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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Utah Statesman The

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Logan City remembers three landslide victims By DAN SMITH news senior writer

In the wake of the Jan. 28 settlement of a multi-party lawsuit resulting from a tragic landslide that killed three people, Logan City officials look to develop the land where the slide occurred. “When we were going through the mitigation side of this lawsuit, the family was down there,” Logan City Mayor Randy Watts said. “I told them we felt, as a city, it’d be fitting that we put a memorial to the mom and her two children. When we get the thing cleaned up we can find out where that memorial would be positioned.” He said he pictures something similar to the Olsen Memorial Park on Canyon Road where a memorial for Merlin Olsen’s mother and father was established near their former homestead. On July 11, 2009, after heavy amounts of precipitation weakened a canal wall near 915 Canyon Road in the Island Neighborhood, several tons of earth gave way. The resulting landslide demolished the home of Evelia Jacqueline Leavey, burying and killing her and her children Abbey Alanis and Victor Alanis Jr. The lawsuit was between plaintiff Victor Alanis Sr. – the husband and father of the deceased – and USU, UDOT, Logan City, Logan

Northern Irrigation Co. and the former owner of the property. “It’s been a long, drawn-out process,” Watts said. “Now that the lawsuit is behind us, we can move ahead to making some great strides with what we’re doing to clean up Canyon Road.” Logan City Parks and Recreation director Russ Akina said he and the Mayor have discussed turning the site into a public park of some kind once the city purchased the homes and cleared the area. “There are a couple of things that are going to need some attention,” Akina said. “That includes continuation of the stability of that slope.” The site is located at the foot of a bluff that supports Interstate 89 and USU property. Akina said most people think of a park as a place with baseball fields and volleyball pits. With the space that is available, he said it will most likely be more of a passive park with benches and easily maintainable plants. The trail that once ran along the canal was washed out by the landslide. Public Works director Mark Nielsen said City Council members have said they want the canal trail put back into use. A GREEN SPACE WILL be landscaped at the site where the Logan Landslide occurred July of 2009 as a memorial for the tragedy which killed three individuals who were in their home. BRECK BYINGTON photo

- See WATTS, page 4

Lyons: Debt due to lack of structure By BLAZE BULLOCK staff writer

MICHAEL LYONS, POLITICAL SCIENCE professor, addresses current issues involving national debt in an event including the College Republicans and College Democrats, Tuesday. CARL R. WILSON photo

The current national debt is not an immediate problem, said Michael Lyons, USU political science professor, Tuesday night in the auditorium of the TSC. According to usdebtclock.org, the national debt is above $14 trillion and a little over $127,000 per taxpayer. The debt problem isn’t urgent but it’s getting worse, Lyons said. Lyons spoke prior to the documentary screening of I.O.U.S.A which was hosted by the College Democrats and College Republicans Lyons said there are a lot of misconceptions about the national deficit and debt in America. He said Republicans like to blame Democrats and social spending programs for the debt, but Democrats like to blame George W. Bush and the two wars for the debt. The real problems and causes of the debt are more a matter of structure, Lyons said.

“We’ve always had deficit spending,” Lyons said. “Our nation was born in debt.” Lyons said two senators for each state and representatives for congressional districts creates “very perverse spending incentives.” Tax money goes into a pot, then states get the money with no relation to how much money they contributed to the pot, Lyons said. “The incentives are to take as much money out of the central pot as you possibly can for your district or state because somebody, somewhere else, is paying most of the bill,” Lyons said. The other problem deals with two-year election cycles, which don’t exist anywhere else in the industrialized world. “It puts tremendous pressure on members of congress to take quick action that is momentarily satisfying to members of their districts,” Lyons said. “It puts pressure on congress not to raise taxes.” Longer congressional terms and less frequent elections might make

it easier for members of congress to shift their focus to long term instead of the short, Lyons said. Lyons quoted former president Jimmy Carter, who said, “Our tax system is a disgrace to the human race.” Lyons said that statement was an understatement. “Our tax system is a disaster,” Lyons said. We have a huge deficit right now because of the recession and high unemployment rates which lowers government revenues, he said. One of the best ways to fix our national deficit and debt problem would be to implement a national sales tax, Lyons said. This would make everything more expensive but it would give people more money to start with. Lyons said people with honest jobs that honestly pay their taxes are carrying the burden of dishonest people like drug dealers who don’t very much in taxes. Having a national sales tax would solve that

- See SYSTEM, page 4

Career Fair suggests Cooling tank may save money economic recovery By KEATON REED staff writer

By CATHERINE MEIDELL news editor

With more than 130 companies attending Wednesday’s Career Fair, students will have a better chance at entering the post-graduation work field than they have within the last few years, said Melissa Scheaffer, associate director of USU Career Services. Randy Jensen, who is also an associate director of Career Services, said 120 companies registered to participate in the fair last year. Just as the number of companies registered for the Career Fair has increased, Scheaffer said she has seen the number of career opportunities she has informed students about increase.

- See GOOGLE, page 4

Inside This Issue

Fences went up on Feb. 15 to mark off a portion of the HPER field where a new thermal energy storage tank (TES tank) is being built. Darrell Hart, associate vice president of Facilities, said the central cooling plant on campus is running out of the air conditioning capacity needed to satisfy all buildings, but this tank will help remedy the problem. “We either had to buy another chiller or construct this tank,” Hart said. He said USU’s air conditioning system currently runs on four chillers, but the central cooling plant only has room to add one more chiller. Ben Berrett, director of Facilities Planning, Design and Construction, said “adding additional chillers doesn’t save money, this does.” Lorin Mortensen, mechanical engineer for USU Facilities

3/02/11 Maranatha Baptist combines with the nondenominational Alpine Church on Main Street. Page 5

Aggie women’s tennis defeated in-state rival Weber State at home. Page 8

Planning, Design and Construction, said the system could save the university around $100,000 per year in electricity costs. Berrett said, “That’s under current prices. Those savings could be larger if power rates go up.” “It saves us money by reducing the amount we pay for electricity. We can run our chillers at night during the off-peak hours when energy costs are lower,” Mortensen said. “Typically, we run those chillers during the peak heat part of the day, which is also the time of peak energy cost,” Hart said. “Cold water storage will chill the water at night when energy costs are low.” Berrett said the tank is 30 feet tall, will hold 2 million gallons of water and will be completely buried under the HPER field by December of this year. He also said the field is expected to re-open at that time.

- See TES, page 3

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Wednesday, Mar. 1, 2011 Page 2

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ClarifyCorrect The policy of The Utah Statesman is to correct any error made as soon as possible. If you find something you would like clarified or find unfair, please contact the editor at 797-1762 or TSC 105.

Nat’lBriefs Gadhafi’s forces retake towns near capital TRIPOLI, Libya (AP) – Moammar Gadhafi’s forces battled poorly armed rebels Tuesday for control of towns near the capital trying to create a buffer zone around his seat of power. The increasingly violent clashes threatened to transform the 15-day popular rebellion in Libya into a drawn-out civil war. Amid the intensified fighting, the international community stepped up moves to isolate the longtime Libyan leader. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he ordered two ships into the Mediterranean, including the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge, and he is sending 400 Marines to the vessel to replace some troops that left recently for Afghanistan.

Army updates PT tests for 1st time in 30 years FORT JACKSON, S.C. (AP) – The Army plans to toughen its fitness tests for the first time in 30 years to make sure all soldiers have the strength, endurance and mobility for battle, adding exercises like running an obstacle course in full combat gear and dragging a body’s weight. Officials at Fort Jackson, a major Army training center, said Tuesday the new regimen would replace twicea-year testing that focused on pushups, sit-ups and a two-mile run. Trials are starting this month at eight bases and the plan could be adopted Armywide after reviews later this year.

LateNiteHumor Monday, Feb. 21, 2011 – Top 10 Little Known Facts About United States Presidents 10. William Howard Taft was so fat, he’s considered our 27th and 28th president. 9. Teddy Roosevelt answered the phone, “Helloosevelt?” 8. The “K” in James K. Polk stood for “Kanye.” 7. Like the cartoon cat, James Garfield loved lasagna and hated Mondays. 6. To conserve energy, when possible, Jimmy Carter would travel via pogo stick. 5. During one of his fireside chats, FDR accidentally burned down the map room. 4. John Tyler was the only president to work his way up from the mailroom. 3. Zachary Taylor’s vice president was a cocker spaniel named Angus. 2. Our only unmarried president, James Buchanan, was fond of posing as his own first lady. 1. George W. Bush was not born in the United States.

Calif. lawmaker pushes for gay marriage SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – California’s attorney general on Tuesday joined lawyers for two same-sex couples and the city of San Francisco in asking a federal appeals court to allow gay marriages to resume while the court considers the constitutionality of the state’s voter-approved ban. The latest offensive against Proposition 8 came when state Attorney General Kamala Harris told the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a letter that sponsors of the measure approved in 2008 were unlikely to prevail in their appeal of a trial judge’s ruling last year that struck it down. Keeping Proposition 8 in effect therefore is a fruitless violation of gay Californians’ civil rights, Harris said. “The public interest weighs heavily against the government sanctioning such discrimination by permitting it to continue,” she wrote. The move also came as supporters of gay marriage grow impatient with the slow pace of court proceedings. The California Supreme Court reiterated Tuesday that it would take at least until the end of the year to consider a legal

question asked by the federal court as it tries to resolve the appeal. Gay marriages have remained on hold until the 9th Circuit decides the appeal. Lawyers for the gay couples who successfully sued in the lower court petitioned the appeals court last week to lift the hold, as did the city of San Francisco. Harris also said the case for allowing gay marriages was bolstered by the Obama administration’s announcement last week that it would no longer defend the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which prohibits the U.S. government from recognizing same-sex marriages. While not directly relevant to Proposition 8, the administration’s new position “substantially diminished” the likelihood the measure’s sponsors will be successful in their effort to get the lower court ruling overturned, she said. “Events have demonstrated that if the stay ever was justified, it is no longer,” Harris said in her letter. Andy Pugno, legal counsel for the coalition of religious and conservative groups that put Proposition 8 on the

November 2008 ballot and campaigned for its passage, disputed the attorney general’s contention that the prospects for a successful appeal were any more dim now than they were last summer. “It’s a highly politicized case, and this is just a reminder that we need the initiative process exactly because state officials sometimes refuse to do their job,” Pugno said. “The fact that President Obama has made a carefully calculated political decision in no way changes the law and the role of the court to decide Prop 8’s validity.” Harris, a Democrat who previously served as San Francisco’s district attorney and who was a strong supporter of Obama’s in 2008, succeeded Gov. Jerry Brown as attorney general in January. Brown had refused to defend Proposition 8 in his previous role, as did then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Last year, both men asked the 9th Circuit to let gay couples marry during the appeals process. The push by Harris to quickly get same-sex marriage reinstated in California could further enflame conservative activists angered by the

CALIFORNIA ATTORNEY GENERAL Kamala Harris gives her first news conference in Los Angeles in this photo taken Tuesday, Nov. 30, 2010. AP photo

administration’s declaration that it considered the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional.

Officials: Harmful bacteria at Playboy Mansion LOS ANGELES (AP) – The bacteria that cause Legionnaires’ disease were found at the Playboy Mansion during an investigation into an illness that affected about 200 people who attended an event there last month, a health official said Tuesday. Other infection sources have not been ruled out as the cause of the illness because the bacteria Legionella is common in moist places, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health director Dr. Jonathan E. Fielding said. “We are still considering several possible causes of illness,” Fielding said in a prepared statement. County health officials opened an

investigation Feb. 11 after attendees of an Internet conference reported symptoms mostly consisting of fever, chills, malaise and coughing. In a statement, Playboy spokeswoman Teri Thomerson said people at the mansion, which is listed as an asset of the media company, were cooperating with the investigation. “To date, there have been no confirmed cases of any respiratory or other illness arising out of any Playboy Mansion function,” Thomerson said in the statement. Hefner has not left his residence, she said. “There has never been any reason for him to evacuate during this investigation,” Thomerson said.

The DOMAINfest Global Conference took place Feb. 1 to Feb. 3 with events at several hotels and a fundraiser at the Holmby Hills estate where Playboy founder Hugh Hefner resides. About 700 people from 30 countries attended lectures and workshops at the conference. The county is investigating the outbreak with state and federal health officials to track illness outside Los Angeles. Health officials declined comment on where the bacteria were discovered at the mansion, calling it only a water source. That could mean anywhere from a kitchen tap to the famed grotto, where Playboy bunnies have mingled with guests in

a hot tub. Legionnaires’ disease causes respiratory illness and its symptoms include coughing, malaise, chills and fever. Fewer than 18,000 Americans are hospitalized for the illness every year. In annual financial filings, Playboy said the mansion is used for corporate activities, film and television production, magazine photography and charitable and civic functions. At least one major event is planned at the sprawling 29-room mansion in coming months. Hefner, 84, intends to marry fiancée Crystal Harris, 24, at the mansion this summer.

Newt Gingrich prepares for White House bid IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) – The biggest obstacle to a Newt Gingrich presidential bid might be Gingrich himself. The twice-divorced former U.S. House speaker has admitted an affair with a former congressional aide who is now his third wife. His career in Congress is remembered as much for his dramatic fall – the federal government shutdown, his censure and the loss of Republican seats in the House – as his rise. His polarizing style sometimes leaves would-be voters cold. “I don’t think it will be Newt’s moral issues that will keep him from winning the presidency,” said Tom Perdue, a Georgia-based GOP political strategist. “When he had a chance to govern, he proved that he couldn’t.” Unlike many candidates, Gingrich won’t have to struggle to make a name for himself. People already know Newt Gingrich. What remains to be seen is whether that hurts or helps him. “The problem for Newt may be that some voters know him too well,” said Ed Failor Jr. of Iowans for Tax Reform. “I think people can get past it, but it’s not going to happen overnight.” Failor met with Gingrich on one of Gingrich’s recent trips to Iowa, the first-in-the-nation caucus state he has visited eight times since May 2010. The strategy Gingrich is using in Iowa provides a glimpse of how he might try to overcome his personal baggage to win the GOP nomination.

FORMER HOUSE SPEAKER Newt Gingrich addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. The biggest obstacle to a Newt Gingrich presidential bid might be Gingrich himself. AP photo

Gingrich, 67, is widely expected to take another step toward a run this week. He and his wife, Callista, have scheduled a meeting Thursday with Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal, a key supporter. Gingrich’s lawyer, Randy Evans, has said the former Georgia congress-

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man will announce the formation of an exploratory committee in the coming days and he expects it will happen in Georgia. As media attention surrounding the Georgia visit intensified, his spokesman Rick Tyler took pains to suggest that Gingrich was not traveling to the state with the intention to announce that he will form the committee. The trip is funded by his tax-exempt conservative group America Solutions for Winning the Future, which cannot endorse specific political candidates. Gingrich will hold a media session with Deal following their meeting. If Gingrich announces Thursday, he would become the first Republican to get into the race, giving him extra time to answer questions about his past and then try to turn the focus toward issues. as media attention intensified about the trip, campaign took pains to separate itself from America group and presidential ambitions resources used via group be used for presidential Any doubts that his personal life would flare up were erased during a speech at the University of Pennsylvania last week where a student confronted him about the affair. “I’ve had a life which, on occasion, has had problems,” Gingrich replied. “I believe in a forgiving God, and the American people will have to decide whether that’s their primary concern.”

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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Page 3

StatesmanCampus News

Teams create green-friendly light fixtures By LIS STEWART staff writer

By the light of 17 fixtures built from objects like hangers, trash bags and packing peanuts, judges paced the stage with clipboards as they chose the winners in the Caine College of the Arts Design Star competition, Design Star, Monday night. Four winning teams went home with trophies topped by a golden light bulb and prize packages, some including Jazz tickets. Teams ranging from one to three people were given one hour to put together hanging lamp fixtures out of recyclable materials and a light. Kylee Groskreutz, president of USU’s chapter of the American Society of Interior Designers, said recyclable materials were the theme because it was cost effective and would push creativity. After coming up with design plans for their light, the 17 teams crowded the area where boxes and tables were piled high with everyday materials such as plastic office trays, cardboard tubes, duct tape, clothing hangers and beer cans. “On your mark, get set, design, go!” Groskreutz said. And they were off. Having not a second to lose, the competitors made a mad dash to the tables and boxes, some carrying away armfuls of hangers and cans, and set to work on their masterpieces. The team Baczuk, Buynak and Graves, who won the people’s choice award, was wrapping the light cord in wire and building an orb-like structure wrapped in clear plastic garbage bags to put around it. “We’re calling it Industrial

ALAN DANGERFIELD, SENATOR for the Caine College of the Arts (left) and Tyler Tolson, ASUSU president (right) look closely at student teams’ light fixture designs that are made from recycled materials. STERLING BOIN photo

Sophistication,” said Ryan Lee, a sophomore in mechanical engineering. Even the judges, ASUSU President Tyler Tolson and arts senator Alan Dangerfield decided to try their hand at making a light fixture. Dangerfield said he actually was going to sign up to compete, and then he was asked to be a judge, so he was excited for the opportunity to be involved.

“Alan, I think we should use this,” Tolson said, pointing at the tablecloth with the leftover materials. Proving that interior design is not just for interior design majors, people from different majors competed. “We just wanted everyone to come together and have fun,” said Trevor Keith Call, who teamed up with American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) from the U.S. Green Building Council to plan the

event. Freshman and English major Lauren Tuttle, of the team Edison Fuse, hammered plastic hangers into little pieces to hang suspended around her light. “I took an interior design class last semester, and I like it,” Tuttle said. Date night turned into success for husband-wife team Andrea and Jay Casto, who took the grand prize for their square-shaped light made of plastic office trays. “I liked having to think on the go about how to use things that you typically wouldn’t use for that,” Jay, a junior in business, said. Andrea, an interior design freshman, said it sounded like fun to compete, especially when she found out the event was open to more than interior design students. Two other prizes were for runnersup, which went to the team Marty’s Boyz, and most innovative use of materials, to Sean Arnold for his use of balloons. Though not everyone took home a prize package or a trophy, the competitors proudly showed off what they created. Sophomores in interior design Emily Williams and Dani Stoddard giggled over their creation of wire hangers hung with white garbage bags and embellished with red, white, and blue shoe laces. “We’ve been laughing the whole time, and that’s all that matters,” Williams said. Call and Groskreutz said they hope this will be an annual event for the Caine College of the Arts, and the lights will be displayed on campus in the near future. – la.stewart@aggiemail.usu.edu

TES: Construction begins on cooling tank, school will save money -continued from page 1 Meanwhile, Facilities asks for students to have patience as construction continues on the north end of the field. Berrett said that every precaution is being taken to ensure safety around the construction zone, especially considering the proximity of the Edith Bowen Laboratory school. He said large dump trucks and cement trucks will be coming in and out over the next few months. “It’s an inconvenience to students who want to use the field, but in the big picture it will save a lot of money,” Mortensen said. Berrett said that the project doesn’t only save money. “It is a buffer to our system, if our chillers go offline, the system can run off the tank until we get things restarted.” He said this is critical in temperature sensitive places, such as the USU data center, where campus servers operate. “This makes our chilled water system more stable and dependable.” He said. Hart said, “There was a power outage at the central energy plant and we couldn’t make chilled water, we started seeing problems in places like the data center within 15 minutes.” He said the new tank will be able to cool down the data center, and other places on campus, in case of an emergency or if some maintenance is required at the central cooling plant. “We already have a small thermal energy storage tank used to cool the NFS building, we built that about five years ago and it works really well,” Berrett said. The overall cost of the project is about $2.5 million, but it absolutely saves money, Hart said. “Little maintenance will need to be done,” Mortensen said. “There will be some temperature sensors that will need to be calibrated every few years.”

Berrett said, “There will be inspections on the inside of the tank for sediment and cracks and leaks, but it will be almost maintenance free.” Hart said this is a great time to start the project because construction companies are competitively seeking contracts. “There were eight or nine firms interested, and we narrowed that down to three firms who

drew up proposals and had ties to specialty tank manufacturers, and then we chose the best of the three,” he said. Hart said he feels the school is getting the best price, the best product and the best schedule that is available. – keaton.reed@aggiemail.usu.edu

The Institute for Communication and Leadership, in conjunction with ASUSU officers, is offering a professional development seminar covering topics such as interpersonal communication and conflict resolution. “We’re looking to help our students gain the edge in the job market,” said ASUSU president Tyler Tolson. The classes will be held from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. on March 3, 17 and 31, in the Eccles Conference Center. ASUSU council’s cooperation, along with the services Eccles Conference Center have contributed to the lower cost of the training. Students may register for the event online for a fee of $40, and attendees who complete all three classes will be presented with a certificate of completion. Matt Sanders, assistant professor of speech communication is one of the founders of the Institute for Communication and Leadership. Sanders said that he wanted to provide students with training that they would otherwise have to get from a corporate

Campus & Community

Senior project will restore the “A” block Graduating seniors have the opportunity to donate $20.11 to help beautify the block “A” on campus as part of their senior gift. The senior gift is a 100-year-old tradition centered on giving back. “It is our responsibility, as Aggies, to give back to this University. The senior gift can be our way to show gratitude for the experience USU has provided us,” Tessa Goodall, 2011 Senior Gift Chair, said. The block “A” was chosen as the benefactor of the gift money because it is starting to sink to the East and the ground is a muddy mess during the winter months and True Aggie nights. If seniors donate by March 25, they will get a line in the commencement program to thank someone that contributed to their college experience, Goodall said. Past senior gifts have included the Utah State University sign on 400 North, the campus map next to the Eccles Conference Center, and the bike rack next to the Natural Resources building. There are three tiers to the Senior Challenge. First, if $1,500 is raised, a concrete foundation will be laid underneath the “A”. For $5,000, brick pavers will be laid around the foundation to keep the area free of mud. Finally, if the senior class can raise $7,000, ground lighting will be added to light up the area. Seniors will be receiving phone calls from their peers February 28 to March 3 to learn more about how and where they can contribute, Bare said. The benefits of donating include one year free membership to the USU Alumni Association along with the pride of taking part in a 100 year campus tradition, Goodall said.

Alumnus, N.Y. health commissioner dies Utah State University alumnus Dr. Richard F. Daines, former commissioner of health for New York state, died suddenly of an apparent heart attack Feb. 26 at his family farm in New York. He RICHARD F. DAINES was 60. Dr. Daines received a bachelor’s degree in history from USU in 1974. He received his medical degree from Cornell University Medical College in 1978. He is survived by his wife, Linda; his children, William, Katherine and Andrew; one grandson; and his parents, Newel and Jean of Logan, Utah; and siblings. News of Daines’s death was noted in The New York Times. He was earlier featured in the summer 2009 issue of Utah State magazine.

Museum event looks at holistic medicine

A SITE ON THE HPER FIELD began construction Feb. 15 for the installment of a cooling tank that is estimated to save USU $100,000 annually. CARL R. WILSON photo

ASUSU organizes seminar to teach leadership By STEVE KENT staff writer

Briefs

training program. To attend such a program, a resident of Cache valley would often have to travel long distances and pay as much as $200. Price and location are not the only differences between the upcoming seminar and corporate training; the seminar uses a different approach to teaching skills, Sanders said. “A lot of these programs will say, here are three things you need to do in order for people to trust you … it’s kind of a cause-and-effect silver bullet idea,” Sanders said. Through role playing exercises and assignments for the attendees to apply the skills they’ve learned, Sanders said that the content of the course is designed for group participation and immediate application. A large portion of course will focus on conflict resolution. “We’re all good with people, but we’re good with the people that we like to be good with and we like to be around. I think the bigger question is, can I be good with people when things are tough?” Sanders said. Sanders said that communication courses are

already offered at USU, but that availability is limited and the classes often fill up the day they open. Tolson said he would like the seminar to become a regular event, giving more students the opportunity to attend. Several students have emailed him expressing desire to attend, though because of scheduling conflicts they won’t be able to attend this time around, Tolson said. Bertha Morris, an undeclared sophomore hoping to enter the business program at USU is one such student. Morris said she found out about the seminar through the USU website and thought it would be a good way to gain marketable skills. If it were possible, Morris said she would like to see such seminars offered two or three times a semester for the benefit of students and faculty. “Because I’m a mother of four kids, I work full time, I go to school part time, I don’t have a lot of opportunities. When something like this comes along, I want to take advantage of it … so I can make more money for my family,” she said. – steve.kent@aggiemail.usu.edu

The Utah State University Museum of Anthropology next presents “Holistic Medicine: Healing the Mind and the Body.” As a premiere event in the ongoing Saturdays at the Museum program, the day promises to provide new and interesting information on holistic and alternative healing practices. The museum hosts six speakers for the event who will share their specialties and experiences with the Cache Valley community. The presentations will be accompanied by an audience collaborated home remedy wall. During the day’s activities, families can make a medicine bag, and perhaps find something special to put in it, event organizers said. “The Museum is very excited for this Saturdays holistic healing event,” said program coordinator Melissa Allen. “We have never hosted an event of this scale, covering the many aspects of alternative healing and we are thrilled to have so many experts support this event to promote mental, spiritual and physical well-being.” The museum will be open for its normal operating hours on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

-Compiled from staff and media reports


Page 4

StatesmanCampus News

Google: More companies attending fair, students given opportunity to network and apply for jobs -continued from page 1 “The number of employers who are attending the Career Fair really indicates the bounce back in the economy,” she said. “The employers come back because of the students that they see here.” This year, Google will attend the event, held in the TSC Ballroom and International Lounge from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Scheaffer said they will be a mustsee booth because of 6,000 positions they must fill due to the company’s growth. In its 22nd year, the fair is the largest of its kind in the state of Utah, and anywhere from 3-5,000 students attend the event, however, Jensen said his goal is to increase the number of those who attend. Enterprise Rent-A-Car recruite Melissa Ceballos has been attending the USU Career Fair to find future employees for nine years, ever since she got started in the recruiting program, and has seen several USU students hired into the company. “Finding students at the fair is really hit or miss,” she said, “but when it’s a hit the student comes prepared with a lot of work experience.” Out of Ceballos’ entire region, which includes Utah and Idaho, she said USU’s Career Fair is in the top three most beneficial to her company. She said they are open to hiring students from all majors. This year, 24 employers will interview students they meet during the Career Fair the day following, Schaeffer

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Watts: Mayor says land was an ‘eyesore’ -continued from page 1

said, so they will receive immediate employer,” Scheaffer said. results from the event. In addition to Upon arriving at the Career Fair, long-term career opportunities, student Jensen encourages students to find the can find temporary occupations as well information booths in order to view all as internships. of the companies that have attended. Some USU students signed up to be Those companies who will interview student hosts, which means they assist prospective employees the following the visiting companies’ employers. USU day will be emphasized on the list. initiated the first student host program Scheaffer said the larger companies in the state and Scheaffer said some of to expect at the event, in addition to these students have Google, include GE been offered jobs durEnergy, Goldman Sachs, “The number of ing “hiring freezes” Goodrich Corporation, employers who from the company they Intermountain are attending the assisted. Healthcare and Rocky Career Fair realyl “We know having Mountain Power. that face-to-face impres- indicates the “We have a lot of sion, that human constudents that report bounce back in nection, is really valuback to us after having the economy. The able,” Scheaffer said. had success from the There is not only one employers come fair,” Jensen said. “We group of students who back because of the have a great response should consider attend- students that they and we always get good ing the Career Fair, feedback from employsee here.” Jensen said. Students ers about the fair itself.” – Melissa Scheaffer, who are unsure about If nothing else, what they are interested Jensen said, it is wise Career Services associate in studying may benefit for any student to go for director networking opportunifrom attending the fair and learning about ties they may not othertheir future career options, he said. wise have access to. Other students are reaching a point “Whether a student is interested where they are seriously considering in engineering or non-profits, there is career options should “dress to impress” something there for them,” Scheaffer and be prepared with resumes. said. “The majority of students need to be able to assess their skills and show – catherine.meidell@aggiemail.usu.edu how they can add value to a potential

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“It’s always been our goal in the Department (Parks and Recreation) to connect parks with trails,” Akina said. “The location of a public park, that Canyon Road location and the canal would seem to make a lot of sense in terms of that idea.” Nielsen said the Canyon Road site is just over two acres of land and consisted of five separate properties. The Public Works Department has recently cleared a large portion of the area, which caused frequent road closings in order to allow bulldozers and other land moving equipment room to work. “We do have one more house that’s being closed on,” Nielsen said. “We now have all the houses that were involved in that slide.” Watts said most people didn’t realize there is a lot of nice property behind those Canyon Road homes. The owners of the last remaining piece of property were going to begin a lawsuit just before Logan City officials arranged to buy the land. “It’s unfortunate that the residents down there have had 1313 to put up with this eyesore for such a long time,” Watts said. “I really, truthfully could not move any quicker than the lawsuit moved along. As soon as the attorneys and the insurance people got that behind them, now we’re making prog-

ress.” In May, when the City Council does a budget review, Akina said the Council has asked that he present a priority list of capital projects – projects that require city funding – that his department recommends for fiscal year 2012. He said there is an existing memorial on the property put in place by the survivors of the landslide victims that will be preserved by the city. There has been no talk, however, of naming the park in honor of those victims. “There aren’t any resources at the time, in terms of what to work with,” Akina said. “We would be working with the City Council as this firms up from what to do, to design, to funding it.” He said closer to May, he and the other city officials involved should have a better idea of what is going to happen as far as development of the Canyon Road site. Nielsen said another deciding factor rests in the hands of Logan Northern Irrigation Co. and whether the canal is refurbished and put back into use. “If that canal goes back in service, you’ve got to stabilize that canal,” Nielsen said. “What now may be a 100-foot wide lot may be a 25-foot wide lot. We don’t know any of those details so that’s why it’s really unknown what this is going to be.”

System: Tax regulations not helping debt problem -continued from page 1 problem. “There is a much better tax system our there, somewhere, than what we have today,” Lyons said. Terry Camp, chairman of the College Republicans, asked Lyons if there were specific areas where he believes the budget should be cut. Lyons said the only areas that can get less money are national defense, Social Security and Medicare, but the real solution is to fix the tax system. Lyons said Medicaid is very expensive because health care costs are so expensive. “There are lots of ways we can get a handle on health care spending in the United States. And even though in real life I’m a Democrat, I would have to say the democratic health care plan did nothing to bring health care costs under control that I can see,” Lyons said. He thinks replacing the social security tax with a national sales tax would help with the debt problem because value added taxes usually bring in more revenue. He also said he’d get rid of taxes on corporations which would help the economy grow and bring in more revenues.

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AggieLife Wednesday, March 2, 2011 Page 5

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Church Caffeinated

Alpine church descends on Cache Valley By GENEVIEVE DRAPER staff writer

Alpine Church, a non-denominational church in Utah, recently teamed up with Logan’s Maranatha Baptist Church to connect the Logan church with the 2,000 people who worship at Alpine campuses throughout Utah. The transition from Maranatha to Alpine occurred due to the similar aims of both churches. Maranatha was involved in a pastor search and Alpine was looking to extend their ministry to Logan with a new campus, said John Abbott, who serves as a church elder in Logan and has been involved with Maranatha for the past 30 years. Instead of one pastor, the congregation now has four pastors. Abbott said three pastors are teaching pastors who rotate through the three campuses while the campus pastor is a shepherd to the Logan community. Abbott said the transition is adding to what Maranatha had been working toward with no theological changes. He said the changes are both challenging and exciting. Chad Hewitt, a native of Utah, is Logan’s campus pastor. He and his family are moving from Provo where he has served as a pastor. Hewitt said his hope as pastor is to connect people to God and show others that it is a relationship worth having. “Lots of us grew up in churches, but there comes a point when we must pursue God on our own,” Hewitt said. Though this is Hewitt’s first time as an Alpine pastor, he has been a pastor for about

10 years and said that doctrinally there is no difference because the authority comes from the Bible. Debbie Bornholdt, a church member, said Alpine Church’s mission statement is important in what they do. “Everything they do is Biblically based, not ritual or routine or protocol, but everything is based off of their mission statement, ‘Helping people pursue God,’” she said. Brad Ewton, a freshman in nursing, said the transition has made everything very straightforward. “I love the simplicity of Alpine,” he said. Alpine Church has two other campuses, in Riverdale and Layton. Bryan Dwyer, one of the teaching pastors, was part of the vision behind the church 10 years ago. Dwyer said the opportunity to be a positive influence in Cache Valley is very exciting. The change hasn’t been wrinkle-free, with technological issues that reminded Dwyer of when the first campus began. He said these problems are not as stressful this time. Bethany Pereboom, a junior in viola performance, has been a part of the Maranatha congregation for two and a half years. Though she jokingly said that having coffee in church has been the best part, she said bringing in Alpine has made the church feel more unified. Pereboom said before there wasn’t a pastor, just people who spoke in church. Having someone lead in the name of Christ every week and to speak for God on Sundays has been very

- See CAFFEINE, page 6

THE ALPINE CHURCH has moved into the former Maranatha Baptist church on Main Street. The church went through two months of building renovations before it opened. BRECK BYINGTON photo

Midterms through teacher’s eyes Charity vs. chillin’ By APRIL ASHLAND staff writer

The sun is calling, the long week is ahead and students are tired of waiting. It’s the week before spring break, and there are teachers who insist on giving tests and assigning papers, but they say it is for the benefit of the students, not to make their lives miserable. Andy Anderson, principle lecturer for the biology department, is teaching three classes this semester: Bio Ethics, Advanced Physiology and Human Anatomy. He said he gives four midterms, two quizzes and a comprehensive final in his human anatomy class, but students can drop the lowest test. “The catch about having all those tests and quizzes is that my students are thinking about it all the time. It makes sure they’re learning.” Anderson is a lucky teacher though, because he rarely does any of his own grading. He said he has teaching assistants (TAs) that do the grading for him, and he creates his tests so that his TAs can easily grade them. He has a multiple choice section on scantrons, an essay section and a fill in the blank section. “I ask very specific questions – there’s only one answer, so even foreign TAs can grade the tests,” Anderson said. “Since I don’t grade my tests they have to be very precise.”

Anderson has nine TAs and many undergraduate volunteer teaching assistants in order to help prepare students for tests and to grade tests. Anderson puts in hours writing his own tests, however, and he grades any tests taken outside of class. Anderson said since his TAs do his test grading, he makes sure any breaks don’t interfere with their grading time, by giving them plenty of time to grade tests to be sure all grading is done before a break starts. “My test Monday is a small class, so the TAs will be done grading by Wednesday,” he said. “In my anatomy class, there was a test last week, and my TAs had finished grading by Saturday.” Anderson said he tries not to interfere with spring break too much, because he knows the students need the break, although he encourages them to get ahead. “When students come back for the last few weeks, there are tests and projects, and all sorts of things. So I tell students to take time over break to get ahead,” he said. Anderson’s advice is well-used – by himself. He plans to spend part of his spring break at his office, in the quiet of the Veterinary Science Building, getting ahead on his lecture notes for a new class he’s teaching this semester.

- See MIDTERMS, page 6

THOUGH MOST STUDENTS do not enjoy the midterm season, sometimes it isn’t much better for teachers. Some teachers give exams that they have assistants grade, some grade their own exams, and some assign papers instead. BENJAMIN WOOD photo

By NATASHA BODILY staff writer

Many students choose to head somewhere warm during spring break. Others need to stay in Cache Valley for work, financial limits or other obligations. These students might be disappointed they are not beach-bound, but there are many opportunities for them to warm their hearts through local service. Ang Haroldsen, graduate in psychology said, “Doing service not only helps other people, but it provides opportunity for growth and resume building. It helps you make connections and lasting memories.” Haroldsen works with USU’s Student Service Center through the Americorps VISTA program. She will be travelling to California for an alternative spring break helping with an ecological service project, graffiti removal and meal and bedding preparation at a homeless shelter. Though it is too late for students to plan for Universityarranged alternative service trips this year, there are plenty of local charity opportunities available. Haroldsen is dedicated to serving the community and said she hopes other students will find ways to serve over spring break. Jordan Hunt also works at the service center. He chooses to spend his time serving because it gives him a venue to develop his ideas. “Other people should be involved in service because it is a great way to meet people and get involved,” Hunt said. He said there are plenty of ways to serve in Cache Valley. “I would encourage things like making blankets. If you have free time and want a stress reliever – and if you already know how to make blankets or hats, you can always use those skills to make (items) for CAPSA,” Hunt said. Karrie Freeman, a Community Abuse Prevention Agency (CAPSA) representative said there are many opportunities for willing volunteers. They are currently preparing for a 5K and are looking for people to sign up and sponsor other runners. If people are interested in the race, but cannot participate, they can hang up fliers to promote it. Freeman said there are always volunteer opportunities available, and if interested, people can contact CAPSA and the staff is willing to help provide service ideas. Hunt serves for the Food Pantry. He said if students do a food drive during the break, they could provide the pantry with goods when school reconvenes. The pantry often needs more supplies after the holiday season, when giving becomes less popular. Marinda Zaleski, a senior in social work, is an intern for the Sexual Assault and Anti-Violence Information (SAAVI) Office. She is the volunteer coordinator and said they are always in need of volunteers. Zaleski organizes and mobilizes the centers’ volunteers so they can have as many opportunities as possible to serve. “Our office was created specifically to deal with interpersonal violence. That ranges anywhere between domestic violence and sexual assault to hazing, stalking and other situations that include violence or the threat of violence,” Zaleski said. Along with helping victims of assault, the office also serves a purpose to spread awareness and educate the campus. “These things do happen and we need to confront them, rather than ignore them,” she said. “Without our volunteers, we would not be able to do a whole lot. The education part becomes

- See CHARITY, page 7


AggieLife

Page 6

A night to remember “ T hat ’s managed to make it work with some thread, a nice kilt, staples and more masking tape than anyman.� Just a few one should ever need. We strapped on our That’s smurf-colored placemats, painted our faces laughs what he and stood tall. It was off to a hardwoodsaid to me. induced war. This was going to be a night My friend to remember. Mike and I Things didn’t go as swiftly as planned, as were walkwe only made it to the 11th row (evidently ing on air, people like to show up early if the game feeling simiis preceded by a women’s game) and my larly to what kilt started to fall off. Luckily for me, and I I’m sure Rachel Leigh Cook felt at the end assume, everyone within sight range of me, of “She’s All That.� A week’s worth of hard I had a belt and was able to at least keep work and creative stress all worth it when thing strapped to my person, even though those words came from his mouth. Most it made breathing a little rough for the time people find triumph and accomplishment at hand. when they win something or fall in love. We screamed in the loudest brute voices This was different. This was substantial, or Woody Allen vocals could summon, because tonight Mike and I enjoyed a spectacular game finally met Brian Green. with each wholehearted I grew up a devout sports fan “In a state where chest bump and even had a in northern Los Angeles. Amid we have people few pictures taken of us. At all the frustration of growing who treat a this point, we felt it a job well up and the turmoil of being in done. an urban Southern California certain Utah This was when we stormed society there were at least county, weirdthe court after the Aggie victhree things that kept us SoCal named player tory – jumping, screaming and kids happy: Arcade games attempting any form of singat donut shops, “Alf� re-runs like a demigod, ing with a throat that at this and basketball. Basketball has here in Logan point felt about as exhausted always been a deep-set part of we have our as the Power Rangers do just my life; more a moral strength before calling on their Zords. hometown hero for me than a sport. We walked around the hardThis, I suppose, is why my in Green – the wood for awhile as excited friend and I harbored imme- well-ambitioned as most people around were, diate respect for Green, the neighbor’s son and that was when Mike saw hard-working, team-spirit mulGreen out of the corner of his tiplier with a 3-point shoot- who you secretly eye. Our time to pay our own ing range of roughly 6.7 miles wish had asked personal Jimmy Chitwood – the cross product of Jimmy your daughter to some respect was finally at Chitwood in “Hoosiers� and hand. Scott Howard from “Teen prom.� We ran over, shook his Wolf� in the flesh. hand and thanked him for In a state where we have a great season. He smiled, people who treat a certain Utah county, laughed, looked down at what we were weird-named player like a demigod, here wearing and laughed some more. Then, in Logan we have our hometown hero in without much hesitation upon my request, Green – the well-ambitioned neighbor’s took the silver sharpie I had in my hand son who you secretly wish had asked your (though I can’t confirm where it came daughter to prom. All this is why meeting from), and signed my kilt. Looking at my him easily outperformed giving “Mean� Joe face, you would’ve thought Superman just Greene a Coke (and a smile, mind you) and asked me to go to a party with him at multiplied it by at least 27. Chuck-E-Cheese. And to think that kilt made it all posAnd there it was, my first experience as a sible. paint-clad crazed fan. Who knew my newly Though I do label myself a sports fan, labeled man-skirt became the beacon of a as previously noted, I’ve never been one night that swiftly went from good, to great, to act too die hard at a sporting event. I’d to inexplicably magnificent. How sweet it just as easily go as far as wearing the team’s was. colors without so much as thinking of strapping on a giant fan and lowering in through – steve.schwartzman@aggiemail.usu.edu the ceiling – I guess I have my limits. This should explain why I was hesitant at first when Mike called me up and said, “Hey, we should do something big for the last home game.� I had no clue what he had in mind, which was good news because neither did he. We sat in his living room for hours working at something creative – all we could think of is doing something, anything really, with face paint or possibly kidnapping one of the opposing players just like Dan Akroyd and Daniel Stern did to Daman Wayans in “Celtic Pride.� Then it hit us both like a lightning bolt, or an NBC “The More You Know� shooting star. We had something good, something outrageous, something we, surprisingly, could credit to Mel Gibson. Music almost began playing as we both said it aloud in unison. “Let’s do a ‘Braveheart’ theme.� What screams “pride� and “victory� to the hearts of two pale-skinned, blond Utahns like anything Scottish-themed? Outside of the Stanley Cup Playoffs or most Macauley Culkin movies, nothing. Within seconds we found ourselves in a fabric store looking for, of all things, dark blue plaid sheets and measuring our waist sizes while doing our best William Wallace impressions. Deep inside we seemed to drink it in: standing courtside, screaming bloody murder and gaining mounds upon mounds of respect from an entire student body who now see us as much more than TAKING THE IDEA FROM Braveheart, Steve “those two guys who make fun of Bobcat Schwartzman promoted Aggie pride by wearing a kilt to the last home game. He was also excited Williams outside the Quickstop.� because he got to meet Brian Green. photo courNeither of us knew how to sew, but we tesy STEVE SCHWARTZMAN

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Wednesday, March. 2, 2011

Caffeine: Local volunteers helped -continued from page 5 positive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You feel like you are cared for,â&#x20AC;? Pereboom said. The change from Maranatha to Alpine also included about two months of building renovations. Alpine brought a team from Ogden to help over the holidays, but local members volunteered their services. Abbott said one day saw 80 people working to improve the building. The most noticeable renovation was in the creation of the welcome lobby from what was previously the gym. The basketball standards and carpet with a painted-on court were removed. The area received new carpet, a blue paint job, and welcome tables that include free Bibles and also some refreshments, such as coffee, tea and hot chocolate. There is a college Bible study group Sunday mornings, which includes many members of campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s F.O.C.U.S group. A number of students share their musical talents in the worship teams for Sunday services. Abbott said there are four different teams who rotate through the month. Darin Linder, a junior in cellular molecular

biology, has played the drums in a worship team for the three years he has been in Logan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really love the drums and worship music. It is the best way for me to commune with God,â&#x20AC;? Linder said. He said the drums are clearly a God-given talent because he is not coordinated in real life. Blake Ewton, also a junior playing in a worship team and a mechanical engineering major, said he got involved with the worship music as a freshman. He said it has been an awesome transition from Maranatha to Alpine. Ewton had known some of the Alpine staff before. He is involved with Focus and other church activities. Ewton said these connections have made him feel â&#x20AC;&#x153;very connected and involved and valued.â&#x20AC;? Alpine Church holds hour-long services, Sundays at 9:30 and 11:00. Greeters and pamphlets are available before and between services for visitors with questions. Information can also be found at alpinechurch.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; genevieve.draper@aggiemail.usu.edu

Midterms: Assistants grade exams -continued from page 5

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve kept up with my students so far, but he has his students write an exam, and he said not all of my lectures are complete, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like students learn that writing a test is much hardto finish through the end of the semester over er than they expected, and blames it on lack of break,â&#x20AC;? he said. awareness. Blair Larsen, temporary lecturer, has set up â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it is often easy to lack appreciation her tests so that she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to grade any for the effort required to create a good exam of them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; she creates them as multiple-choice that adequately serves the purpose of identifytests and uses scantrons. ing and differentiating studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; abilities until Larsen teaches three classes this semester as you have attempted to do so on your own,â&#x20AC;? he well, Natural Disasters, a depth science class, said. online as well as face-to-face, and Geology 1010. John Engler, lecturer in English, said he has She said she has a grader, but she utilizes her about 80 papers due this week in individual grader for assignments rather than tests. conferences with his students in English 2010, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have done it before â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had a test or a but that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not grading them over spring project due before spring break so I can spend break. Instead, he will be meeting with his stuthe break grading, and space it out,â&#x20AC;? Larsen dents and discussing the paper. said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really mind either way if the â&#x20AC;&#x153;The assignment is graded on completion,â&#x20AC;? project is due before or after a break.â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a second rough draft of an arguLarsen said the reason she is giving a test ment paper, and we meet and talk about the this week is for the benefit of the student. differences, what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re learning through â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know students are not research, etc.â&#x20AC;? going to study during the break. Engler said he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better for them, they tend â&#x20AC;&#x153;At minimum it treat spring break any differto perform better than if the test should take me ently than any other week of the is after a break,â&#x20AC;? she said. semester â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the students leave four and a half Larsen has 300 students on a Friday, and they arrive on enrolled in her Natural Disasters hours to grade Monday in class again. class, so she said she cannot give these papers, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it happens that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a essay tests, despite the fact she which really isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t test this week, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just how it believes essay tests are the most out. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t organize it too bad. I should worked effective way to assess learning. that way,â&#x20AC;? he said. Larsen said the most difficult be done quickly, Susan Anderson, also a lecthing about having a test before since the papers turer in English, said she tries spring break is that students try are only three to make papers due the week to prolong the break even more. before, rather than the week pages or so.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have students come to me after, spring break. She said before the break, and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m she believes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nicer for the leaving early, can I take the test â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Susan Anderson, students to have the paper out early?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she said. the way, so they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to English lecturer of Larsen had the same issue in think about it over the break. Fall 2010 before Thanksgiving But she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind the break, so she has set aside a time for students time spent grading the papers she gets. Susan who were leaving early to take the test, and for said she has a class of about 27 students who those who cannot make that, she had options. will be turning in papers this week, and that â&#x20AC;&#x153;They can drop the test. I allow one test to she will grade over spring break. be dropped, and if they get a zero thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the test â&#x20AC;&#x153;At minimum it should take me four and a I drop,â&#x20AC;? she said. half hours to grade these papers, which really Kyle Hancock, assistant professor in the isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too bad,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I should be done psychology department, is teaching four classes quickly, since the papers are only three pages or this semester. He said he only gives tests in his so.â&#x20AC;? undergraduate classes, and one of his classes Anderson said she doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have TAs to help has a test this week with mostly multiple choice her with grading, but sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine with that, questions, but four short answer questions. because she would always be the one to assign a Like Anderson, he uses TAs and scantrons grade to a paper. to grade, but he said the hardest part of testing â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the classes I teach are small enough that for him, is writing the actual test. He said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not an issue,â&#x20AC;? Susan said. difficult to make a test fair for all students, and Other than grading papers and spending yet differentiate between who knows the matetime with family, Susan said she plans on using rial and who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. break to catch up on other work she has. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a lot of science that goes into the â&#x20AC;&#x153;My husband doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a spring break, creation and scoring of an exam that I believe so itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good time to really get caught up,â&#x20AC;? she many students do not adequately appreciate,â&#x20AC;? said. he said. In fact, in one of his classes, Psychometrics, â&#x20AC;&#x201C; april.ashland@aggiemail.usu.edu

4ODAYÂ&#x17D;S 0UZZLE !NSWERS


AggieLife

Wednesday, March. 2, 2011

Page 7

Planning for the future as interns and scholars By NATASHA BODILY staff writer

The hunt for scholarship funding and internships can seem daunting. Fortunately, there are options available for USU students. Career Services provides opportunities for students to locate internships that cater to their future careers. internships Donna Crow, executive director for student services, said students can visit Career Services in person or online to view internship opportunities. She said they can navigate the Career AGGIE online job posting system and there are several hard copy guides available in the Career Café for students to check out. To create a profile on Career AGGIE, students must create a login and complete a profile. Once students have completed this step, they can start searching and applying for both internships and jobs. Job seekers can specify the type of job and start dates they are looking for. They can submit resumes through the site. “There are some supply and demand issues with opportunities in Logan,” Crow said. She encourages students to broaden their geographic preferences to increase their chances of obtaining an internship that fits their career goals. “Students who have completed internships are more marketable in a global economy,” Crow said. “They receive approximately 10 percent higher starting salaries, 60 percent of the time they have an offer from their internship employer by the time they graduate, and they are more likely to stay with that company compared to non-interns.” Career Services will be holding its 22nd annual Career Fair Wednesday, March 2 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the second floor of the Taggart Student Center. Students with questions about internships can learn ways to prepare for interviews at the fair. The Service Center recommends six steps to Career Fair success: research organizations, prepare your resume, dress for success, prepare your approach and introduction, ask questions and follow up. According to the Career Guide provided by Career Services, when students graduate with internship experience, they position themselves for more meaningful career employment. “Internships allow you to combine careerrelated work experience with academic coursework to enrich your total educational experience, while earning academic credit and pay,” states the internship section of the career guide. The guide explained there are tools and strategies for searching for ideal internships. Crow also recommends using a career coach who will help create a strategy for finding the internship that matches a student. If students are interested in interning for a specific company, Crow said they are more than

encouraged to reach out. She said they might want to access their system to save them time. “This just makes the process more effective for students,” she said. Kirk Miller, a senior in accounting, said he realized employers look for potential and can look past lack of experience. Miller is interning for Allred Jackson, an accounting firm in Logan. When he first applied, they told him he was not qualified enough for the job. “To my surprise, I got a phone call a month later saying I had an interview for the position,” he said. He did not think he had a chance so he said he took the pressure off himself and joked with the interviewers. Fortunately, he said, they loved his jokes. “But once again, (they saw) how my qualifications were very weak,” Miller said. Two weeks later, they offered him the position. “It has been the biggest blessing for me and my career as well as the skills they are teaching me,” he said. Kristen Johnson, a senior in interdisciplinary studies, has an internship with the Real Salt Lake soccer team. “I had one of my professors with connections there contact them and inquire about available positions. Then I sent in my resume. I followed up with them, got an interview and got the internship,” Johnson said. As a soccer player, this internship suits her and her career goals well. Scholarships In addition to internship hunting, many students look for scholarships. Often, they do not know where to look and the process seems overwhelming. “I’ve looked a lot (for scholarships), but nothing has really worked,” said Mckelle Tobey, sophomore in psychology. “My new scholarship is called ‘grandparents,’” she said. Tobey said she searched all over the Internet, talked to her department, the honors department and the financial aid office. Tobey said she felt that you have to accomplish something different from every other college student in order to receive private scholarships, “which fails when that is the goal of every college student.” Other students express similar disappointment in scholarship searching. “I have applied before and never heard back,” Selina Weighill, a junior in biology, said. Jake Matthews, junior in sports medicine, said he never hears about scholarship opportunities. “I haven’t heard about them since high school,” he said. He is frustrated with how scholarships and other financial aid venues are set up. “I hate how they give huge scholarships to incoming freshman who had good GPAs in high school, but I can’t get grants because my parents make too much money,” Matthews said. Though the scholarship hunt can be frustrating, there are many resources where students can search for and apply to a variety of private schol-

‘TIS THE SEASON for applying for internships and scholarships. Though this can be daunting, there are many resources available to help students with the process. ARMEN HOVSEPYAN photo

arships. Online, students can go to fastweb.com, scholarships.com, finaid.org and college-scholarships.com and create personalized profiles. These sites will find scholarships that cater to the profile. Many scholarships exist that specify to specific types of students based on many factors. Often, scholarships are not well publicized and are not awarded to anyone because no one applies. According to the College Money Unlimited website, hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarship money go unawarded each year. The site recommends students take the time to sift through the many applications and apply for anything that fits their qualifications. It said students should not get discouraged when they do not hear back right away.

Scholarships are available within the university as well. Despite budget cuts, each college has some money allotted for financial aid. Students can look to their own college for details on what is available. Utah State has scholarships for freshman, transfer and returning students. More details on requirements are available on USU’s website. For students with disabilities and health struggles there are 16 scholarships available through the Disability Resource Center (DRC) scholarships. Students can be discouraged by the specificity of private scholarships, but through searching, they are likely to find something that matches their skill set and experiences. – natasha.bodily@aggiemail.usu.edu

Street Speak What are your plans for spring break? “Travel to San Diego for rock climbing.”

– Tony Kusbach, junior geography “Road trip to Las Vegas and San Diego.”

– Ani Zaqar, sophomore psychology

“Vegas for WAC game.”

– Nicole Zhang, sophomore graphic design

“Going to Mexico.”

– Katie Wilde, freshman undeclared

Information gathered by Armen Hovsepyan

HELPING WITH A BOOK drive is just one way to give back over spring break. Though many students take vacations or travel miles away to help with charity organizations, there are many other ways to volunteer in towns across the nation. Statesman file photo

Charity: Many options are available -continued from page 5 especially in need of volunteers because only Monica (SAAVI coordinator) and myself cannot reach the whole campus.” Zaleski said volunteers are an important part of the organization. “There is not enough money to employ people to help with the problems that our society faces and I have seen with just a little help from our volunteers, we have the ability to make the move toward necessary change,” she said. Currently, SAAVI’s focus is on their biggest event of the year – Walk a Mile in her Shoes. This event raises about half their budget for the following year. Casey Allred, founder of Effect International, said he thinks serving over the break is a great idea and is very rewarding. Effect International is a non-profit organization dedicated to building schools and reading rooms in India and Nepal. “If people are interested in ways to help out,

Effect International would be a great outlet,” he said. “We are always looking for more volunteers, and over the break specifically, people could help out by collecting books, raising money and awareness and learning more about the cause.” According to their website, the Cache Valley Volunteer Center said they have a mission to promote volunteerism in Cache Valley, increase citizen involvement and to promote causes and services. Their website provides a list of more than 30 charitable organizations with contact information. Zaleski said students who are staying local can have a fulfilling break and can continue to serve when school starts again. “A little bit of help from everyone can do a whole lot,” she said. – natashabodily@aggiemail.usu.edu


Wednesday, March 2, 2011 Page 8

WednesdaySports Utah State University â&#x20AC;˘ Logan, Utah â&#x20AC;˘ www.utahstatesman.com

Aggie menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball ends season on road By TYLER HUSKINSON assistant sports editor

With their fourth consecutive Western Athletic Conference championship locked up, it would appear that the No. 21 Utah State Aggies (26-3, 13-1 WAC) donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have much to play for, but head coach Stew Morrill is trying to help his crew avoid any letdown. The Aggies still have much to play for, and that is the message that Morrill is hoping to convey this week as they prep for their final games of the regular season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The very best thing that we can do is to try and keep winning, obviously,â&#x20AC;? Morrill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully we understand that and we are excited about where we are at and what we need to do. As a team, we have tried to have fun with it and making them feel good about what they have accomplished, and yet still be excited about what they can still accomplish. We keep talking about those things in a positive manner and we will continue to do so.â&#x20AC;? The Aggies may also have revenge on their mind as the take the floor at the Pan American Center tonight to face the other Aggies of the WAC, in New Mexico State. The Aggies sputtered at the beginning of WAC play last season, as they fell on the road to New Mexico State (55-52) and Louisiana Tech (82-60). â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hope they look at it as a chance for some payback but I am not sure that they will sense we have already beat both of these team, granted it was at home when we beat them,â&#x20AC;? Morrill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be brought up that they thumped us last year. You have to be ready as a team and know what you are

in for. Sometimes the payback for our seniors came when we played them the first time, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not really sure as to what effect that will have on these games. Utah State only defeated New Mexico State 59-49 earlier in the season, and USU expects another battle, especially on New Mexico Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Mexico State is undefeated at home this season, in conference play, and they get really juiced up when they play us,â&#x20AC;? Morril said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that we have won the regular season, some of the past history we have with them, and the fact that they beat us in the tournament last season, I am sure they will be ready to go.â&#x20AC;? Utah State should be ready for whatever New Mexico State bring its way however, as they have had teams gunning at them every single game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They get geared up to play us, there is just no question about that,â&#x20AC;? Morrill said of New Mexico State. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t something new to this team though. We have won the conference several years in a row now and we have come to expect everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best shot in conference play. Add on top of all of that the fact that we are ranked No. 21 and we have a 13-1 league record, teams in the conference are going to get geared up to play you. We take teams best shots night in and night out.â&#x20AC;? New Mexico State gives Utah State plenty of match-up difficulties, but none more than Troy Gillenwater, who leads the team with 19.3 points per game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gillenwater is pretty dang good, if you look at his stats you see that he does NBA type things when he is on the floor,â&#x20AC;? Morrill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You think you have him covered and realize that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t when he shoots

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SENIOR FORWARD TAI WESLEY pictured here checking out during the final minutes of Senior Night against Idaho on Saturday will be looking to lead the Aggies to a pair of road wins this week. The senior finished with 22 points in his final home game as an Aggie and will be looking come up with another strong performance against New Mexico State and Louisiana Tech. TODD JONES photo

by you because he has so much skill and size. There are times on the bench when he does something we look at one another a say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;well there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much we couldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done about that.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how good he is.â&#x20AC;? Gillenwater isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only other Aggie that Utah State will be worrying about, however. New Mexico State held Utah

State to 41 percent from the floor and 31 percent from 3point land during their visit to the Dee Glen Smith Spectrum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That New Mexico team is more than just one guy, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for sure,â&#x20AC;? Morrill said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The matchup with New Mexico State is the same old problems that we always have when we face them. They are big, they are

quick and they cause all kinds of problems for us. They always seem to play us man-to-man and they get into us, and block shots, and overplay on defense.â&#x20AC;? Game time is set for 9 p.m. in Las Cruces, N.M., and can be seen on ESPN2. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ty.d.hus@aggiemail.usu.edu

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Kaneshiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home run record, a long time in the making By MITCH FIGGAT staff writer

The Utah State softball home run record was broken Saturday by senior Kelley Kaneshiro. During a game against Cal State Northridge at the University of Nevada Las Vegas Invitational, Kaneshiro was able to hit two out of the park, setting her record and the new school record at 26 home runs in a collegiate career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is just going up there and trying to get a hit,â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am just trying to do my part for the win.â&#x20AC;? The previous home run record was set by Sandy Taylor at USU was from 1997-00, during which she launched 24 balls over the wall. Kaneshiro tied that record last week during the Aggiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; third game of the season at a tournament in Los Angeles. Kaneshiro has been a power hitter during her whole career as a starter for the USU softball. The slugger hit 10 home runs and ranked No.1 in batting average for the Aggies with .359 her freshman year. She is also the holder of the record for the most home runs hit in one game in the whole WAC conference with three recorded against Northern Colorado. Kaneshiro said she had thought if she set the goal of getting about 10 home runs a season she could break the school record, but all that home run thinking stays

SENIOR INFIELDER KELLEY KANESHIRO broke the Utah State softball home run record Feb. 19 against Cal-State Northridge. The senior cranked out No. 26 to put herself in the record books, and help her team to a 9-1 victory during the University Nevada-Las Vegas Louisville Slugger Desert Classic. The Aggies currently hold a 3-7 record. BRECK BYINGTON photo

stuck in the back of her head. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not thinking that I have to get a home run when i step up to bat,â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am thinking that I need to get a hit to help my teammates get home and score for our team.â&#x20AC;? Regardless, her personal and team preparation have been a huge factor in her long ball success. Kaneshiro did

not focus specifically on being in top â&#x20AC;&#x153;home run shapeâ&#x20AC;? but credits, among many, her strength and conditioning coaches that helped her to be in the best athletic shape she could be in, to be such a power hitter on the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt that my personal 10home-runs-a-season goal was good, so I got in any extra hits I could but still focused on

practicing with my team and working well with my teammates,â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro said. Kaneshiro also enjoys the pre-game rituals that her team and coaches perform before every game, some of which include a nice hotel continental breakfast and getting her hair done in the hotel room before piling on the bus with the rest of the team.

While on the bus, the whole team keeps loose by singing and dancing to the pump-up mix tape their coaches made. A few standout tracks, according to Kaneshiro, are Adam Lambertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sure fire winnersâ&#x20AC;? and Kaneshiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own personal walk-up song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remember the nameâ&#x20AC;? by Fort Minor. After the bus ride, it is just getting warmed up on the field.

Kanshiro said she also likes to make sure that all evidence of previous batters is gone from the box at home plate because as she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it is my box when I am up to bat.â&#x20AC;? Kanshiro is from Auburn, Wash., near Seattle. She was all-State shortstop there as a senior in 2007. This caught the attention of coaches and recruiters for USU. She came to see the campus in Febuary 2007, just after a Cache Valley snow dusting. She met with the team and they told her about the school and the community and she said it â&#x20AC;&#x153;just felt like it could be her new home.â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro is an academic senior and an athletic junior since she was redshirted due to injuries during her true sophomore year. She is majoring in parks and recreation and has a internship lined up, but there are a few smalltime professional softball leagues in Europe and and Japan, though their recruiting of Americans is regulated. Kaneshiro has not received any offers since it is against regulations, but said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just depends on where I am and what opportunities come up.â&#x20AC;? Kaneshiro said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a great team and coaching staff. If they did not believe in me it would have been way more difficult. They push me to be successful on and off the field.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; mfiggat@gmail.com


StatesmanSports

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Page 9

WAC basketball power poll: Final Edition By MATT SONNENBERG sports editor

Going into the final week of regular season play, only one thing is clear in the Western Athletic Conference standings, and it’s the same thing that has been clear all along. Utah State is No. 1 in the conference by a wide margin, and that’s about all anybody can say for certain. The race for the No. 2 seed in the WAC Tournament is still wide open, despite Boise State’s position as the current leader of that pack. As it stands, four teams could end up with 9-7 records at the end of the regular season, leaving the tournament seeding to be decided by tiebreakers, and leaving whichever team lands at the bottom of those tiebreakers without any kind of bye in the WAC Tournament. 1) Utah State (26-3, 13-1) The Aggies are No. 1 and it isn’t even close. Since the last power poll, USU has racked up a revenge win against the one WAC team to pull out a win against them and soundly beaten a top 25 team on the road at Saint

Mary’s. The final week of the season has one major test on the road at New Mexicao State, but looking at it, the Aggies can put all their eggs into the basket of winning that game, seeing as how last place Louisiana Tech is the follow-up game to Wednesday’s showdown of Aggies on ESPN2. 2) Boise State (17-11, 9-6) The Broncos are just one win at home away from being the second WAC team to win 10 games, and are just one of two teams who even have a chance to do so. Boise State has currently won four straight games in conference play, and will essentially put a lock on its position as the No. 2 seed for the WAC Tournament if they can seal the deal on senior night against San Jose State. 3) Idaho (16-12, 8-7) Despite the fact that the Vandals have already been swept by both New Mexico State and Boise State, the two teams next to them in the standings, the Vandals arguably have the best chance at landing at No. 3 in the final standings with a final home game against

Fresno State. They also get major kudos for power poll favoritism given that they are the lone team to claim a victory over Utah State. 4) Hawaii (17-10, 7-7) While Idaho managed to pull off the shocker against USU, Hawaii came awfully close, and with two more games on the schedule against teams outside of the top six in the conference, the Warriors are looking to be in good shape to also finish 9-7. It might not be all sunshine and rainbows for Hawaii though, as they look to be in bad shape for any massive second or third place tie in the standings. 5) Nevada (11-17, 7-7) Losing three straight games has dropped the Wolf Pack from the drivers’ seat for the No. 2 seed, to potentially finishing sixth in the standings. Nevada has the same final two games as Utah State though, and should be able to propel itself upward in the standings into 9-7. The Wolf Pack open this weekend’s games at last place Louisiana Tech and finish at New Mexico State, a team that the Pack

has generally had the number of, even on the road. 6) New Mexico State (14-15, 8-6) While the southern Aggies currently possess a better record than the three teams directly above them in the poll, NMSU has to finish off the year hosting Utah State and Nevada. While USU has always struggled for wins in Las Cruces, nobody can logically bet against Utah State in WAC play right now, especially with NMSU’s Troy Gillenwater seeing a drop in production as of late. Nevada seems to always play spoilers to New Mexico State too. 7) San Jose State (15-12, 5-9) At this point, the Spartans are essentially battling for the chance to potentially avoid Utah State until the WAC Tournament finals if they can pull out first and second round victories in Vegas. They host Hawaii in their first chance to play spoiler to a team aiming for the No. 2 seed, and then have to go on the road to play Boise State in what would be another opportunity to put a dent in a

team’s dream of finishing in second place. 8) Fresno State (13-15, 5-9) The Bulldogs’ chance to play spoilers takes them first to Moscow, Idaho where they can shatter the Vandals’ hopes of finishing better than third place. Then they get the chance to put Hawaii to the test to knock them out of contention for a top-two finish. The role of spoiler is about all that Fresno State can do at this point as they, along with San Jose State, appear hopelessly buried down in seventh and eighth place. 9) Louisiana Tech (12-18, 2-12) There’s not much else to say other than “Thanks for playing”. The Bulldogs have to go out facing Nevada on Thursday, and then get to end their season against Utah State for what will probably be one final kick in the rear to end a season that once appeared to be a promising one. They are already mathematically eliminated from WAC Tournament play. – matt.sonn@aggiemail.usu.edu

Aggies need to finish strong When we sent off the 2011 senior class other usually holds major implications for of players from their final home game, it regular season standings, or is a do-or-die was still February. game in the WAC tournament. At this point in the seaThe differing levels of son, I feel it would be safe animosity toward a program to say that it has indeed the reason why if Utah The View are been a great season, but State were to lose to a more the things that truly make a respectable program like from season take the step from I generally won’t Section F Nevada, greatness to a thing of leglose sleep over it. I can’t say end are the things that hapthe same for New Mexico pen in March. State. It’s two different aniI don’t think I speak alone mals. when I say that I would love Hate aside though, what’s for this regular season to be wrapped up really important is that Utah State finish off with one of the final two victories coming this regular season with a bang, and to do on the road against New Mexico State. If that, they have to go through one of those Utah State vs. Nevada is an example of a teams that everybody seems to hate. respectful and peaceful rivalry, then the The Aggies are in prime position to land opposite end of the spectrum of hostility the highest seed in the NCAA tournament is Utah State vs. New Mexico State. that head coach Stew Morrill has ever had Maybe this is due partly to the fact in his time at USU, if they can just win that NMSU is the only Western Athletic their next four games. If that happens, that Conference school that hasn’t been NCAA Tournament monkey that has been entirely dominated by Utah State since hanging on the Aggies’ back since 2001 the current WAC came to fruition in 2005, might finally be shaken loose. Granted, but for me, and I’m sure plenty of others, NCAA Tournament wins for teams in the hatred toward the red Aggies of the USU’s position are, and always have been WAC is due to a complete lack of respect rare, but Utah State has worked its way to for how they operate their program. the fringe of transcending the mid-major Either way, it is a game that is auto- label. In order to work past that fringe, matically one of the biggest of the year for winning in the big dance has to happen a each school, which automatically qualifies bit more. And what better an opportunity it as a rivalry. And when schools start bust- than with the best senior class in school ing out the gimmick promotions for those history? games, like New Mexico State’s idea of The calendar has officially turned to having a pajama party for Wednesday’s March. The first of the madness can been game against USU, you know they are seen on ESPN2 when Utah State faces off dying to get the house packed and rock- with its most hated conference rival, then ing against the four-time WAC champs. it’s off to the WAC Tournament in Las This is the kind of rivalry where the Vegas and hopefully off to achieve NCAA majority of fans want nothing but the Tournament glory after that. worst to happen to each team throughout In other words, let the madness begin! the course of a season. It’s fueled by hate, and there’s a certain unique passion that Matt Sonnenberg is a senior majoring in comes from hate. It makes every win over print journalism. Matt is an avid fan of that team that much more enjoyable, and Aggie athletics and can be found on the every loss that much more agonizing. front row of every home football and Now, keep in mind that this is all within basketball game. He can also be reached the context of sports, and nothing else, at matt.sonn@aggiemail.usu.edu. but it definitely intensifies things. It intensifies it in the way that any win against the

Matt Sonnenberg

Sprinter Lewis named Aggie student-athlete of the week BY USU ATHLETICS LOGAN, Utah - Utah State men’s track and field senior sprinter Armahd Lewis has been named the America First Credit Union Utah State Student-Athlete of the Week for the period ending Sunday, Feb. 27, an award that is voted on by a state-wide media panel. Lewis, a native of Stockton, Calif., (Edison HS/Sacramento City College) won two individual titles and was named the co-Track Athlete of the Meet in helping Utah State finish tied for first at the 2011 Western Athletic Conference Indoor Championships. Lewis won the 60m with a career-best time of 6.77 to rank fourth all-time at USU in that event, and also won the 200m in 21.46. This is Lewis’s first USU Athlete of the Week honor of not only the year, but also of his career. It is the third USU award for an Aggie track and field member, as men’s high jumper Clint Silcock

earned the accolade on Feb. 7, followed by women’s distance runner Ruth Hilton collecting the honor on Feb. 4. Those athletes that qualify will be competing in the NCAA National Championships, in College Station, Texas on March 11-12. Clint Silcock is the lone Aggie who has already qualified when he cleared 2.24m in the high jump at the New Mexico Classic on Feb. 4, for an automatic qualifying mark. The championship field will be announced on March 7. If not selected, USU track & field teams will be in preparation for the opening of the outdoor season, which kicks off March 17-19 at the University of Arizona Willie Williams Invitational at Tucson, Ariz. Utah State’s lone home meet of the season, the Mark Faldmo Invitational, is Saturday, April 16 at the Ralph Maughan Track Stadium.the Trojans with 21 stolen bases (21-of-21) and a perfect 1.000 fielding percentage.

FREE 3-course MEAL

Come to a Campus Recreation sponsored focus group! Any USU student is invited.

Event is:

March 16, 23, or 30 At the TSC, 12:00 to 1:00 Reservation Required

PM

Contact Jesse Dredge by emailing jddredge@gmail.com or call 435-757-2898


StatesmanSports

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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Allen scores 25 to lead Celtics over Jazz SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – Ray Allen scored 25 points and Paul Pierce added 21, including a late 3-pointer and pair of free throws, to help the Boston Celtics hold on for a 107-102 victory Monday night over the Utah Jazz. The loss spoiled the home debut of new Jazz players Devin Harris and Derrick Favors, who were acquired last week in the trade that sent for All-Star Deron Williams to New Jersey. Al Jefferson had 28 points and a season-high 19 rebounds for Utah, which has dropped six straight at home — the team’s worst home skid since 1982. Allen hit a 23-footer for a 103-99 Celtics lead with 42.3 seconds left. Jefferson had a chance to cut it to one point but couldn’t convert a threepoint play. Rajon Rondo then hit a 15foot jumper to seal the win for Boston. Harris finished with 19 points for the Jazz, who have lost 16 of 21, and Favors added nine points, four rebounds and a block in 15 minutes. The win gave the Celtics a series sweep after they routed the Jazz 110-86 on Jan. 21, shooting 55.2 percent in the process. In that game,

Williams had only five points for Utah. The fans welcomed Harris with open arms, chasing after him on Sunday as he visited a local outdoor mall, and giving him the loudest ovation of any Jazz player during pre-game introductions Monday. The home crowd also got their first close look at rookie Favors. “Hey, D-Will, thanks for the Favors,” read one sign in the arena. Though the Jazz would erase a 13-point first-half deficit, they couldn’t hold off the Celtics down the stretch. The Jazz, who are 1-2 since the Williams trade, jumped out to a 10-2 lead on 4-of-5 shooting. But the Celtics answered with a 12-0 run to take 14-10 lead and followed with a 13-0 run and led 30-21 after the first quarter. Allen started the Celtics on their roll by hitting 3 of 3 from beyond the arc in the first quarter, while the Jazz shot just 36.8 percent as a team. The Jazz fought back. Down 42-31 after Pierce’s 3-pointer, Utah outscored the Celtics 154, capped by Harris’ fastbreak layup to tie the score at 46 with 3:19 left in the half. Andrei Kirilenko’s spinning layup started Utah’s second-

UTAH JAZZ FORWARD Al Jefferson seen here driving to the hoop against Los Angeles Clippers Craig Smith earlier in the season, finished with 28 points and 19 rebounds in a losing effort to the Boston Celtics at Energy Solutions Arena. The Celtics game was the first chance for Jazz fans to see newly-acquired guard Devon Harris and forward Derrick Favors from the New Jersey Nets. TODD JONES photo

quarter run, and Paul Millsap added a pair of short jumpers. But it was defense that helped Utah get back in the game in

the second quarter. The Jazz forced the Celtics into a pair of three-second violations, and held Boston to 38.8 percent

shooting. Jefferson had a doubledouble by halftime (18 points, 10 rebounds). He entered the

game averaging 23.4 points, 9.2 rebounds, 2.0 blocks and shooting 55 percent in February.

Aggie women’s tennis knocks off Weber State at home By MITCH FIGGAT staff writer

In their first chance to play at home in a month, the Utah State women’s tennis team brought its progressing toughness to the battle with innerstate rival Weber State and won with a final score of 5-2. The Aggies have made a recent habit of coming out extremely strong in the double matches, which they upheld, as they dominated all three doubles matches to put their first point on the board. Senior Jaclyn West and sophomore Kristina Voytsekhovich finished first, winning 8-1, followed by senior Hailey Swenson and junior Romina Nedakovic who won 8-2 with senior Taylor Perry and junior Julie Tukuafu finishing up the doubles sweep, 8-6. Bringing the same momentum, USU commanded much of the singles matches with No.1 West beating out her opponent

SOPHOMORE KRISTINA VOYTSEKOVICH seen here returning a serve during a singles match in a 6-1 loss earlier in the season, helped the Aggies to 5-2 victory over Weber State with a 6-2, 6-0 singles victory over Wildcats’ Annika Karlsen, and a doubles victory with partner Jacyln West. The Aggies face San Francisco on Wednesday, March 24. CARL R. WILSON photo

Nassem Eslami 6-2 in the first set and then 7-5 in her second set. Nedakovic commanded her entire match to mark up the only shutout during the

entire competition, taking out Michelle Warwick 6-0, 6-0. Both Swenson and Voytsekhovic held Weber state to less than two games each. This would be a near-shutout for Voytsekhovic

who notched shut-out victories over the weekend in the North Texas tournament. “I did really good last year so it is a lot of pressure to do good this season, but once the match

starts i just settle in and really focus,” Voytsekovic said about her recent string of victories for the Aggies. The only two victories the Aggies yielded to Weber

State did not come easily for the Wildcats. Junior Brianna Harris, who just recently received the Verizon WAC Tennis Player of the Week award, played every set up to the very end, but would lose both by extremely close margins of 7-6 in the first set and 6-4 in the second. Tukuafu lost her first set, 2-6, and then came back with a vengance to tie with a 6-0 shut out. Tukuafu lost the set in a super tie breaker, 10-7 after an extremely physical set. “We are working really hard on being tough but also patient, waiting for the right moment to make a push and scoring,” said head coach Christian Wright of the new 8-3 record for the season. Their next match will not be until after the week of spring break, and will be played against San Francisco University in California, Thursday, March 24.

– mfiggat@gmail.com


Views&Opinion

Wednesday, March 2, 2011 Page 11

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

OurView

AboutUs

Aggie men: Is that not the winning team?

Editor in Chief

hen we get back from Spring Break, WAC play will be over for our Utah State Aggie men’s basketball team. We will have finished regular-season WAC play against New Mexico State and La-Tech, rocked it at the WAC tournament in Las Vegas, Nev. and will know our seed for the NCAA tournament. This basketball season has been a phenomenal one so far, and Senior Night was definitely one to remember, with the career-capping performances, sweet revenge for our only conference loss against the Idaho Vandals, celebration of our fourth championship in as many years and a whole row of Wild Bills – but it’s not over yet. This postseason has the potential to be the biggest and best ever for Utah State. These 12 athletes – Tai Wesley, Nate Bendall, Brian Green, Tyler Newbold, Pooh Williams, Matt Formisano, Brady Jardine, Morgan Grim, James Walker, E.J. Farris, Brockeith Pane and Brad Brown – have built for themselves the chance to go further than any other team ever has in the NCAA tournament, bringing March Madness closer to home than ever before. In each of the previous occasions that we’ve made it to the NCAA tournament, we’ve lost in the first of six rounds.Several times in the past dozen seasons, we’ve come close. This is head coach Stew Morrill’s 10th championship in his 13 seasons at the helm of Aggie basketball, and if that doesn’t say that this is a top-notch program, I don’t know what does. We are ranked No. 21 in the nation right now – that’s 21st out of more than 300 teams in the country. That is impressive. This is a really special team. Aside from the one conference fluke against Idaho, the Aggie men have lost only two games this year, neither at the Spectrum and both to teams that were ranked when we weren’t. And BYU, now ranked third in the nation, needed some pretty bogus calls to bail them out of a near-loss at the Marriott Center. If you don’t have Spring Break plans yet, see about getting down to Las Vegas to get in on a piece of history and cheer our Aggies on to victory and into the history books. The team is going to need the Spectrum on Wheels with them in Nevada, if not for the Spectrum Magic, then to have someone to celebrate with when they win. We at The Statesman are fans of Aggie basketball, and we want to make sure we give Stew and his crew due credit for entertaining, inspiring and delighting us this season and let them know as they head into the postseason – We believe that they will win.

News Editor

Benjamin C. Wood Copy Editor Chelsey Gensel

W

A final plea from a common man First and foremost, pay The ’Low attention while I explain what an opinion column Down is. There is definitely one thing that it is not, and that is responsible journalism. I am not here to please the masses and provide a neutral view. I desire to express my view, which I believe is shared by many members of the student body. We have a lot to expect from our newly elected leadership. First and foremost, we expect greatness from our newly elected student body president, Erik Mikkelsen. When I say that we expect greatness, it is not to say that I am counting on it. My hope is that he will take on responsibility which is beyond himself, beyond his fraternity and beyond the executive council itself. Erik, your most prominent campaign promise was to put students first. Which students? I hope that when you said that, you meant the general interest of the ENTIRE student body, not just those who love big parties and athletics. You say that you admire Abraham Lincoln for not surrounding himself with yes-men? Be inspired and do the same. If you surround yourself with appointed cronies from your fraternity, then you will have not followed through on your promise. If you truly want to put students first, appoint somebody who disagrees with you and encourage the rest of the council to do the same. A compromise among differing views is the only way to have a fair, democratic operation. We’ve seen this year what an Executive Council full of best friends and yes-men can do. They produced disasters like the BJ Novak event, and the most poorly-planned Howl that I have ever heard of, let alone attended. Now, let’s see what a balanced Executive Council with differing views and people who are willing to work for the good of the student body can do. Do not let personal agendas get in the way of what is best for the average student. Take the initiative to figuratively wave a flag of open mindedness

Tyler Barlow

- See PLEA, page 12

Catherine Meidell Assistant News Editor Megan Bainum Features Editor Kellyn Neumann Assistant Features Editor Kasey Van Dyke Sports Editor Matt Sonnenberg Assistant Sports Editor Tyler Huskinson

All roads lead to heaven and hell This week, I want to Faith and discuss the ideas of salvation, damnation and the Reason afterlife within a religious framework. What do these terms mean, and how did our contemporary understanding of them develop? The following is a brief summary of what I have discovreferred to as fundamental, ered and pondered regarddue to their strict belief sets, ing these topics. often construct a narrow Separate realms in the path for salvation within world to come – one for their established doctrine. good people and one for Often times, one must bad – have often existed believe a certain set of prinwithin the commonly held ciples and may be required beliefs of respective relito live in accordance with gions. In the polytheistic a certain lifestyle to avoid beliefs of ancient Greeks, damnation. Within such relithe souls of men went to the gious ideologies, salvation underworld of becomes a lotHades upon tery of sorts. death. Those “While the comThose of us who had led mon religious lucky enough good lives to have waded man understands in their morthrough the the purpose tal existence sea of differing entered into of these two ideologies and a paradisarealms, one finds established ical region of belief in the Hades known a wide spectrum one deemed as Elysium. of belief regardcorrect receive Those deemed ing who enters the prize. wicked would Those who into each of be sentenced die holding a to dwell in these realms and differing reliTartarus, a whether such gious ideolhellish region ogy, and even realms exist.” of torture and those who depravit y. understandContemporary ably leave religion alone individuals are familiar with due to the confusion that similar realms now referred comes with seeking truth, to as “Heaven” and “Hell,” become the victims of damand like their Greek predenation. cessors understand one to More middle - of-the be the destination of “good” road religions may believe people and the other a desin heaven and hell, or some tination for “bad.” While place of reward contrastthe common religious man ed by a place of punishunderstands the purpose of ment, but have less clearly these two realms, one finds defined beliefs about who a wide spectrum of belief ends up where. They may regarding who enters into believe everyone enters each of these realms, and into a similar afterlife and even whether such realms hell is a state of mind resultexist. ing from the regret carried Religions commonly

Cam Davis

over from mortal life. Universalist religions tend to believe that god loves all and wishes damnation upon no person. Theirs is the god described in 1 Timothy 2:4, “who wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth (NIV).” Like Judaism, Universalist ideology tends to be less concerned with self-interested avoidances of hellfire and more interested in connecting with something bigger than the individual. Such religions often believe there is no hell or damnation. Traditional Judaism, in which both Christianity and Islam are rooted, was much more concerned with covenants or temporal duties to God and fellow men than the afterlife. In fact, there is no official agreedupon doctrine regarding the afterlife other than the acknowledgment that there is one. The closest idea to hell found in Judaism is that of Gehinnom or Sheo’l. This was a place in which the souls of the wicked were purified for up to 12 months. Even this unofficial idea of post-mortal punishment ends up being a temporary stay, much different than the eternal hellfire and brimstone which came about in later centuries. Official Jewish doctrine states that all nations have a place in the world to come. Modern religions seem to be outgrowing traditional concepts of hell. Religions such as Judaism and Roman Catholicism have less clearly-defined stances on what exactly hell is and who goes there. Mormonism, the dominant

- See DAMN, page 12

Photo Editor Carl R. Wilson Assistant Photo Editor Alison Ostler Web Editor Rob Jepson

Editorial Board Benjamin C. Wood Catherine Meidell Kellyn Neumann Matt Sonnenberg Chelsey Gensel Rob Jepson

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Online poll What do you think of HASS’s new name? •

Love it. With CSA splitting off then needed a change. • Hate it. It sounds like a disease. • If it’s not Huntsman then who really cares. Visit us on the Web at www.utahstatesman. com to cast your vote and see results from this straw poll.


Views&Opinion SpecialFeatures

Page 20

SUMMER IN MAINE Page 12

Wednesday, 23, 2011 Wednesday,Feb. March 2, 2011

Damn: The truth is hard to find Plea: Students of USU have spoken 4HEÂŞ)NTERVIEWÂŞ9OURÂŞ&IRSTÂŞ3TEPÂŞ5PÂŞ,ADDERÂŞOFÂŞ3UCCESS

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In other cern should be how our faith attack on Tyler Tolson. I believe he Goes Green proposal really is. The OPPORTUNITIESÂŞ2ECOGNIZEÂŞ sÂŞ&AILUREÂŞTOÂŞKEEPÂŞEYEÂŞCONTACT â&#x20AC;˘ Silver Jewelry â&#x20AC;˘ Rocks words, you have to know â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in moves us, acting as more of a THATÂŞMOSTÂŞINTERVIEWSÂŞFOL did the best that he could with the fact that it passed has been taken as a sÂŞ,ATEÂŞTOÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEW â&#x20AC;˘ English Riding â&#x20AC;˘ Ropes a knowing sort of way, not in a guide than an insurance policy LOWÂŞAÂŞSIMILARÂŞFORMATÂŞ sÂŞ!SKSÂŞNOÂŞQUESTIONSÂŞABOUTÂŞTHEÂŞJOB executive council that he had. 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Many of us Enjoy our website. sÂŞ%XCESSIVEÂŞINTERESTÂŞINÂŞSECURITYÂŞÂŞBEN many give unto AÂŞVARIETYÂŞOFÂŞQUESTIONSÂŞASSO Him. This god is of putting the students first. see this as a horrendous waste of our CIATEDÂŞWITHÂŞEACHÂŞFACTORÂŞ&ORÂŞ EFITSÂŞ ÂŞ7HATÂŞCANÂŞYOUÂŞDOÂŞFORÂŞME Apply Online. definitely not the loving God I Cam Davis is a senior studying As for the other officers, there were money, and an unethical way of taksÂŞ)NAPPROPRIATEÂŞBACKGROUNDlearned about inEXAMPLEÂŞTHEÂŞQUESTION ÂŞ$OÂŞ Sunday school. political science and religious few surprises. Kirsten Frank staved off ing said money from students by putYOUÂŞGETÂŞBOREDÂŞWITHÂŞDETAILÂŞ TRIPP LAKE CAMP for GIRLS: ÂŞ (OWÂŞTOÂŞ3UCCEEDÂŞINÂŞANÂŞ)NTERVIEW Anyone who has experienced studies. He can be reached at an ambitions write-in campaign for ting the â&#x20AC;&#x153;greenâ&#x20AC;? flag on it. The main ISÂŞMEANTÂŞTOÂŞASSESSÂŞAÂŞCHARAC ÂŞ 4OÂŞSUCCEEDÂŞINÂŞINTERVIEWS ÂŞITÂŞISÂŞVITALÂŞ 1-800-997-4347 a doctrinal debate or taken the cam.davis@aggiemail.usu.edu. Executive VP with about the same consequence will be research money TERÂŞTRAINÂŞ!ÂŞGOODÂŞANSWERÂŞTOÂŞ TOÂŞUNDERSTANDÂŞTHATÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞSELLINGÂŞAÂŞ www.tripplakecamp.com time to investigate different relipercentage of votes as your average for a select number of students all THISÂŞQUESTIONÂŞISÂŞ PRODUCTÂŞÂ&#x2C6;ÂŞYOURSELFÂŞÂ&#x2C6;ÂŞTOÂŞANÂŞORGANIZA gious ideologiesÂŞ.O ÂŞ)gMÂŞGETTINGÂŞPAIDÂŞTOÂŞDOÂŞ has likely found democratic presidential candidate managed by a full-time coordinator. TIONÂŞ4HESEÂŞEMPLOYERSÂŞBUYERS ÂŞONLYÂŞ that it is difficultWHATÂŞTHEÂŞJOBÂŞREQUIRESÂŞ)FÂŞ to find truth out pulls in the District of Columbia. Ry While I question the wisdom of it all, WANTÂŞCOLLEGEÂŞGRADUATESÂŞTHATÂŞCANÂŞSUC Bay fared about the same as Athletic I am going to give it the benefit of CHECKINGÂŞDETAILSÂŞISÂŞPARTÂŞOFÂŞ CEEDÂŞINÂŞTHEIRÂŞORGANIZATIONSÂŞ'IVENÂŞ VP. One bright spot in the interest the doubt since the fact that it passed WHATÂŞITÂŞTAKESÂŞTOÂŞDOÂŞTHEÂŞJOBÂŞ THATÂŞTHEÂŞNUMBERÂŞOFÂŞCANDIDATESÂŞAPPLY of change is the victory of our new signals that the approximately 5,000 RIGHT ÂŞTHENÂŞTHATgSÂŞWHATÂŞ)ÂŞDOÂŞ INGÂŞFORÂŞEACHÂŞCAREERÂŞPOSITIONÂŞISÂŞHIGH ÂŞ VP of Programming, Zach Larsen. In students that voted have spoken their 3UCCESSÂŞANDÂŞADVANCEMENTÂŞ ANÂŞEMPLOYERÂŞWANTSÂŞTOÂŞSEEÂŞEVIDENCEÂŞOFÂŞ a debate hosted by The Statesman, opinion. AREÂŞNOTÂŞBORINGÂŞANDÂŞTHEYÂŞ AÂŞCANDIDATEgSÂŞQUALIFICATIONSÂŞASÂŞTHEYÂŞ Larsen and his opponent Jackson As for the thousands of students DIRECTLYÂŞRESULTÂŞFROMÂŞDOINGÂŞ RELATEÂŞTOÂŞTHEÂŞJOBÂŞOPENING Cozzens were asked whether it is bet- on campus who did not vote, I believe MYÂŞWORKÂŞWELL ÂŞ $ISPLAYINGÂŞTHESEÂŞQUALIFICATIONSÂŞINÂŞ ter to have bigger events or a variety that you have no right to an opinion ÂŞ 1UESTIONSÂŞ9OUÂŞ-IGHTÂŞ!SKÂŞ INTERVIEWSÂŞISÂŞNOTÂŞEASYÂŞBUTÂŞSELF ASSESS of events throughout the year. While about how things turn out because 4HEÂŞ)NTERVIEWER MENT ÂŞPREPARATION ÂŞANDÂŞPRACTICEÂŞCANÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ-AYÂŞ)ÂŞTALKÂŞWITHÂŞTHEÂŞLASTÂŞPERSONÂŞ ÂŞ 2EMEMBER ÂŞITÂŞISÂŞNOTÂŞONLYÂŞHOWÂŞYOUÂŞ Cozzens maintained that bigger 7HATÂŞDOESÂŞTHEÂŞJOBÂŞENTAILÂŞ is you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even bother to go to a HELPÂŞ#OLLEGEÂŞGRADUATESÂŞNEEDÂŞTOÂŞANA WHOÂŞHELDÂŞTHISÂŞPOSITIONÂŞ ÂŞ7HATÂŞAREÂŞTHEÂŞFIRSTÂŞPROJECTSÂŞYOUÂŞWANTÂŞ ANSWERÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEWERgSÂŞQUESTIONS ÂŞBUTÂŞ ÂŞ/NCEÂŞTHEÂŞPROBATIONÂŞPERIODÂŞISÂŞCOM LYZEÂŞTHEIRÂŞSTRENGTHS ÂŞWEAKNESSES ÂŞ better, and that he wanted to make website and click eight buttons to TOÂŞTACKLEÂŞ MOTIVATIONS ÂŞANDÂŞGOALSÂŞTOÂŞSEEÂŞHOWÂŞWELLÂŞ ALSOÂŞWHATÂŞQUESTIONSÂŞYOUÂŞASKÂŞWHICHÂŞCANÂŞ PLETED ÂŞHOWÂŞMUCHÂŞAUTHORITYÂŞWILLÂŞ)ÂŞHAVEÂŞ the big events huge, Larsen asserted make that opinion known. 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I envy ÂŞ7HATÂŞQUALITIESÂŞAREÂŞYOUÂŞLOOKINGÂŞFORÂŞ ÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ7RITEÂŞAÂŞFOLLOW UPÂŞLETTERÂŞTOÂŞKEEPÂŞ ALLOWSÂŞYOUÂŞTOÂŞOVERCOMEÂŞSTRESSÂŞINÂŞORDERÂŞ INGÂŞQUESTIONSÂŞDURINGÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEW already overblown events even bigyour capacity for ignorance. I wish INÂŞTHEÂŞCANDIDATEÂŞWHOÂŞFILLSÂŞTHISÂŞPOSI YOUÂŞFRESHÂŞONÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEWERgSÂŞMINDÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ0LEASEÂŞDESCRIBEÂŞTHEÂŞDUTIESÂŞOFÂŞTHEÂŞJOBÂŞ TION TOÂŞFOCUSÂŞONÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEW ger. I would much rather have freI could not care, but I do. So, to 4HISÂŞLETTERÂŞALSOÂŞSHOWSÂŞTHATÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞ FORÂŞME ÂŞ )NTERVIEWÂŞ0REPARATION quent occurrences of something all the winning candidates, I tip my ÂŞ7HATÂŞSKILLSÂŞAREÂŞESPECIALLYÂŞIMPOR APPRECIATIVE ÂŞORGANIZED ÂŞANDÂŞINTER ÂŞÂŞ7HATÂŞKINDSÂŞOFÂŞASSIGNMENTSÂŞMIGHTÂŞ)ÂŞ sÂŞ2ESEARCHÂŞTHEÂŞCOMPANYÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞPUR TANTÂŞFORÂŞSOMEONEÂŞINÂŞTHISÂŞPOSITION good then a handful of huge events metaphorical hat in congratulations ESTEDÂŞ-AKEÂŞSUREÂŞTOÂŞEXPRESSÂŞYOURÂŞ EXPECTÂŞTHEÂŞFIRSTÂŞSIXÂŞMONTHSÂŞONÂŞTHEÂŞJOB SUINGÂŞ3EEÂŞYOURÂŞCAREERÂŞADVISORÂŞFORÂŞ ÂŞ)SÂŞTHEREÂŞAÂŞLOTÂŞOFÂŞTEAMPROJECTÂŞWORK that are hit and miss. On that note, for quality wins. I do so expecting APPRECIATIONÂŞOFÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEWERgSÂŞTIMEÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ!REÂŞSALARYÂŞADJUSTMENTSÂŞGEAREDÂŞTOÂŞ MOREÂŞINFORMATION ÂŞ(OWÂŞMUCHÂŞTRAVEL ÂŞIFÂŞANY ÂŞISÂŞ another promise from president-elect your best efforts to shore up student ANDÂŞCOMMENTSÂŞ-AKEÂŞITÂŞCLEARÂŞTHATÂŞYOUÂŞ THEÂŞCOSTÂŞOFÂŞLIVINGÂŞORÂŞJOBÂŞPERFORMANCE sÂŞ#ONFIRMÂŞTIME ÂŞPLACE ÂŞANDÂŞNAMEÂŞ INVOLVEDÂŞINÂŞTHISÂŞPOSITION Mikkelsen is to ensure that events confidence in your leadership and AREÂŞEXCITEDÂŞABOUTÂŞTHEÂŞJOB ÂŞCANÂŞDOÂŞIT ÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ$OESÂŞYOURÂŞCOMPANYÂŞENCOURAGEÂŞFUR INCLUDEÂŞSPELLING ÂŞFORÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEWÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ7HATÂŞISÂŞTHEÂŞNEXTÂŞCOURSEÂŞOFÂŞACTIONÂŞ are planned that will be of interest ANDÂŞWANTÂŞITÂŞ+EEPÂŞITÂŞSHORT ÂŞTYPEÂŞIT ÂŞANDÂŞ to disappoint as few people as possible. THERÂŞEDUCATION !RRIVEÂŞ ÂŞMINUTESÂŞEARLY 7HENÂŞSHOULDÂŞ)ÂŞEXPECTÂŞTOÂŞHEARÂŞFROMÂŞ more members of the student body. Go therefore and do! PROOFREADÂŞITÂŞCAREFULLYÂŞ sÂŞ$RESSÂŞAPPROPRIATELYÂŞANDÂŞBEÂŞSUREÂŞYOUÂŞ ÂŞÂŞ7HATÂŞPRODUCTSÂŞORÂŞSERVICES ÂŞAREÂŞINÂŞ YOUÂŞORÂŞSHOULDÂŞ)ÂŞCONTACTÂŞYOU So, Mr. Larsen, do your best to folÂŞÂŞ ÂŞ)FÂŞYOUÂŞDOÂŞNOTÂŞHEARÂŞANYTHINGÂŞWITH THEÂŞDEVELOPMENTÂŞSTAGEÂŞNOW HAVEÂŞSEVERALÂŞCOPIESÂŞOFÂŞYOURÂŞCOVERÂŞLET ÂŞ &OLLOW UP INÂŞAÂŞREASONABLEÂŞPERIODÂŞOFÂŞTIMEÂŞONEÂŞTOÂŞ low through on your words and help Tyler Barlow is a sophomore majoring ÂŞÂŞ$OÂŞYOUÂŞHAVEÂŞPLANSÂŞFORÂŞEXPANSION TER ÂŞRESUME ÂŞANDÂŞREFERENCESÂŞREADY ÂŞ 5NLESSÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞTHEÂŞLASTÂŞPERSONÂŞ TWOÂŞWEEKS ÂŞMAKEÂŞAÂŞCALLÂŞTOÂŞTHEÂŞLEADÂŞ our Student Body President to do the in computer engineering. He can be ÂŞÂŞ(AVEÂŞYOUÂŞCUTÂŞYOURÂŞSTAFFÂŞINÂŞTHEÂŞLASTÂŞ sÂŞ0RACTICEÂŞRESPONDINGÂŞTOÂŞSAMPLEÂŞQUES INTERVIEWED ÂŞTHEÂŞIMPRESSIONÂŞYOUÂŞMAKEÂŞ INTERVIEWERÂŞ2ESTATEÂŞTHEÂŞPOINTSÂŞYOUÂŞ same. reached at tyler.barlow@aggiemail. THREEÂŞYEARS TIONSÂŞ"EÂŞSUREÂŞTOÂŞLINKÂŞYOURSELFÂŞANDÂŞ WILLÂŞFADEÂŞWITHÂŞEACHÂŞSUBSEQUENTÂŞINTER MADEÂŞINÂŞYOURÂŞLETTER ÂŞANDÂŞRESTATEÂŞYOURÂŞ Perhaps the biggest shock of last usu.edu. ÂŞÂŞ(OWÂŞDOÂŞYOUÂŞFEELÂŞABOUTÂŞCREATIVITYÂŞ YOURÂŞBACKGROUNDÂŞTOÂŞTHEÂŞJOB VIEWÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEWERÂŞUNDERTAKESÂŞ4HEÂŞ INTERESTÂŞINÂŞTHEÂŞPOSITIONÂŞ9OUÂŞMAYÂŞWANTÂŞ week was the approval of the Blue ANDÂŞINDIVIDUALITY sÂŞ-AINTAINÂŞAÂŞPOSITIVEÂŞATTITUDE FOLLOWINGÂŞIDEASÂŞENSUREÂŞTHATÂŞOUTÂŞOFÂŞ TOÂŞSAY ÂŞ)ÂŞFEELÂŞCONFIDENTÂŞABOUTÂŞMYÂŞABIL Goes Green Fee. It appears that even ÂŞÂŞ)NÂŞWHATÂŞWAYSÂŞISÂŞAÂŞCAREERÂŞWITHÂŞYOURÂŞ sÂŞ(AVEÂŞAÂŞLISTÂŞOFÂŞQUESTIONSÂŞTHATÂŞYOUÂŞ SIGHTÂŞDOESÂŞNOTÂŞMEANÂŞOUTÂŞOFÂŞMINDÂŞFORÂŞ ITYÂŞTOÂŞCONTRIBUTEÂŞTOÂŞYOURÂŞDEPARTMENTgSÂŞ COMPANYÂŞBETTERÂŞTHANÂŞONEÂŞWITHÂŞYOURÂŞ WANTÂŞTOÂŞASKÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEWERÂŞ3HOWÂŞ YOU EFFORTS ÂŞANDÂŞ)ÂŞREALLYÂŞWANTÂŞTHEÂŞJOBÂŞ COMPETITORS THEMÂŞYOUÂŞHAVEÂŞDONEÂŞSOMEÂŞRESEARCHÂŞ ÂŞ 3TEPSÂŞINÂŞTHEÂŞ&OLLOW UPÂŞ0ROCESS ÂŞ )FÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞTOLDÂŞTHATÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞNOÂŞLON ÂŞ)SÂŞTHISÂŞAÂŞNEWÂŞPOSITIONÂŞORÂŞAMÂŞ)ÂŞ ANDÂŞTHATÂŞYOUÂŞAREÂŞAÂŞTHOUGHTFULÂŞPERSON ÂŞ ÂŞ)MMEDIATELYÂŞAFTERÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEW ÂŞ GERÂŞINÂŞTHEÂŞRUNNING ÂŞBEÂŞSUREÂŞTOÂŞASKÂŞFORÂŞ REPLACINGÂŞSOMEONE ÂŞ 0EOPLEÂŞWHOÂŞINTERVIEWÂŞWELLÂŞAREÂŞ DOÂŞAÂŞWRITTENÂŞRECAPÂŞOFÂŞTHEÂŞINTERVIEW THEÂŞOPPORTUNITYÂŞPOSSIBLYÂŞATÂŞANOTHERÂŞ ÂŞ7HATÂŞISÂŞTHEÂŞLARGESTÂŞSINGLEÂŞPROBLEMÂŞ OFTENÂŞBETTERÂŞEMPLOYEESÂŞBECAUSEÂŞTHEYÂŞ ÂŞ 7HOÂŞDIDÂŞYOUÂŞMEETÂŞNAMESÂŞANDÂŞ TIME ÂŞTOÂŞDISCUSSÂŞWAYSÂŞYOÂŞMIGHTÂŞ FACINGÂŞYOURÂŞSTAFFÂŞDEPARTMENT ÂŞNOW HAVEÂŞLEARNEDÂŞHOWÂŞTOÂŞSELLÂŞTHEMSELVESÂŞ TITLES ÂŞ IMPROVEÂŞYOURÂŞINTERVIEWINGÂŞSKILLSÂŞ

Take the time to express your views in a letter to the editor. Submission box found at www.utahstatesman.com

Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coming to the 2011 Career Fair? ADP (Automatic Data Processing) www.adp.com Payroll and Human Resource Outsourcing Aerotek Inc. www.aerotek.com Staffing Affiliated Computer Services, Inc., A Xerox Company www.acs-inc.com BPO and IT Outsourcing

Agriculture Clearfield Job Corps Center www.clearfieldjcc.org/main.html Education Conservice www.conservice.com Utility Billings Consolidated Electrical Distributors www.cedcareers.com Electrical Sales and Distribution

Allegis Financial Partners www.allegisfp.com Financial Services

Convergys Corporation www.convergys.com Communications

AmeriCorps and The Medically Underserved in Utah www.auch.org/americorps Non-Profit

Del Sol www.delsol.com Retail Merchandising

Ames Construction www.amesconstruction.com Heavy Civil & Industrial Applied Signal Technology, Inc. www.appsig.com Engineering ARUP Laboratories www.aruplab.com Clinical and Anatomic Pathology Reference Laboratory ATK Aerospace Systems www.atk.com Aerospace Auto-Owners Insurance Company www.auto-owners.com Insurance Barnes Aerospace www.barnesgroupinc.com Aerospace - Manufacturing Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation www.bettislab.com Government Research Laboratory Bo Bunny Press www.bobunny.com Scrapbooking Boston Scientific Neuromodulation www.bostonscientific.com Medical Devices Bridgestone Retail Operations, LLC www.bfrc.jobs Retail Cache County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office www.CacheSheriff.com Law Enforcement Cache Employment and Training Center www.none.com Social Services China Horizons www.chinahorizons.org Education Circle Four Farms www.c4farms.com

Electrical Consultants, Inc. www.electricalconsultantsinc.com Engineering (Consulting) Entec Composite Machines, Inc www.entec.com Composites and Composite Machinery Enterprise Rent-A-Car www.enterprise.com Transportation/ Travel and Tourism Extra Space Storage careers.extraspace.com Real Estate Farm Bureau Financial Services www.wheremybusinessbegins.com Insurance Farmers Insurance www.farmers.com Insurance Fastenal Company www.fastenal.com Wholesale Distribution / Sales Flatiron www.Flatircorp.com Engineering/ Construction GE Energy www.geenergy.com Engineering - Energy Geneva Rock Products, Inc. and W.W. Clyde & Co. www.genevarock.com Construction/Heavy Civil & Industrial Goldman Sachs & Company www.goldmansachs.com Business - Financial Services Goodrich Corporation www.goodrich.com Engineering Granite Construction www.graniteconstruction.com Construction HELP International www.help-international.org International Development - Non-profit

Heritage Financial Group www.heritagefinancialadvisor.com Finance, Economics, Marketing Hill Air Force Base (Elec Engr/Comp Engr/Comp Sci) Government IM Flash Technologies (an Intel, Micron venture) www.imftech.com Manufacturing/Engineering Ingeo www.ingeo.com Software Inovar Inc. www.inovar-inc.com Technology Manufacturing Insitu www.Insitu.com Unmaned Aircrafts Intermountain Farmers Association www.ifa-coop.com Agriculture Intermountain Financial Group/ MassMutual www.massmutual.com Financial Services Intermountain Healthcare www.intermountainhealthcare.org Healthcare International Language Programs www.ilp.org/taiwan Non-profit

Marvell Semiconductor www.marvell.com Integrated Circuits

RAM Company www.ramcompany.com Manufacturer of Solenoids & Valves

#1  BEST  VALUE  among   Reliable Controls Corporation www.rcontrols.com public  universities  in  the  West Engineering

MasterControl, Inc. www.mastercontrol.com Software Development

Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Best  College  Buys,  Forbes  2010

Melaleuca, Inc. www.melaleuca.com Consumer Direct Marketing

Rocky Mountain Power www.pacificorp.com Energy/Utilities

TSC  Ballroom

U.S. Marine Corps Officer Selection www.usmc.mil Government/Military

Modern Woodmen Fraternal Financial www.modern-woodmen.org/public Financial Mutual of Omaha mutualofomaha.com Financial Services Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc. www.myriad.com Biotech National Credit Union Administration www.ncua.gov Government NAVAIR Weapons Division www.navair.navy.mil/nawcwd/ Government - Defense Nelson Laboratories, Inc. www.nelsonlabs.com Microbiology/Biotech Lab Newfield Production Company www.newfield.com Oil and Gas Services

SabiOso, Inc. www.sabioso.com Custom Software Development/IT Services Sherwin-Williams Company www.sherwin-williams.com Retail - Paint ShopKo www.shopko.com Retail Silver Star Communications www.silverstar.com Telecommunication Broadband Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Food & Drug www.sfdc.com Retail Grocery Solar Turbines www.solarturbines.com Oil & Gas

Malt-O-Meal www.malt-o-meal.com Manufacturing

Prudential Financial www.prudential.com Financial Services

The Scoular Company www.scoular.com Agriculture

Management & Training Corporation www.mtctrains.com Corporate Training Programs

Questar Corporation www.questar.com Energy

Thermo Fisher Scientific www.thermofisher.com BioProcess/Life Sciences

JC Penney www.jcpenneycareers.com Accounting Kelly Services www.kellyservices.com Science/Engineering Staffing Kohlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department Stores www.kohlsoncampus.com Retail Kraft Foods www.kraftfoods.com Food and Beverage Kroger Layton Bakery Plant jobsearch.kroger.careers.monster.com/ Manufacturing L-3 Communications www.l-3com.com/csw Manufacturing/Defense

U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Utah www.blm.gov/nhp Government U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service www.fws.gov Federal Gov.

LDS Employment Resource Services www.ldsjobs.org Employment Services

JBS www.jbssa.com Beef Production

U.S. Army Medical Recruiting healthcare.goarmy.com Recruiting

USU  GRADUATE  SCHOOL  FAIR

Micron Technology, Inc. RR Donnelley Date:  September  22,  2010 www.micron.com www.rrd.com Time:  10  AM  -­  2  PM Semiconductor Print

SOS Staffing Services www.sosstaffing.com Enineering, Technology, Manufacturing Learn  more  at:  www.usu.edu/graduateschool Northrop Grumman Corporation www.careers.northropgrumman.com Space Dynamics/Energy Dynamics Lab Aerospace/Defense www.usurf.org Research/Defense/Aerospace Northwestern Mutual Financial Network www.nmfn.com/pattersonfinancial Staker Parson Companies Financial Services www.stakerparson.com Construction Novell, Inc. www.novell.com â&#x20AC;˘ Computers Target (www.target.com/careers) Retail Nutraceutical Corporation www.nutraceutical.com TD Williamson Consumer Products, Manufacturing tdwilliamson.com Pipeline ON Semiconductor www.onsemi.com TEKsystems Semiconductor www.teksystems.com Information Technology One on One Marketing 1on1.com The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Internet Marketing Saints www.lds.jobs Oracle Corporation Religious www.us.oracle.com Technology - Software The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints - ICS ParallelHR Solutions, Inc. www.lds.jobs www.parallelhr.com Information Technology Recruiting The McPartland Group Financial POOLCORP Services www.poolcorp.com www.guardianlife.com Wholesale Distribution Financial

Ivory Homes www.ivoryhomes.com Real Estate - Builder

www.treadlightly.org Non Profit - Environmental

Tread Lightly!

U.S. Navy (www.navy.mil) Navy Officer Programs U.S. Peace Corps www.peacecorps.gov Non-profit Union Telephone/Union Wireless www.unionwireless.com Telecommunications USANA Health Sciences www.usana.com/dotCom/index.jsp Nutraceutical USDA Nat. Res. Conservation Service www.ut.nrcs.usda.gov Government USU Army ROTC www.usu.edu/armyrotc/index.php USU Army ROTC Soniya  Patel Utah Department of Agriculture/ Food MBA,  2010 www.dhrm.utah.gov Government - Poultry

Utah Department of Workforce Services www.dws.state.ut.us State Government Utah State Tax Commission tax.utah.gov Accounting - Government Verizon Wireless www.verizonwireless.com/careers Telecommunication Vulcraft, Nucor Corporation www.nucor.com Structural Steel Wavetronix www.wavetronix.com Electrical Engineering WesTech Engineering Inc. www.westech-inc.com Water Process Equipment Western Metals Recycling www.wmrecycling.com Recycling WestHost (westhost.com) Internet Xactware Inc. www.xactware.com Software Development Yellowstone Bear World www.yellowstonebearworld.com Travel and Tourism, Animal Care Zions Bank www.zionsbank.com Banking


TimeOut

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Page 13

All But Dead â&#x20AC;¢ sarah.a@aggiemail.usu.edu

Pearls Before Swine â&#x20AC;¢ Steve Pastis

Friends by Default â&#x20AC;¢ Trevor.Stewart@aggiemail.usu.edu

Loose Parts â&#x20AC;¢ Dave Blazek

Rhymes with Orange â&#x20AC;¢ Hilary Price

Dilbert â&#x20AC;¢ Scott Adams

Bound & Gagged â&#x20AC;¢ Dana Summers

Synaptic Meltdown â&#x20AC;¢

b.luke@aggiemail.usu.edu

Rhymes with Orange â&#x20AC;¢ Hilary Price

Student Jobs

Answers elsewhere in this issue

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Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Issue

Page 14

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

StatesmanBack Burner

Wednesday

Mrs. Hill

March 2 Today is Wednesday, March 2, 2011. Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s issue of The Utah Statesman is published especially for Jessi Timothy, a sophomore majoring in speech comunications from Bennington, Idaho.

Almanac Today in History: In 1904, Theodor Geisel, better known to the world as Dr. Seuss, is born in Springfield, Mass. Geisel, who used his middle name as his pen name, wrote 48 books that have sold well over 200 million copies and been translated into multiple languages.

Weather High: 40° Low: 34° Skies: Rain and snow.

- Recent Alumni Art Exhibit, Tippetts - Communication and Leadership Seminar, Eccles Conf. Center, all day - Career Fair, TSC, 9-3 p.m. - Safe Spring Break, Library, 10 a.m. - Meditation Club, TSC, 1:30 p.m. - Math Anxiety Workshop, TSC, 3:30 p.m. - Wild Wednesday, Stokes Nature Center, 4 p.m. - Religious Studies Club Lecture, Old Main 121, 4 p.m. - Aggies Against the Grain Club Meeting, Business 202A, 5:30 p.m. - Reuse, Reduce, Recycle Auction, 6 p.m. - Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Basketball at New Mexico State, 9:05 p.m.

Thursday

March 3

You need to know....

Annual Spring Book Sale. From beach reading to scholarly texts, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something for everyone. All books only 25 cents, only 3 days. Sale starts 9 a.m. March 2, continues during regular library hours, and ends 5pm Friday, March 4. Come to the Celebrate the 123rd Founders Day Atrium of the Library, and find someof Utah State University March, 4 thing to entertain, feed, or boggle your mind from our diverse selection. at 6-8:30 p.m. This is an awards Pancake Breakfast on the TSC event celebrating alumni and friends of the university. Cost for Patio. Enjoy a hearty breakfast while supporting Prevent Child Abuse the evening is $35 per person. America March 16, 8-11 a.m. ShamRock â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Till You Drop! Want information on how to have The only place to be on St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a safe spring break? Come to the Day! Dancing, photo booths, games, inflatables and concessions for the library entry March 2 from 10-2 prevention of child abuse. March 17, p.m. to get a Safe Spring Break 7-11 p.m. in the TSC Ballroom. 20 Kit! percent of all proceeds go to Prevent Child Abuse America and 80 percent of all proceeds go to the Child and Religious Studies Club presents Prof. Richard Sherlock on March Family Support Center. Spring fever? It is time to get 2 from 4-6 p.m. in Old Main 121. started with seeding and transplanting. Get weekly up dates on what you can do to help at the Student Farm. Jared Farmer is this monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highlighted speaker for the HASS Always a blast! studentfarm@lists. usu.edu. Distinguished Speaker Series. Ceremony to honor women over The title of his presentation is 65 from the community for Early â&#x20AC;&#x153;Possessed by the Past.â&#x20AC;? A light Career and Lifetime Achievements. lunch will be served. He will Awards will be presented. TSC discuss how USU influenced his Ballroom 6 p.m. on March 14. life and will talk about the value Maceyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Theater cooking of a history education. March 4 at classes is hosting Heritage Cooking 12:30 p.m. with David Sidwell. He will teach us how to make perfect Sour Dough USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dance company Full Circle Delights! He will even have a starter straight from San Francisco. Come is holding guest artist auditions Hungry-Leave Happy! March 3 at 7-8 for their show â&#x20AC;&#x153;CHROMATICS: p.m. LIFE IN COLORâ&#x20AC;? on March 3Dance United. Come learn social 4. Registration starts at 3 p.m. dance or expand your already amazand auditions at 4 p.m. at the ing skills! Cha Cha, Swing, Salsa, Kent Concert Hall. There is a $5 Audition fee! Questions: Contact Foxtrot, Waltz, ect. Thursday nights from 8-11 in FAC room 104 (the band Krissy at dancecom@hotmail. room). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free your first time but com. every time after that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $2 for non members, $1 for members. Included dance lessons are from 8-9. Darrin Brooks and Nancy Hills First Club Meeting for the USU present, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Hair, Big Chair: The Aggies Against the Grain: Celiac Power and Influence of Women Awareness and Support Club will be in the 18th Centuryâ&#x20AC;? as part of held March 2 at 5:30 p.m. Business Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Month. The Building room 202A. EVERYONE event is free and is open to all. Library 101 March 3 at 3:30 - 5:00 is welcome, no need to be Gluten Intolerant. p.m.

Deep Endâ&#x20AC;˘tyson.cole@aggiemail

Come see â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mrs. Hillâ&#x20AC;? presented by the Theatre Student Association March 2 at 7:30 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre. Tickets are $5 and $3 for TSA members.

Founders Day

Safe spring break

Richard Sherlock

Strange Brewâ&#x20AC;˘Peter Deering

Jared Farmer

- Communication and Leadership Seminar, Eccles Conf. Center, all day - Spring Book Sale, Library - Weight Watcher Class, TSC, 11:45 a.m. - Free Fitness Assessments, HPER, 12 p.m. - Big Hair, Big Chair Presentation, Library 101, 3:30 p.m. - Wii Lumber Jacks, NR Building, 5 p.m. - CIL Short Course, ESLC Auditorium, 5:30 p.m. - CPR Certification Course, HPER, 7 p.m. - Maceyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little Theater Cooking Classes, 7 p.m.

Friday

March 4

Guest auditions

Big Hair, Big Chair

- Spring Book Sale, Library - Alumni Speaker Jared Farmer, Haight Alumni Center, 12:30 p.m. - USU Founders Day, TSC Ballroom, 6 p.m. - Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gymnastics vs. Cal State Fullerton, 7 p.m.10 a.m. to 5 p.m.,

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Wednesday, March 2, 2011