At approximately 7:15 a.m., the race announcer will instruct all participants to line up at the starting line according to the assigned corral letter and corresponding color. The start line will be divided into six pre-assigned corrals. Please start with your assigned corral. Participants may move back to join friends or family in a later corral, but they cannot move forward. The assigned corral system is developed to allow for a safe start for every participant. For the safety of children and other participants, parents pushing baby joggers are STRONGLY EN-

CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

COURAGED to start in baby jogger family area near Corral D. Joggers positioned in a manner that creates an unsafe obstruction will be removed by race officials. WHEELCHAIR-TIMED PARTICIPANT DIVISION All wheelchair participants are required to check in at 7 a.m. on race day at the start line (north end of the Congress Avenue Bridge). The start time for wheelchair participants is 7:30 a.m. All wheelchair participants must cross the start line at this time to be eligible for an official finishing time. All wheelchair participants must yield to the right side of the course when other participants or official vehicles approach

to pass. In addition, all wheelchair participants must wear helmets and use a chair suitable for competition. Please see Cap10K.com for official wheelchair rules. PLEASE NOTE: Hand-cycles are not allowed. HOW TO GET TO THE RACE ON TIME Ride your bike to the race. Visit our FREE convenient bike corral near the Long Center, located at the corner of South First Street and West Riverside Drive. Bike racks will be provided for bicycle parking. Please bring your own lock to secure your bicycle in the parking area. All bicycles must be removed from parking area by 2 p.m. on Sunday.

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

CHRONOTRACK TIMING TAG All participants are timed using the ChronoTrack timing tag (B-Tag). Tags are attached to the back of the race bib. DO NOT REMOVE the tag from the race bib. You must wear the B-Tag to be timed. Each participant will have their 5K (3.1 mi.) half and 10K (6.2 mi.) finish time recorded. The ChronoTrack system begins timing when you cross the start line timing mat and records when you cross the finish line timing mat. This provides the actual time (chip time) that it takes you to complete the course. Sign up for Runner Tracking and get immediate personal results messaging under Race Results at Cap10K. com. KING & QUEEN OF THE HILL CHALLENGE The Cap10K King & Queen of the Hill Challenge pits runners to compete up one of the

notable hills on W. 15th St. at West Ave. The distance between these two timing check points is 200 meters (0.125 mi.). All participants will be timed on the ascent. The fastest participant times between the two timing mats on the ascent will be crowned King & Queen of the Hill. A polka-dot jersey is awarded to one male and one female in each of the three categories: Overall, Masters and 19 & under. RACE NUMBER REQUIREMENTS Medical information and emergency contacts must be filled in on the back of your bib number. • Do not alter the bib number in any way. • Securely fasten the bib number to the FRONT of your running outfit using the safety pins provided to you. • All bib numbers MUST be visible and worn on the front and outside of all clothing during the entire race. • Bib numbers are non-transferable and MUST only be worn by the participants to whom they are assigned. • Marathon-Photos. com, the official photographer for the Statesman Cap10K, identifies participants by their bib number. Be sure your number is clearly visible on the front of your shirt.


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RUN LONG 410 PRESSLER ST | AUSTIN, TX

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AID STATIONS sponsored by Whataburger Drink plenty of water before, during and after the race. Water and portable toilets will be available at each of the four aid-station locations along the race route. If you’re running or walking and must stop, please

ON-COURSE ENTERTAINMENT Live entertainment on the race course is aimed to please. More than six musical bands and acts will be performing along the course on race day. For a full list of who’s performing, visit Race Weekend, Live Music at Cap10K.com.

Tomar and the FCs , Finish Line Festival headlining band

pull off to the side of the road. Thousands of thirsty participants will be behind you waiting for their water turn. Remember to recycle all empty water bottles at a recycling station. MILE MARKERS & CLOCKS powered by Polar Highly visible mile markers will be positioned at every mile and at the 5K halfway mark. Digital clocks will also be positioned at each mile location and 5K point to indicate your unofficial time. Clocks are set on gun time.

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COURSE INFORMATION The Statesman Capitol 10K course is USA Track & Field certified: TX17032LAB. The 10K course will close on a gradual schedule based on a 2:00:00 finish time (approximately a 20-minute/mile pace). Participants will not be allowed to start the race after the starting line closes at 8:45 a.m. It’s imperative that participants maintain a 20-minute per mile pace so that the closed course can be reopened to normal vehicle traffic. For pace information, visit

CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

Participants, Course Info & Amenities at Cap10K. com. MEDICAL EMERGENCIES Space is provided on the back of your race bib to allow you to indicate any significant medical issues you may have. Please fill it out before the race. This will help us help you should the need arise. Providing this information is intended to assist the medical team in identifying participants with special medical needs. The individual participant is responsible for consulting their physician about any medical conditions, how to manage them and how they affect the participant’s ability to race. Medical staff will be ready to assist you at any time. Medical support staff, portable toilets and communications personnel will be positioned at the start line, along the course and at the finish line. ONLY those participants who require medical assistance will be allowed access to the medical tent at the finish line. EMTs on bicycles will patrol the course.

Corrals A & B regardless of owner’s corral assignment. Austin Police will remove any animal displaying aggressive behavior immediately from the corral with their owner. Baby Joggers are permitted. For the safety of children and other participants, parents pushing baby joggers are STRONGLY ENCOURAGED to start with Corral D Family Area. Baby joggers positioned in a manner that creates an unsafe obstruction will be removed by race officials. CHILDREN UNDER THE AGE OF 12 Children under the age of 12 should not run alone. Each child under 12 should be supervised by a parent or guardian who is participating with the child. Have a specific meeting point at the finish line area picked out

RULES FOR SAFETY ENFORCED For safety reasons, please adhere to the following prohibitions: no hand-cycles, no bicycles, no in-line skates, no roller skates and no wheeled vehicles (except registered wheelchairs). Violators will be disqualified and removed from the course by a race official. Participants are allowed to run with a leashed dog. Leashed dogs are NOT allowed in

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

ahead of time if parent or child should become separated. Be sure everyone — especially children — have important contact and medical information filled out on the back of the race bib number. FINAL RACE PREPARATION Hydrate before, during and after race; plan your commute and parking (bike or bus alternatives available); arrive early to avoid traffic congestion; complete participant medical and contact info on back of race bib number; pin race number on FRONT of T-shirt; do not remove timing tag from race bib (B-Tag); line up in correct start corral; choose a finish line meeting spot; if weather is cold, layers are best. Average raceday temperature high 77.2 °F and low 53.8 °F.

Bring mobile phone and money for Finish Line Festival food trailers and vendors. FINISH LINE & EXIT CORRAL Location: Vic Mathias Shores, Main Lawn Please do not stop at the finish line. KEEP MOVING and make room for the thousands of participants coming in behind you. Outside the exit, five alphabetical signs will offer a REUNION AREA for you to reconnect with friends and family. Food, water and restroom areas are located once you EXIT the finishers’ corral. If you need medical attention, signal race staff or go to the medical tent adjacent to finish corral (look for big Red Cross sign) where EMTs can assist you. LOST & FOUND In the event that you lose an item during the race, please check the Lost & Found/Information tent near the finish line after the event. Many items left at the start line as well as on the course are gathered and brought to this location. If you have questions about a lost or found item following race day, please contact the Cap10K office at cap10K@statesman. com. Check our list of lost and found items online, visit Participants, Lost & Found at Cap10K. com. Also, planning on a post-race meeting location ahead of time for you and your fellow participants or supporters is advisable.


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Over 645,000 Runners in 40 Years. Over 79,197,212,141,979 Pixels Pushed in 10 Years. We did it Cap10K! Thanks for shaking things up this year and selecting us to be your creative partner for the 40th race. It was an honor to bring back the beloved Cap10K Dillo, and the entire experience has been the highlight of our 10th year in business. Cheers to many more races and many more pixels ahead.

ShakeWellCreative.com BRANDING | ADVERTISING | DIGITAL | VIDEO | SOCIAL | PR

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MARATHON-PHOTOS. COM EVENT PHOTOGRAPHER Capture the excitement of the Statesman Capitol 10,000! Take a few seconds to be photographed at various locations around the course. Visit marathon-photos.com to look up your official race photos. CAP10K COSTUME CONTEST This year’s costume contest has gone social! All contest submissions will be submitted and voted on via “Likes” on Statesman Cap10K’s official Facebook page, facebook.com/cap10K. Be sure to “Like” Statesman Cap10K on Facebook to vote and submit. Categories include: Spirit of Texas, Armadillo, Centipede, Wild in the Park, Everyday Heroes and Best in Show. For official contest category descriptions and rules, visit Participants, Costume Contest at Cap10K.com. OFFICIAL RACE RESULTS Complete race coverage, photos and the top results will be printed in Monday’s Austin American-Statesman newspaper and available online under Race Results at Cap10K.com. Sign up for Runner Tracking and get immediate personal results messaging on your 5K split and 10K finish times visit Race Results at Cap10K.com. The results look-up tent will be located in the Finish Line Festival. COOLDOWN CORNER Toast to your successful run in the newly expanded Cap10K Cooldown 10

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Corner. This year, you can pull up to the Deep Eddy Bloody Mary Bar, featuring bloody marys and brunch cocktails, including the new Deep Eddy Peach Vodka. And don’t miss the Oskar Blues Beer Garden as well as the Third Base Taco bar, serving handcrafted breakfast tacos. Alcohol will only be served to participants and spectators who are 21 years old and older. First come, first served. DRONIE EXPERIENCE The Cap10K takes the selfie to new heights with the launch of the dronie. Gather your family and teammates to have your dronie video taken against the dramatic downtown skyline. (Subject to rain or strong wind.) A few days later, you’ll receive a short clip of your dronie experience to share. Please note: This experience is limited to the first 200 groups. AUTHENTIC AUSTIN FOOD TRUCKS Plan on slipping a little spending money in your gear for a delicious taste of Austin’s foodtruck flavor. Enjoy La Fantabulous Taqueria, Juice Austin, Slab BBQ, Wanderlust Coffee, Burro Cheese Kitchen and Onnit trucks at the Finish Line Festival. GREYSTAR AUTOGRAPH WALL Leave your mark on the race. Stop by the new area to record your favorite Cap10K moment (Ex: When the superhero in a tutu passed you!). You can put pen to wall to congratulate a loved one.

CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

It’s also a memorable

backdrop for photos.

CAMP GLADIATOR RACE RECOVERY AREA You were a warrior on the course (and maybe a dinosaur, too!). So, it’s only fitting you meet fellow Gladiators. After the race, they’ll help loosen up your limbs with a foam rolling station and stretching mats. You can also enjoy free giveaways and fire away with any fitness questions. FREE SPORTS MASSAGES Massage therapists will be available to provide FREE sports massages to race participants. The massage tent will be located in the Finish Line Festival on Vic Mathias Shores. Massage opportunities are limited quantity, first come first served and not guaranteed. White Claw Hard Seltzer will be sampling product in a tent adjacent to the Massage Tent.

Responder, and Elementary, Middle & High School divisions. Location: Finish line live music stage at approximately 10:15 a.m. The top three participants in each age group will receive their awards in the mail when the official results are confirmed. The Statesman Capitol 10,000 Race Director tabulates all results and all decisions are final. Age groups for Male & Female: 12 & under, 13-15, 16-19, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74, 75-79, 80-84, 85-89, 90-94, 95 & over. AUSTIN CITY CHAMPIONS

The Statesman Cap10K, High Five Events and FloSports are proud to recognize Austin City Champions, a special award and recognition of the outstanding runners in the Austin area, as part of this year’s Cap10K race. YMCA CAPKIDS ZONE powered by DASANI The Cap10K isn’t just for grownups. Kids are encouraged to join in on the fun at their very own YMCA CapKids Zone, filled with inflatable obstacle courses, jump house, slides and more. BABY JOGGER FAMILY STARTING AREA The Cap10K is happy to continue a great feature at this year’s start line

for families participating with a baby jogger, The Family Baby Jogger Starting Area. This is a family-friendly staging area for baby joggers with a few great perks. Families are invited to take advantage of free reserved parking* at the Austin American-Statesman, conveniently located at the start line. Once you’ve parked, join us at the baby jogger staging area near Corral D for family-only restrooms, diaper changing tent, complimentary juice from Honest Kids and free pinwheels for kids. (*Parking opportunities are limited quantity, first come first served and not guaranteed. Parking credential must be present for admittance.)

MUSCLE PAIN? JOINT PAIN? ARTHRITIS?

OFFICIAL CAP10K MERCHANDISE provided by Green Layer Be sure to visit the Green Layer booth in the Finish Line Festival to purchase your finisher’s swag! AWARDS PRESENTATION Champion Awards Presentation: Overall, Masters, Wheelchair and King & Queen of the Hill winners Location: Finish line media tent at approximately 9:30 a.m. Team Awards Presentation: Largest Teams from Social, Corporate, Nonprofit, Military/First AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

CHARM utilizes non-surgical techniques to stimulate repair of ligaments, tendons and cartilage in order to normalize joint integrity while increasing mobility and decreasing pain

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Pre-race and post-race tips

Nutrition and Hydration Dehydration is long-term issue. Chugging a bottle of water before the race won’t properly hydrate you just like dumping water on a withering plant won’t immediately bring it back to life. In the 2 days leading up to race day pay attention to drinking enough water. How much? Use your urine as a gauge. Dark yellow- keep sipping. Light yellow- good job! Crystal clear and frequent- slow down buddy. For food, stick with familiar items the night before and morning of the race. The old concept of “carb loading” with pasta the night before has been pretty much debunked by current research. Focus on a balanced meal such as baked chicken breast on a bed of rice and black beans and topped with some fresh avocado wedges. Add a side of salad with fruit and nuts and you’ll have the fuel

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reserves ready. In the morning eat something that you know will sit well in your stomach. A personal favorite is oatmeal, an egg, and banana. Steer clear of trying new energy bars or gels before your race. You’ve trained too much to get an upset stomach before the big event. Pre-Race Warmup Race day isn’t the day to try that new stretch your friend showed you. Stay consistent with what you’ve done before training runs. An active warm up is a great idea and can include jumping jacks, mini squats, small walking lunges, and jogging in place. The idea is to get blood flowing to the areas that will be working so when the gun goes off, the muscles are primed and ready. Most important is to pre-hydrate the day before the race and to re-hydrate

after the race to help with processing waste products. Post-Race Cool-down Soreness after a race is very common and can be quite unpleasant. To minimize having dead legs the next day have a post-race cool down plan. First, keep moving. Your legs will be filled with the waste byproducts of your physical effort. Taking a 5-10 minute walk afterward will keep circulation going to help wash these byproducts out of the system. Stretching hamstrings, quads, calves, and hip flexors can also help reduce soreness by promoting healthy muscle function and healing. Advice provided by: Cameron Cope, PT, DPT Physical Therapist 425 University Blvd | Suite 345 | Round Rock, Texas 78665


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MEET MANZANO

Meet Leo Manzano, 2012 Olympic silver medalist in the 1,500 meters and 2017 Statesman Cap10K Race Ambassador. • Leo will sign autographs and pose for pictures at the Cap10K booth, April 21 – 22, 12 – 2 p.m., at the Cap10K Health & Fitness Expo. • Plus, meet Pam LeBlanc, Fit City columnist and adventure junkie, on Friday, April 21, 12 – 2 p.m. • Dash the ‘Dillo will also be at the booth with free race tattoos.

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A (Brief) History of “The ‘Dillo”

PASTA NIGHT

OUT

By DREW CARR

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

When the Cap10K was conceived in 1978, Ben Sargent— The Austin American-Statesman’s cartoonist at the time— was asked to create a mascot for the race. Making the request for the mascot was none other than Linda Anthony—a reporter at the time who is now mayor of West Lake Hills, and an accomplished runner. The first drawing Ben showed Linda featured an armadillo in running gear coming down the front steps of the Capitol, but the two decided it would be more flexible to omit the scenery and have The ‘Dillo stand alone.

April 21-23,2017

Cap1OK Pasta night out features local restaurant partners offering special discounts to Cap1OK participants. Enjoy pre-race Italian pasta and artisan pizza dinners at a special price. Simply present your race bib number at the time of purchase.

Today, Ben recalls that The ‘Dillo you see today went through several renditions. “He may have been reproduced in more different ways than any other drawing I’ve done,” said Sargent. “Everything from a 3D version in the race trophy to being

For more information, visit http://bit.ly/PastaNightOut

*Offers and discounts vary between partners and are valid during normal business hours during Cap1OKweekend.

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painted in the street at the starting line.” As the years progressed, so did The ‘Dillo. If you’re familiar with Cap10K, chances are you’ve spotted him on shirts, on stickers, in costume, or in Ben’s case, across the country.

“Once my fellow Austin cartoonist Dan Shefelman and I were walking out the front door of the Del Coronado Hotel in San Diego,” said Sargent. “And here came a runner down the street in his ‘dillo shirt from the Cap10K, and I knew he was a truly universal presence.”


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Fatigue. It happens. How do we combat it? Fatigue. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, fatigue is “a reduction in the efficiency of a muscle or organ after prolonged activity.” As we all know, fatigue can be something that stops us in our tracks. It can debilitate your performance and keep you from getting your workouts or runs in. So, the question is: how do we keep the efficiency in our muscles going strong to reduce the effects of fatigue? Well, experts say that some ways you can combat fatigue are by doing things that reduce stress in the body. Below are 3 helpful and EASY things to do to relieve stress: De-stress with a massage and deep breathing techniques. Get a massage to help relax your body and ease your aches and pains

as well as reduce anxiety and relieve stress faster! I also recommend practicing deep breathing exercises when you feel overwhelmed or exhausted, this will tell your body that you are aware and present and will get more fresh oxygen to your fatigued muscles! More oxygen to your muscles equals better and faster recovery times because your body will use your oxygen as an energy source INSTEAD of lactic acid fermentation, which rends far less energy to your cells. I recommend doing deep abdominal breathing. This type of breathing is where you take a deep breath in through your nose, and out through your mouth trying to make your abdomen move on inhalation/ exhalation. Do 6-10 deep breaths every minute or so for 10 minutes at a time to see the greatest benefits.

Aromatherapy. When you’re fatigued, you’re pretty low on energy and aromatherapy can be utilized to boost your mood and energy without all the extra cups of joe! You should know that you don’t have to be rich and famous to take advantage of aromatherapy. Yes, you can add them as essential oils in aromatherapy massage session, but you can also utilize some energizing scents at home! Some scents that I enjoy that have been shown to boost your energy are lemon, lime, orange, peppermint/ spearmint and rosemary. You can either consume these in herbal teas and enjoy the aromatherapy that way or just cut up some citrus fruits and inhale the goodness! Organize and Prioritize! When you’re fatigued, it can feel like you have a never-ending-story-like list of things to do each

day. Break them down into order of importance each night before you go to sleep so that you can get a good night’s rest, knowing you accomplished what you needed to do that day, and have tomorrow’s to-do list prepared. Each day has

its own tasks that need to be accomplished, so theoretically, you just go by the list/order of importance and have less stress and anxiety about what is and isn’t getting done. A method I like to utilize is the 4 quadrant method.

It keeps things simple and organized and helps me when I am fatigued and need to hone in on what HAS to get done each day. Below is how you prioritize in 4 quadrants from www.wanderlustworker.com (you can access information about the 4 quadrant model elsewhere as well). 1-Manage-Important and urgent 2-Focus-Important but not urgent 3-Avoid-Urgent but not important 4-Limit-Not urgent not important Above all else, listen to your body. Take breaks and relax when necessary so that you can avoid fatigue as much as possible! Cheers to keeping bodies healthy and happy. Advice provided by: Heidi Summers, LMT, Baylor Scott & White Health.

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A RACE WITH CHARM AND MORE $25

$15

The Cap10K has delighted race participants for 40 years, and now there’s a delightful charm and keychain to match. Purchase a charm and keychain (while supplies last) at the Cap10K Health & Fitness Expo. Friday, April 21: 12 – 7 p.m. • Saturday, April 22: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Palmer Events Center, downtown Austin

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Experts offer tips on how to heal plantar fasciitis By PAM LeBLANC

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Running kept Javier Soto centered. A former cross country athlete at Texas A&M International University in Laredo, Soto regularly logged 100 miles a week. Running meant so much to him that he told friends if he ever had an accident, he hoped his arms would be injured before his legs, so he could keep moving. Then, a few years ago, Soto — who now lives in Pflugerville — noticed pain in the arch of his foot. At first, it flared up after a long day on his feet at the shoe store where he worked. But the time it took before pain hit began to shrink. These days, the burn kicks in after just 15 minutes of standing. Experts estimate that about 10 percent of the population will develop plantar fasciitis, the painful inflammation of the connective tissue that supports the arch of the foot. Many of those tenderfoots are people with flat feet or high arches. Runners, athletes who overtrain and out-of-shape tourists who suddenly walk all day are prone. Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning has battled it. I’ve been sidelined by it for about seven weeks now. “It’s one of those problems that will start very slowly, with mild symptoms, so you tend to put it on backburner and not address it immediately,” says Dr. Thanh Dinh, a nationally recognized expert on planter fasciitis and

Harvard Medical School professor. So what to do when heel or arch pain strikes? Remember that everything’s connected. The plantar fascia, a semi-contractile tissue that runs from the base of the big toe to the heel, flows into the Achilles tendon, which blends into the calf, hamstring and, ultimately, the hips. What affects one affects the other. A strong core can help keep things aligned. Take a yoga class to hone those abdominal muscles, Dinh says. Get your gait analyzed at a reputable running store, buy proper shoes and replace them when they wear out. “The biggest thing is that people don’t change

their shoes enough,” says Andy McDonnell, clinical rehabilitation manager at Baylor Scott & White Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic in Round Rock, where Soto is getting treatment. “Once those shoes break down, you’re setting yourself up for problems.” The general rule is to replace them every 300 to 400 miles. If plantar fasciitis does hit, modify your activity. If you’re used to running long, reduce your distance. If you’re used to running trails, try running on a soft track. Consider aqua jogging, recumbent bicycling, elliptical training or other forms of nonweight-bearing exercise. “You don’t necessarily

have to stop all together,” McDonnell says. “But you have to respect it to get it to turn around.” Deep tissue massage and over-the-counter shoe inserts can help. So can a special, funky-looking splint worn at night while you sleep. Don’t walk around barefoot, and avoid minimalist running shoes. If symptoms persist, some doctors recommend steroid injections, dry needling (which is similar to acupuncture), shockwave therapy, ultrasound, platelet rich plasma therapy or surgery. But stretching is key. Try to spend 15 to 30 minutes a day doing it. The good news? Although it can take several months, most people do

recover. When you do start running again, take it easy. Dinh recommends alternating days to allow your body to recover. And once you’ve had plantar fasciitis, you’re at risk of redeveloping it. Keep it at bay through regular stretching. We’ve rounded up 10 good stretches — Soto tries to do several daily — that you can try if you’ve got plantar fasciitis: 1. Place your foot on a wedge-shaped block (or curb, with your heel on the ground and your toes on the rise) and gently lean forward, stretching your calf. 2. Use a rocking foot stretcher, like a Pro Stretch, to get an even deeper stretch in your calf.

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

3. Sit down, take off your shoes and socks and stretch your plantar fascia by pulling up on your big toe. 4. Loop a long, elastic band, like a Theraband, over one foot, just below the toes, and then under the other foot. Rotate your ankle outward and sweep it back and forth. Then cross your ankles and do the same thing, this time rotating your ankle inward. 5. Loop a cord or towel over your foot, just below the toes. Lie on your back, extend your leg upward and gently pull the sash to stretch your hamstring. 6. Stand against the wall, with one leg a few feet back. Gently stretch forward. Do the stretch with a straight leg in back, then bend at the knee to work a different part of your leg. 7. Take off your shoes and socks. Empty a bag of marbles on the ground. Use your toes to pick them up one at a time and drop them into a bowl. 8. Move your foot back and forth over a rollingpin-sized roller with textured grooves. 9. Roll your foot over a commercially made refrigerated gel-roller or the home version: a disposable bottle of water that’s been filled with water and frozen. Remember that muscles get stiff when they’re cold, so do this one at the end of the day to reduce inflammation. 10. Roll a tennis ball or golf ball under the arch of your foot. For more information, go to FootHealthFacts. org.

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What runners think about when they run By PAM LeBLANC AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

What do you think about when you’re running? Some of us focus on the run, and how fast — or slow — we’re moving. Others try to distract themselves, thinking about anything but what they’re doing. Some ricochet from topic to topic. Others do their best to zone out. Food. Sex (I confess). Everything. Nothing. What do I need to do at work? Where are we going for breakfast tacos? What if I have to use the bathroom? How’s my family? Can we stop for coffee? We polled Austin runners to find out what goes through their minds when they lace up their shoes and hit the road. Here’s what they told us. Vania Lanas “As a chef in training, I plan my recipes and culinary creations as I train for the Houston Marathon.” Edward D. Burgess “I think about how I can change my training so I can be as effective a runner as I was at 29. Of course, I don’t always listen to my own advice.” Cheryl Tulkoff “Backgrounds I made up and nicknames I have for all the regulars I see on the trail and what their nicknames for me might be; finishing off crazy partial stories I overhear on the trail; solving work problems; food.” David W. Peters, assis-

tant to the rector at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church “I plan an upcoming sermon. I process why I’m afraid or anxious. Sometimes I’m in the moment, and I don’t think at all.”

life goals. This usually comes to me after the first third of a workout is done. Before that I’m usually thinking, ‘Ouch. This hurts. Getting old sucks.’”

Gilbert Tuhabonye, Gilbert’s Gazelles “Each run is a blessing for me. So, when I run, I sing songs and enjoy the journey along the way. I like to always think about warming up well and finishing strong. I run with joy!”

Dena Childs “At the end of my long runs, I visualize feeling strong as I cross the finish line of my next big race.”

Amy Heil “We critique houses we pass on the way and guess prices of homes for sale.” Heather Dunn “How I do this so that I can still rock out and look as good as Tina Turner when she still rocked out at 70 in white leather pants. Truly.” Katie Preston “I’m currently 25 weeks pregnant. I once read an article that every time you workout your baby’s heart gets healthier. So I remind myself of that — and it encourages me to stick with it.” Jimmy Olivares “I like to think that I’m not going to trip over roots or rocks and break my face! After that, I think about breakfast tacos.” Paul Perrone “I like to think about how great it is to be outside and doing something healthy and positive that I know will allow me to focus on my work, my relationships and other

Robert Nathan “I think about not disappointing my teammates.” Dawn Dailey “I think about how I can improve my pace, and how I can switch up my routine and treat myself to good views when running. I get inspired by the bluffs around me. Sometimes I run knowing that I’ve just earned some pasta or ice cream, or that if the zombie apocalypse comes, I have a fair chance. True story.” Angelina Bonetti Deans “I’ve had some cool spiritual experiences while I run — felt oneness with the universe and other woo-woo stuff. Most of the time I count, though. Count steps, breaths, cows, telephone poles…” John Conley, race director, Austin Marathon and Half Marathon “I think about how grateful I am to simply be able to run, if only for a mile. When I finished my sixth Honolulu Marathon and 18th marathon overall earlier this month, I kept thinking about how lucky I was that I was alive and in Hawaii and on

my two feet and moving forward.” Stacey Conley “I think about how much further I have left. Ha ha. I’m not crazy about running, so I just tell myself encouraging things like, ‘You’re more than a mile in! You’re more than halfway done! You have less than a mile left!’”

Anthony Ferraro “About enjoying the route I am taking, exploring the city, about how attractive runners are, about whatever I am dealing with at the time, and about how awesome running is, simply enjoying the moment.”

Sarah Donovan “I think about how running has helped with my postpartum anxiety. I often visualize anxiety as something I am running from and it inspires me to go faster (in spurts, of course). I also pray sometimes when I’m running, I’ll turn my music off and just let all my thoughts run wild.”

Ryan Hess, owner of Ready to Run “I try to distract myself as much as possible. The last thing I try to do is think of how far I have to go or how much it hurts. In racing especially, you have to be able to play mind games and distract yourself. I try to think of something happy — like a life event or a vacation or something — that gets endorphins up!”

Andrew Howard “I’m thinking about the people I’ll beat at my next race, how I’m out there right now getting stronger than everyone else, and, if I’m ever in a group of people hiking in the woods and a bear shows up, how I’ll be the one person who got away.”

Pam Hess “When I am running with at least one other person, I try to always be in conversation with them. It’s actually a great way to practice being a good listener. Listening to stories and really engaging in conversation will take your mind off the

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CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

run. It also makes me run faster than what I would have done on my own.” Susan Rankin, executive director of the Trail Foundation “You may not realize this, but even when I am talking with my running partners, I am always looking at the plants, seeing what is in bloom, and thinking about what native plants should be in that specific habitat.” Pauline Alba “I try to think about my breathing, shoulders and post-run coffee.” Rika Toll “Breathing, route and the audio book I’m listening to. My to-do list that day. And the Starbucks drink I want after the run.” Elaine Richards Hellmund “I think about how my son says I look like a T-Rex when I run and then I straighten up a little and relax my arms.”

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Cap10K training tips to get your very best out of the race When it comes to running Cap10K, preparation is the key. Whether this is your first Cap10K or your 40th, keep these tips in mind for best results. 1. Always check your laces. You want to make sure your shoes are laced up for both support and safety, so don’t go too loose or too tight. 2. Wear the right apparel. A breathable, moisture wicking shirt keeps you cool and prevents chafing. A hat will protect you from the sun or rain like a shield. 3. Hydration is golden, so hydrate often. Water

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and electrolytes help prevent cramps and heat stroke while you’re out there sweating profusely and going for that new personal record. You can even take your water bottle with you for the run. 4. Don’t forget to warm up. A dynamic warm up (e.g., jump rope, foot drills, lunges) works best, helping prevent injury and getting your muscles primed for performance. 5. Eat 30 minutes afterwards. Something good for you of course—a well-balanced snack with the protein and carbs your body needs.

CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

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CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

Don’t let the jitters run you down You signed up for the Capitol 10K, you’ve trained, and now you’re ready. But for many runners, pre-race anxiety is something that can leave them stalling at the finish line, rather than sprinting toward their goals. “It’s completely normal to experience jitters before a big event, such as a race or any big endeavor you have anticipated and worked toward,” said Kendall Burleson, Acupuncturist, Baylor Scott & White Austin/Round Rock. “Expecting that you may feel this way keeps this natural feeling from overwhelming you.” How to conquer those pre-race jitters? Prepare for them just as you’ve prepared for the race itself.

in advance will help you channel your jitters constructively.

Channel appropriately. Why do we get anxious in anticipation of an important event in our life, such as the race? Simply put, it’s our human response to dealing with stress. Remember that you’re not the only one who feels this way. A quick look at the anxious faces around you at the start line will confirm that everyone feels this way at one time or another, and it’s completely normal.

Visualize success. Before the race, study the course map and visualize yourself at the finish line. When you’re training and preparing, imagine yourself on the course, picture yourself running the road and sprinting across the finish line. Think about what the temperature will feel like, what kind of surface you’re running on, the major landmarks you will pass along the way.

Plan to succeed. Use those pre-race jitters to help you focus on what you need to do to help ensure success. Work your pre-race plan, gather all the items you will want to take with you, make arrangements with friends and family who may be there to cheer you on, take the right snacks with you on race day, and gather the gear you will wear. Preparing yourself

Tune the world out. Listen to music, repeat positive mantras, or whatever you can do to keep your mind in a “zen” place. Practice a favorite yoga pose or stretch, or close your eyes and visualize a place that is calming and peaceful to you. Take a few deep breaths and exhale slowly. Don’t let the anxiety of those around you impact you and your race.

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Reflect and reward. A great way to keep jitters at bay is to remind yourself of how hard you’ve worked toward this goal, and how you have prepared yourself. Have faith in your training and your abilities: remind yourself how many miles you’ve logged, how many hours you’ve worked, and how far you have come. Reflect on all the hard work that got you to standing at the start line to begin with. Use them. Jitters – when channeled correctly – can help propel you. Use that excited feeling to move you forward and propel you to the finish line. Reframe your thinking from “I’m nervous” to “I’m excited” and think about outrunning that fear all the way to the finish line. Now go run your race! Content ourtesy of Baylor Scott and White.


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Mile 5

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VIP Area

Sports Massage

Greystar Autograph Wall

Parking Locations 1. City Hall, 100 Lavaca Street (Rate) 2. Palmer Events Center, 900 Barton Springs Road ($8) 3. One Texas Center, 505 Barton Springs Road ($8) 4. Texas Dept. of Trans., 118 East Riverside Drive 5. Texas Dept. of Trans., 150 East Riverside Drive 6. Texas Dept. of Trans., 200 East Riverside Drive Capital Metro Park & Ride Public transportation travel plan on race day, visit Capital Metro at capmetro.org/planner 1-Day Local Pass ($2.50) Route info: (512) 474-1200

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THREADGILL’S

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Starting Corrals & Times

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N CHEVRON

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Organize parking plan before race morning and consider rideshare or bicycle options.

8:00 A.M. Elite

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Share your #Cap10K experience or check race results & coverage at Cap10K.com Plan your friends and family post race reunion area location in advance.

8:25 A.M. Family Baby Jogger

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Race snacks are provided but have some cash on hand for local food trucks or exhibitors.

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Taking care of your body before (and during) the big race

Heat vs. Cold Wondering whether to apply a heating pad or an ice pack to those sore muscles after the race? In the first three days after the race (including race day), cold will help decrease swelling and inflammation of the tissues. Keep the icing to 10-15 minutes at a time, however, to avoid damaging the skin, as well as over-cooling the area resulting in the body delivering more blood to the area, defeating the purpose of decreasing inflammation. After that initial 3-day period, applying heat, then performing some gentle stretches can help decrease muscle pain.

You may want to follow the heat and stretching with another round of ice, as well. When to Bail on the Race It’s easy to get so caught up in the excitement of running the race, and

watching (and watching out for) other people that you ignore warning signs your body may be giving you to slow down or even stop. Here in Central Texas, dehydration and heat exhaustion are common problems during

vigorous physical activity. Here are some red flags which you should not ignore: - abdominal and muscle cramping -nausea -headache -dizziness, lightheadedness, disorientation -extreme fatigue -rapid pulse -inability to catch your breath -cool, moist skin with goosebumps even though the ambient temperature is hot. All may be signs of heat exhaustion. Stop running, hydrate, and seek medical attention if symptoms do not return quickly to normal and before symptoms prog-

ress to the more serious condition of heat stroke. Symptoms of a possible heart attack include many of the above red flags, as well as a feeling of pressure, tightness or pain in chest or arms, possibly spreading to neck, jaw, or back. Finally, while running, if you experience joint or muscle pain which worsens and affects your ability to run normally, it is probably time to walk or stop and rest.

improve or worsens, this may indicate an injury to the muscles or joint. Resting the affected area, as well as applying ice, elevating it, and wrapping with moderate compression may be enough to heal the injury. If you’re still having pain which prevents you from doing the things you normally do up to two weeks later, seek medical attention.

Soreness vs. Pain Muscle soreness is a normal effect of a hard workout. Usually 1-3 days of rest will get you back to normal. However, if that soreness does not

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Presented by

Tomar & the FCs In 2015, three decades after his last show with the family band, Tomar returned to his roots as a frontman. Tomar and the FCs debuted during SXSW and released their first EP, “Day by Day”, in October. Deborah Sengupta Stith of the Austin American Statesman selected it as one of her top releases of the year writing, “Williams shows his own soul chops with searing vocals that drip with blood, sweat and tears”. Cap10K Finish Line Festival, Vic Mathias Shores, starting at 9:30 a.m. 30

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Presented by

Rochelle & The Sidewinders Cap10K Finish Line Festival Vic Mathias Shores at 8:30am

On the Cap10K Race Course Tiarra Girls, Audioroad, Austin Thaalam, Little Green Bunnies, DrumForGOOD!, Annie & Kate and World Gone Mad

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Streak runners get in their daily mile come rain, heat or travel By PAM LeBLANC

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Bill Schroeder, 53, Austin’s grandpappy of streak running, once ran every day for more than 13 years. Under United States Running Streak Association rules, streakers must run at least 1 mile each calendar day. Running streaks can take on a mind of their own, Schroeder says. Even the postal carrier could learn a thing or two about dedication from these streakers. They lace up their shoes every day — and we mean every single day — to run. They don’t care if eggs are frying on sidewalks, rain bombs are bursting or hurricanes blowing. It matters not if they’re traveling or nursing a cold. They can’t not run. And they’ve been doing it for a long time. Take Schroeder. In 1993 he launched a daily running streak that spanned more than 13 years. That one started after he lost his job with the U.S. Air Force during a reduction of forces. He was crushed. “I thought, ‘This is something no one can take from me. It doesn’t matter what’s going on in the world, I’m worth 25 minutes a day,’” he says. The streak ended, by choice, after 4,810 days. He never suffered an injury, and never got sick enough to skip. He did learn how to plan efficiently. “International travel, young kids — there’s always something going on. 32

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There’s always an excuse. But people always have time to find food, so why not feed your body physically?” he says. His latest running streak started in October 2011, four days after his mother died. It shows no signs of letting up. Under official United States Running Streak Association and Streak Runners International rules, streakers must run at least 1 continuous mile within each calendar day. They can run on road, track, trail or treadmill, but they can’t stop, not even for a traffic light. Schroeder’s streak would qualify, but he uses his own criteria. He’s part of a streak running group on Facebook with members from around the world. “My feeling is who cares. It’s your streak,” CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

says Schroeder, who works at Dell Inc. and heads No Excuses Running, a local running group that hosts monthly low-cost races. “My minimum is 25 minutes. I don’t look at it as a competitive thing.” Streak runners love discipline, he says. They learn how to mix up their runs so they’re not running long and hard every day. If they’re not careful, he warns, the streak can take on a mind of its own. That’s when a streaker must decide if he’s running because he wants to run, or for the sake of the streak. Wing Ho, a computer engineer at Oracle, frequently runs with Schroeder. His streak started about two years ago and has included a run the day after a 50-mile trail race and late-night

stints on a hotel treadmill during family vacations. Ironically, he says streak running has simplified his life because he doesn’t have to decide whether or not he’s going to run each day. He’s also more in tune with how he feels. “I pay a lot more attention to my body and how much it can handle now,” he says. “And if I get sick, a high fever or I can’t breathe normally, I’ll stop. A streak is one thing, my health is another.” Like Schroeder, marketing consultant Jodi Ondrusek, 39, who also coaches running, started her running streak when she was laid off from a job. “At first a week was a big deal, because I was used to a day off,” she says. “I kind of joked with my husband — ‘I’m going to streak until I get preg-

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

nant and can’t run or get a new job.’ Neither has happened so far.” In the 14 months since then, running has become just another part of her day, along with brushing her teeth and eating meals. Travel presents the biggest challenge. She didn’t want her running streak to overshadow the adventure of a recent road trip, so she got up at 5 a.m. each day and ran circles in the hotel parking lot while her girlfriend slept. She also says her streak won’t come at the cost of her health or her family. “I’m going to do it until I can’t, and when I can’t I won’t,” she says. “And then I’ll start again.” And then there’s Vanessa Antoine, 37, who says she won’t let anything get in the way of her streak.

“There have been times when it’s 11:53 p.m. and I have run in street clothes and dress shoes before to get in that 7-minute mile,” she says. “When I get it I’m all giddy because I know the streak is still alive, it lived to see another day.” She sticks to the official association rules, and runs in circles if she hits a stoplight to ensure a continuous mile. “No pause, no stoplight, no ducks crossing the road,” she says. Nothing, she says, is worth breaking the streak. Streak running has made her stronger, faster and happier. Her latest streak spans more than 14 months. “I never want this to end,” says the former Austin resident who now lives in Dallas, where she coaches runners through her company, PaceFlow Running. She knows, though, that one day it will sputter to a halt. “And that’s something that scares me,” she says. “I’d be devastated if I had to end my streak. It’s such a part of my everyday life, and I feel I’ve worked so hard that nothing stops me from going out and giving just a little bit every day.” Just like a postal carrier. The United States Running Streak Association specifies that members run at least 1 mile within each calendar day. To be listed on the website at runeveryday.com, a streak must last at least one year.


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Experts say more sleep can improve athletic performance By PAM LeBLANC

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Studies by Cheri Mah show that more sleep can increase reaction times, speed and accuracy in elite athletes. Healthy adults need at least 7 hours of sleep to prevent health risks, but a third of adults don’t get that. Staff at Intelligent Sleep on Burnet Road in Austin work with clients to improve their sleep. Tips for sleeping better include unplugging electronic devices, dimming lights and wearing amber glasses. Most athletes know the importance of focused training. They’re not likely to down lots of junk food, either. Too often, though, they don’t worry enough about sleep. And quality and amount of sleep, it turns out, can make a difference in athletic performance. Researchers have long known that sleep deprivation can cause everything from irritability and cognitive impairment to slower reaction times and an impaired immune system. But studies now show that getting extended sleep can help swimmers dive off the starting blocks more quickly, tennis players hit balls more accurately, basketball players make the hoop more often and football players run faster. Those studies of elite collegiate athletes, by sleep researcher Cheri Mah at the University of California-San Francisco’s Human Performance Center, should serve as a reminder to recreational athletes that getting enough sleep is a crucial 34

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part of race readiness. “The underlying message is sleep is foundational and should be considered a priority along with other aspects of a training program,” Mah said by phone from California last week. According to the latest recommendations, released this year, healthy adults need at least seven hours of sleep to prevent health risks, Mah says. Many of us don’t get that. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly 30 percent of adults reported an average of less than six hours of sleep per day. That’s a bad thing, especially for athletes, because recovery happens during the restorative phase of sleep, which usually occurs early in the night. That’s when the body releases human growth hormone, which helps rebuild muscle broken down during exercise. “Many athletes are chronically sleep deprived, and many don’t get what they need,” Mah says. “Over time, that can build up as a sleep debt, and we’re starting to recognize that with reducing that debt there may be performance advantages.” The good news? You can pay back sleep debt. The bad news? Studies suggest that it might take more than a single night or weekend to do that. Mah is still trying to understand exactly how long it might take, but says it depends on everything from how much sleep you’ve been getting to the quality of CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

that sleep. “It’s not as easy as do it for one week and it’s fully eliminated,” she says. “But if you build up a sleep debt, you can pay it back, even a little bit at a time.” At Intelligent Sleep on Burnet Road in Austin, owner Bruce Wayne Meleski, who has a doctorate degree in human biology from the University of Texas, works with clients to improve their sleep. He sells mattresses, but also offers treatments on what’s called a sound bed, where music with specially synchronized beats is transmitted through a table as well as a set of earphones, so you can feel it as well as hear it. It’s used to promote relaxation and recovery. “Athletes need to recover from training,” Meleski says. “You train hard, you recover. If you don’t get restorative sleep, your next workout is not going to be as strong.” Among the athletes Meleski has worked with is Ryan Hess, a former collegiate runner who now co-owns the Ready to Run store on Far West Boulevard. Hess says he needs eight or nine hours of sleep — sometimes more. He set a personal record in the 5-mile and half marathon distances when he was working with Meleski, although he’s not sure how much was due to the treatments and how much was the placebo effect. Regardless, he knows solid sleep is key to a good performance. “I tell people all the time training is only a

third of it,” Hess says. “The other is nutrition and sleep habits. If you’re not doing all three and mastering them, you’re not going to get the best out of yourself and it’s going to show on race day.” Lying on the sound bed feels a bit like listening to soothing music while lounging on the hood of a pickup truck with the engine running, but it does help distract from the usual “monkey mind” jumble of thoughts that swirl around some people. Meleski says this type of relaxation training on an athlete’s rest day can take away anxiety and edginess, which can translate into an advantage at the starting line. Meleski can also send clients home with a kit to see how they sleep at night. (I tried this, dutifully sticking a pair of electrodes to my chest before hitting the hay. When Meleski crunched the data, he found that

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I’m not getting enough restorative sleep, which surprised me.) He offers some basic tips for sleeping better, many of which revolve around unplugging from electronic devices, dimming the lights and slowing things down. Mah, the California sleep researcher, also notes that if you need more sleep, it’s easier to back up your bedtime than it is to sleep later. Slow breathing and meditation can help. So can “sleep phones,” soft headbands with built in speakers that can be worn in bed. You can even get special music that uses what’s called binaural beats synced to frequencies to train the brain to go from hyper to calming mode. It just might pay off at the next race. TIPS FOR BETTER SLEEP 1. Turn off computers, cell phones and bright

lights an hour before bedtime. 2. Put on amber-tinted sunglasses an hour before bedtime to block out white light. 3. Avoid caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. 4. Stretch before bedtime. 5. Avoid refined sugars and big meals before bedtime. 6. Don’t read or watch TV in bed. 7. Spritz a little lavender or rosemary scent on your pillow. 8. Go to bed at same time and get up at same time each day. 9. Find a comfortable sleep position that supports your entire body without any pressure points. 10. If you wake up and can’t sleep, don’t stay in bed. Your mind will associate that with not sleeping. Source: Bruce Meleski, Intelligent Sleep


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Gait analysis can help pinpoint cause of running pain By PAM LeBLANC

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

You’ve probably spotted them on the trail before — a runner whose gait looks more clunky than a broken-down car, another whose arms flap like a flamingo with each stride. Idiosyncrasies in running form can translate into injuries. Weak hips might cause knee pain, feet that roll inward too much might trigger shin splints, and an imbalance in the strength of quads versus hamstrings could mean lower back pain. But how do you know if that’s happening? Most running stores will put customers on a treadmill to fit them in shoes, but you need to look at the entire body to understand what’s going on biomechanically, says chiropractor Kim Davis, owner of RunLab. The company performs gait analysis of both injured runners and those looking to prevent injury, then follows up with any needed rehabilitation. The goal, says Davis, 39, isn’t to tell the runner to change his or her natural stride — it’s to pinpoint any weaknesses in the body that are causing bad form. Strengthen those weaknesses and the form will naturally correct itself, based on an individual’s bone structure and flexibility. That makes sense to me, so I agree, a little apprehensively, to step onto a treadmill at RunLab and let rehab technician Jimmy Eierdam, 34, aim the cameras at me. He’ll tape me from the front, back 36

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and side, first while I’m wearing my shoes, then while I’m barefoot. (Cash rate for a gait analysis is $210. RunLab will file for insurance coverage if the analysis is related to an injury.) It takes about 15 minutes, and by the time we’re finished I’ve worked up a good sweat. Davis downloads the footage onto her computer, then projects it on a screen so we can all scrutinize it. We look at the version where I’m wearing shoes first. The first thing Davis notices is that my right leg crosses slightly over the midline when I run. “It’s almost like you’re running on a beam,” she says. But instead of just telling me to run with my legs farther apart, she suggests strengthening my hips, which should naturally cause me to run with a straighter stance. “That’s where rehab comes in,” she says. She points out a few other issues. I’m landing a bit on the side of my feet, and I’m getting “stuck” in the pronated position. From the front view, it’s pretty obvious my left foot does a weird waggle with every step, too. It’s all probably related to the hip thing — one side isn’t strong enough to hold the other side, and my body is compensating. Then we switch to the barefoot video, where Davis notices something else — my left big toe looks stiff. She has me stand up, then tries bending my toe a few different directions. Yes, she confirms, I have an inflexible left toe. “Big toe mobility is CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

such a big deal,” she says. A running shoe with a bit of a rocker, like the Hoka One One, might help, she suggests. She had good things to say, too — I don’t overstride much, and my pelvis looks pretty even, at least when I’m running in shoes. “You don’t have a drop like we see in people with knee problems,” she says. My upper body mechanics look good too — no crazy flailing to balance myself. To wrap things up, she flashes a photo of a pack of Kenyan runners blazing through a marathon. Their front legs are much higher than mine, their back legs more fully extended. “If you want to get stronger and more powerful, strength is important,” she says, tapping at the image.

RunLab works with both elite and recreational athletes. Suzanne Nuccitelli, 45, started having lower leg pain while training for her first full marathon last year. She got her gait analyzed and found that her hip was dropping on one side. She discovered that her hips and glutes weren’t strong enough, so her hip was dropping and her lower leg was taking on more of a load than it should. That image motivated her to stick with the exercise program that therapists recommended, and she recently completed her first Ironman triathlon. “No matter how you think you’re running, when you see how you’re running (on video), oh my gosh, there’s nothing like it. I will never forget my

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

hip dropping like that,” she says. Another triathlete, Barb Brooks, 62, wondered if by having her gait analyzed she could spot a way to improve her form and ultimately get faster. By watching video of herself running, she learned she runs on her toes, and that her stride is a little short. That explained the calf pain she’d been having. Rehab work, she says, has helped ease the problem. John Schrup, 44, has been running most of his life, but says as he’s gotten older and spent more time in front of a computer or driving, it’s gotten tougher. A gait analysis revealed some muscular imbalances caused by sitting for long periods. “I had this picture of myself of everything is great, I’ve been doing

this forever, I’m a natural. The truth of the matter is as we get older things change,” he says. He worked with Davis on a series of exercises to do before or after long drives, and that’s helped him get back to happy running. As for me, I have some work to do. I need to strengthen my hips and loosen my toes. Correct that, and maybe I’ll run more like a Kenyan and less like Quasimodo. IF YOU GO RunLab Austin has three locations: 700-B South Lamar Blvd.; 1700 RR 620 North No. 102; and inside CATZ at 12611 Hymeadow Drive. For more information go to runlabaustin.com or call 512-266-1000.


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The Runner’s Club: meet Cap10K’s All-Years Runners By DREW CARR Since beginning in 1978 with 3,400 participants, The Statesman Capitol 10,000—widely known as Cap10K—has grown into the largest 10K in Texas and seventh-largest in the nation. More than 20,000 runners are expected to be off to the races for Cap10K with year, with 31 of them holding a unique and impressive distinction: they’ve run the Cap10K every year since ’78. If you’ve ever run Cap10K, you know how much fun it is— starting Ann Richards Bridge over Lady Bird Lake, enjoying the winding, scenic and hilly route then finishing back at Auditorium Shores. Imagine how much fun this bunch has had over the years. You can call them the Runner’s Club—ask any of them how they feel heading into their 40th Cap10K, and you’ll see they’re ready as ever. “Getting ready for the

40th Cap10, I’m paying special attention to my training routine,” said Gerre Boardman, one of Cap10K’s all-years runners. “I’m trying to up my mileage a little and thinking about how the big event is less than a month away. I hope the weather will be good, but I know I’ll have plenty of company, no matter the conditions. I remember that one year with thunder and lightning, and then the year with sleet. Lots of good memories.” Boardman said she enjoys the fun and excitement of running with such a large group of people through the beautiful city of Austin, TX. “I love the music and the bands, I like clicking off the miles, climbing those hills, hearing the encouragement and cheering from the crowds,” said Boardman. “This year, those of us who have done the race every year have the option to start with the first group. I’m wondering if I’ll choose that option and

what that would be like!” As for being an allyears runner, Boardman says it feels like a dream come true. “I feel so fortunate to have been able to do this run for 40 years. It seems like a dream,” said Boardman. “It’s really been a thrill. I enjoy being in contact with the other runners who have done the Cap10 every year. Connecting with them has made the run even more fun.” One of Boardman’s friends, Debbie Norman, also happens to be an all-years runner and is excited for her 40th Cap10K as well. “I can’t believe it,” said Norman. “When I started it 40 years ago, it never crossed my mind that I’d be here today. What really makes it special is sharing it with the rest of the “Never Missed Group”, as we call ourselves.” Norman said her friendship with Boardman remains inspirational and encouraging to this day.

“The other woman in our group, Gerre Boardman, has become a great friend,” said Norman. She has been my source of encouragement & inspiration for each race. As we age, we joke that our only goal is to get to the finish line in an upright position!’ For all-years runner Danny Krause, these 40 years of Cap10K began in college. “I was a freshman at UT when I ran my first Cap 10K. My conditioning class professor gave our class a homework grade of “A” to participate in the first Cap 10K,” said Krause. “You had to complete the race in 56 minutes to get a shirt. My best time was 40.42.” Krause says the race is a perfect fit for the city of Austin. “I grew up in Austin and what I love about the Cap 10K is that it exemplifies the spirit of this city,” said Krause. “It’s more ‘inclusive’ than ‘exclusive,’ it’s active and healthy, creative and

witty.” Krause also said that while preparing for the race may be a bit tougher than it was four decades ago, the race’s feel and energy remain the same. “It’s hard to believe that it’s been 40 years already. It’s harder to prepare for running six miles than it used to be, but once the race starts and you experience the energy of the participants it’s worth it.” For all-years runner Kenneth Hausmann, Cap10K is a must. Every year. “I love Cap10K,” said Hausmann. “That’s something I won’t miss for anything.” This includes vacation (Hausmann is postponing an upcoming vacation until immediately after this year’s race) and even injury (he once had a cast removed to walk the entire Cap10K on crutches). Along with the tradition of running the race each year since he was 20 years old, Hausmann said it’s the feel of coming

together that makes the Cap10K such a special and important event. “It’s a time when Austin gets together,” said Hausmann. “It’s a very varied city. You have liberal and conservative, environmentalists and industrialists, bankers, students, retirees, educators— and everybody gets together and just has a blast. Nobody cares what you do or what you think, you just get together and enjoy running together. It’s a good way to bring in the spring.” While Hausmann may be running Cap10K for the 40th time, he’s still keeping it competitive. “Next year I’m hoping to win my age group,” I got second in my age group a couple years ago, this year it’ll be tough, but next year I want to win it.” So, before the big race kicks off this year, here’s to 40 years of fun. And 31 remarkable runners. Pictured: Kenneth Hausmann and Gerre Boardman.

Cap10K All-Years Runners Mark Adams William (Bill) Bard Gerre Boardman James Braddock Jeff Brower Fred Fuchs Kenneth Hausmann Wayne Huffman Oscar B. Jackson, Jr. MD Danny (Daniel) Krause Bruce Latour Art Lavalle Ken Lerner Don Lujan Michael (Mike) McShane Eddie Mixon AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

James Nance Debbie Norman Steve Parker Tinsley Penick Bill Pfaff Doug (James) Phelan Bradley Price David Ray Leon Rosen Charles Scheibe James Smith Patrick Smith Richard Wiggans Bruce Wiland Don (Donnie) Williamson CAP 10K RACE GUIDE

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Summer running: Hydrate, dial it back, stay cool By PAM LeBLANC

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

When you head out for a run in the heat and humidity, you need to take care of yourself. Here are a few tips: 1. Hydrate. Drink up a few hours before you

head out, and sip on something every 15 minutes or so if you’re out more than 30 minutes. If you’re going for a longer run, make sure you get some electrolytes too. It’s actually possible to get too much water, so make sure your belly isn’t gurgling.

2. Shade. Don’t run down a sun-baked stretch of hot black pavement. Look for trails or streets that are shaded. The Butler Trail around Lady Bird Lake is a good option; if you like trail running try the Barton Creek Greenbelt. You can

cool off in the creek if you overheat. 3. Slow down. Now is not the time to set a personal record. It takes about two weeks to get used to running in the heat, and even so, you shouldn’t expect to run as fast as you can when it’s,

say, 60 degrees outside. St. Vincent Sports Performance in Indianapolis suggests slowing your pace 20 to 30 seconds per mile for every 5 degrees above 60. 4. Go early, go late. Just try not to go midday, between noon and 6

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p.m., when the sun’s at its highest point and you might catch a sunburn. 5. Clothes. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothes that breathe well. Grab your sunglasses, slather on the sunscreen and wear a cap.

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Police share tips for staying safe while exercising By PAM LeBLANC

AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

As runners, many of us hardly think twice before heading out on the streets or trails to log our daily workouts. We’re strong. We’re fast. We’re not an easy target for a criminal — or so we think. But that’s not always true, as a rash of recent assaults illustrates. Several of the attacks have involved runners and have occurred in broad daylight. We’re not about to stop running, so we checked with local law enforcement officials to get tips for staying safe while exercising outdoors. We also heard from one of the victims herself. The assaults have occurred in downtown Austin, North Austin and Cedar Park. Police are unsure if any of the incidents are related. That, frankly, doesn’t matter. An assault can happen anywhere, at any time. The most important thing, according to senior police officer Rheannon Cunningham and Sgt. David Daniels, both with the Austin Police Department, is to stay vigilant. Get your nose out of your phone. Lower the volume on your headphones or remove one earbud. Pay attention to what’s going on around you. “Everybody wants to do their thing and use headphones and jam out, but if you cannot hear anyone behind you, it could be potentially dangerous,” Daniels said. When you can, exercise with others. That’s espe-

cially important when it’s dark, but a good idea all the time. “Most people like to run early morning or late evening,” Daniels said. “When you run at those times, you might want to double up with a buddy or run in groups.” If you do go alone, tell someone where you’re headed and what time you expect to return. Carry a cellphone. Consider taking pepper spray or a noise maker, and know how to use it. Remember, though, it could be used

against you, and if you’re attacked from behind, as several of the recent victims have been, you might not have a chance to grab it. Another suggestion? Make eye contact with other people around you. “If somebody recognizes that you looked specifically at them, it may be a deterrent and it may intimidate them,” Cunningham said. If you feel like someone is following you, or someone suspicious is lurking around, don’t be afraid to

call the police. And if the worst does happen, be ready. “Rehearse in your mind what you’d do in an attack. By practicing, you’re likely to have a faster, better reaction if anything does happen,” Cunningham says. Call for help. Yell for 911. Make noise. Do anything, she says, to draw attention to the situation and get the attacker away from you. The victim we talked to didn’t want to discourage others from running.

“Thousands of people run in this city every day, and most of them have amazing days,” she said. She doesn’t know why she was targeted, and doesn’t think much could have prevented the attack. But running with friends, making eye contact with others and using just one earbud to listen to music could help in some cases, she said. “I thought there’s no way I’d be someone’s ideal victim,” she said. She’s running again, and says she’s reassured

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by the way Austin police officers have treated her. “From the moment the Austin Police and paramedics arrived, I felt like they were absolutely going to do everything they could to find this person,” she says. One more thing. If you hear someone yelling for help, call the police. We’ve got a closeknit running community here in Austin — and we need to look out for one another. It’s the right thing to do. FRIDAY, APR 14, 2017

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