Page 1

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Utah Statesman The

Campus Voice since 1902

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Campaign reaches $300 million By CATHERINE MEIDELL news editor

University Advancement announced the comprehensive campaign goal to reach $400 million in general USU funding has passed its $300 million mark, making the final goal an attainable feat, said campaign manager Jeannie Simmonds. Originally, when the campaign began in July 2003, the goal was $200 million, but after reaching it, USU President Stan Albrecht and University Advancement believed the campaign could become twice as profitable. Simmonds said if the comprehensive campaign’s success keeps its momentum, the campaign will reach its $400 million goal by March of 2012 as planned. However, the campaign will end once this goal is attained because the campaign will most likely lose momentum at that time, Simmonds said. Ross Peterson, Vice President of University Advancement said, “There are a number of things we’re working on that have an immediacy to them such as getting funding for the business building addition.” Peterson said additional current goals for the campaign are to establish funding so the art barn may be transitioned into an anthropology museum and so new rooms can be constructed in the education building. In athletics, Peterson feels the turf in the indoor football facility needs to be replaced as soon as possible because safer materials for turf have been developed. Most recently, USU was given

USU initiated support Endowments

- Scholarships - Academic Support - Programs

$22,299,798.10 $20,293,982.97 $6,380,150.46

Current Operations - Scholarships - Academic Support - Programs

Facilities

$17,598,912.03 $7,176,234.65 $115,853,255.13

- Logan Campus - Regional Campuses - Centers

$54,695,303.41 $31,004,661.31 $75,200

Research Total

$26,487,499.39

Donor initiated support Facilities

- Logan Campus - Regional Campuses - Centers

$0 $32,075,000 $2,762,500.51

Operations Total

$1,341,121

Additional Support $36,178,521.51 Total

$338,178,621.51

a $337,000 piece of property in Blanding, Utah, a lot that will house the next extension campus. Simmonds said this donation is not yet added into the current running campaign total of $338,043,618. This number includes scholarships, academic support, programs and facilities and includes total amounts that donors have agreed to pay USU throughout a set period of time. Most importantly, Peterson said, university advancement works heavily on accumulating scholarship money for students. Simmonds said over two-thirds of USU students work as well as attend classes and she wants to ease the financial burden a higher education requires by creating as many scholarship opportunities as possible. Since the comprehensive campaign’s beginning in 2003, USU presidents in conjunction with University Advancement have brought in $7.1 million in scholarships. University Advancement developers connect with USU alumni in order to encourage scholarship and other types of donations. In addition to alumni, a handful of USU faculty and staff have created scholarship funds, such as David and Terry Peak. David Peak, a 16year faculty member and physics professor, said he and his wife Terry, a social work profes-

Lurker suspect not convicted By CATHERINE MEIDELL news editor

After four court appearances, Aaron Foote, the man charged in connection with the Logan Lurker burglaries, has yet to be convicted for the thefts committed in multiple student housing developments during the 2010 spring semester. Foote, 32, will appear in Logan’s First District Court again Oct. 27 at 9 a.m. Foote’s court appearance on June 15 was continued because parties were negotiating. His July 7 appearance was also motioned to continue. He is currently not booked into jail. He has been charged with three second-degree felonies and a parole violation. Foote has been arrested on multiple occasions and charged for burglary throughout the state of Utah. He has also been a suspect in many other campus burglaries throughout the state including University of Utah and Southern Utah University. Because many college students leave their doors unlocked, Foote was able to enter homes and apartments. On occasion he was seen by the residents of the buildings he broke into. When this happened, Foote would apologize for the intrusion and state he was looking for a particular person. Belongings such as undergarments, television sets, gaming consoles and loose cash were reported stolen, but only a fraction of these items have been returned to their owners. Foote was arrested in Logan Feb. 11, 2010, when a resident on Canyon Drive reported a burglary. Police followed footprints from a Canyon Drive residence to the car in which Foote was found. Police then found items in Foote’s vehicle that were reported missing earlier that day.

– catherine.meidell@aggiemail.usu.edu

- See DONORS, page 6

New arts senator aims to unify students By MEGAN BAINUM assistant news editor

Over the summer, Alan Dangerfield was appointed the first Arts Senator for the newly created Caine College of the Arts. The position was created after a vote on the Associated Students of Utah State University (ASUSU) ballot last spring. While other positions required winning an election, legislation allowed the President of ASUSU, Tyler Tolson, and Craig Jessop, Dean of the Caine College of the Arts to work together in finding and appointing someone to fill the Arts Senator seat on the ASUSU Executive Council. The Caine College of the Arts wanted a senator appointed as early as possible so the students wouldn’t feel under-represented come fall semester. Christopher Terry, Associate Dean for the Caine College of the Arts, said, “ASUSU chose Dangerfield early in order to expedite the process and get someone in place so students wouldn’t be left without representation.” Tolson said he also felt it necessary to appoint an Arts Senator as soon as possible. “We wanted to allow the new senator ample time during the summer to catch up on the training they had missed in the spring.” Tolson said. Jessop said he was pleased with ASUSU’s selection and looks forward to seeing what Dangerfield brings to the college.

Inside This Issue

“Since the time I was a student myself at USU, I have always valued the role played by student government in college and university affairs,” Jessop said. “We are delighted with the appointment of Alan Dangerfield as our Caine College of the Arts Senator and we look forward to working with him to strengthen student involvement in the college.” The dean and each department head from the new college nominated a student. Each one chosen wrote a letter explaining why they should become senator, and what their goals and plans were for the college. The applicants were then referred to ASUSU where they were interviewed. Tolson said after the interviews, the committee agreed Dangerfield was the best candidate for the position. “Alan was extremely well prepared coming into the interview,” Tolson said. “He had definitely done his homework and we could tell he was excited and that he would pour everything he had into it.” Terry said the main responsibility Dangerfield has will be representing the students of the Caine College of the Arts in student government. He said the college administration won’t be setting the agenda for Dangerfield, but the faculty and staff are “very eager to work with him to accomplish shared goals.” Dangerfield agreed, saying his main objectives coming into this year are getting students involved, better marketing for the college, and making sure the students are getting represented. “Most of the students don’t know what

- See ASUSU, page 3

8/30/10 It’s been a strange offseason in the WAC, but USU is staying focused on Oklahoma. Page 17

ALAN DANGERFIELD has goals to keep students that are in the new arts department informed on their college’s development as well as upcoming events. He would also like to see more student involvement and represent those in the arts school to the best of his ability. CARL R. WILSON photo

Learn your rights as a renter in Utah and what to expect from your landlord. Page 7

www.utahstatesman.com Look for The Statesman on Facebook and Twitter to stay up to date on campus news.

Official Student Newspaper of Utah State University • “It’s All The News You Need!”


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010 Page 2

World&Nation Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.aggietownsquare.com

ClarifyCorrect The policy of The Utah Statesman is to correct any error made as soon as possible. If you find something you would like clarified or find unfair, please contact the editor at 797-1762 or TSC 105.

Michigan tea partiers win convention seats

LANSING, Mich. (AP) Court. – Michigan Republican Party The party’s moderate choice for Chairman Ron Weiser talks enthugovernor, business executive Rick siastically about welcoming tea Snyder, picked well-regarded conserparty supporters into the GOP, but vative state Rep. Brian Calley as his he wasn’t planning to give them his running mate Wednesday to avoid seat at the state convention. running into difficulty getting his Michigan tea party supporters lieutenant governor choice ratified f locked to Republican party meetby tea partiers. ings across the state this month and Efforts to press other tea party won several hundred delegate seats causes, such as draconian cuts in More police crews to for the Saturday state convention, government, could also produce a including Weiser’s. Now, the activwith moderate Republicans hunt for Utah fugitive ists are positioned for an attempt to collision who have held sway despite growSALT LAKE CITY (AP) – More push the Michigan GOP further to ing conservative strength in the law enforcement teams were being the right and put hard-core conserstate. GOP leaders are worried that called in Sunday to hunt down vatives on November’s general eleca rebuff of tea party followers could a man accused of killing a Utah tion ballot. sap their support for GOP candisheriff’s deputy. The tea party’s bid to capitalize dates in the closely fought general Scott Curley has eluded authori- on its delegate coup, which caught election campaign. ties for three days and was believed veteran Republican activists by Although there is no precise to be hiding in the wilderness on surprise, is an important test for a count of the delegates affiliated with MICHIGAN REPUBLICAN PARTY CHAIRMAN RON WEISER is shown in his office, in Lansing, Mich. Weiser talks enthusiastically about welcoming the Arizona-Utah line. national movement seeking concrete Michigan’s approximately 50 active “It’s hard to find someone who political impact. tea party groups, they could amount tea party supporters into the GOP, but he wasn’t planning to give them his seat at doesn’t want to be found,” said The movement has racked up to a fifth or more of the nearly 2,100 the state convention. AP photo which is normally staid and consen- He said he’s still excited by the tea Coconino County, Ariz., Sheriff Bill several big wins in Senate primaparty activists who will vote at the sus-oriented. party push. “These are the people Pribil, according to a digital record- ries in Kentucky, Utah, Nevada and East Lansing meeting. “Is it really about seeking new who are going to go out and work ing of a Sunday news conference Colorado this year, and is on the Tea party leaders plan to hold direction? Is it really about trying for this ticket after the convention,” provided by his department. brink of prevailing in Alaska. But their own pre-convention caucus to get more conservatives elected? he said. it’s also suffered a few notable losses meeting Friday night. They say they The tea partiers won the posiU.S. wasted billions – the latest came Tuesday, when for- can leverage their strength by coor- If so, come and join us,” said Greg Moore of Athens, who was beaten tions by running their members in mer Rep. J.D. Hayworth lost to Sen. dinating efforts, as they did in seizin rebuilding Iraq by a tea party candidate this month precinct elections, which normally John McCain in Arizona. ing the delegate slots. after serving as a delegate many attract few candidates, and then Tea party supporters also have “This is about wrestling with the KHAN BANI SAAD, Iraq (AP) times over the last 25 years. “But turning out in force at many county won GOP delegate seats or other very devil himself, if we have to, for – A $40 million prison sits in the if it’s just trying to create havoc, GOP meetings to support the winparty roles in Maine, Idaho, Illinois the soul of the Republican Party,” desert north of Baghdad, empty. there’s going to be problems.” ners for state convention slots. and several other states in recent said Dennis Moore, an underemA $165 million children’s hospital Weiser still will preside at the Moore says he knows there are months. But their potential impact ployed drywall contractor who leads goes unused in the south. A $100 convention. But the major GOP hard feelings about the results and could be the greatest in Michigan the Willow Run Tea Party Caucus in million waste water treatment sysexpects a turbulent convention. Ypsilanti, a working class city about donor and former ambassador to tem in Fallujah has cost three times because the convention chooses the Slovakia must go as an alternate “This is hitting the proverbial fan,” Republican nominees for secretary 30 miles southwest of Detroit. more than projected, yet sewage after he was defeated at the party he said. “If they freeze us out, it’s of state, attorney general, education Some GOP activists don’t know still runs through the streets meeting in Washtenaw County. going to be a huge, huge problem.” boards and the Michigan Supreme what to expect at the meeting, As the U.S. draws down in Iraq, it is leaving behind hundreds of abandoned or incomplete projects. More than $5 billion in American taxpayer funds has been wasted – more than 10 percent of the some ISLAMABAD (AP) – Muslim countries, organiza- lions of dollars to help Pakistan cope with the floods, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar, he said. $50 billion the U.S. has spent on tions and individuals have pledged nearly $1 billion which first hit the country about a month ago after “They have shown that they are one of the largest reconstruction in Iraq, according in cash and relief supplies to help Pakistan respond extremely heavy monsoon rains. But some officials contributors of assistance both in kind and cash,” to audits from a U.S. watchdog to the worst floods in the nation’s history, the head of had criticized the Muslim world for not contributing said Ihsanoglu of the various donors. He spoke duragency. a group of Islamic states said Sunday. enough. ing a joint press conference with Pakistani Foreign That amount is likely an underThe announcement came as floodwaters inundatEkmeleddin Ihsanoglu, head of the 57-member Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi in Islamabad. estimate, based on an analysis of ed a large town in Pakistan and authorities struggled Organization of The Islamic Conference, likely Ihsanoglu did not provide a breakdown of the more than 300 reports by auditors to build new levees with clay and stone to prevent one sought to counter that criticism by announcing that pledges or say how much of the money would flow with the special inspector general of the area’s biggest cities from suffering the same Muslims have pledged nearly $1 billion. The pledges through the Pakistani government versus indepenfor Iraq reconstruction. And it does fate. came from Muslim states, NGOs, OIC institutions dent organizations. not take into account security costs, Foreign countries have pledged hundreds of miland telethons held in Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Kuwait, Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani critiwhich have run almost 17 percent cized donations made to foreign NGOs rather than for some projects. the Pakistani government Sunday, saying much of the money would be wasted “Eighty percent of the aid will not come to you directly,” said Gilani, referring to Pakistani citizens. “It will come through their NGOs, and they will Top 10 Ways Miss Universe Plans eat half of it,” he said during a press conference in his To Make The World A Better hometown of Multan. Place The floods began in the mountainous northwest 10. Inspire peace and unity by about a month ago and have moved slowly down the looking hot. country toward the coast in the south, inundating 9. During this bedbug crisis, go vast swaths of prime agricultural land and damaging door-to-door scratching the itchy. or destroying more than 1 million homes. 8. Bring your car to my house and Floodwaters surged into the southern town of I’ll change the oil. Sujawal on Sunday after breaking through a levee on 7. I’ll find a new wack-job to take the Indus River two days earlier, said Hadi Baksh, over as “American Idol” judge. a disaster management official in southern Sindh 6. I’ll offer Osama Bin Laden a province. Most of the town’s 250,000 residents had meet–and–greet – when he shows already fled, but the damage to homes, clinics and up, bam, we grab him! schools added to the widespread devastation the 5. Teach men to pull over and ask floods have caused across Pakistan. for directions – am I right, ladies? Authorities in Sujawal were trying to limit the 4. Give world what it really needs flood damage, but the water level has already risen – a new celebrity perfume. up to 5 feet (1.5 meters) in the center of town and 3. Bring peace and stability to 10 feet (3 meters) in the surrounding villages, said Jennifer Aniston’s love life. Anwarul Haq, the top official in Sujawal. 2. Gonna go ‘round the globe The floodwaters also threatened Thatta, a historic kickin’ butt like the Expendables. A PAKISTANI WOMAN displaced by flooding sits on a bed after taking refuge from rising waters on an city of some 350,000 people who have mostly fled to 1. Support equal rights for less embankment near the flooded Indus River, near Thatta, Sindh Province, southern Pakistan, Sunday, Aug. 29. AP higher ground. attractive people, like Dave. photo

Nat’lBriefs

Muslims donate nearly $1 billion to Pakistan

LateNiteHumor


Page 3

StatesmanCampus News

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

THE MOBILE HOME Park on the East side of campus is closing down and will no longer be a place where USU students may reside. A problem with the water pipes made it necessary to move families and friends out of the mobile homes during the summer. CARL R. WILSON photo

Mobile home residents forced to move By MARISSA BODILY staff writer

By summer 2011, Utah State University Mobile Home Park will no longer be home to many families and USU students as the outdated, well-used space is vacated and prepared for the construction of new townhomes, according to USU student and former mobile home park resident Virginia Todd. Some residents were told they needed to move out this summer after water pipes burst underground which caused leaking in some areas of the park, Todd said. There are still some people living in the mobile home park, but many people and students are noticing that much of the land that was occupied by trailers last year is now empty and abandoned because of the situation. It is obvious when passing by the park now that much of the land is no longer in use. Where many mobile homes used to be parked, providing convenient, affordable housing to students and other tenants there are now unused lots. Those tenants who were not residing on the land that was

damaged by the pipes have been allowed to stay in the trailer park until next summer, Todd said. There are now other plans for the land, so those residents still living there will need to find other places to reside by the summer of 2011. Todd said that many people, including her, living in certain sections of the trailer park were kicked out because of the pipes bursting and leaking, making the land unsuitable to live on. The residents were given some notice that they needed to leave the park. Most of them needed to be out by July 1 while others were permitted to stay until Aug. 1. Todd believes there were about twenty residents of the mobile home park that were told to leave at that time. She lived in number 74, which was the last spot on the section that needed to be vacated. Todd was one of the residents that had to be out by July 1 of this summer. The mobile home park, located on the east side of campus and across from the Student Living Center, is owned by Utah State University. It was an option of Family Student Housing along with Aggie Village, Townhouses and West Stadium Villa. Many Utah State University students picked this hous-

ASUSU: Senator seat filled

SERVICE DESK http://it.usu.edu servicedesk@usu.edu 797-HELP (4357) 1-877-878-8325

-continued from page 1

is going on in the college and we want to bring that to their attention.” Dangerfield said. He said he wanted to form student groups where they can come and talk openly about what they want to see changed and what their needs are. Dangerfield also said he wants to help “unify the students”. “There are a lot of differences in the various departments within the college but there are also a lot of similarities that I want to bring out,” Dangerfield said. “I want the music majors and the art majors to know each other.” Dangerfield is implementing a monthly pamphlet that will preview the upcoming events goinga on within the college as well as throughout the university. He said he hopes that with the help of a monthly reminder, students will get more involved. Since being appointed the first week of August, Dangerfield said he has been doing some “internal PR,” going around to the faculty and giving presentations to talk about his goals and ask for their support . “The faculty and staff have been overly supportive of me and my ideas,” Dangerfield said. “From what I have seen, they are in favor of helping students and getting them involved. They care very much about the success of each person within their department.” Dangerfield said that even though he is the first Arts Senator and they are trying to figure out what works and what doesn’t, the college is very resourceful and can function well on its own. “I have had ideas that I thought would have to go through somewhere else in the university to get accomplished but everyone here at the college has been more than willing to help me out,” Dangerfield said. – megan.b@aggiemail.usu.edu

ing option along with community members not attending USU. There are still people living in the usable sections of the park, but next summer the entire mobile home park will be shut down and replaced by townhouses. The majority of the residents at the mobile home park were USU students, but the park was also a home to many families. “I think one couple has lived on the property for thirty years.” Todd said. Some of the occupants on the land rented mobile homes owned by USU while other residents chose to provide their own trailers on a lot at the park; land-owners allowed either option. Soon, even the remaining residents will be required to vacate. USU now plans to shut down the entire mobile home park by next summer and sell the land on which the proposed townhouses will be built. – marissa.bodily@aggiemail.usu.edu

Get Connected id.usu.edu

Located in JQL Janet Quinney Lawson Building (Across from Education Building)

to change your password, activate your Aggiemail account and update your preferred email.

Trained Technicians to Help You With:

bluezone.usu.edu

-Email -Access/Banner -Blackboard -Hardware Problems -Data Recovery -Malware Removal

to register your computers on the USU network.

-Hardware Upgrades -Software Upgrades -Wireless -Warranty Repair -and more!

11 open access comupter labs Utah State University Student Open Access Lab Sites (available to all registered students with a valid I.D. card)

11 9

10

12

8 4 6

5

2

7 1. Old Main Room 229, 406, 407 (797-1450) 2. TSC Room 101 (797-1382) 3. Family Life Room FL L201 (797-3607) 4. Info Commons Merrill-Cazier Library (797-3556) 5. Ag Science Room 119 (797-3489)

1

6. Sci-Tech Library Room 002 (797-2909)

3

7. Business Room 107, 113, 115, 118, 120 (797-2269) 8. Engineering 301, 303, 305 (797-3098) 9. YETC Lab Room 170 (797-3377) 10. ETE Lab IS Room 008 (797-1802) 11. UR Graphics UR 101-102 (797-2495) 12. Service Desk Janet Quinney Lawson 797-4357 (not a lab)

Visit: www.usu.edu/computerlabs or www.sls.usu.edu for more intormation.

The Open Access Computer Facilities are committed to assisting Utah State students in pursuit of their academic goals by providing state-of-the-art computer services and software; qualified consultants trained to answer any software, general, or university question, while maintaining a professional and academic-friendly atmosphere in each computer facility; and employment opportunities with real-world application and hands-on experience of Information Technology.


CampusNews

Page 6

The Utah Statesman: Downloading to latops since 1902.

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Donors: Making USU growth possible -continued from page 1



  

   

     

  



       : !/ - ! 5       

5* ,; +/2,  7/*2 < 55* # +,,6 +/7 /!- 3*/, =!5,2 , # + !, 7* 5 #!, 2, * *6# /!-  +,* >2 *?*- @ @ @ @

A!5,2 5* 9 B /*,C  D !#-!3 ,!  =*2 !, ,-!, 9*!-7 ;5,2: /** -6/!# !, --,!/ /7 !#!,62 /2/: 9! <*> !6*! !,

#;- /! /++!, !, ,-/7E

 $* /++7 !! ,-/7E

 

    ! %1 *,; ' /2,: 3/!

Expecting? !6*372 2 /! $ 898.8

BUDGE CLINIC

OB/GYN

t /PSNBMBOEIJHISJTLQSFHOBODZ

t 'FNBMFTVSHFSZ

t *OGFSUJMJUZFWBMVBUJPOBOEUSFBUNFOU t 1SFNBSJUBMDPVOTFMJOHBOEFYBNT

t 'FNBMFDBODFSTDSFFOJOHUSFBUNFOU t $PNQMFUFXPNFOTIFBMUITFSWJDFT

+BNFT1#FOFEJDU .%t,SJTUJO'$SBJH .%t&#SFUU)PSTMFZ %0 ,JNCFSMZ%.D$VMMPDI .%t5BOEZ(0MTFO .%t+FOOJGFS"OEFSTPO /1 %FCPSBI'MBOTCVSH $/.t&OB.VSJMMP /1t"OHJFDzPNQTPO /1

500 East 1400 North

435.716.1920 budgeobgyn.org

Most insurance plans accepted

sor, have established endowments for students studying social work, physics, and also created a scholarship for undergraduate research achievements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We both have academic degrees from state universities and believe deeply that public education is critical for maintaining the health of our society and economy,â&#x20AC;? Peak said. He said having access to scholarship funding in his own education was essential in earning a degree. Though the campaign began in 2003, not many knew it was happening until 2007 because it was kept in its â&#x20AC;&#x153;silent phase,â&#x20AC;? Simmonds said. When the campaign was announced, it seemed as

though it had just begun and powered the momentum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because our quiet phase was quiet enough, we had a celebration on Founderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day to announce the second phase, called the public phase,â&#x20AC;? Simmonds said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To keep the momentum we have going we need to match potential donorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passions to the direction USU is taking.â&#x20AC;? She said one of the biggest reasons the campaign has been so successful is because President Albrecht has connected and built many relationships with current and future donors. He also saved the campaign during economic struggles by establishing sturdy relationships with Utah legislators, Simmonds

BY USU MEDIA RELATIONS

Utah State University administrators gathered at the Utah Botanical Center for a groundbreaking ceremony for the Community Education Building. The center is part of USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Regional Campuses and Distance Education programs for Davis, Morgan and Weber counties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an exciting new addition to RCDE,â&#x20AC;? said Ronda Menlove, vice provost for Regional Campuses and Distance Education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are cornerstone USU degrees offered in a unique location, giving students access to hands-on learning.â&#x20AC;? The groundbreaking took place Thursday, Aug. 12, and launches the first of three phases at the site. Phase one will be completed March 2011 and includes 6,400 square feet housing

 !  



                              !                  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)*#')  +$*&) &$ %. +%0&+)&,'&%&)*#&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0 &&" %*&)%++%&,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%%&)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+&  .)')&  + ,"+&

 !    !  6 !   !  6 !    !  !   6 6    ! !            



 

  

     

                              !                  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)&$ %. +%0 &+)&,'&%&)&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0&&" %*&)%++% &,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%%&)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+& .)')&  +

&+"(* 1+,*0% %)#1*/,!(%' ,!--1*/#,!!.*,!!%0!!(%'-",*(%$!'-*/(1*+.*/..)1.%(!

  



        

   7     7 

  

                              !                  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)*#')  +$*&) &$ %. +%0&+)&,'&%&)*#&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0 &&" %*&)%++%&,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%% &)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+& .)')&  +

  



 

   7     7 

  

             

3$*2%&00$/".#--).".&/                        4    6  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)*#')  +$*&) &$ %. +%0&+)&,'&%&)*#&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0 &&" %*&)%++%&,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%%&)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+&  .)')&  +

"+&0*$&1..%.-%"5 3(312 3-%"5&/2&,#&0.-+5 "+&0*$&1..%.-%"5 3(312 3-%"5 3(312.-+5 *,.$!%$!'-)!,!-.1*/'' 

*,0%-%./-%$!'-*("*,-.*,!'*.*,%#)/+*)'%)!.*,!!%0!-+!%'!(%'*2!,- ) ,!.%0!+,*&!.% !-)%+&2 *&,%+*)&2&)  %#+ "+')  ##) +)*$0%&+'++##*+&)*#+ &%%),#)') *$0-)00'&)'  '&+&)' %') %+ %))&)*)*,!++&&))+ &%++*+&)#-# ,+&+**&%#%+,)&&,)')&,+*(,%+ + *$0# $ +%+)$0%&) %"* **,)*)-+) ++&# $ +(,%+ + *&$-)+ * +$*$0%&+- ##+##*+&)#&+ &%*2)&&&%#0 % 

11 classrooms, all fully equipped with cutting-edge technology. The building can receive interactive broadcast courses from Utah State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Logan and regional campuses. The new facility provides residents in Davis, Weber and Morgan counties enhanced opportunities to continue and complete a university education. There is also space for community classes, meetings and events. With its location at the Utah Botanical Center, the new building furthers USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to sustainability. Several graduate programs will be offered at the facility, including computer science, human resources, engineering, business administration, instructional technology, family and human development, social work, school counseling and special education. In addition to the extensive graduate program offerings, students at the new education center can currently earn bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees in special education and horticulture, with agribusiness and recreation resource management degrees on the horizon. Professional educators will also be able to earn licenses and endorsements, such as school library media, at the new center. The centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location at the Utah Botanical Center will be beneficial to programs in agriculture and natural resources. Additionally, USU Cooperative Extension will use the facility to benefit the community by holding classes, trainings and seminars on gardening, nutrition, home canning and more. Earlier, Zions Bank provided a donation of $75,000 to support the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction.

BY USU MEDIA RELATIONS

(.2.,*$)"&+1$.,2.'*-%"12.0& -&"05.3"-%1*(-3/2.0&$&*4& 1/&$*"+.''&01"-%$.3/.-1

 

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; catherine.meidell@aggiemail.usu.edu

Student awarded Pearson prize

    

     

!  

money for their needs rather than what I want. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not my campaign. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for the university. So, I go out and meet with high-end donors to fill the aspirations and needs of those colleges and departments.â&#x20AC;? According to University Advancement records, 173 endowments have been established since the start of the campaign; 139 for scholarships alone. Simmonds said it is University Advancementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main concern to be able to support the students in their higher education goals as much as possible as well as allow them to experience the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Utah State feeling.â&#x20AC;?

Ground broken for education center

          

 !  6 !  !  6 !     !  !    6  

   !  !     

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We saw a slight dip in donations during the down economy,â&#x20AC;? Simmonds said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been impacted so much less than we could have been because of Albrecht.â&#x20AC;? The comprehensive campaign experiences peaks and valleys in the amount of funding it has received over the years, but between Oct. 2007 and Feb. 2008, the campaign raked in $80 million, Peterson said. Though all the campaign money is promised to USU, a large portion of it will be used throughout the next ten years. Peterson said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to learn from departments and colleges to know what their priorities are and raise

,%0'%$1&%+'%$

/'+.)')&  +0#. #*&%++0&,)#&# #*&)  #*&$&)&,)*&&')+ &%

5($'"&*01-/&0,$ 

Utah State University Honors student Justin Hinh was awarded a 2010 Pearson Prize for Higher Education in June and travels to Boston Aug. 4-6 to be honored. Hinh is one of 50 students nationally to be named a Pearson Prize Community Fellow and is the recipient of a $500 scholarship from the Pearson Foundation. Additionally, 20 students were named Pearson Prize National Fellows and will receive $10,000 over two years. The Pearson Foundation is flying the prize winners to Boston Aug. 4-6 to formally recognize their achievements and service at an awards ceremony. The Pearson Foundation is a non-profit arm of Pearson, an educational textbook and media company. The foundation strives to promote learning by supporting students who give back to their respective colleges and communities. The prizes identify these students and enable them to continue their work. Applicants must attend a two- or

four-year accredited institution, maintain at least a 3.0 GPA, have completed at least one year of college and demonstrate leadership through community service. Hinh attended high school in Farmington, Utah, where he became involved in debate, leading to an interest in politics. Now a political science major at Utah State, Hinh is working to gain the experience and knowledge he needs to pursue a career in politics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Due to this award, I can continue to support my university and fellow peers and pursue my goals,â&#x20AC;? Hinh said. In the 2009-10 academic year, he competed with the USU Debate Team, contributing to its first place ranking at the 2010 Northwest Forensic Conference. Hinh also worked with fellow USU student lobbyists to get their voices heard concerning state education budget cuts. For fall semester 2010, Hinh will volunteer for the Honors Mentor Program, a new peerto-peer program dedicated to furthering the academic and leadership skills of USU Honors students.


StatesmanCampus News

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Page 5

Fugees coach speaks to incoming students By MEGAN ALLEN news senior writer

At the freshman Connections convocation Saturday morning, Luma Mufleh spoke about her experience as the founder and coach of the Fugees refugee soccer teams in Clarkston, Ga. When Mufleh left her home in Jordan 15 years ago, she knew she would not be going back, but she did not know the impact she would have on the lives of hundreds of refugee boys living in America. “Outcasts United: An American Town, a Refugee Team, and One Woman’s Quest to Make a Difference” by Warren St. John, a reporter for the New York Times, was the book chosen as the common literature assignment for this year’s Connections class. The book, which started out as just a news article, tells the story of Mufleh and the Fugees. “It was the surprising sense of kinship of these kids from different cultures, religions, and backgrounds that drew me into the story and

made me want to understand and tell it,” St. John said in the introduction to the book. “I don’t enjoy being written about,” Mufleh said, “but it’s a story that needs to be heard.” Mufleh was raised in a wealthy family in Jordan, but left that life behind to come to school in America. After graduating from Smith College, she moved to Georgia to begin a life for herself. She did not have any family support and was struggling on her own. One day she made a wrong turn and came across a group of refugee boys playing soccer. They were barefoot, playing with an old ball, and having the time of their lives, Mufleh said. Mufleh continued to watch these boys play, and on her third visit, joined them. “And with that,” she said, “the Fugees were born.” Mufleh said she wanted to coach the kids because she knows how they feel and wanted to understand them better. “I have an in with these kids and their families because of my background,” she said.

The goal of the Fugees is not just to win soccer games, their other big focus is education. “It’s not how many games we win,” Mufleh said, “it’s how many kids stay in school and move on to the next level.” Mufleh spends a lot of time working with the kids on their school work and making sure they are doing well. Along with soccer practices, there are a certain number of hours each player is required to spend in tutoring. “Just because my kids missed out on their childhood doesn’t mean they have to miss out on their education,” Mufleh said. Recently, the Fugees purchased 17 acres of land. That land will include their own home field for games and practices as well as a school building. However, they are not going to be able to provide for these things on their own. Fugees Academy is one of the schools participating in the Kohl’s Cares program. Kohl’s Department Store is donating $10 million to schools across the country. They are giving $500,000 to the top

20 schools who are voted on by Facebook users. Each person gets up to five votes per school and can be done on Facebook through September 3. Megan Garrido, a biological engineering major and freshman who participated in the Connections class, said “I thought the book was really inspiring. I think that it’s something people need to see and be aware of.” “I’ve always wanted to help out,” said Shellece Neff, an art major that also participated in the class. “There are so many people who don’t have what we have.” Mufleh said she does not consider herself a hero to the Fugee boys, she’s just there for them. Tracie Ediger, the co-founder and team’s manager said, “Putting Luma on a pedestal is counterproductive. She is really a normal person doing what she can for the people around her.” “No one person can do everything,” she said, “but we can all do something.” – megan.allen@aggiemail.usu.edu

Briefs Campus & Community

Construction alters bus route

In preparation for roadway paving, the road edges will be cut back to a 5-inch depth. This will take place Wednesday, Sept. 1, and will prohibit travel in the area. Two options are offered to those who park in the following areas: * Aggie Village Townhome parking lots * Northwest parking lot * Northeast parking lot * Parking lot immediately west of Aggie Village * East Stadium parking lot Distribution, ORC and student parking Option 1: Move your vehicle by 2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 1, into the terraced lots off 1000 North. Option 2: Leave your vehicle parked and do not move it until paving is completed, expected by 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 2. The advisory reminds everyone that once paving begins, vehicles will not be allowed to leave or enter the parking lots, so plan accordingly. The roadway will be closed at the 1000 North and 1200 East entrances. Also, the Aggie Shuttle Bus route is changed due to the construction. The Aggie Shuttle will have temporary stops on 1000 North at approximately 950 East and 1200 East. Paving for the northeast parking lot is scheduled Friday, Sept. 3. Striping the lines in the lot is scheduled Sept. 7. The large parking lot Northeast of Aggie Village should re-open Sept. 8 if all goes as planned.

The “A” joins the green movement

LUMA MUFLEH is a prominent character in the book “Outcasts United: An American Town, a Refugee Team, and One Woman’s Quest to Make a Difference,” by Warren St. John, a book written about her and her soccer team that was chosen as the Connections book this year. CARL R. WILSON photo

PoliceBlotter Friday, August 20, 2010 • USU Police responded to the San Juan building on a medical assist. A resident was found unconscious in the lobby area. Paramedics arrived and evaluated the victim. The victim informed the paramedics that she did not want to be transported to the hospital for further treatment. The victim was released to her boyfriend. • USU Police resopnded to the Eccles Science Learning Center on a fire alarm. A custodian said he observed a fire alarm activation box on the wall that appeared to have been pulled down. When the custodian attempted to fix the activation box, the fire alarm was activated. • USU Police responded to a suspicious activity call that occurred at the USU Townhouses. Complainant was concerned about a phone call he received that was suspicious in nature. Police investigated the call and learned that a collection agency was trying to confirm that the complainant was who he stated to be. There was no further action taken. Saturday, August 21, 2010 • USU Police received a report that an individual’s vehicle was involved in a hit and run accident. The damage to the vehicle is under $1,000.00 and there are no known suspects at this time. Police are investigating. • USU Police were asked to keep an eye on the walkway between the TSC and LLC. It was reported that people were driving on the sidewalk. • USU Police received a report of three individu-

als moving traffic barricade flashers. Upon arrival officers contacted the individuals and sorted out the situation. • USU Police assisted the Logan City Police Department with a traffic stop which resulted in an individual being arrested by the Logan City Police for driving under the influence of alcohol. Monday, August 23, 2010 • USU Police responded to the new Engineering building in three minutes for a report of a person possibly living in the building. The subject was contacted and advised of the school policy of staying in the building. The person left the building. Tuesday, August 24, 2010 • USU Police was called to the HPER Field on a male subject who had passed out while playing soccer. • USU Police assisted the North Park Police with a medical incident where a male individual had a seizure while driving but his car came to a stop on the sidewalk along the roadway. The male individual was transported to the hospital. Wednesday, August 25, 2010 • USU Police responded to Morgan Hall in two minutes for a fire alarm. The alarm was set off by a resident curling her hair. The alarm was reset by electronics. • A vendor was selling hot dogs near the intersection of 700 North 800 E. After checking with Student Services and finding out that the vendor didn’t have permission to sell items on campus,

Contact USU Police at 797-1939 for non-emergencies. Anonymous reporting line: 797-5000 EMERGENCY NUMBER: 911 police contacted the vendor. While talking to the owner of the business, it was discovered that there are some questions on the property line, and if the vendor has permission to sell at his location. The vendor was allowed to continue selling his product until the university could look into the matter. • Police are investigating a fraud case that involves a student who tried to sell his guitar on line. The buyer tried to manipulate the student into cashing a fraudulent check that was much more than the original guitar price. Thursday, August 26, 2010 • USU Police responded to a party at Wasatch Hall. There was a lot of alcohol. All individuals were advised that USU is a dry campus. One minor was arrested for minor in possession of alcohol. • USU Police responded to a residence hall about a welfare check. A parent had been unable to make contact with her student. The student later called and let the parent know all was well. • USU Police responded to the parking lot on the Northwest side of the Student Wellness Center due to a traffic accident. Police investigated and found that a vehicle had backed up and struck a passing vehicle. There were no injuries and only minor damages to each vehicle. • Police responded to a fire alarm at the business building. The alarm was activated by an individual who accidentally bumped a water line while pulling communication wire from the basement ceiling. The leaking water went into a smoke detector which triggered the alarm. -Compiled by Catherine Meidell

The lighted “A” atop Old Main tower at USU is receiving an energy efficient upgrade. The iconic “A,” which can be seen throughout Cache Valley, will receive new light emitting diode strips to replace the current neon lights that shine both white and blue. “There won’t be a noticeable difference to the white light, but the blue light will have a more intense color,” said Stanley Kane, university architect and director of operations at USU. The university entered into a contract with YESCO to replace the existing neon, which has been subject to regular damage by birds, said Kane. Replacement requires having technicians climb outside the building to replace the glass tubes. The new LED lighting has a longer lamp life of approximately 10 years and will save a considerable amount of electricity. A sample of the new lighting was already tested on the north facing “A” and has been checked for light level and color. YESCO has begun fabricating new lights for all four sides of the “A” and the university hopes to have them all replaced by the beginning of fall semester.

Music lessons open for youth The second of two open house registration sessions for Utah State University’s Youth Conservatory is approaching. The Youth Conservatory is the Department of Music’s long-running piano study program from young musicians. The second open house registration is Tuesday, Aug. 31, from 6-8 p.m. in the courtyard area at the entry of the Chase Fine Arts Center. In case of inclement weather, registration will be held in the foyer to the Kent Concert Hall of the Chase Fine Arts Center (southwest corner of 700 N. 1200 East, Logan). Fall semester classes at the YC begin Tuesday, Sept. 7. The Youth Conservatory offers private piano lessons and group musicianship classes for children and young people ages 4-18. Students of all stages of musical development are welcome. There are a variety of instructional options available to YC students.

-Compiled from staff and media reports


CampusNews

Page 6

The Utah Statesman: Downloading to latops since 1902.

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Donors: Making USU growth possible -continued from page 1



  

   

     

  



       : !/ - ! 5       

5* ,; +/2,  7/*2 < 55* # +,,6 +/7 /!- 3*/, =!5,2 , # + !, 7* 5 #!, 2, * *6# /!-  +,* >2 *?*- @ @ @ @

A!5,2 5* 9 B /*,C  D !#-!3 ,!  =*2 !, ,-!, 9*!-7 ;5,2: /** -6/!# !, --,!/ /7 !#!,62 /2/: 9! <*> !6*! !,

#;- /! /++!, !, ,-/7E

 $* /++7 !! ,-/7E

 

    ! %1 *,; ' /2,: 3/!

Expecting? !6*372 2 /! $ 898.8

BUDGE CLINIC

OB/GYN

t /PSNBMBOEIJHISJTLQSFHOBODZ

t 'FNBMFTVSHFSZ

t *OGFSUJMJUZFWBMVBUJPOBOEUSFBUNFOU t 1SFNBSJUBMDPVOTFMJOHBOEFYBNT

t 'FNBMFDBODFSTDSFFOJOHUSFBUNFOU t $PNQMFUFXPNFOTIFBMUITFSWJDFT

+BNFT1#FOFEJDU .%t,SJTUJO'$SBJH .%t&#SFUU)PSTMFZ %0 ,JNCFSMZ%.D$VMMPDI .%t5BOEZ(0MTFO .%t+FOOJGFS"OEFSTPO /1 %FCPSBI'MBOTCVSH $/.t&OB.VSJMMP /1t"OHJFDzPNQTPO /1

500 East 1400 North

435.716.1920 budgeobgyn.org

Most insurance plans accepted

sor, have established endowments for students studying social work, physics, and also created a scholarship for undergraduate research achievements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We both have academic degrees from state universities and believe deeply that public education is critical for maintaining the health of our society and economy,â&#x20AC;? Peak said. He said having access to scholarship funding in his own education was essential in earning a degree. Though the campaign began in 2003, not many knew it was happening until 2007 because it was kept in its â&#x20AC;&#x153;silent phase,â&#x20AC;? Simmonds said. When the campaign was announced, it seemed as

though it had just begun and powered the momentum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because our quiet phase was quiet enough, we had a celebration on Founderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day to announce the second phase, called the public phase,â&#x20AC;? Simmonds said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To keep the momentum we have going we need to match potential donorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passions to the direction USU is taking.â&#x20AC;? She said one of the biggest reasons the campaign has been so successful is because President Albrecht has connected and built many relationships with current and future donors. He also saved the campaign during economic struggles by establishing sturdy relationships with Utah legislators, Simmonds

BY USU MEDIA RELATIONS

Utah State University administrators gathered at the Utah Botanical Center for a groundbreaking ceremony for the Community Education Building. The center is part of USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Regional Campuses and Distance Education programs for Davis, Morgan and Weber counties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an exciting new addition to RCDE,â&#x20AC;? said Ronda Menlove, vice provost for Regional Campuses and Distance Education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are cornerstone USU degrees offered in a unique location, giving students access to hands-on learning.â&#x20AC;? The groundbreaking took place Thursday, Aug. 12, and launches the first of three phases at the site. Phase one will be completed March 2011 and includes 6,400 square feet housing

 !  



                              !                  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)*#')  +$*&) &$ %. +%0&+)&,'&%&)*#&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0 &&" %*&)%++%&,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%%&)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+&  .)')&  + ,"+&

 !    !  6 !   !  6 !    !  !   6 6    ! !            



 

  

     

                              !                  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)&$ %. +%0 &+)&,'&%&)&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0&&" %*&)%++% &,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%%&)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+& .)')&  +

&+"(* 1+,*0% %)#1*/,!(%' ,!--1*/#,!!.*,!!%0!!(%'-",*(%$!'-*/(1*+.*/..)1.%(!

  



        

   7     7 

  

                              !                  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)*#')  +$*&) &$ %. +%0&+)&,'&%&)*#&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0 &&" %*&)%++%&,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%% &)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+& .)')&  +

  



 

   7     7 

  

             

3$*2%&00$/".#--).".&/                        4    6  %&,'&%'),*+&$)')0)  %#&,'&%$,*+*,))%)++ $&',)*0%&+,*&)') &)',)**&)*#')  +$*&) &$ %. +%0&+)&,'&%&)*#&) *&,%+0%&+,*+&',)* +)* +)*#*** %*+&)+ - + * )+0')+0 &&" %*&)%++%&,) )*# + #**+&)*&%#0 $ ++&*+&"&%%&)')&,+ &%*&)#+)&%  $*'+&  .)')&  +

"+&0*$&1..%.-%"5 3(312 3-%"5&/2&,#&0.-+5 "+&0*$&1..%.-%"5 3(312 3-%"5 3(312.-+5 *,.$!%$!'-)!,!-.1*/'' 

*,0%-%./-%$!'-*("*,-.*,!'*.*,%#)/+*)'%)!.*,!!%0!-+!%'!(%'*2!,- ) ,!.%0!+,*&!.% !-)%+&2 *&,%+*)&2&)  %#+ "+')  ##) +)*$0%&+'++##*+&)*#+ &%%),#)') *$0-)00'&)'  '&+&)' %') %+ %))&)*)*,!++&&))+ &%++*+&)#-# ,+&+**&%#%+,)&&,)')&,+*(,%+ + *$0# $ +%+)$0%&) %"* **,)*)-+) ++&# $ +(,%+ + *&$-)+ * +$*$0%&+- ##+##*+&)#&+ &%*2)&&&%#0 % 

11 classrooms, all fully equipped with cutting-edge technology. The building can receive interactive broadcast courses from Utah State Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Logan and regional campuses. The new facility provides residents in Davis, Weber and Morgan counties enhanced opportunities to continue and complete a university education. There is also space for community classes, meetings and events. With its location at the Utah Botanical Center, the new building furthers USUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to sustainability. Several graduate programs will be offered at the facility, including computer science, human resources, engineering, business administration, instructional technology, family and human development, social work, school counseling and special education. In addition to the extensive graduate program offerings, students at the new education center can currently earn bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degrees in special education and horticulture, with agribusiness and recreation resource management degrees on the horizon. Professional educators will also be able to earn licenses and endorsements, such as school library media, at the new center. The centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s location at the Utah Botanical Center will be beneficial to programs in agriculture and natural resources. Additionally, USU Cooperative Extension will use the facility to benefit the community by holding classes, trainings and seminars on gardening, nutrition, home canning and more. Earlier, Zions Bank provided a donation of $75,000 to support the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction.

BY USU MEDIA RELATIONS

(.2.,*$)"&+1$.,2.'*-%"12.0& -&"05.3"-%1*(-3/2.0&$&*4& 1/&$*"+.''&01"-%$.3/.-1

 

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; catherine.meidell@aggiemail.usu.edu

Student awarded Pearson prize

    

     

!  

money for their needs rather than what I want. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not my campaign. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for the university. So, I go out and meet with high-end donors to fill the aspirations and needs of those colleges and departments.â&#x20AC;? According to University Advancement records, 173 endowments have been established since the start of the campaign; 139 for scholarships alone. Simmonds said it is University Advancementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main concern to be able to support the students in their higher education goals as much as possible as well as allow them to experience the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Utah State feeling.â&#x20AC;?

Ground broken for education center

          

 !  6 !  !  6 !     !  !    6  

   !  !     

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We saw a slight dip in donations during the down economy,â&#x20AC;? Simmonds said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have been impacted so much less than we could have been because of Albrecht.â&#x20AC;? The comprehensive campaign experiences peaks and valleys in the amount of funding it has received over the years, but between Oct. 2007 and Feb. 2008, the campaign raked in $80 million, Peterson said. Though all the campaign money is promised to USU, a large portion of it will be used throughout the next ten years. Peterson said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to learn from departments and colleges to know what their priorities are and raise

,%0'%$1&%+'%$

/'+.)')&  +0#. #*&%++0&,)#&# #*&)  #*&$&)&,)*&&')+ &%

5($'"&*01-/&0,$ 

Utah State University Honors student Justin Hinh was awarded a 2010 Pearson Prize for Higher Education in June and travels to Boston Aug. 4-6 to be honored. Hinh is one of 50 students nationally to be named a Pearson Prize Community Fellow and is the recipient of a $500 scholarship from the Pearson Foundation. Additionally, 20 students were named Pearson Prize National Fellows and will receive $10,000 over two years. The Pearson Foundation is flying the prize winners to Boston Aug. 4-6 to formally recognize their achievements and service at an awards ceremony. The Pearson Foundation is a non-profit arm of Pearson, an educational textbook and media company. The foundation strives to promote learning by supporting students who give back to their respective colleges and communities. The prizes identify these students and enable them to continue their work. Applicants must attend a two- or

four-year accredited institution, maintain at least a 3.0 GPA, have completed at least one year of college and demonstrate leadership through community service. Hinh attended high school in Farmington, Utah, where he became involved in debate, leading to an interest in politics. Now a political science major at Utah State, Hinh is working to gain the experience and knowledge he needs to pursue a career in politics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Due to this award, I can continue to support my university and fellow peers and pursue my goals,â&#x20AC;? Hinh said. In the 2009-10 academic year, he competed with the USU Debate Team, contributing to its first place ranking at the 2010 Northwest Forensic Conference. Hinh also worked with fellow USU student lobbyists to get their voices heard concerning state education budget cuts. For fall semester 2010, Hinh will volunteer for the Honors Mentor Program, a new peerto-peer program dedicated to furthering the academic and leadership skills of USU Honors students.


AggieLife Monday, Aug. 30, 2010 Page 7

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Now Renting Tenant’s rights in Utah

Club aims to earn money for Zambia By APRIL ASHLAND staff writer

By STOREE POWELL features senior writer

College often means renting housing, and usually it is students’ first time doing so. Students are excited to be on their own, and frequently are overly trusting of their landlord and naïve about their rights as renters. Marty Blaustein, an attorney for Utah Legal Services with experience in housing issues, said too often students don’t read the lease agreement before they sign it and hand over their deposit. Case in point: Ashley Valli, a freshman majoring in nutrition, is living in campus housing. Valli said she is not aware that she has renter’s rights and she did not read the contract before signing. “I talked to my RA about questions, however, and I do have my contract,” Valli said. According to Blaustein, It is important to read the lease because it lets the renter know what the landlord can and cannot do, such as raise rent if the

landlord’s taxes go up. “If a landlord tries to raise the rent, and there is no clause in the contract stating they can do that for whatever reason, they cannot raise the price of rent during the time the contract is valid,” Blaustein said. He said it is the same with utilities and repairs. “The terms of a contract cannot be changed in the middle of a lease,” Blaustein said. As for repairs, most leases state that landlords are responsible for capital improvements, like major problems with the electrical or plumbing, Blaustein said. A student should realize when they are being hustled by the landlord for capital improvements. For example, the landlord can’t charge the tenant to replace the carpet if it was stained by previous tenants, and it is ten years old. The tenant might be responsible for getting it cleaned, but not the replacement, Blaustein said.

- See RIGHTS, page 9

Zambia’s Scholarship Fund at USU, a club only a month old and ten members strong, is hoping to raise money that helps students and teachers in Zambia. “In Zambia, the government only pays for free education through seventh grade,” Jeff Merrell, the club’s president, said. Merrell is a sophomore in business administration and political science. The new club has ties to a charity founded in northern Utah, Zambia’s Scholarship Fund, which is a registered charity with the IRS, and has 501(c) status, he said. Merrell and Carlee Berry, senior in speech language pathology, went to high school together, and were the presidents of the National Honor Society. As part of the organization in high school, Berry said the two of them were told about the charity and put on a benefit concert. “When we were in high school not a lot of people knew about the event. We are from a small town,” Berry said. “We want to do more.” The conditions in Zambia can’t be called good, as Amanda Brough, junior in social work, can attest. Brough has been to Zambia to do humanitarian work, and said the country is poor, and doesn’t have the ability to export anything to other countries. “Zambia is the world’s pauper,” she said. When Merrell came back from serving a mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, he and Berry decided to begin a club at USU together to help those in Zambia. “The literacy rate is falling, and so is the life expectancy. What the fund does is make it so people can sponsor a student for a year in Zambia,” he said. When these sponsored students graduate from high school, the fund hires them to be teachers in other villages, Merrell said. “We’re not asking USU students to sponsor kids in Zambia, but we’d like to get the word out, maybe get some people from Cache Valley to sponsor them,” he said. Not only does the fund sponsor students to go through high school, but it also has other projects to help teachers and students Zambia. Merrell said in Zambia, it can sometimes take a teacher days to walk to get their paycheck and days to walk back.

- See CLUB, page 8

Program offers benefits for student mentors By COURTNIE PACKER features editor

Who mentored you? Pass it on. Mentor a child. This is just one of the ideas behind the Youth and Families with Promise program, YFP, which is making some big changes that could affect a few student’s lives this upcoming school year. YFP is designed to increase characteristics and strengths of youth ages 10-14 and their families. According to their website, whomentoredyou.vpweb.com, this mission is accomplished by utilizing one-to-one mentoring, involvement in 4-H clubs and family activities. Sharilee Griffiths, Program Director of YFP said this organization is similar to a big brother, big sister program. They are geared toward preventing children from “living in a bubble” and helping those children whose parents may have a difficult time taking care of them. The program is comprised of four key components. The first of those components is one-to-one mentoring. This allows volunteer mentors to work directly with the youth to help build skills they need to succeed in the world. Griffiths said one of the program’s

main focuses is the benefits provided to mentors that will help them become dedicated to the child they are guiding. “We had a lot of mentors that came at the beginning of the year and wanted to mentor, but they fizzled out,” Griffiths said. “That does more damage to these kids. Being a mentor, a committed mentor, makes a huge impact. It really blesses their lives. They have had enough adults fizzle out on them and not be reliable.” This upcoming year, YFP has teamed up with PALS to create an even larger mentoring program and to provide more students the chance to mentor young children. A mentor will be committed to spend one hour per week with the assigned youth and report the activity online. They must attend mentor training held bi-monthly. Also, they must communicate regularly with the mentee’s parent so they become familiar and gain trust with the mentor. Students who mentor can receive two upper-division credits. This is a new addition to the program which Griffiths said they are excited about. The class is a pass or fail course that students must take for

- See YFP, page 11

A MENTOR AND MENTEE from the Youth and Families with Promise program participate in a fall activity. The program is geared towards mentoring youth ages 10-14. photo courtesy SHARILEE GRIFFITHS


Page 8

AggieLife

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Stealing the intangible Methods for keeping student information private By STOREE POWELL features senior writer

Riddle: what can someone steal from a student that is often intangible, and despite the fact that the student is low-income, still make the criminal rich? It is a student’s identity. The theft of a date of birth

Surprise her with a solitaire... let her choose the ring. Starting at $500. (Perfect for a student budget.)

and social security number are known as stealing the “key to the kingdom” because this information can be turned into money, according to Mike Prusinski, Senior Vice President of Corporate Communications at the identity theft protection company LifeLock. Prusisnki mentioned statistics like ‘You’re ten times more likely to get your identity stolen in America than your car,’ and ‘According to the FBI, identity theft is the fastest growing crime in America,’ as well as ‘Identity theft is a low risk-high reward crime so less than half of 1 percent of people ever committing this crime ever get prosecuted.’ “It is not hard to believe that college aged students are in one of the fastest growing segments of the ID theft crime, according to the Federal Trade Commission,” Prusinski said. When students go back to school, they are bombarded with people looking for their information, like financial aid sources, housing, local banks and creditors, Prusinski said. Marketers see college students as a brand new form of income, so they target them. Prusinski said while Utah is in great standing overall, approximately 34th nationally, it all comes down to how the crime is reported. He said it may be in Utah that not as many cases get reported, but it doesn’t necessarily mean the crime is not going on. On Aug. 26, LifeLock paired with the FBI Law Enforcement Executive Development Association (LEEDA) to put on a free identity theft summit in West Valley City to help Utah law enforcement become aware of new trends and how they can best work to combat the crime. Prusinski said these summits are critical because identity theft is a very fast-changing crime.

COLLEGE AGED STUDENTS are one of the fastest growing targets of identity theft. There are up to 30 different way to steal an individual’s identity. CARL R. WILSON photo illustration

Some of the common things students do that put them at risk for ID theft are, according to Prusinski, are: – Leaving out wallets or purses, checkbooks, ID cards or even leaving a computer logged on, not just in public places like libraries, but also in dorm rooms where roommates or friends can have access to them. Prusinski said, “You might be friends now, but 25-30 percent of all identity theft crimes are cases of friendly fraud, where the thief knows the victim.” – Carrying a social security card in a purse or wallet. Prusinski said the number should be memorized and the card put in a safety deposit box.

– Downloading filesharing networks. Some of these networks are free downloads that anyone can get on their computer to share music with the world, like Limewire, Bearshare or Frostwire. They not only enable the user to share music, but documents from their computer. Prusinski said, “If you are saving your tax return on your computer, criminals can do a simple search on the network for “tax return,” and then they will download it on their computer. You may not ever know it was taken. You should never put these dangerous programs on your

- See THEFT, page 11

Club: Sends aid to Africa -continued from page 7

“We’d like to help by maybe paying for bicycles so teachers don’t have to cancel school for a week at a time,” Merrell said. The fund at USU is planning two main events to raise funds, Berry said. A 5K race in September and a benefit concert in April. Berry said the 5K will be held on Sept. 25. Registration will open at 7:30 a.m. and the race will begin at 8 a.m. “It’s 5 dollars, and all the money we raise goes to the fund,” she said. The benefit concert, called Zambia Fest, will be held April 30, called Zambia Fest, is shaping up to be a big event, according to both Berry and Merrell. “We’re going to have Keith Stubbs, from (radio station) 101.5 The Eagle, be our MC, and he said he was excited to help,” Berry said. Stubbs has won awards for being the best talk show host on the radio, and Berry said he owns Wiseguy Comedy Club in Ogden, UT. Merrell said the club is growing, and he hopes it continues to do so. “We’re looking for help, to give people opportunities,” he said. To get more information on events and the scholarship fund, you can visit www. Zambiasscholarshipfund.org or email them at Zambia.usu@ gmail.com. –april.ashland@aggiemail.usu. edu


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Rights: Guide to housing issues -continued from page 7 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The damaged item is only worth its market value. At most the tenant pays for the repair, being no more than the current value of the item. The rule is to repair when possible, not replace. Normal wear and tear that breaks or ruins items is not the tenantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility,â&#x20AC;? Blaustein said. Another important reason to read the lease is to learn of the time period in which a renter has to raise concerns about the premises to the landlord. It is often 24-48 hours, Blaustein said. Therefore, by not saying anything, the tenant is agreeing the place is in an inhabitable condition. Also, Blaustein said it is critical for tenants to scan their lease contract and keep both the electronic and physical copy in safe places, â&#x20AC;&#x153;not just the kitchen drawer.â&#x20AC;? According to utahcourts.gov, tenantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rights website, renters have the right to â&#x20AC;&#x153;a safe and sanitary home. You have the right to call a health or housing inspector if you think there is a code violation in the property you are renting.â&#x20AC;? Blaustein said this standard is defined by health and building codes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A property should have functioning heaters, drinkable water, a degree of security like a locking door, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The damaged item windows that open is only worth its marand shut, it is free of rodents and pests, has ket value. At most the working fire detectors, tenant pays for the and it should be clean. repair, being no more If these things are not than the current value in place, do not trust the landlord,â&#x20AC;? Blaustein of the item.â&#x20AC;? said. Marty Blaustein, If a tenant discovers attorney for Utah Legal something like a health Services hazard that was not disclosed by the landlord, like meth use or infestation, they should contact health department, Blaustein said. This is because if the case goes to court, the health department can be subpoenaed to testify on behalf of the tenant. Bottom line: if the landlord knew there was a danger and did not say so, it is a deceptive practice, and the tenant can turn to a private attorney. Renters should know that in Utah, according to utcourts. gov, landlords do not have the right to lock a tenant out of the property unless the renter is legally evicted by a court order. Blaustein said landlords routinely enter a tenantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unit forcibly to lock the tenants out rather than use the legal process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You often see this in smaller towns. Sometimes police support the landlords. In that situation, most students have low income and qualify for legal services, and should contact Utah Legal Services,â&#x20AC;? Blaustein said. When moving in and out of a rental, take lots of pictures of the premises, inside and outside of drawers, the back of fridge, the ceiling. According to Blaustein, landlords will find every possible reason to not give a deposit back. When taking the pictures, use a copy of that dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newspaper in the background of the pictures as evidence of when it was taken. Landlords can say the date can be changed in the camera. Students should also keep in mind that it is very difficult to enforce oral agreements because a judge has to decide who is telling the truth. They need to get everything in writing, including deposit and rent payment receipts. When a student moves out of a rental, the state code says they have to make a written demand to the landlord that they are requesting the return of their security deposit. They then have 30 days to give it back or state the reason they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t giving it back. If neither of these things happens, a renter can file a small claims action, according to Blaustein. If the landlord doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respond in the 30 days, the tenant would be entitled to a $100 penalty. Blaustein said it is always risky to vacate a rental because it is considered breaking the lease and the landlord can sue for the rest of the lease time. The only way a tenant can break a lease is when there is a material breach of the lease by the landlord. For example, if the furnace goes out in the winter, and the landlord is not getting it repaired, the tenant may have a case. But first, Blaustein said, the tenant has to notify the landlord in writing of the problem and then should contact the health department. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would never advise a tenant to break a lease unless it is a case of domestic violence,â&#x20AC;? Blaustein said. Tenants should remember that federal and state laws prohibit discrimination in all aspects of housing, according to utcourts.gov. This includes different treatment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap, family status or source of income. Blaustein said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no such thing as a nice landlord when it comes to accusations of a property in deficient condition. Get everything in writing. State laws require receipts.â&#x20AC;? For information on landlord and tenant rights and responsibilities, go to www.utcourts.gov/howto/landlord/. For Utah Legal Services, visit www.utahlegalservices.org/. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;storee.powell@aggiemail.usu.edu

AggieLife

Page 9

Now that you are on your own ... Students just starting college are usually experiencing their first on-their-own move. Mom helped pack the knickknacks and underwear, but now what to do (besides send her a thank you note)? Alert the people. Let them know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve moved to a new address.

requires a change of address on your driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license (donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry, it is free).

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Send an email or text message to friends and family with the new physical and/or mailing address, and how long you will be there.

Scope out the town.

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; File your change of address with the Post Office at least 30 days prior to the date of the move, if possible. This can be done online at usps.com. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Alert the following of your address change: banks, credit cards, old and new employers, cell phone provider, insurance providers and magazine subscriptions. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; If you are out of state, you may need a change of a drivers license if you are now a resident of Utah. For those still residents of their home state, Utah law

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; As you make friends in your new place, ask locals for referrals to the best places like dentists, restaurants, hair stylists and grocery stores. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Learn where important services are, such as student services, medical providers and public transportation. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Keep copies of the Aggie Shuttle routes and campus maps on hand so seniors donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get annoyed at freshman asking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the bus stop?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Get the record straight. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Obtain records from medical providers, dental records, employment

records and recommendations, copies of personal documents such as birth certificates and health insurance records, and if need be, college transfer records. Unpacking the kitchen sink. While it is tempting to unpack in a crazed frenzy to attempt quick unloading, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; First, unpack the tools: scissors, hammers, nails, screwdriv ers, flashlight, tape measure, picture hangers, gloves and a utility knife. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Then, unpack the kitchen essentials: utensils, dish detergent, towels and paper dinnerware. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Next, unpack the bathroom essentials: toilet paper, toothbrush and toothpaste, towels, soap, shower curinformation gathered by Storee Powell



Workout Where Your Friends Workout!

!"#$%$&'()*+,,-,./)012345  



&6')7$89&):5)9&!('"&9)&;)9$<")!=

!"#"$%"&'&(!""

and so much more!

9=;8&9)>?>('%@)%'%A'896$= KLDE*K+M+NOPQ3MDP 1B55)"):CC)'/)"DE*F)#D.+,/)!*+F)G)HI5J25IJ25CC        

Basketball Racquetball Over 100 Group Fitness Classes Yoga Zumba Pilates Spinning Tonic Fitness Indoor/Outdoor Pools Jacuzzi Sauna Steam Room Indoor Track Massage Facials Body Wraps

Your Club! Your Results! Your Life!

Windshields

* Approved by all * Unbeatable Customer Service Insurance Companies* Free lifetime chip repair * Lifetime Warranty with windshield replacement

$9.95

Rock Chip Repair 435-753-6671

$125

$125 off

deductible on

any windshield replaccement *some restrictions apply ask for details

905 North Main

for most windshields *May require new moulding. Not valid with any other offer. Expires 12/1/2010

www.loganglassonline.com


Page 10

SpecialFeatures

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010


AggieLife

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Page 11

Back to college with must-have gadgets By GREGG ELLMAN McClatchy-Tribune

With college classes starting up during the next few weeks, here are just a few of the endless supply of must-have/ cool/can’t live without gadgets for your shopping list. The Kiwi U-Powered Solar & USB Portable Charger assures users that, as sure as the sun will rise, they will have power for most any portable gadget anywhere, anytime. This includes cell phones, PDAs, digital cameras, iPod, iPhones, portable gaming devices and anything else that needs a charge to keep such essential power-hungry gadgets going. To charge the solar power unit, built with three solar panels, unfold the panels and put it in the sun to charge. Kiwi rates solar charging time at up to 17 hours for a full charge or about 4 hours with AC or USB. You can charge the battery up to 1,000 times, and expect an output of 2000 mAh. Very often portable batteries come with a small selection of charging tips and you must order and buy additional ones. Kiwi supplies 11 different small tips and a USB port for the supplied cable. The following are listed on the company’s website as being compatible:

Nokia, Samsung, LG, Palm, Blackberry, iPhone, iPod, Motorola, Sony, Bluetooth, GPS, digital cameras, PSP, e-book, Nintendo DS, Kindle, etc. The iLuv iMM178 Vibe Plus does what every college student hates doing – getting up in the morning. It’s built with dual alarms and sets the time with a new time sync feature, which sets the clock directly from an iPhone or iPod to ensure everything synced with the same time. In addition to being a great sounding unit, which iLuv has come to be known for with their jAura acoustic speaker technology, users can have the device shake the bed to help make it to class on time. This is done by plugging the bed shaker (about the size of a hockey puck) into the back of the unit and then placing the device under a pillow or mattress. Once the alarm goes off, the shaker vibrates to help you wake up. If the bed shaking isn’t your thing (I’m with ya), then choose from seven different alarm sounds or wake to music of your choice from your charged up iPhone or iPod. Old school users can even choose to wake to FM radio. Regardless of whether it’s for home, work or play, everyone needs some extra digital storage these days and a good

start is the Iomega Skin-branded portable hard drive for Mac or PC users. The company designed the look of drives in conjunction with Skin Industries so the drives stand out in today’s hip culture. There are three different eye-catching USB 2.0 powered models in the new line with 500 GB of storage for documents, videos, images, videos or music. Iomega rates the 500GB to hold up to 200,000 photos, 125,000 songs or more than 190 hours of video. These numbers can vary depending on the size of each file, but regardless they will hold a lot. Users can choose from the Radical, Red Hot or the Knock Out hard drives, all of which store your data in the same secure way. What I like about the Iomega drives is they are built with the companies Drop Guard protection. This helps protect the unit from damage if dropped from up to 51-inches on industrial carpet. The AViiQ Portable Laptop Stand puts a new meaning to the word portable. I’ve used the stylish laptop accessory several times on the road recently and each time I’ve been asked, “what’s that” while setting it up. A recent press release called it the world’s thinnest laptop stand and who can argue, since it folds down.

YFP: Seeking student mentors -continued from page 7

both semesters and YFP pays for the credit. tors and students,” she said. Students are required to attend all of the Another component of YFP is the family trainings, and write two papers throughout night-out activities. Griffiths said these are the course of the two semesters. activities designed to help improve family Additionally, mentors are given many free relationships. Training and a vast selection of tickets to concerts, community activities resources will be available for parents of parand plays to attend with their mentees. They ticipating youth. Many of these activities will receive service hours for graduate school be held for those also participating in PALS applications and an addiin hopes of making life more tional item to place on their consistent for the families. resume. Also, up to ten stu“The smoother transition “After six dents have the opportunity to we can make on the families, receive a scholarship through the better, Griffith said. months of menAmeriCorps. “With the PALS mentors for toring is when However, Griffiths said example, as the youth move you are actumentors must be able to to YFP, the mentors will move ally making a mentor for a full school year. with them.” Cassie Glade, PALS director, Griffith said up to one hunchange. If it is said mentoring for the full dred mentoring positions, for less than four year is crucial. YFP and PALS combined, are months, it can “After six months of menopened for this school year. be detrimental.” toring is when you are actuStudents who are interested in ally making a change,” Glade becoming a mentor for both said. “If it is less than four –Cassi Glade, the Youth and Families with months, it can be detrimenPromise program or PALS, PALS director can attend the recruitment tal.” PALS is an organizacarnival today from 11 - 3 on tion through the Val R. the front lawn of the Living Christensen Service Center, and is a program Learning Center. similar to YFP. PALS recruits students and A recruitment activity will also take place matches them with children in the 6-9 age at the Logan Aquatic Center Friday Sept. 3. group, whereas YFP is matched with children Email Griffiths at cacheyfp@gmail.com for ages 10-14. more information on the activity or for any Glade said PALS is excited about the colquestions or the Youth and Families with laboration with YFP because they feel it will Promise program. help their organization get their feet on the If you are interested in becoming a menground and give them the ability to serve tor or have any questions about PALS, email more youth while doing it. Glade, or Braden Thompson, co-director of “This is great for us because YFP is very PALS, at pals@aggiemail.usu.edu. structured. Our goal this year is to create –courtnie.packer@aggiemail.usu.edu structure with leadership roles for both men-

Theft: Learning tricks to security -continued from page 8 computer.” What can a consumer do to protect themselves? Prusinski said the first thing is to get educated by using the internet. Criminals use it to get information on victims, but students can use it to learn about the different types of ID theft. He said there are 27-30 kinds. Taylor Stroshine, a freshman majoring in psychology, said while she has no filesharing networks on her computer, her personal documents are just in a file box, and are thus not protected from friendly fraud, a common mistake according to Prusinski. He also said to know where there are risks when providing information. For example, whenever someone asks for a social security number, ask why it is needed, like at a doctor’s office. If they cannot answer why, nor tell how it is being protected, don’t give it. ID theft can even happen through a college or university. A LifeLock press release said, “Since July 2009, an estimated 72 breaches in 30 states have been reported, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse website. It said in approximately 88 percent of these instances, a student or individual’s SSN was exposed. A number of the listed breaches on Privacy Rights Clearinghouse’s website do not specify the number of affected individuals, implying that this number could actually be higher.” What happens when an identity is stolen?

Often, the thief opens credit accounts, utilities, mortgages, gets medical treatment or will even go to another part of the country and get a job. Prusinski said it is not uncommon for them to file the victim’s tax return and receive the refund. Then, when the victim files, the IRS is asking why he or she has double filed. “ID theft is different from every other crime in America. You are guilty until you prove yourself innocent,” Prusinski said. If someone learns they have had their identity stolen, they need to file a police report and contact the Federal Trade Commission so the case is documented. Next, contact the credit bureaus to work on fixing credit scores. Prusinski said generally when someone learns their identity has been stolen,it is because they receive a bill in the mail or a phone call from a bill collector. “You don’t have to live with your head in the sand, use precaution and research insurance. States and colleges are getting smarter about not putting numbers on cards, but some people still carry them around anyway,” Prusinski said, “We have a feeling it won’t happen to me, even though all the stats show you that you know someone who has been victimized or have been yourself. Every ten seconds, there is a new victim of ID theft.” –storee.powell@aggiemail.usu.edu

Welcome Back

AGGIES!! Thirsty Thursday

FREE DRINKS! must bring in coupon and Student ID not valid with any other offer

Ditch the Dorm Sunday Meal Deal from 11 am to 8:30 pm

$7.99

must bring in coupon and Student ID not valid with any other offer drinks not included

Come in and save! 435-787-9750 2044 North Main


Views&Opinion

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010 Page 12

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

OurView

AboutUs Editor in Chief

Stabbed in the WAC

Benjamin C. Wood

O

n Aug. 19, rumors started flying that BYU was thinking about leaving the Mountain West Conference, going independent for football, and joining the WAC in all other sports. This talk sent Aggies everywhere into a frenzy. What came next shocked us even more. That Friday, Utah State was offered a spot in the MWC. Our athletic department turned the offer down for a few reasons, one of the biggest being a contract all WAC teams had signed after Boise State announced its departure. The contract essentially said that we were going to stay together as a conference for the next five years. If any team decided to leave, they would have to pay a $5 million buyout fee to the conference. After we turned down the invitation, the MWC started talking to Nevada and Fresno State. At first no one was worried because we were sure they’d stick to the contract. Apparently, we were wrong. That day, both Nevada and Fresno State announced they would be leaving the WAC and joining the MWC. WAC-stabbers. Thanks for that. We turned down the offer out of loyalty to the conference. It had only been a week or so since the contract had been signed. We assumed everyone else would treat it the same way. It all could have been really good for us. With Utah gone, and BYU possibly joining us in the WAC, neither the WAC nor the MWC would have been the conferences they used to be. Utah State’s basketball program is already strong and our football program is growing. Give us a couple years and we could hold our own in, or against, the MWC. More importantly, we were true to our commitments. We believed in the unity, and future, of our conference. We thought that contract meant something. Apparently not. If BYU does leave, the Mountain West is not going to be nearly as strong as it has been in the past. The WAC had the potential to be the next Mountain West if these teams had stayed. The program would have grown, the level of competition would have increased, it would have been a win-win situation for all of us. Instead, Fresno and Nevada just decide to leave us all hanging. So now what? Everyone’s worried that the WAC is going to completely fall apart. And let’s be honest, it might. But let’s have a little optimism, shall we? This is our chance to dominate the conference all-around. This is our chance to show the country what Utah State is made of. Bring it on.

More than just another year at college Welcome home, Aggies. ASUSU Get ready for a year of events on this campus that you will View never forget. However, this school year will be more than just going to the 80’s dance on the quad Friday night with DJ Marcus Wing. This year will be more than seeing The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus play a free show on the street this Saturday. More than winning a motorized scooter or a plasma screen TV during high stakes bingo this Thursday, this year is about getting that cute girl’s number during our outdoor screening of Iron Man 2 on Old Main Hill. It is about meeting new friends as you listen to Quietdrive live in concert tonight on the TSC Patio. Of course you will be getting free food everyday this week, including Aggie Ice Cream, Scotsman Dogs, pizza, etc. As you do I hope you feel as though you are a part of something greater than just another year at college. This Wednesday as you are laughing along with NBC’s “Last Comic Standing” finalist, Ryan Hamilton, I hope someone you meet that night is still your friend 40 years from now or maybe even your spouse ... wait, this isn’t BYU. I hope you feel that you can call Utah State home. As we welcome you to campus either for the first time this year or the eighth, I hope you feel a sense of belonging. There is a lot to look forward to this week, this semester and this school year. With bands like S-Curve Records’ recording artist “We the Kings” playing at the Howl, or the Emmy award winning actor, writer, and producer of NBC’s hit TV show The Office, BJ Novak, coming to campus, I hope the memories and friendships you make last forever. Having the largest freshman class to ever hit this campus, along with all the transfer and returning students, remember we are all Aggies. Here’s to the year of soda in the drinking fountain. Be sure to check out our website at www.usu.edu/asusu for a full list of WOW week events. Also, don’t forget to follow us on twitter @ASUSU1888 for weekly prize giveaways.

Tom Atwood

Tom Atwood is the ASUSU Programming Vice President

News Editor Catherine Meidell Assistant News Editor Megan Bainum Features Editor Courtnie Packer Assistant Features Editor Kellyn Neumann Sports Editor Adam Nettina Assistant Sports Editor Matt Sonnenberg Copy Editor Chelsey Gensel

Say hello to your paper Hello, and welcome to another exciting year of upper-academia. We at The Utah Statesman are committed to providing you with the information you need to better navigate your time here at Utah State: cutting-edge news coverage, in-depth features on campus and community events, and all the buzz on Aggie athletics. Thomas Jefferson once said that if he had to choose, he would prefer to have newspapers and no government, rather than government with no newspapers. We at the Statesman understand this responsibility that we hold, and take our job – serving you as readers and members of the USU community – very seriously. As we find ourselves undertaking this venture I feel the need to reach out and offer my advice for taking full advantage of your friendly, neighborhood, student-staffed campus newspaper – campus voice since 1902. Yeah, we know that’s impressive. Read it The Statesman is free. Really. We publish every Monday, Wednesday and Friday that classes are held, and in addition to the brain-wrinkling knowledge packed in every page, you just might score a coupon for a free smoothie at McDonalds. Just about everything that happens on campus, a good deal of what happens in Cache Valley, some stuff that goes on in Utah and a little bit of international sugar on top make up the delicious cocktail found in every issue of The Utah Statesman. Want to know where

From the Chief

Benjamin Wood the Logan Lurker is going to strike next – or at least where he’s already...stricken? – or what legal grey area Anthony DiLoreto has found himself in? Want to know what new college is going to emerge next out of HASS – I’ll give you a hint, it ain’t Journalism and Communications – or what time the paint dance on the quad starts? Read it in the Statesman. We are human, sadly, and as such we may fall short of absolute perfection. I can assure you, however, that we are working our absolute hardest at printing the most accurate, comprehensive, and timely campus information. Write it The Statesman is a fullyfunctioning independent student newspaper. We employ a full range of positions ranging from staff reporters, movie reviewers and columnists to ad salesmen and photographers. We pay, and we’re hiring. Or, for those of you who occasionally have a bone to pick without needing the regular obligation of producing copy for admittedly meager pay, write us a letter. Our opinion page is an open forum for the marketplace of ideas. Whether you’re a registered student, a faculty member, or a concerned parent who has picked up an issue to distract from the backwards-walking fauxhawk guiding your tour of

campus, our editorial arms are open to you. Guidelines for our letters to the editor can be found in this section. Express your thanks to the administration for its calm, steady hand in directing the affairs of our university. Offer your side to an allegedly ill-reported story. Shed insight into an ongoing subject of community discussion, or, for you more high-profile players, share a heartfelt mea culpa for some cataclysmic indiscretion. We love that last category especially. If, by chance, you find yourself standing upon a soap box that requires more than a 400-word maximum, stop by the office and pitch us a guest column – especially you faculty, step up! Be it While we can’t offer free publicity to every campus organization, the backburner and online calendar are open to any event that pertains in any way, shape or form to USU. The campus briefs section is also available for more newsworthy announcements, and advertisements can be purchased at affordable rates for student groups. News happens every day, all around us. Often we see it and shrug it off as unimportant or irrelevant. Don’t hesitate to tell us when news is happening around you. We would never advocate that you and your roommates rob a bank, light yourselves on fire, or instigate a nude protest parade around the quad; but that said, if your neighbors do, make sure you let us know.

- See CHIEF, page 13

Photo Editor Carl R. Wilson Assistant Photo Editor Alison Ostler Web Editor Tyler Huskinson

Editorial Board Benjamin C. Wood Catherine Meidell Courtnie Packer Adam Nettina Chelsey Gensel Tyler Huskinson

About letters

• Letters should be limited to 400 words. • All letters may be shortened, edited or rejected for reasons of good taste, redundancy or volume of similar letters. • Letters must be topic oriented. They may not be directed toward individuals. Any letter directed to a specific individual may be edited or not printed. • No anonymous letters will be published. Writers must sign all letters and include a phone number or email address as well as a student identification number (none of which is published). Letters will not be printed without this verification. • Letters representing groups — or more than one individual — must have a singular representative clearly stated, with all necessary identification information. • Writers must wait 21 days before submitting successive letters — no exceptions. • Letters can be hand delivered or mailed to The Statesman in the TSC, Room 105, or can be e-mailed to statesman@aggiemail. usu.edu, or click on www.utahstatesman. com for more letter guidelines and a box to submit letters.

Online poll What will be the state of the WAC in one year? •

Stronger, with new programs and the Aggies in the lead. • Weaker, we’ve lost our best programs and appeal. • Dead and buried. Visit us on the Web at www.utahstatesman. com to cast your vote and see results from this straw poll.


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Views&Opinion

Pg. 13

USU says goodbye to a dear friend Utah State University lost a well-known voice for its students over the summer break. Miss Jones, weekly contributor to the Utah Statesman, friend to all those in need and avid cat-lover, passed away while aboard the Queen Mary 2 World Cruise. While details are unclear, an incident report obtained from the Queen Mary 2 cruise personnel states that shortly after re-boarding the ship after a scheduled stop in “The City of Peace” – Sharm el-Sheikh – Egypt, Miss Jones got into an argument with one of her fellow passengers, a woman by the name of Jade O’Ryan. While it remains unclear what, precisely, the argument was about, there is some speculation that Miss Jones had begun an affair with Mrs. O’Ryan’s husband, Gabriel. Twelve crewmen were reported injured trying to break up the cat-fight, which started in the Grand Lobby and continued through the Mayfair Shops, into the Royal Court Theater, across the stage, back out of the theater, through the Empire Casino, up the Grand Rotunda Staircase, through the Upper Britannia Restaurant and across the deck before somehow ending up in the crow’s nest. At that time, the two women were so exhausted, they both collapsed. When all was said and done, the boat had sustained approximately $428,080.48 in damage and there was an unexplained leak in the starboard-aft engine room. The two women were taken to the brig and held until they calmed down, at which time they received a stern talking-to from the ship’s captain. Later that evening, guests reported a disturbance on the deck’s basketball court, where Miss Jones had stolen a basketball and thrown it overboard. She was promptly put back in the brig. The brig’s officers later reported she was in good spirits and had been telling them stories from her life – a beautiful Asian man in Venice, an incident involving a mountain lion and her brother, a man

JONES with Gherkinson’s Disease, being a cook for a boat off the shores of Colombia, etc. The following day Miss Jones was released from custody and allowed to enter the port city of Safaga with the other passengers. Upon re-boarding the ship there was a catastrophic gangplank failure. A small child was snagged on the gangplank, dangling 100 feet above the water. Miss Jones acted quickly, grabbing the child and handing him off to safety just as a gust of wind tilted the gangplank further away from the ship. Miss Jones fell those 100 feet into the water below. Rescue boats and swimmers were dispatched to save her, but after 5 hours of searching were unable to recover her body. Although the last few days of her life were turbulent, Miss Jones died a death that she could be proud of. While she loved kittens more, she had a strong fondness for children and gave up her own life to save that of a child. She will be remembered by all those who read her columns as a wise woman who cared for everyone but that sexist tramp Katherine O’Mann. Though she can no longer teach us with her words, we can always learn from her actions. As Miss Jones once said to me, “I want to be in you,” she now can. May that kind old woman be in me and be in you always. This obituary was prepared by Miss Jones’ father’s cousin’s second child’s great-grandson, Connor Jones.

Chief: We’re here for you -continued from page 12 On the softer side, our features section is constantly looking for an interesting and compelling story. Maybe your frat brother can reproduce the Mona Lisa by painting with his eyelashes or perhaps a girl in your dorm is actually the princess of a Pacific Island nation that was smuggled to the U.S. by Somali pirates. Frankly, if any of you have any connection to Somali pirates, introduce yourself to me immediately. We exist to tell your story. Whether it is something that you, or a group of you, have accomplished, caused, or instigated; or a campus occurrence that may pertain to you in any way, we will do our best to have it in print and on the stands. This is your news, this is your school and we would certainly hope that you come to think of us as your newspaper. Benjamin Wood is the editor in cheif of The Utah Statesman. He can be reached at TSC 105, statesmaneditor@aggiemail.usu.edu, or by calling 797-1745.

Check out summer news you missed by visiting www.utahstatesman.com


World&Nation

Page 14

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Latest Afghanistan fighting kills 7 U.S. troops

AFGHAN DOCTORS TRY TO REVIVE ABDUL MANAN, a candidate for the September Parliament elections,after he was shot, in Herat, west of Kabul, Afghanistan, Saturday, Aug. 28. On Saturday evening in Herat province, a candidate running for a seat in parliament was shot and killed as he was on his way to a mosque, said Lal Mohammad Omarzai, deputy governor of Shindand district. AP photo

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) – Seven U.S. troops have died in weekend attacks in Afghanistan’s embattled southern and eastern regions, while officials found the bodies Sunday of five kidnapped campaign aides working for a female candidate in the western province of Herat. Two servicemen died in bombings Sunday in southern Afghanistan, while two others were killed in a bomb attack in the south on Saturday, and three in fighting in the east the same day, NATO said. Their identities and other details were being withheld until relatives could be notified. The latest deaths bring to 42 the number of American forces who have died this month in Afghanistan after July’s high of 66. A total of 62 international forces have died in the country this month, including seven British troops. Fighting is intensifying with the addition of 30,000 U.S. troops to bring the total number of international forces in Afghanistan to 140,000 – 100,000 of them American. Most of those new troops have been assigned to the southern insurgent strongholds of Helmand and Kandahar provinces where major battles are fought almost daily as part of a gathering drive to push out the Taliban. The five campaign workers were snatched Wednesday by armed men who stopped their two-vehicle convoy as it drove through remote

countryside. Five others traveling in the vehicles had earlier been set free, according to a man who answered the phone at the home of candidate Fawzya Galani and declined to give his name. Residents of Herat’s Adraskan district reported finding the bodies early Sunday. They were later transported to the local morgue for identification by family members, district chief Nasar Ahmad Popul said. No one has claimed responsibility for the killings, although Taliban insurgents have waged a bloody campaign of murder and intimidation against candidates and election workers in hopes of sabotaging the Sept. 18 parliamentary polls for the 249 seats in the lower house. In a similar attack in Herat, male parliamentary candidate Abdul Manan was shot and killed Saturday on his way to a mosque by an assassin traveling on the back of a motorcycle. Meanwhile Sunday, two suicide bombers attempted to climb over the back wall of a compound housing the governor of the far western province of Farah, but were spotted by guards and shot, provincial police Chief Mohammad Faqir Askir said. The men’s vests exploded, although it wasn’t clear if they detonated themselves or because they were hit by bullets, Askir said.

19 dead from insurgent shootout in Russia’s Caucasus TSENTOROI, Russia (AP) – A shootout between the Chechen president’s personal protection detail and suspected separatist insurgents left 19 people dead early Sunday, including five civilians, officials and media reports said. At least 12 suspected insurgents and two security officers were killed when the rebels entered Tsentoroi, Ramzan Kadyrov’s home village, his spokesman Alvi Karimov told The Associated Press. TV reports said five civilians were killed in the crossfire. Kadyrov, who is thought to regularly supervise security operations in the field, was in the village at the time and directed the counter-offensive, Karimov said. “We let them into the village so they couldn’t escape,” Kadyrov told Channel One television, which showed him examining the bodies of the suspected militants strewn across a road. “We forced them into a place where they could be eliminated,” he said. An AP reporter at the scene saw fire-ravaged and bul-

let-ridden homes, with body parts lying among the rubble. Resident Vargan Edelgeriyeva, 48, said the gunbattle started at about 3 a.m. at a construction site about 150 meters away from Kadyrov’s residence. Militants entered local homes but were quickly surrounded, Edelgeriyeva said. In one house an insurgent detonated explosives, perhaps a grenade, killing himself and a 30-year-old resident, she said. Police in 2009 averted a possible assassination attempt on Kadyrov, shooting dead the driver of a car suspected of containing explosives before he could reach a construction site where Kadyrov was due to make an appearance. In a separate incident Sunday, security forces in nearby Dagestan province shot dead four suspected militants traveling in two cars when they refused to stop at a police checkpoint, according to police spokesman Magomed Tagirov. He said weapons were later found in the cars. Russia’s volatile North Caucasus suffers daily attacks

by insurgents seeking independence from Moscow, but this weekend’s bloodshed has been especially fierce. On Saturday, nine suspected militants were killed in two separate shootouts with police in the KabardinoBalkariya republic, while five suspected militants and two police officers were killed in another shootout in Dagestan. Kadyrov previously fought on the side of the rebels but switched sides and was installed by the Kremlin as Chechen leader in 2007. Comparative peace has arrived in Chechnya and its capital, Grozny, since then, but rights activists say the price has been brutal. They allege Kadyrov has directed widespread human rights violations, including abductions and summary executions of suspected rebels and sympathizers. Associated Press writers Sergei Venyavsky in Rostovon-Don and David Nowak in Moscow contributed to this report.

Come to Sears for all your

Back to Campus Needs Wednesday, August 25th thru Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

everyday low price

00 59 Eureka ®

Maxima upright bagless vacuum #36761

119

99

everyday low price

SALE

00 59 Kenmore black 22.25-in.

SAVE $35

Kenmore® 3.3-cu. ft. compact refrigerator #93382

0.7-cu. ft. counter top microwave oven #69079

Show your College ID and receive 10% off Offer good 8/25 thru 9/15/10 on in store purchases only.

18999

SALE

SAVE $10

Sylvania® 19-in. class LCD HDTV #71209

2999

everyday low price

SALE

99 19 Craftsman Evolv

SAVE $30

Bionaire® oscillating 2-speed power fan #90043

™ 23-pc. homeowner tool set #10028

While Quantities Last

While Quantities Last

Join us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/searshometownstores and follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/searshts for special offers every Friday.

VISIT US ONLINE AT: SearsHometownStores.com

AVAILABLE AT THIS STORE LOCATION ONLY

LOGAN

909 S. MAIN, LOGAN, UT 84321 435-753-3770

PUB:UT003 JA#008C027

A PARTICIPANT OF THE 7TH ANNUAL WORLD TESTICLE COOKING CHAMPIONSHIP eats a dish in the village of Ozrem, some 150 kilometers (90 miles) south of Belgrade, Serbia, Saturday, Aug. 28, Teams of chefs cook up bull, boar, camel, ostrich and even kangaroo testicles. AP photo

Kangaroo testicle? OZREM, Serbia (AP) – In a remote Serbian mountain village, they’re cooking up delicacies to make your mouth water – or your stomach churn. At the seventh annual World Testicle Cooking Championship, visitors watch – and sometimes taste – as teams of chefs cook up bull, boar, camel, ostrich and even kangaroo testicles. “This festival is all about fun, food and bravery,” said Ljubomir Erovic, the Serbian chef and testicles gourmand specialist who organizes the bizarre cooking festival and has published a testicle cookery book. The food – politely called “white kidneys” in Serbian – is believed to be rich in testosterone. In the Balkans, it is considered to help men’s libido. “The bulls’ testicles are the best, goulash style,” said last year’s winner Zoltan Levai, stirring a metal pot heated by a wood fire and filled with vegetables and large testicles that he said were provided from a state-run slaughter house. The festival – which includes dishes like testicle pizza and testicles in bechamel sauce flavored with a variety of herbs found in the region. Visitors eat the dishes with plenty of wine or beer, and cool themselves in a small mountain river that flows beside the makeshift cooking stands blasting folk music. The stalls also sell roasted pig or lamb as a side dish. “I came here last year, and decided to come back,” said Anna Wexler, an Israeli citizen originally from New York who’s now a member of the festival’s jury. “It was delicious. There was testicle moussaka, goulash, stallion, boar, bull and many other things.” The festival also gives prizes to to those who have made the news for being “ballsy”. This year one of the unsuspecting winners is U.S. President Barack Obama. “He’s the bravest man in the world,” said Erovic. “Obama took over the world at the most difficult economic and political times,” Erovic said. “He showed he has balls.” The other prize went to American pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger who last year glided a passenger jet into the Hudson river in New York rather than risk crashing in a densely populated area trying to reach an airport.


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

SpecialFeatures

Page 15


Today’s Issue

Page 16

StatesmanBack Burner

Monday

Aug. 30 - First Day of Classes, Fall Semester - Big Blue Scholarship Fund, 12 p.m.

Today is Monday, Aug. 30, 2010. Today’s issue of The Utah Statesman is published especially for Kris Sayer, a junior majoring in accounting from Twin Falls, Idaho.

Important dates You need to know.... The Registrar’s office would like everyone to be aware of the following dates: Sept. 3 is the Last Day to Add without an Instructor’s Signature and a Tuition and Fee Payment Deadline. On Sept. 4 all wait lists are discontinued and registration purge will take place Sept. 4-6.

Flight Deck • Peter Waldner

Go to utahstatesman.com and add your event to Big Blue’s Best Calendar, the most comprehensive list of events at USU. Calendar items will appear in both the online and print editions of The Utah Statesman.

Gen Ed SI courses

SI begins for selected General Ed classes. Students attending 6 or more times earn 1/2 grade or better for their final course grade.

Major Fair

Almanac Today in History: In 1983, U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Guion S. Bluford became the first African American to travel into space when the space shuttle Challenger lifted off on its third mission.

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Tuesday

Aug. 31 - Ancient Painters, Merrill Cazier Library, All Day - SI for General Ed Classes -Youth Conservatory Fall Registration, Chase Fine Arts Center, 6 p.m. - Volleyball vs. Weber State, Spectrum, 7 p.m.

Weather High: 68° Low: 41° Skies: Scattered Tstorms with 30 percent chance of rain.

Wednesday

Sep. 1

- SI for General Ed Classes

The Major Fair will be held on Oct. 1 in the TSC International Lounge from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come learn about the variety of majors, minors, and degree programs available at USU. Enter the drawing for great prizes! This event is designated as an Aggie Passport opportunity. More info available in TSC 304.

Strange Brew • Peter Deering

Ancient Painters

Utah State University’s Merrill-Cazier Library sponsors “Ancient Painters on the Colorado Plateau,” a Utah Arts Council Traveling Exhibit that featrues the photographs of USU professor Craig Law. The exhibition can be seen in the library’s atrium Aug. 13 through Sept. 15. Law is featured in an exhibit lecture and public reception Thursday, Sept. 2, 5-6:30 p.m., Merrill-Cazier Library, Room 101.

Registration

Youth Conservatory Fall Registration Aug. 31 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. to be held at the Chase Fine Arts Center (FAC) Courtyard. The Youth Conservatory is the Music Department’s long-running piano study program for young musicians, ages 4-18.

More Calendar and FYI listings, Interactive Calendar and Comics at

www.utahstatesman.com


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010 Page 17

MondaySports Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Strange Days Utah State, WAC facing uncertain futures after summer shake-ups HEAD FOOTBALL COACH GARY ANDERSEN addresses question during the WAC’s media days in July. Andersen is beginning his second year as the head coach of the Aggies, who are entering the season with high expectations, but now have a potentially cloudy future ahead as conference realignments cast uncertainty about the Aggies future conference affiliation . CARL WILSON photo

By ADAM NETTINA sports editor

SALE

Utah State’s best offensive player was lost for the season before it ever began. Stanley Morrison, the play-making receiver who was supposed to step in for the injured Robert Turbin, went down for the year in a freak divingboard accident early this summer. The Western Athletic Coference (WAC) the Aggies were hoping to surprise this season learned that it would lose its flagship football program in June, while the teams slated to fill the void left by Boise State – Fresno State and Nevada – recently announced their decision to jump ship for the Mountain West Conference. If that weren’t enough, the ultimate coup de grace came when Aggie fans learned that USU also had an opportunity to the MWC, yet turned it down out of loyalty and the promise that in-state rival BYU would join the WAC in all sports except football. Dizzy yet? We’re less than a week away from the opening of the 2010 college football season, but you wouldn’t know it from talking to fans of the WAC’s nine teams. Instead of buzzing over preseason watch lists and talking of which games will be the most important this season, WAC fans, including those in Logan, have instead been taken on an offseason odyssey worthy of a daytime Emmy. It wasn’t supposed to be like this. Just eight short months ago the Aggies looked primed for a breakout campaign. After a promising 4-8 season in 2009 the team figured to be even more potent in 2010, with second team all-WAC running back Robert Turbin returning along with most of the pieces from the NCAA’s 12th-ranked total offense. Likewise, the WAC looked as powerful as it had in years, and following a perfect season by Boise State and impressive campaigns by Nevada and Fresno State, national pundits had reason to believe that the WAC would be among the

strongest non-Bowl Championship Series (BCS) conferences in 2010 and beyond. Some speculated that the conference could achieve automatic qualifying status for the BCS within a few years, while die-hard fans reveled in the chance to stick it to the MWC. As the winter began to thaw, however, so did the league’s future begin to unravel, and so did the “sure thing” of a quick Aggie turnaround begin to take on more caveats than certainties. It started with Turbin going down in an offseason conditioning drill in late January. The second-team all-WAC running back tore his ACL, and although various reports speculated that he could rejoin the team in time for the 2010 season, Aggie fans learned this summer that he’ll instead miss the entire season. The outlook for the season – incredibly optimistic following a road upset of bowl-bound Idaho in the 2009 finale – dimmed even further when wide receiver Stanley Morrison broke his foot during a summer swimming accident. If Aggie fans were looking to the WAC’s reputation for solace for their own team’s injury concerns heading into 2010, then they were greeted instead with more uncertainty and ominous news. With conference realignment rumors running rampant throughout May, Boise State became the first team to depart when the program announced its intention to transition into the MWC following the 2010 season, and was followed by similar defections by Nevada and Fresno State just two weeks ago. This second round of shuffling – which will leave the WAC with a perilously slim six members beginning in either 2012 or 2013 – is especially painful for Aggie fans, when they learned that USU had also been invited to join the WAC’s more powerful rival. USU declined the invitation, however, on the assumption that BYU would join a stable WAC conference in all sports except football. While the situation remains fluid, it now appears that BYU will remain in the MWC. USU Athletic Director Scott Barnes has reportedly been at

work attempting to renegotiate a deal to bring the Aggies into the former offshoot of the WAC, but as the days drag on the prospect of securing a conference invitation appears increasingly bleak. All of this comes just days away from the Aggies’ Sept. 4 opener against Oklahoma. Despite the turbulent offseason and talk of impending conference implosion, USU head coach Gary Andersen remains committed to the program’s goals in 2010. One of those goals includes getting his team to a bowl game – a feat not achieved by USU since 1997. Asked after USU’s scrimmage last Wednesday if he was concerned his players might be paying too much attention to off-the-field events, Andersen set the record straight as to where the team’s focus is. “It is not hard keeping the guys focused,” said Andersen, who is entering his second year as head coach. “I don’t think they have given it two seconds of thought to be quite honest with you. They are just happy to come out and play and prepare for the season that is in front of them.” Andersen went on to say that neither he nor his players have paid much attention to the ongoing situation with the WAC’s future and where USU might fit into it. Instead, he’s making sure his players understand just what’s at stake when it comes to the on-field action this season, including the daunting trip to Norman, Okla. “We will just take it as it falls and continue to fight on,” Andersen said. Levi Koskan, a junior defensive end from Cache Valley who anchors what many are hoping is an improved USU defense, echoed his coach’s sentiments. “Right now it’s just one day at a time, one practice at a time, one play at a time. All that (other) stuff, we are not worried about it,” he said. USU’s players aren’t sweating the uncertainty of the WAC’s future, and they’re not losing sleep over the loss of Turbin and Morrison, either. With innovative offensive coordinator Dave Baldwin at the helm, USU’s players have confidence in the offense to perform even without

their top running back and wide receiver, and say that the loss of the unit’s top play-makers will only present the opportunity for a previously unheralded player to step forward. “We still have play-makers on offense,” said senior running back Derrvin Speight. “Those were two main big-play guys last year, but we have some guys willing to step it up who are ready to fill that void and make some big plays.” Speight hopes to be one of those players. He saw limited duty in 2008 and 2009, but actually led the Aggies in rushing in 2007 with 504 yards. He has shown explosiveness and great change of direction in fall camp, and could be a major surprise for Baldwin’s offense. Also included in USU’s plans to replace Turbin will be senior Michael Smith and sophomore Kerwynn Williams. Aside from filling in for Turbin at running back, Williams will also see time as a punt returner and kickoff returner for USU this fall, hoping to replicate some of the dynamic moves that Morrison wowed Aggie fans with last year. Like Speight, Williams isn’t concerned with all the rumors about USU’s place in the college football landscape. He said it’s out of his control, and the only thing he can do is to stay focused on the season. “I haven’t really paid much attention to the conference talk,” Williams said. “I’ve just been concentrating on how the season is going to be. I feel like my mind is all on that right now.” USU’s future in football, and in all other sports, may be in limbo for now, but as the leaves begin to turn and the days become shorter, the strange days of summer will take a backseat to the excitement of Saturdays on the gridiron. It all starts this Saturday, and for USU’s players, the challenge couldn’t be more exciting. “I’m really excited, it is going to be a good game,” Williams said. “I think everyone on the team is as excited as I am. We are ready to play in a big venue in front of all those fans.” – adamnettina@gmail.com

New Faces, New Places, A New Ride Best Prices of the Season on bikes and accessories • ALL 2008-2010 Bikes 15-40% OFF • Helmets SAVE $10.00-$90.00 • Clothing and Accessories on SALE 20-60% OFF Joyride Bikes 65 S. Main Street Logan 435-753-7175 www.joyridebikes.com


Page 18

StatesmanSports

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Single and Pregnant? 3INGLE0REGNANT

A Call for Help Explore your options. We’re here to listen. We’re here to help. FREE confidential services available to all.

175175 W. W. 1400 N., N., Suite A, Logan 1400 Suite A , Logan

USU Bid Sale Public Invited

September 1-3, 2010 Time: 9 am-6 pm 880 East 1250 North North Romney Stadium Hundreds of Items including: pickups sedans cargo vans gates desks chairs file cabinets

panels

computers printers monitors feeders projectors man-bucket truck

Kawaski UTV SUVs copiers animal scales shelving furniture & much more!

Check our Web Site at: www.usu.edu/surplus

SOPHOMORE LIBERO LAUREL BODILY goes down for a dig during the volleyball team’s blue and white scrimmage last Wednesday. The Aggies opened their regular season Saturday with wins over UC Davis and the University of Utah in the Utah Classic. CARL WILSON photo

Volleyball slams way to 2-0 By MATT SONNENBERG assistant sports editor

The USU volleyball team is off to a quick start after winning both of its matches this weekend, just a week after coming off a warm-up scrimmage. Following the scrimmage, head volleyball coach Grayson DuBose said his team was looking to get rid of a bad taste left in its mouth from a 2009 season in which high expectations went unmet. “They learned how to compete,” DuBose said of the lessons learned from a year ago, when his team experienced periods of both early-season triumphs and late-season struggles. But after a Saturday doubleheader against UC Davis and the University of Utah, that bad taste from 2009 appears to be on its way out, replaced by something much more favorable for the Aggies. “It’s hard not to like everything we did,” DuBose said. “I thought as a team we played very, very well.” Utah State opened up the 2010 campaign with an afternoon sweep of UC Davis and

finished off the opening day of the season with the Aggies’ first victory against Utah in Salt Lake City since 1990. Leading the way for USU was junior outside hitter Liz McArthur, who tallied 19 kills in just three sets against UC Davis, and tied a careerhigh with 25 kills against the Utes. “She’s capable of getting in this really nice groove,” DuBose said of McArthur’s play Saturday. “She was hitting smart and she was being decisive and she didn’t hesitate.” USU opened up against UC Davis with a small deficit throughout most of the first game before running off four straight points to break an 18-18 tie against the Big West Conference member. From there, Utah State held on for a 25-21 victory in the first set – a score that would become a trend throughout the remainder of the match. In the second set, USU opened up a commanding 93 lead early before UC Davis eventually battled back to tie the set at 15-15. Still, the WAC Aggies never trailed en route to the 25-21 win over the Big West Aggies.

The third set saw USU’s largest deficit of the entire match when the team trailed 9-13 early. USU battled back to tie the match at 14, however, before dropping three straight points. Behind 14-17, Utah State took control of the match one last time as they notched seven of the next eight points to take the lead back one last time for another 25-21 win to complete the sweep in the battle of the two Aggie teams. Later in the day, USU took on in-state rival Utah, a foe DuBose’s team hasn’t beaten during the last two seasons. USU came out against Utah with a bit of a rocky start, falling behind for the majority of the first set before eventually battling back to force the set into a tiebreaker, which the Aggies lost 30-28. That’s when the resolve and experience kicked in for the Aggies. “We just kept grinding and grinding,” DuBose said. “I think it shows a lot about who we are as a team and our character. We were down and we came back.” Utah State battled back in the second set with a 25-19 victory in which the Aggies never trailed. The third set was much less convincing for USU, as there were three lead-changes throughout a set that also saw the score tied at 10 different points, the last of which came at 22-22. Fortunately for Dubose, USU won three of the next four points for a 25-23 win and a 2-1 lead in the match. The fourth set was a much more commanding one for USU. The Aggies led for the majority of the action on their way to a 25-19 win in that set and a 3-1 win. While McArthur’s combined total of 44 kills over the two matches landed her Most Valuable Player honors for the Utah Classic tournament, DuBose was pleased with the effort of everyone involved. “Everyone played a vital role in what we were trying to accomplish,” he said. One of those roles was played by senior Chelsea Fowles, who logged 56 assists in the tournament finale against Utah to follow up a 36-assist performance in the first match against UC Davis. Fowles also had three service aces during the tournament. Utah State’s 2-0 start to the season marks the first time the Aggies have stayed perfect through two matches since 2005, when USU started the season 4-0. The Aggies will attempt to push the record to 3-0 when they host Weber State Tuesday night at 7 p.m. in USU’s home opener at the Spectrum. Admission is free for students. – matt.sonn@aggiemail.usu.edu


StatesmanSports

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Page 19

WAC quarterbacks aim high in 2010 By ADAM NETTINA sports editor

Forget talk of the WAC’s impending implosion. Put aside rumors of possible expansion and further realignment. Look beyond the “selfish” actions of Nevada and Fresno State. This week, when the college football season kicks off, all eyes will be on the WAC’s crop of quarterbacks, who look to bring their respective teams to national prominence. In an offseason dominated by talk of anything and everything off the field, the WAC boasts considerable star power on it. It starts with Boise State’s Kellen Moore, but it doesn’t end there. In total, seven WAC quarterbacks return to play this season after registering a passing efficiency rating of 125.00 or greater in 2009 – a statistic no other conference can match. Whether it be the pinpoint accuracy of Moore and Idaho’s Nathan Enderle, or the dual-threat play-making ability of USU’s Diondre Borel and Nevada’s Colin Kaepernick, the conference’s strength at quarterback figures to earn the WAC plenty of national attention. “I think their names are probably not as much out there as other quarterbacks, but they do have the ability to be at the top,” said USU linebacker Bobby Wagner. Wagner commented that the WAC’s quarterbacks – including Borel – often don’t get the exposure of many of the nation’s top signal callers, but he expects that to change this season. “Playing more and more games, the nation will get more of a chance to see them play and see that they are elite,” Wagner said. “Kellen Moore has obviously shown he can be one of the best quarterbacks in the country and Diondre (Borel) has shown that he can be one of the best quarterbacks in the conference. The more and more they’re seen the more and more they’ll be compared to other (great college) quar-

terbacks.” is where it all starts, and these guys play at a treThis isn’t the first time the WAC has seen a mendously high level.” national star among its ranks at the quarterback Kellen Moore agreed, going so far as to say position. Colt Brennan led the Hawaii Warriors to that in order to be successful in WAC play, a team a BCS bowl game in 2007 while setting numerous must have a good quarterback. passing records, while players like Billy Volek and “You’ve got to be successful at quarterback to David Carr have gone onto NFL success. The 2010 hopefully have a successful team,” he said. season looks to be different, however, and unlike The WAC’s top signal callers may all play previous seasons where only one or two WAC at a very high level, but when it comes to their quarterbacks earned national acclaim, this year personal styles of play, they’re as varied as the the conference boasts a quartet of bona fide stars. conference’s geography. Last year’s Offensive Not only that, but several “lesser-”known WAC Player of the Year, Moore may be undersized by signal callers – like Hawaii’s Bryant Moniz and traditional standards, but his pinpoint accuracy Fresno State’s Ryan Colburn – could surprise after and understanding of the game are unequaled. showing flashes of brilliance in 2009. “He’s the only quarterback I’ve played against Just where do WAC quarterwho puts it only where their receivbacks stack up nationally? At WAC “He might be ers can get it,” said Bobby Wagner. media days in July, new Louisiana the best ‘wiggle “I think that’s what makes him Tech head coach Sonny Dykes said around and make special.” the conference’s top quarterbacks Moore is ranked as the 12th compared “very favorably” to their a play’ quarter- best draft-eligible quarterback back I’ve ever counterparts in the PAC-10. The by Phil Steele magazine, and was PAC-10 is considered to be especially seen in a long named a first team All-American strong at quarterback in 2010, with time,” by both ESPN.com and SI.com last Washington’s Jake Locker and season. Kellen Moore, Stanford’s Andrew Luck already getIf Moore represents the quinon USU QB Diondre tessence of efficiency and producting mentions as future first-round NFL draft choices. Borel tion as a passer, than Kaepernick Locker and Luck may have and Borel represent the new school to compete for the draft dollars. of NCAA quarterbacks who are a According to Dykes, WAC quarterbacks bring threat to defenses with both their arms and their just as much to the table as anyone in the nation. legs. Both are blessed with exceptional speed, and Their play, he said, is a testament to the systems are especially dangerous when plays break down they play in and the coaching they have received. in the pocket. “The guys in this league are very well “I think Colin is very good,” said Moore of coached,” said Dykes, who served as offensive Kaepernick. coordinator at Arizona before taking the job in “If people haven’t had the opportunity to watch Ruston. him, he is just a tremendous athlete – one of the “It’s a really progressive league with great coaches best athletes, I think, who plays college quarterand outstanding quarterback play, and that’s back as far as being able to run and make plays what makes it difficult to win in this league. on the run.” Getting your quarterbacks to play at a high level “At the same time he can drop back and make

throws,” added Moore. “We’ve seen him get better and better like a lot of quarterbacks throughout the years and next year he’s got some opportunities to definitely showcase his talents.” The feeling of mutual respect is a common theme for WAC quarterbacks. Kaepernick, who is coming off a year in which he threw for more than 2000 yards and rushed for more than 1000, couldn’t stop raving about his peers, and said that their unique styles make watching them a treat. “They are a big play waiting to happen,” said the Nevada quarterback. “They run their offenses great. You can see it in the way they play. They are all very confident in what they do. I love watching them making plays and leading their teams to wins ... they all win games for their teams and they all do a great job but it’s all in a very different way. You kind of get something different each week.” Local media outlets and WAC players aren’t the only ones who’ve taken note. In August, ESPN. com columnist Pat Forde ranked the top ten quarterbacks in college football who “find a way to win.” Three WAC players – Moore, Enderle, and Kaepernick – all made it onto the list, giving the conference more players than any other league featured. Is it a safe bet to say that 2010 will be the year of the quarterback in the WAC? It may be too early to tell, and other conferences certainly have their share of star power, but Fresno State defensive end Chris Carter may have summed it up perfectly in July. “I feel like the WAC has four of the best quarterbacks in the country,” Carter said. That alone, even in an offseason filled with so much drama, is reason enough to tune into what could very well be the conference’s most competitive season yet. – adamnettina@gmail.com

The fearsome foursome of WAC quarterbacks Kellen Moore, Boise State Count Aggie linebacker Bobby Wagner as one who believes Moore is among the best players in the country. “He’s the only quarterback I’ve played against who puts (the ball) only where his receivers can get it,” Wagner said of the Boise State University quarterback. Moore, who is considered by many to be a Heisman trophy candidate in 2010, was the WAC Offensive Player of the Year in 2009, leading the nation in passing efficiency (161.65) and finishing second in touchdowns thrown (39). With a career record of 26-1, he’s a proven winner, and gives the Broncos a real chance at winning a national title this season.

Young, and that’s no exaggeration. Kaepernick – who like Moore is a Heisman contender – is one of only 10 QBs in NCAA history to rush for 1000 yards or more in backto-back seasons, and became only the second player in FBS history to throw for 2000 yards or more while rushing for over 1000 yards in back-to-back seasons. “(Colin) is one of the best athletes who plays college quarterback as far as being able to run and make plays on the run,” Moore said.

6’3’’ Eric Shaw. Mel Kiper Jr., ESPN draft guru, currently has Enderle ranked as his third best senior QB in the country. Diondre Borel, Utah State

Nathan Enderle, Idaho Colin Kaepernick, Nevada The 6’6’’ quarterback says that he models his game after Vince

A prototypical passer with next level size (6’5’’, 227 lbs.) and a rocket arm, Enderle enters his senior year after finishing fifth in the nation in passing efficiency

a year ago, despite missing two games. Four of his top five receivers from last season return in 2010, including 6’6’’ Eric Greenwood and

Logan’s own is just as as dangerous with his legs as he is with his arm, and has earned the respect from the WAC’s other top QBs. “I think he might be the best ‘wiggle around and make a play’ quarterback I’ve ever seen in a long time,” said Moore. Borel led the WAC in total offense last year with 287.6 yards per game, and already holds the school record for rushing yards by a QB. His four interceptions thrown in 2009 were the second fewest in the FBS (Football Bowl Subdivision).


StatesmanSports

Page 20

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

Aggies continue solid start, remain unbeaten By TYLER HUSKINSON web editor

For a program only in its 11th year, four consecutive 10-win seasons is quite an accomplishment â&#x20AC;&#x201C; except for the Utah State Aggies womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team, that is, which has done just that. Expectations will be high again in 2010, as the Lady Ags are the Western Athletic Conferencesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; preseason pick to win the conference. On Aug. 29, the Aggies (2-0-1) drew with the Idaho State Bengals, 0-0 in double overtime. The Bengals had more shots on goal (9-2) but the Aggies had more shots overall (17-13). In preparation for the match against the Bengals, Aggie head coach Heather Cairns said the Lady Ags needed to play physical and be patient. According to Cairns the Aggies did just that, but werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t able to find the net. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We kept the ball on the ground and battled against long grass. They play a more physical style and we battled against that as well,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. In any other collegiate or club sport, the Bengals wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t generally be considered an Aggie rival, but the two teams have gutted out hard fought matches but are even in the all-time series with five wins each and Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tie. Three of the last four matches between the two teams have gone into overtime. The Aggie season started Aug. 20 when USU defeated in-state rival Weber State, 2-1 at Rio Tinto Stadium in Sandy, Utah. Junior forward Shantel Flanary and senior forward Lauren Hansen scored goals for Utah State late in the contest. Flanary headed the ball into the net off a Hansen pass in the 81st minute, and put a 22-yard shot past Wildcat goalkeeper Ryann Waldmann five minutes later. In their home opener on Aug. 22, the Aggies crushed in-state rival Utah Valley University with a 4-0 final score. Sophomore defender Natalie Norris headed two goals off corner kicks and

assisted another goal as well. Flanary picked up her second goal of the season in the 55th minute to help secure the lead. The shut-out victory was particularly special for junior goalkeeper Molli Merrill, who said, â&#x20AC;?Putting away UVU was great. It shows what kind of team we are.â&#x20AC;? The Aggies finished the 2009 season falling to Boise State during the WAC tournament on penalty kicks. Despite the disappointing finish, Cairns says the team isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dwelling at all on last year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even thinking about last season, we are just focused on this season,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really excited about our core of returners and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got some great rookies. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an exciting time of year where you get to look forward.â&#x20AC;? The Lady Ags are returning several key players including Flanary. The junior from Highland, Utah received the 2009 Western Athletic Conference Offensive Player of the Year Award, and was named first team All-WAC and was a member of the WAC AllTournament team. Flanary received the 2010 Preseason WAC Offensive Player of the Year and according to the junior forward, the expectations for the program are justified. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They just continue to get higher,â&#x20AC;? Flanary said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We expect more than just 10 (wins) now. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to know that our program is rising instead of flattening out or going down. We definitely have a target on our backs being picked to win the conference, but I think we wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it any other way.â&#x20AC;? According to Cairns, Flanary will definitely be able to handle the pressure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things that makes Flan(ary) so special is that she really likes the pressure,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She really thrives under pressure. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got that great risk-taking mentality where if it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work that time, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll work next time.â&#x20AC;?

SENIOR FORWARD LAUREN HANSEN battles for control of the ball against Utah Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s keeper during the Aggiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4-0 victory over the Wolverines a week ago. The womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s soccer team remains unbeaten after three games following a 0-0 tie versus Idaho State on Sunday. ANI AGHABABYAN photo

The Lady Ags will also be looking to Hansen to lead the offensive attack for the remainder of 2010. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think if you look at Lauren Hansenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on track to break the all-time scoring record,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think she needs nine more to break that. Laurenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had a great career here and we expect her to end it with a bang.â&#x20AC;? Freshman forwards Libby Lundquist, Mauri Miyashiro and Jessica Hoskin have found a niche in the Aggie lineup as well. According to Cairns, freshman midfielder Kendra Pemberton has stepped up and made an instant impact after making her first collegiate assist in the victory against UVU. Junior defender Chandra Salmon has also earned All-WAC accolades and

plays a vital role in the midfield. â&#x20AC;?Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really the engine in our midfield,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She sits back and destroys everything and lets our other midfielders be creative.â&#x20AC;? According to Cairns, senior midfielder Stefani Shiozaki and Natalie Norris both have a lot of experience and play a key role in the backfield. Merrill played full-time goalie last season and according to Cairns she has solidified her position at goalkeeper for this season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is even more confident, she has been making bigger saves, and she is really good at communicating and that calms down our back,â&#x20AC;? Cairns said. The Lady Ags are loaded with individual skill but they know that any success will be a team effort. Flanary said of her preseason accolades, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anytime

you get individual awards itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obviously really a reflection of a team effort because I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have gotten it if we had gone fifth or last in the conference. If no one is looking out for you, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re obviously not doing anything worth watching.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here, this probably is the closest we have been as a team as a whole,â&#x20AC;? Flanary continued. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a good job at realizing that we had a lot of newcomers coming in and we knew many of them would need to step up. We are a lot closer this year than we have been in the past.â&#x20AC;? The Aggies travel to California to face Long Beach State Sept. 3. at 6 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ty.d.hus@aggiemail.usu.edu

HIGH-SPEED INTERNET FROM QWEST   

 





  mo.



'+!&%*.!+ &,+ &$' &%*)-!-!##/*",* &.&+)$&%+)+)(,!) *Price available to new subscribers to 1.5 Mbps speed tier or higher. Requires Qwest local phone service. Other restrictions apply. Limited time offer. Offer is only available to residents of AZ, CO, IA, ID, MN, NM, OR, UT and WA.

TO ORDER QWEST HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ÂŽ:

CALL ..... 866.770.6673

EspaĂąol 888.273.8993

CLICK ..... qwest.com/university VISIT ..... For Qwest locations, qwest.com/stores Promotional Pricing: After six months, customers also having Qwest home phone service will pay the monthly rate for the following speed tiers: $30 for 1.5 Mbps/896 Kbps; $35 for 7 Mbps/896 Kbps; $40 for 12 Mbps/896 Kbps; $50 for 20 Mbps/896 Kbps; and $80 for 40 Mbps/896 Kbps. These rates are subject to change. Prices for customers without local phone service will be $10 higher. Discount will begin with first full month of billing. Offer cannot be combined with other High-Speed Internet promotions or reward cards unless otherwise allowed. Other restrictions may apply. Limited time offer. Qwest High-Speed Internet: Service not available in all areas. Connection speeds are based on sync rates. Download speeds will be up to 15% lower due to network requirements and may vary for reasons such as customer location, websites accessed, Internet congestion and customer equipment. Fiber-optics exists from the neighborhood terminal to the Internet. Speed tiers of 7 Mbps and lower are provided over fiber optics in selected areas only. Customers qualifying for 7 Mbps speed tier will receive maximum line speeds ranging from 3 to 7 Mbps. With approved credit. Activation fee applies. Prices exclude taxes, surcharges, and other fees. Requires compatible modem. Subject to additional restrictions and subscriber agreement. Copyright Š 2010 Qwest.All Rights Reserved.


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

StatesmanSports

Pg. 21

No shortage of WAC starpower By ADAM NETTINA sports editor

Think the WAC is just about quarterbacks? Think again. Here are five exciting players to keep an eye out for in 2010. WR Phillip Livas, Louisiana Tech: Perhaps the most electrifying athlete in the entire conference, the 5’8” Livas displays exceptional quickness and vision whenever he touches the ball. He’s a dangerous return man who took both a punt return and kick return to the house last year, and figures to be the perfect fit in coach Sonny Dykes’ new spread offense. DE Chris Carter, Fresno State: A first-team All-WAC player a year ago, Carter notched five sacks in 2010 despite playing with a broken hand. An exceptional athlete with a great first step, Carter is simply too quick for most tackles in the conference. His relentless pursuit and ability to tackle in space make him one of the most feared defenders in the WAC. WR Greg Salas, Hawaii: The Warrior receiver is a statistical machine, and is coming off a junior year in which he averaged over 122 yards per game in receiving yards. At 6’2” and 210 lbs., he has impressive size, but his 4.5 speed in the 40-yard dash and lateral quickness make him a nightmare to cover in the slot. He caught two TDs against USU last

year, and is expected to be one of the best WRs in the country this season. SS Jeron Johnson, Boise State: The unquestioned leader of the Bronco “D,” Johnson is a true enforcer in the secondary. He was second-team All-WAC after notching 91 stops a year ago, including 14 against Utah State. Johnson has already been named to the Thorpe Award watch list, which is given at the end of each season to the nation’s best defensive back. DE Dontay Moch, Nevada: The reigning WAC defensive player of the year, Moch turned heads this offseason when he ran a reported 4.18 second 40-yard dash in practice. Last season he recorded 20 tackles for a loss, and according to his coaches is still far from the best player he can be. A former linebacker who has shown marked improvement in the technical aspects of playing DE, Moch needs just 7.5 sacks this season to set the new WAC career record. LT Rob McGill, Lousiana Tech: A 6’6’’ behemoth with 32 career starts under his belt, McGill is the most dominant offensive lineman in the WAC and the player who’ll be called upon to protect the blind side of Bulldog quarterback Steve Ensminger. He plays with great leverage and has exceptional use of his hands, while he shows remarkable footwork despite his 310 lbs. – adamnettina@gmail.com

The average cost of a DUI in Utah is about $7000. Mom will be thrilled.


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

SpecialFeatures

Page 22

Michael Emerson â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a little lost after â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BY JEN CHANEY The Washington Post

The Emmy Awards generally recognize the best of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s currently on television. But occasionally, some nominees are honored for work thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already behind them. Such is the case for Michael Emerson -- up for his supporting turn as the manipulative Benjamin Linus on ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost,â&#x20AC;? which ended its six-season run in May with much hype and heavenly imagery -- and Connie Britton, competing for a best actress prize as super-mom Tami Taylor on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friday Night Lights,â&#x20AC;? which wrapped production in July on its fifth and final season. (Those episodes air beginning in October on DirecTV and next year on NBC.) We recently chatted with both veteran TV actors - one a previous Emmy winner,

the other a first-time nominee -- about the big night and how it felt to say goodbye to characters they knew, loved and lived with for years. Q: You have a couple of Emmys under your belt already, including the one that you won last year for playing Ben Linus on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost.â&#x20AC;? If you feel any pressure going into the Emmys, does the fact that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve already won alleviate it? A: I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t feel much pressure. I just feel like, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a great honor to be nominated, but I feel like I have maybe slightly less to prove. And you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have that tension of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will I ever win it?â&#x20AC;? in mind. I feel very comfortable with it this year. Q: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve said in other interviews that you and fellow â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lostâ&#x20AC;? Emmy nominee Terry Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Quinn are shopping around

a TV project to work on together. Is that right? A: Terry had a good idea and we presented it to certain people who are the kind of people who get TV shows made. They liked the idea, but they also had other ideas. So I think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a batch of ideas being batted around and I think some of them have been farmed out to veteran TV writers who are coming up with ideas that they might present. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see if any of those is the dream project and whether thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the will and energy to make it go forward. If it ever happens, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a ways off. Q: What do you miss most about no longer being Ben Linus? A: Well, it hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fully soaked in yet that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not him. For the purposes of walking around the streets of

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010 Page 22

ClassifiedAds

Utah State University â&#x20AC;˘ Logan, Utah â&#x20AC;˘ www.aggietownsquare.com

Announcements New Location! Visit Oasis Books, 25 West Center, Logan. http://www.oasisbooksoutreach.com 435-753-8697.

Misc 4 Sale Bag of Books only $7! Incredible deals in store. http://www. jensonbooksonline.com 435-753-5367.

Student Jobs For more information about these jobs, see USU Student Employment, TSC 106 or www.usu.edu/studemp on-campus jobs: C429-96 Mowing $6.55/hr C341-05 Substitute Truck Driver $10.50 C513-10 Programmer $11.50 per hour C005-04 Research Assistant $1500/month

C018-11 Private Tutor negotiable C037-11 Heavy Equipment Operator BOE C160-06 Substitute Teacher 65.00 - 75.00 C046-11 Undergraduate Lab Technician $8-$10, negotiable C061-11 Technical Writer/web Specialist $14+ DOE C062-11 Research Assistant 7.50/hour C064-11 Scientific Drilling Field And Lab Assts $10.00/hour C053-10 Food Service Worker $7.25 C073-11 Scientific Drilling Field & Lab Assts 10.00 C074-11 Scientific Drilling Field & Lab Assts 2 $10.00 per hour C076-11 Environmental Technician 10.00 C448-07 Customer Service- Tooele Distance Ed 8/hr C371-04 S I Leader Usu 1350 002 9.00 C027-09 Information Systems Helpdesk Assistant DOE C014-93 Grader $7.25 per hour C595-10 Ee Research Assistant BOE C083-95 Teaching Assistant $7.25

C070-07 Cil Lab Programmer $12 C221-05 Property Assistant BOE C091-11 Research Assistant (calibration) BOE C492-01 Fisheries Technician $9 per hour C356-03 Research Assistant $9.50/hr C018-93 Writer BOE C092-11 Research Assistant (edl) BOE C094-11 Proposal Development Assistant BOE C135-91 Intramural Official/scorekeeper $7.25 to $8 per game C269-94 Phonathon Caller 7.75 + excellent bonuses C098-11 Special Education Program Assistant 8.00 - 10.00 C296-05 American Sign Lanugage Interpreter $14-$26+ C134-09 Laboratory Technician minimum $7.25 C208-96 Tutor $7.25/hr C203-06 Manager Off-Campus 3545 Quality Control Internship $14.00

Manhattan, I still kind of am Ben Linus, as far as I can tell from the people that come up and approach me. It still feels like one of the usual summer breaks from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lostâ&#x20AC;? and that at the end of August, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get on a plane again and go back to the rain forest and keep shooting. But it will dawn on me as this year goes on that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all over. Q: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing that, because of your role on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost,â&#x20AC;? you get a lot of offers to play villains. A: Yeah, I do. I guess I could be out there now playing, you know, the guest star bad guy on this series or that series. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see how it would be anything other than a step backward, unless it were an extraordinary script and something so original and unusual and different. I guess Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know that when I see it. For now, I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll leave those kinds of things alone and focus more on finding something thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a change of pace or change of tone. It would be more fun to be funny or silly or holy or inarticulate. Q: Do you get any comedy offers? Because you are very funny on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost,â&#x20AC;? even in the role of Ben. A: I know, sometimes I thought in the last couple of

MICHAEL EMERSON

seasons that I was in an unannounced comedy and sometimes I felt like I was the only one that knew it. Q: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also a great candidate for voice work. Do you ever get offers of that nature? A: I audition for it all the time, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really difficult to get. Q: Why is that? A: I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. I think because the competition is so fierce. It may be that some of the associations that come

with my particular vocal tone are not positive ones. What product wants the villain from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lostâ&#x20AC;? to be its spokesman? You know, life insurance? Uh, mace? I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that or Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just a poor auditioner. I audition all the time for voiceover and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in the running but I never quite win the prize. ... It may be that we have to wait until the image of Benjamin Linus fades a little bit, so that the voice has less character connotation.

Reinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nostalgia falls flat BY RICK WARNER Bloomberg News

A nostalgic coming-of-age story about the roller-coaster relationship between two young neighbors from 1957 to 1963, Rob Reinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flippedâ&#x20AC;? sinks under the weight of its dogged sincerity. When Bryce (Callan McAuliffe) and Juli (Madeline Carroll) meet as second-graders, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s smitten and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s skeptical. As the years pass, their roles are reversed. Juli, a stubborn iconoclast who refuses to descend from the top

of her favorite tree to prevent landscapers from chopping it down, begins to see Bryce as shallow and small-minded. Bryce, meanwhile, learns to appreciate Juliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s independence and creativity. Told through alternating narrations by Bryce and Juli, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flippedâ&#x20AC;? includes period touchstones like TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bonanza,â&#x20AC;? crewcuts and songs by the Everly Brothers, the Drifters and the Chiffons. It also has subplots involving Juliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s financially strapped father (Aidan Quinn), Bryceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wise grandfather (John Mahoney, in the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best performance) and Juliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backyard chicken farm.

B,9?,;3:90B4?3,8,5:=49>:.4,790?B:=6492 ,9/,849:=490.:9:84.> 49,77D  D:@ .,9 3,A0 ?30 9?0=90? 0C;0=409.0 D:@IA0 -009 B,4?492 1:= :9 D:@= ;3:90  (30=0I> >?@11 D:@I/ 0C;0.?  7460 08,47 ,9/?3492>D:@8423?9:?0C;0.? 7460.4908,?4.A4>@,7> ::270",;> F,9/(I>=409/'?=0,8B34.3-=492>,77 D:@=.:9?,.?>,9/74A0@;/,?0>?:20?30=49:90;7,.0 (30-0>?;,=? ?I>,77>?477>8,7709:@23?:J?49D:@=1=:9?;:.60?

'* :11

)?,3'?,?0)94A0=>4?D>?@/09?> 20?D:@=/4>.:@9??:/,D

3?. .:8

=492D:@=>?@/09? ?:,9(('?:=0 ?:/,D,9/809?4:9.:/0  :=2: ?:,?? .:8 B4=070>> @>@>?@/09?>

-,>4.8:9?37D>0=A4.0.3,=20>

HTC=4,F

B4?3,<@,74J0/;7,9

  #:=?3",49'?=00? !:2,9 )(  

0C.7@>4A07D,?

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


Page 23 Pearls Before Swine â&#x20AC;˘ Steve Pastis

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

TimeOut A collection of student-produced & syndicated comics, puzzles, fun stuff ... and FREE classified ads!.

Friends by Default â&#x20AC;˘ Trevor.Stewart@aggiemail.usu.edu

Loose Parts â&#x20AC;˘ Dave Blazek

Breaking the Mold â&#x20AC;˘ Kenneth.Locke@aggiemail.usu.edu

Dilbert â&#x20AC;˘ Scott Adams

Bound & Gaggedâ&#x20AC;˘ Dana Summers

Rhymes with Orange â&#x20AC;˘ Hilary Price

Answers on www.utahstatesman.com 2297 North Main, Logan 753-6444

OPEN SAT AT 11:30 FOR MATINEES

Knight and Day PG-13 Daily 7:00, 9:30 NO 9:30 on Sunday

Twilight Saga: Eclipse PG-13

The Karate Kid PG Daily 3:45 Sat Mat 12:15

Ramona & Bezzus PG Daily 5:00 Sat Mat 12:45, 2:50

Cats and Dogs PG Daily 4:15 Sat Mat 2:15

Daily 4:00, 6:45 Sat Mat 12:15

Dinner for Grown Ups PG-13 Schmucks PG-13 Daily 7:30, 9:45 No 9:45 on Sunday

Daily 9:50 NO 9:50 on Sundays

5398 Marketer/salesperson Up to $25/ hour 6253 Psr Worker And Bilingual Psr Worker 16-20 6281 Route Manager 6323 Cfd Engineer 6336 Financial Advisor 6355 Cota Or Pta 6356 Speech Pathologist based on experience 6377 Outbound Sales Agent 10.00 - 14.43 hour 6374 Outside Sales Rep Commission Based 6417 Marketing $61.00 per contract 6427 Massage Therapist 6431 Tutor doe 6438 Front Desk/ Graveyard 7.25/hr 6440 Wetland And Vegetation Specialist 6445 Sales Rep Commission 6280 Telephone Agent 8.00 1592 Personal Aide starts at $8.75 6455 Education Assistant/youth Counselor $8.28 + Training Bonus 6457 Qa Analyst 40k to 60k DOE 6338 Sales Manager Depends on experience 6469 High School Assistant Swim Coach Stipend $800.00 to $1000. 0119 Steel Yard Worker $9/hr 6459 Assembly 8.25

5729 Phone Sales Consultant commission based 6472 Live In Maid Free rent, own room more1 6471 Internet Marketing negotiable 6462 Biological Techician (plants) $13 to $17 per hour, DOQ 6463 Dance Instructor 6473 Greens Mower $8 Hour 6483 Live-in Nanny $400/Week + Room & Board 6453 Window Screen Installer Piece rate 6495 Labeaus Hourly 6500 Sales $8.50- $12 6501 Night Audit/front Desk 7.25 6506 Outside Sales Rep / Account Manager Base Salary & Commission 6502 Electronic Assembly 9.00/hour 6499 Food Prep based on exp. 6498 Dishwasher min. to start 6497 Lab Assistant Contract, $250/wk FT 6514 Licensed Practical Nurse DOE 6507 Optician $7.50-9.50 DOE 6511 Receptionist 7.25 6510 Technical Support $9 - 12/hour 6513 Education Coordinator DOE 1017 Cook $9-11/hr BOE 0220 Administrative Assistant 7.50 to 8.00/hr 6515 Mothers Helper/ Nanny $7.25 6518 Business Design And Name will discuss 6517 Contracted Labor N/A 6487 Toys R Us Store Manager Varies 6521 E-commerce Assistant Neg 6523 Office Worker 6522 Bilingual Preschool Teacher 6528 Administrative Assistant $8/hr or

BOE 6520 Sales Associate Neg 6519 Recreation/youth Counselor 6456 Independent Associate Commission 6358 Substitute Preschool Teachers 6525 Retail Sales Associate 0554 Swing Shift Cashier 6524 Marketer/salesperson $9 to $25 per hour 6529 Clear-pinnacle $10-$25 per hour 6537 Line Cook based on exp. 6536 Pizza Delivery Driver based on exp. 6538 Hr Assistant based on experience 6540 Account Contact Representative 10- 30 6544 Account Contact Representative Commission 6541 Babysitter/nanny $25/day 6539 Psychosocial Rehabilitation Specialist $15-$18 hr- Contract 6535 Server based on exp. 6534 Sales Reps $10-$25 per hour 6533 Management DOE 6531 Truck Driver 6530 Painter $15/hr 6543 Appointment Setter/ Caller 8.50 5745 Aide 8.25 w/increase after 60 6171 Door Hanger Contractor 6388 Manufacturing - Student Schedule $8.75 - 10.50 6546 Afternoon Babysitter $15/hour 6545 Jewelry Sales Consultant 6476 Mechanic - Small Engines Based on experience 6542 Part Time Nanny 7.25 0526 Delivery $8-9/hr 6547 Part-time Nanny 6548 Web Developer Depending on Experience

 



      

        

       

      

  

  

        

  

      

Answers found on www.utahstatesman.com

USU Bid Sale Public Invited

September 1-3, 2010 Time: 9 am-6 pm 880 East 1250 North North Romney Stadium ("'' #& "" #

   

 

    

(* '"!%!*$&!*$%/)(**.() ,00%! -2<.-+A!2,17::2;*6-7A,..?2;

 &1*<;75. ;2:.6;-7

;; :2;14.*-.:.:<2.  :.; ,7=6<.:8*:<;  <5*A+.+4*63  77-8:7,.;;7: ;.<<260  =<+*,3,:2<<.:  23.*-2*4.,< ,7*,1 6-7/*6 *,*-.52, *--:.;;  .:27-; 57=6<*6- 26<.:>*46=5+.:;  7<,766.,<. !..4*:<  6*,3 &1*4.+76. .?'7:3175. 7/!.6;;.4*.: 74A<.,162, 6;<2<=<. #1:..<25. :.6,18.6 ,1*58276 <;;A5+742;"6 =;2,*436*,3 &.+-*60.:*6*126<<7<12; 8=BB4.E;<1.5. =:,2*:; =<:2<276*4;<*<

23.;75. 8*6.4;

.6.;2;47,*4.

.A7/7B*:<E; "A58176A7



&1.:.<1.*26. ;*63

@8.,<;

76;.9=.6,.; 7/*6*446201<.:

+;.;; #2<*62*E;,76;7:< .6.:*476* 5.6= 6;?.:/:75 774 &1.:.26* #7<.6+.:0 :.87:<; 6=2</7: C?75.6E;+7*<D

2>.;;75.# <7?2<1C26D

77/=;

#1.AE:.1.*>2.: <1*6/724;

"7=:,.7/+:7?6 /=:

 

/ '+#('/%-$

 2:87:<;*/.<A7:0 *;<4.<<.:;76 ;75.42;<; "42,3.:

 .:/7:5.:?2<1 /2>.12<;2612; /2:;<A.*:76<1. 244+7*:-,1*:<; 6.*<<1..-0. 7/<1.0=<<.:

!.,7:-4*+.4 4*=6,1.-26   2<,1 7>.:7/ ;A,1. #776-70 7;< 2587>.:2;1.1:2;<5*; *+4.))  C".58.:2-.42;D ,7587;.: <5*A878=826 *,4.*:260 %.6-260 5*,126.26;.:<  2;1.*<260 5*55*4  *8*,2<*6,.=62<  .:+2>7:7=; :.8<24.;  *;;;A5+74 7A7/C#1.%2.?D  7:!*A 2<A"7/ 1.:+7=:0

#,)* /1*,00%!(%-!

!NSWERSFOUND ATWWW UTAHSTATESMANCOM 5NDERÂ?/PTIONSÂ&#x17D; 'OOD,UCK  )$,'!! $!)-$!*'

 *8*;7/C(7:+* <1.:..3D *524A5*<:2*:,1; C7::.*4D @/7:-/.447?;

.,75. +*4*6,. <14.<.;/7:78. ,7/7=6-.: *55

&7:-76*<7?.4

5+:*,.;

206*,758.<2<7:

 

=--*=+.:;.0

"5.44; 7A?2<1* /2;1260874.26* E ;;2<,75<2<4. ;,:..6 2014*6-;1244;2-. !7,3,76,.:< /2@<=:. $":5A  .0 *5*2,*60.6:.  124*;.<<260

Hundreds of Items including: pickups sedans cargo vans gates desks chairs file cabinets

panels

computers printers monitors feeders projectors man-bucket truck

Kawaski UTV SUVs copiers animal scales shelving furniture & much more!

Check our Web Site at: www.usu.edu/surplus

iness and get

pand your bus

ut how to ex Not sure abo ntion? studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; atte

The Utah Statesman

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll help you unscramble your advertising ideas

Call 797-1743 or visit www.utahstatesman.com


Monday, Aug. 30, 2010

SpecialFeatures

Check us out on facebook.com/leesmarketplace tplace

See our website at leesmarketplace.com

MARKETPLACE

1400 North

Visit our red box® for your favorite new releases. Just $1 per day!

1200 North

N A

Romney Stadium

Closed Sunday

We are located in the University Shopping Center

600 East

Three Convenient Locations: Logan • 555 East 1400 North Smithfield • 850 South Main North Ogden • 2645 N. Washington Boulevard

STORE HOURS: Mon.-Sat. 6:00 AM - Midnight,

800 East

Page 24

1000 North

WELCOME BACK AGGIES!! Your “True Blue” Local Grocer Since 1981! Prices Effective Aug. 30th - Sept. 4th, 2010

Look what you get for under a buck!

79

Hot Price!

¢

88

¢

lb.

¢

1 lb. Bag

Mini Carrots

99

¢

WOW!

¢

16 oz. Rockstar or AMP

10 oz. Asst.

Gala Apples

88

WOW!

With Coupon

Western Family Milk

Farm Bread

Small

¢

Half Gallon 1%, 2% or Skim

24 oz. Asst. (Includes Widepans)

99

99

Hot Price!

Don Julio Chips

Energy Drinks

AT LEE’S MARKETPLACE EVERYONE SAVES!!

1

Hot Price!

Hot Price!

$ 97

$

Kraft 4 pk. 7.25 oz.

Mac and Cheese

4 5 $

fo r

Sunbelt 8 pk.

Granola Bars

Hot Price!

1

42-50 oz. Giant Bag Spooners, Marshmallow Mateys, Tootie Fruities, Berry Colossal Crunch, Frosted Flakes or Cinnamon Toasters

Malt O Meal Cereal

Ripe Bananas

Ground Beef

“5 Buck Cluck”

Rotisserie Chicken

WOW!

4 5 $

fo r

Kelloggʼs 7.8 oz. New Superfurit Fusion

Nutri Grain Bars

6 WAYS TO SAVE

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

MultiPack

Nabisco Snacks

$ 99

MONDAY Golden

3

99

WEDNESDAY

80% Lean

FRIDAY

Made From Scratch Loaf

French Bread 10 lb. Limit Per Person

Birchberry

SATURDAY Half Gallon

Sliced Turkey

Farr Ice Cream 5 lb. Limit

Limit 4 Per Person

Monday, Aug. 30, 2010  

complete issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you