Page 1

Friday, April 8, 2011

Utah Statesman The

Campus Voice since 1902

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Vandalism cases on the rise By DAN SMITH senior news writer

Vandalism, specifically graffiti, is on the rise at USU and in Cache Valley in general, said patrol officer Sutton Hanzalik of the USU Police Department. Tagging, stenciling and even using ketchup or dry-erase markers are all forms of graffiti that have been found recently by university police. “This is the first year where we’ve really been hit like we have in the last month and a half,” Hanzalik said. “I went to our last gang meeting a couple weeks ago and they’re up dramatically.” Hanzalik, the USUPD liaison to the Logan City Police gang task force, said a lot of the graffiti seen on campus is not gang-related. Most of the recent tags are references to social media sites. A lot of these sites are new and not as broad as Facebook, he said. They are geared towards specific preferences to things such as sneakers, rap music and street art. “All the people that are getting caught right now are still the young GRAFFITI CASES ARE RISING at USU with nine cases so far this year. Last year only 12 cases were reported. Sutton Harzalik of the kids,” Hanzalik said. “They’re not 20- or USUPD said those getting caught are “young kids” trying to get atten- 30-year-olds, they’ve grown out of it. Most of the kids are just trying to get tion. ALISON OSTLER photo

noticed.” Capt. Steve Milne of USUPD said nine occurrences of graffiti have been reportedalready in 2011, compared to the total of 12 that occurred in all of 2010. Last week he was notified that the f-word was spray-painted on the Business Building and on an airconditioning unit atop the Lillywhite Building. Some buildings on campus have exterior roof access, Hanzalik said, but others are only accessible from the inside of the building. “It’s not just the police that are here trying to protect the property, it’s every student kind of has a responsibility.” Milne said. “The problem is it destroys property, it takes time and funding and resources away from something else. I bet you a lot of people have either seen something going on, or know or heard somebody talking about it, and that’s the information we need coming in to us.” Graffiti is a part of rebellion for young people, Hanzalik said. The respect for other people’s personal property has been lost over the last 2025 years, he said, and the community needs to work with police to change things.

“There’s no way (police) can be somewhere 24-7,” Hanzalik said. “If you look at inner-cities, any inner-city that has changed in a positive way, it’s come through the community. It didn’t come through law enforcement.” Milne said graffiti is a form of vandalism, which is classified as criminal mischief. If caught, the perpetrator is charged with at least a class-B misdemeanor and the penalty goes up depending on how much damage is incurred. A more obvious form of vandalism – outright destruction of property – also occurs somewhat frequently on campus, Milne said. On March 29, Starr Christensen, a resident assistant at Snow Hall, called university police to notify them that three windows were damaged on the ground floor of the building. “I don’t know the monetary amount of damage,” Christensen said. “It was enough that they had to replace the glass, it made the rooms colder and it made the residents feel a lot less safe, which the most valuable thing is my residents’ safety.”

- See ART, page 4

Billiards room to move for new fitness class

By MEGAN BAINUM assistant news editor

we wouldn’t see more than a third of the students. They are taking the class because they can spend the time to get to the Fieldhouse, not the Fun Park,” Crook said. Lee Stevens, general manager of the Fun Park, said during the day the billiards tables are usually slow so it will have “minimal effect on the customers.” He said pool tables will be available to customers during class time depending on enrollment numbers. Jacob Wolim, a sophomore and member of a billiards course, said it isn’t as accessible to students since they would have to worry about finding a way to get down there for class. “They are basically eliminating the club, I know that isn’t their intention but that is what they are doing,” Wolim said. “In a year or two there are just not going to be enough students that are willing to go down there.” Crook said the billiards courses bring in money to the university, and moving the class would not be financially positive. He said there are about 320 students currently enrolled and with a $50 course fee,

The billiards room in the Nelson Fieldhouse at USU may be turned into a cross-fit class room come Fall semester and members of the billiards club and instructors for the course say enrollment will fall if the pool tables are moved off campus. Chris Crook, the treasurer of the billiards club, said as of now the plans are to move the billiards courses to the Cache Valley Fun Park because a cross-fit class is going to be taught in the current billiards room. Kevin Kobe, director of campus recreation, said he hasn’t heard of anything being finalized, although negotiations with the Fun Park are ongoing. He said because of the success of the Fun Fit Forever program, there is a need for added space. Crook said the majority of students he has talked to say they probably won’t be enrolling in billiards classes if they are moved to the Fun Park. He said students take the course because they have breaks in between classes and it is close on campus. - See POOL, page 3 “If they go to the Fun Park I bet

MEMBERS OF THE BILLIARDS CLUB SAY moving the pool tables will hinder their ability to practice. The billiards room in the Nelson Fieldhouse is set to be relocated. A Fun Fit Forever class will likely be held in that room starting in the fall. MEGAN BAINUM photo

Flooding in valley possible if wet weather continues By RHETT WILKINSON staff writer

Warnings of the first floods in Logan and surrounding area since 2006 abounded in a presentation given by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hydrologist Brian McInerney, Tuesday, at the Logan City Municipal Meeting at City Hall. Following the meeting, McInerney said current NOAA projections, based on runoff rate from melted snowpacks from the surrounding mountain range, foresee the possibility of summer homes in the Logan Canyon area, below the Logan River, and perhaps residences in the valley below the Blacksmith River, to encounter problems. “This year, if temperatures remain mild and we have an absence of heavy rain, we’ll come out with no problem,” he said. “But if the weather remains cold and wet as it did in March up until late May, we’ll definitely have some flooding issues.” Such problems were caused by a jet stream from several Pacific regions into the nation’s midwest and east coast regions, resulting in

Inside This Issue

a bad case of La Nina, McInerney said. “We had bad air in absence of storms, then a high pressure retrograde that opened the door for storm activity,” he said. “That went away but was replaced by two big low-pressure systems that moved through area and dumped tons of snow into the mountains.” McInerney said the current snowpack in the mountains in Logan is 145 to 150 percent of the average snowpack amount for this time of the year. The rate is right on pace with the valley’s record snowpack amount in 1982, which resulted in an overflow above standard river levels to the point of being just 0.4 feet from flood quota. In contrast, in May 2006, rivers were flooded as high as 5.2 feet above the standard level. McInerney’s presentation revealed that the threat has been a rapid increase from the precipitation rate of October 2009 to January 2010, when the rate hovered between 50 and 89 percent in the valley, according to studies conducted by the NOAA. However, temperatures 5-7 degrees above average beginning in January 2010 resulted in a 129-150 percent runoff volume in various rivers throughout the valley, most prominently the Logan and Blacksmith Rivers. Following La Nina, which produced slightly colder than normal

4/08/11 USU alumnus expands novelty toy store “Magical Moon Toys.” Page 5

Two superstars leading what looks to be a stellar linebackers unit for USU football. Page 8

temperatures, early snowfall in affected areas resulted in a 644 percent precipitation from average in Utah’s Virgin River Basin in late December of last year. The storm included 19 inches of precipitation there in a three-day period. The outpouring brought abnormally cold and wet conditions throughout the Pacific northwest before scattering her remains throughout the Rocky Mountains. As a result, the valley is also encountering its highest soil moisture in eight years, McInerney said. Council member Dean Quayle acknowledged the threat, but said he feels with many necessary precautions established, the city would be ready. “You know, we could have serious problems, but we could also have no problems at all,” he said. “There’s potential for flooding this year, so now we’ve just got to hope for a moderate springtime so we don’t get a flood. I think as you saw, the city is well aware of it, are doing what they can ahead of time. They know where the flooding potential is very high.”

- See COLD, page 4

www.utahstatesman.com A Statesman iPhone app to keep you right on top of campus news, local businesses and specials, is now available in the App Store at iTunes. Official Student Newspaper of Utah State University • “It’s All The News You Need!”


2

Friday, April 8, 2011 Page 2

World&Nation Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

ClarifyCorrect The policy of The Utah Statesman is to correct any error made as soon as possible. If you find something you would like clarified or find unfair, please contact the editor at 797-1762 or TSC 105.

Nat’lBriefs Trump goes after Obama on citizenship WASHINGTON (AP) – Real estate tycoon Donald Trump said Thursday he isn’t convinced that President Barack Obama was born in the United States, but says he hopes the president can prove that he was. Officials in Hawaii have certified Obama’s citizenship, but “birthers� have demanded additional proof. And Trump, who is weighing whether to seek the Republican presidential nomination, says not all the questions have been answered. In an interview broadcast Thursday, Trump told NBC News he plans to decide by June whether to run, and said that if he is the GOP nominee, “I’d like to beat him straight up,� not on the basis of the question of where Obama was born. Trump insisted he didn’t introduce the citizenship issue, but he isn’t letting go of it either.

Convicted sex offender set free in Utah PROVO, Utah (AP) – A Utah judge on Thursday ordered a convicted sex offender freed from a state hospital after the man was deemed incompetent for trial, but not a danger to society. Prosecutors wanted Lonnie Hyrum Johnson to stay at the Utah State Hospital for continued treatment so he could eventually face the nearly two dozen counts against him of rape, sodomy and aggravated sexual assault of a child. “The constitution prohibits me from holding someone who has not been convicted and who cannot participate in their own defense,� 4th District Judge James R. Taylor said. Johnson could be freed as early as Thursday afternoon – but he’s not off the hook. Taylor did not dismiss the case and ordered Johnson to meet with new psychiatric evaluators in October. A hearing on those findings is set for Nov. 17. “We’re encouraged that Judge Taylor allowed us to have a review in six months,� said Deputy Utah County District Attorney Craig Johnson, who is not related to the accused. “We’ll

come back in the fall and see how he’s doing and hopefully get this case back on track.� Lonnie Johnson’s family, which packed the front row of the Provo courtroom on Thursday, has said he is innocent of the charges. “I’m happy, I’m happy,� Johnson’s mother, Wanona Pixton, shouted as she left the court after the hearing, Christy Danner, the mother of one of the two victims, was not. “We’re not happy, but we’ve just begun to fight,� Danner said. “We’re not gonna let this die. We’re not gonna lay down. And we’re not gonna go away, as much as him and his family would like that to happen. The truth will come out.� The case has drawn national media attention, and Craig Johnson has spoken out widely about the need to alter Utah’s civil commitment laws. The resulting publicity drew about 100 voicemail messages from individuals in 20 different states, including some that court security officers considered harassing, court spokeswoman Nancy Volmer said. Johnson has a cognitive disorder,

prosecutors said. He was charged in 2007 with 21 sexual assault charges. Authorities allege he had inappropriate contact with his stepdaughter and her cousin over five years beginning in 2001. Both alleged victims are now adults. Taylor deemed Johnson incompetent for trial in 2008. Under Utah law, a defendant fits that condition if he suffers from mental illness, cannot understand the charges against him or is unable to participate in his own defense. For a civil commitment, a doctor must find that a person’s mental illness makes him a danger to himself or others. The court ordered doctors to attempt to restore Johnson’s competency but about a month ago they said they had seen no improvement despite two and a half years of treatment. Taylor then said he believed it was unlikely Johnson would ever be able to stand trial. A civil commitment petition, which would have kept Johnson hospitalized, was also denied last week after three psychiatric evaluators said they did not believe he presented a danger to himself or the community.

U.S. gov’t may use social network for terrorism warnings WASHINGTON (AP) – Terror alerts from the government will soon have just two levels of warnings – elevated and imminent – and those will be relayed to the public only under certain circumstances. Color codes are out; Facebook and Twitter will sometimes be in, according to a Homeland Security draft obtained by The Associated Press. Some terror warnings could be withheld from the public if announcing a threat would risk exposing an intelligence operation or an ongoing investigation, according to the government’s confidential plan. Like a gallon of milk, the new terror warnings will each come with a stamped expiration date.

LateNiteHumor Top 10 President Obama Campaign Promises For 2012 – Wednesday, April 6, 2011 10. Be more of a warlock, less of a troll. 9. Keep unemployment below 75 percent. 8. Fight three wars and the fourth one is free. 7. Replace space shuttle with this (VT of Don Rickles firing a rocket). 6. Get fat like the rest of America. 5. Send troops to quell feud between Meat Loaf and Gary Busey. 4. Fortune cookies actually tell fortunes, no more of this lucky numbers crap. 3. Less talk, more rock. 2. Pardon Lindsay Lohan. 1. Go back to being that cool, smoking badass we all fell in love with.

NANCY GARRIDO CONSULTS WITH ATTORNEY Stephen Tapson before the start of an arraignment hearing Thursday, April 7. Both of the Garridos pleaded not guilty to all charges regarding the 1991 kidnapping of Jaycee Dugard. AP photo

Plea deal derailed in abduction case

PLACERVILLE, Calif. (AP) – A California woman who was abducted as a girl in 1991 and held captive for 18 years must wait longer to see justice done after an expected plea deal was derailed Thursday by defense concerns that a grand jury might have been improperly selected and acted inappropriately. Phillip Garrido, a convicted sex offender charged with kidnapping Jaycee Dugard and fathering her two children by rape, entered a surprise plea of not guilty to an amended indictment that his lawyer intends to challenge. “If there are defects in the grand jury, it’s my job to argue those things and that’s what I am going to do,� Deputy Public Defense Susan Gellman told reporters after a 10-minute court hearing. The developments were unanticipated because prosecutors and defense lawyers previously said they hoped to reach a settlement and spare Dugard, now 30, and her two daughters, ages

13 and 16, from having to testify. Attorney Stephen Tapson, who represents Garrido’s wife and co-defendant Nancy Garrido, 55, went even further, stating publicly that the couple gave full confessions to authorities and that Phillip Garrido, 60, had agreed to plead guilty at Thursday’s hearing and spend the rest of his life in prison. Gellman blasted Tapson for telling reporters that her client planned to plead guilty. “He shouldn’t have been speaking for Phillip. He should speak for his client,� Gellman said, adding her client had not been offered any plea deal. Tapson said he only found out about Gellman’s plans late Wednesday. Nancy Garrido also pleaded not guilty Thursday to kidnapping, rape and other charges contained in the amended indictment. Tapson advised her against pleading guilty unless prosecutors offer a deal that holds the possibility – however remote – that she would one day be freed from prison.

Arizona board votes yes for tuition hikes

TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) – Despite recent student protests, regents for Arizona’s public universities voted Thursday to dramatically hike tuition, but also will offer rebates to some students to help ease the financial strain. The Arizona Board of Regents’ vote raised tuition and fees at the University of Arizona in Tucson by 22 percent to $10,027 for in-state freshman undergraduates in the fall. Those costs will jump by 19.5 percent, to $9,716, for in-state undergraduates at Arizona State University in Tempe and by 15 percent, to $8,824, at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. The increases are far larger than average tuition hikes seen last year, when public universities nationwide increased in-state tuition and fees by an average of 7.9 percent, with the average price at $7,605, according to the College Board, the nonprofit group that runs the SATs. But the regents also decided to give rebates of $350 to incoming in-state freshman undergraduates at NAU and $750 rebates to all in-state undergraduates at UA because those schools have rainy day funds to address cuts in their budget by the Arizona Legislature. Board Chair Anne Mariucci said UA had $28 million and NAU has $18 million in unused money set aside in the event of legislative cuts to their budgets. ASU has no such money. The rebates only apply for one year. “I think it’s certainly better than nothing,� Mariucci said after the vote. “Next year it’ll be a new ball game.� The board voted for the increase 72 after about six hours of debate, with members arguing over various alternative proposals that were mostly turned down. Students have been strongly pro-

& / $ 5 . 6 % 8 5 *  f  % 5 ( 6 / $:  f  6 7 2 1 ( / ( , * + L o g an’s P re mi e r St u d e nt Ap ar t m e nt s CLARKSBURG

Summer Contracts Only

(DVW1RUWK

%5(6/$:

6721(/(,*+

(DVW1RUWK

(DVW1RUWK

LONNIE JOHNSON WALKS to his attorney during a hearing at the 4th District Courthouse in Provo, Utah on Thursday, April 7. AP photo

)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO'DUODf  f3DJHU  fGDUODGFODUN#SFXQHW RUJRRQOLQHDWZZZFEVDSDUWPHQWVFRP

t t t t t t t t t t t t t t

testing against the tuition increases and legislative cuts. Hundreds of students rallied at the three universities on March 23, carrying signs that read “Keep education alive� and “Say no to cuts.� “Are you kidding me? That’s stupid,� said Jordan King, a 20-year-old UA business sophomore, after learning of the vote. Of the rebates, he said, “That’s just a slap in the face. That’s like taking $1,000 from us and giving us $10 back.� “That’s so much money. My parents are paying my tuition and they can’t afford that,� he said. “We’re all struggling,� said nursing sophomore Candace Jackson, 20, who goes to Arizona State University, before the vote. “It’s a big chunk of money.� Jackson has a $9,000 yearly scholarship for books and tuition, and said she’d probably have to get a job to cover any increases in tuition. She said that would take away some of her study time and threaten her ability to maintain a 3.5 grade-point average or higher to keep her scholarship. “Not everyone is fortunate enough to have a scholarship,� she said. “I know a good handful of people who wouldn’t be able to afford tuition increases at all.� The tuition spike was also tough to take for some regents, including Dennis DeConcini, a former U.S. senator. “We are absolutely going crazy on tuition, it’s absolutely out of sight,� he said. “It is really absurd what we get ourselves talked into here, with all due respect to the great work of the presidents. This board is drinking the Kool-Aid. We’re taking these figures right down the line.�

4JOHMF4UVEFOU"QBSUNFOUT "DSPTTUIF4USFFUGSPN$BNQVT 'VMMZ'VSOJTIFE 1SJWBUF#FESPPNTBOE#BUISPPNT %FTL #FE #PPLTIFMWFTJO#FESPPNT -BSHF$MPTFUT7BDVVN -JWJOH3PPNXJUI57 %7% BOE7$3 .PEFSO'VMMZ&RVJQQFE,JUDIFOT %JHJUBM$BCMF57XJUI0VUMFUTJO#FESPPNT 8BTIFSBOE%SZFSJOFBDI"QBSUNFOU $FOUSBM)FBUJOHBOE"JS$POEJUJPOJOH )JHI4QFFE8JSFMFTT*OUFSOFU4FSWJDF 1SJWBUF1BSLJOH/P)BTTMFT 'JSF1MBDFT

School Year Sold Out and Accepting Applications for Summer Still Accepting Applications Next School Year for Summer


Page 3

StatesmanCampus News

Friday, April 8, 2011

Kinkead gives Last Lecture on stories Briefs Campus & Community

By CHRIS LEE staff writer

New Aggie Ice Cream flavor is official

Joyce Kinkead began her remarks for the 36th Annual Last Lecture in a fitting way for a teacher. “Good afternoon class,” Kinkead, vice president for research, said,. She drew laughter from the audience as she began her lecture containing family stories, fictional stories and a classic story modernized with zombies. The Last Lecture, held Wednesday in the TSC Ballroom, is an annual lecture given by a full time professor who is nominated by students in the honors program. The lecture allows professors to give a lecture as if it were their last at USU. “I am keenly aware though, the irony of delivering a lecture, as the approach I take in my own classroom is one that focuses on students. So as much as I enjoy being the “sage on the stage,” I continually try to be the “guide on the side”,” Kinkead said. Dr. Christie Fox, honors director, said professors are nominated for the Last Lecture by students. “They want to find somebody who’s made a significant impact on campus but also who will have a topic that will appeal widely to the student body,” Fox said. Fox said a committee of honors students look through the student nominations and choose a deserving professor for the Last Lecture. “She seemed to us to be able to expand to a more broad audience and to have something very important to say to every person who would be listening to her last lecture,” said Nikelle Hunsaker, a member of the committee that selected Kinkead for the lecture. Vice President of Research Brent Miller said it is fitting for Kinkead to give the Last Lecture. “She stands out as a professor who mentors undergraduate students especially and creates opportunities for them,” Miller said. Kinkead’s lecture, “Standing on Boo Radley’s Porch: The Importance of Story,” emphasized the importance of stories in people’s lives. She explained that reading stories help students think critically and enable

With red, yellow and purple sprinkles decorating its cake batter flavoring, the new “Aggie Birthday Cake” ice cream will serve as a tasty reminder that the National Children’s Study is officially part of the Cache Valley community. National Children’s Study officials and community supporters will join Utah State University’s Aggie Ice Cream team Friday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. to unveil the new flavor to some willing taste testers – Northern Utah children and their parents at Little Wonders Learning Center, 3223 S. Main St. in Nibley. A press conference that will address the study’s goals and progress so far will immediately precede the ice cream unveiling.

UPR begins on-air fundraising drive

Utah Public Radio, an affiliated service of Utah State University based in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, launches JOYCE KINKEAD SPOKE AT the 36th annual Last Lecture Wednesday in the Ballroom. She spoke on the importance its spring on-air fundraising of a good story. She said stories help students think better and there is a need for liberal arts in higher education. BRECK pledge drive beginning with Web BYNGTON photo Pledge Day Tuesday, April 12, and continuing Saturday, April 16, them to solve complex problems The quiz included the first lines about ‘degrees to nowhere’ and through Saturday, April 23. as well as understand the world of great literary works such as ‘do-nothing degrees.’ My own fear The pledge drive theme of “Hit around them. “David Copperfield,” “To Kill a is about ‘know-nothing degrees,’” and Quit” comes with a larger “I really want to call this talk Mockingbird,” and “Pride and Kinkead said. fund-raising goal than ever before: “the joy of text,” as I wanted to focus Prejudice and Zombies.” According to Kinkead, the book $120,000. on more than just fictional stories. “But stories are so much more “Academically Adrift” notes stuWith the uncertainty of future But I realize now that “text” means than just first lines. They bring to dents who study liberal arts gain something really quite different mind the richer themes of character more in areas such as critical think- federal funding, which provides nearly 58 percent of UPR’s annual than what we in the English profesand conflict,” Kinkead said. ing and complex reasoning than program costs, the statewide sion talk about,” Kinkead said. She She said “To Kill A students who study other subjects. radio station has raised the goal said the word story would be the Mockingbird” is much more than Kinkead said listening to her to preserve and expand quality better term for her lecture. its opening line. The story brings father tell family history stories on programming, according to UPR’s “Stories are how people make the reader into the past where peoher front porch as a child gave her sense of themselves and their ple are convicted of crimes based an appreciation for stories. She said Development Directory Bryan Earl. world,” Kinkead said. She related on the color of their skin. Stories stories help us see from other peoA bill cutting federal funding how Scout, in the novel “To Kill a such as “To Kill A Mockingbird” get ple’s perspectives and “words truly for public broadcasting, includMockingbird,” was initially afraid the reader to think critically about have the power to change our world ing radio, waits to be reviewed by of Boo Radley but over time learned social issues such as civil rights. and our lives.” the U.S. Senate. The measure has that he was not a demon but a Stories also help students think Kinkead will be going on sabbeen passed by the U.S. House of guardian angel. better in general, she said, and batical this fall where she will be Representatives. Kinkead guided the audience there is a need for liberal arts in visiting Europe and writing. Earl said it is important to through her lecture by quizhigher education. zing them on famous first lines. “In our own state we have heard – chris.w.lee@aggiemail.usu.edu understand that financial support for public broadcasting also helps provide funding for programs distributed by public radio networks American Public Media and Public Radio International as well as independent producers. Pledges support costs associated with program production -continued from page 1 and broadcast delivery, including the university brings in about the pool tables might be disUPR’s news coverage and “Access $16,000 per semester. He said tributed throughout campus Utah.” with an enrollment decrease, housing and will only be availThose who make financial conand having to pay the Fun able to residents. tributions become UPR members. Park to have the class, USU Crook said along with “We want listeners to know will just not be making as students taking classes for their pledges make a big differmuch as it has in the past. fun, members of the billiards ence,” Earl said. “Financial pledges The main goal at this point club will be inconvenienced help public radio continue to grow is to find a new place for the as well. He said as of right and improve.” pool tables on campus, Crook now, they are practicing for Pledges can be made through said. free because the room is paid the UPR website, www.upr.org or “There is no way we can for by student fees, but if they DR. MARION BISHOP SPOKE TO students Thursday in the Natural Resources building by telephone, 435-797-3138. For keep this have to go to about women in the medical field. She said women shouldn’t let the doubt of financial issues or more information about making having a family stop them from become doctors. Bishop works as an emergency room physician room. Our the Fun Park a financial pledge or the pledge “Our goal now goal now is to practice, any at Evanston Regional Hospital in Wyoming. KYLE PETT photo drive, contact Bryan Earl, 435-797is to find someto find somekind of fee to 3107.

Pool: Club will have hard time practicing off campus

where to have where to have use tables will the class that be more than the class that is is still on cam- still on campus. what they are pus. We want spending now. We want to keep He also said to keep the tables on cam- the tables for the tables are pus for the P.E. the student body different at the department, Fun Park so it as a whole.” the billiards won’t be very club and the helpful to prac– Chris Cook tice on those student body as a whole,” Billiards club treasurer tables. Crook said. “As a club it Mike isn’t good for us McIntyre, a certified billiards because we are trying to train instructor, said the trick will for tournaments. If we have be to find a building and to pay it will hurt because we department that would be won’t be able to practice as willing to house the pool much as we do right now,” he tables in one of their buildsaid ings. Crook said they have Crook said he is going been talking to a few different to start a petition Friday or people and have a few places Monday where students can in mind, but it is just in the come sign in the billiards early stages of planning. room if they are interested. “There are still a lot of He said their Facebook group, people we need to talk to to USU Billiards, is another way figure all of this out,” he said. students can get involved or McIntyre said those in help in any way. charge “decided to take the Earlier this year, the easy road” and move to the Billiards Club petitioned the Fun Park because there are administration following the already pool tables there. removal of two billiards table He said the majority of the to make office room in the feedback he has gotten from Fieldhouse. students has been negative. McIntyre said he has heard – megan.b@aggiemail.usu.edu

Bishop encourages women to enter the medical field By STEVE KENT staff writer

Marion Bishop, an emergency room physician at Evanston Regional Hospital in Wyoming, followed an unusual path to become a doctor. Bishop spoke to USU students Thursday night at the request of the Women in Science and Medicine club. A Cache Valley native, Bishop said she became interested in medicine because she admired her father, a physician, for the way he treated patients and community members. Later, her father became the first Emergency Room director at Logan Regional Hospital. “I loved what he did,” Bishop said. Even though she became interested in medicine at an early age, Bishop said she originally pursued a different career because she believed people who told her a medical career would be too difficult for a woman who wanted a family. Bishop earned a Ph.D. from New York University and began teaching college English courses. “I picked my second favorite thing,” Bishop said. Though she doesn’t teach English anymore, Bishop said her educational background has helped her in her current vocation. “English is all about people and stories,”

Bishop said. “Medicine is the same. It’s all about people and stories.” Women aspiring to enter the medical field don’t need to sacrifice their dreams of becoming a doctor or their goals of raising a family, Bishop said. In her early 30s, a divorce and a tough job market for English instructors prompted her to do some soul searching, Bishop said. She said eventually, she decided to follow her life-long ambition to become a doctor, overcoming concerns that attending medical school would be too complicated, too financially straining or too incompatible with her desired lifestyle. Yvonne Kobe is an academic advisor for students at USU who want to enter medical school. Kobe said one of the biggest concerns for women aspiring to jobs in the medical field is the desire to have both a successful career and a family. In a society that traditionally views women as mothers and homemakers, women in medical school often feel pressure to give up pursuing careers in medicine and pursue a career more compatible with family goals. “That’s something that’s not on the men’s plate,” Kobe said. While demanding, success in

- See CLUB , page 4

Debate team places 19th in nationals USU’s Speech and Debate team closed out the season placing 19th at the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament in Portland, Oregon, in March. The team entered the event looking to repeat its success from 2009-10 by capturing both the conference and national titles in debate. After winning the conference for the seventh consecutive year, the Aggies fell short in the national competition March 24-26. The tournament was held at Mt. Hood Community College between 83 teams competing in more than 1,400 speech entries and nearly 500 debate entries. Individuals compete in categories such as broadcast journalism, impromptu speaking, persuasive speaking and dramatic interpretation. Eight Aggies competed in several types of debate, preparing speeches around advancements in medicine, diploma mills and the misuse of emergency services. They returned with 11 individual awards.

-Compiled from staff and media reports


Page 4

StatesmanCampus News

Friday, April 8, 2011

Cold: Children die every year from crossing streams McInerney says -continued from page 1

Quayle said many sandbags from the most recent flood are still in place, while more would certainly be added if the runoff does rise above standard levels. Mark Nielsen, City of Logan Public Works director, said each spring season presents unique challenges and opportunities to learn about what nature has to throw at the city. “Basically, every year is a different set of circumstances,” he said. “Generally, it’s a matter of a few little things that make a big difference in certain areas. So we’ll try to have all those things addressed and hopefully (flood management) will go very smoothly. Hopefully we don’t learn anything new this year. That would be great.” Nielsen said he felt unsure whether or not he could provide a thumbs up to the likelihood of unwelcome water headed into the city. “We thought we’d have a lot of problems a few years ago and we didn’t, so I couldn’t say what the likelihood is,” he said. “If (NOAA) could predict the weather six weeks out, we could say, but until they can project out that far, I have no idea.” Nielsen said city administra-

tion and citizens alike ought to be on the lookout. “Just keep track of it through our website and when (the river flow) comes up, we won’t have a lot of notice, so we will have to react to a lot of different areas very quickly. That’s what we’re gearing up for now,” he said. After the meeting had concluded, McInerney issued one warning. “Regardless of flooding, every year we have people die crossing steams with water that is extremely cold, or not getting out before hypothermia comes fast,” he said. “Little kids die every year from playing in these rivers, so monitor your children closely. Keep them away from treacherous rivers. People are going to die most likely either way, and that’s the worst case of this whole thing.” Tracking of snowpack and resulting runoff levels can be viewed at www.loganutah. org or at the National Weather Service’s website, www.weather. gov. – rhett.wilkinson@aggiemail.usu. edu

LOGAN CITY HAS POTENTIAL flooding issues due to wet weather. The Logan City Municipal Meeting met Tuesday and discussed the potential dangers and results that flooding could bring. Council member Dean Quayle said problems or not, Logan City is ready to handle floods if they come. MEGAN BAINUM photo

Budget recommendations approved for 2011-12 school year

By ROUCHELLE BROCKMAN staff writer

The ASUSU executive council approved tentative budget recommendations that would make $5,000 available to clubs next year at their meeting Wednesday. These recommendations will not be finalized until next week. Each year the ASUSU executive council recommends a budget to the incoming council. These budget recommendations are based on estimates of how much money will be collected from student fees. The incoming council will vote whether to accept or reject these recommendations before this Fall. The $5,000 for clubs would come from $2,000 that was allocated last year to Greek organizations and $3,000 from the $9,000 that was allocated last year for the Aggie Blue Leadership Conference held during the Fall of 2010. The $2,000 given to the Greeks was an extra, one-time allotment and

changes to the budget recommendations will not affect their regular funding. ASUSU recommended funding for the leadership conference be reduced from $9,000 to $6,000 so that $3,000 could go to the club fund. At the March 30 meeting, Tyler Tolson, ASUSU president, said by giving $9,000 to the leadership conference last year, organizers were able to lower the registration price from $75 to $25, allowing for a 275 percent increase in student participation in the conference. This week Tolson said the large size of the event made it difficult to organize and that reducing funding would make it easier “to keep everybody on the same page.” “The size made (the conference) not as personal as we would have liked it to be,” said Brent Crosby, ASUSU executive vice president. Kaho Fiefia, ASUSU diversity vice president, said the clubs in the access and diversity center may receive less funding next year to allow more

money to go to the general club fund. “The club fund is really really low,” he said. Fiefia said the director of the access and diversity center and the incoming diversity vice president will plan next year’s budget for the access and diversity center, but no definitive plans have been made. Last year the executive council recommended an extra $175 to each college senator’s budget. The current executive council also plans to re-recommend this extra funding. ASUSU also approved a change to its constitution Wednesday that officially makes the regional campuses and distance education representative an ex-officio member of ASUSU. An ex-officio member is a member of the ASUSU executive council and can voice concerns and opinions about legislation during their meetings but cannot vote on legislation. The public relations director, administrative assistant and ASUSU president are also ex-officio members of the coun-

cil.

In the past, regional campuses and distance education representatives could attend ASUSU meetings but could not voice concerns about legislation that could affect regional campuses and distance education students. While the regional campus and distance education representative has been acting as an ex-officio member for the past two years, the position was not made official until Wednesday. “There was a disconnect between the regional campuses and the Logan campus in prior years,” said Rachael Anderson, current regional campus and distance education representative, “The unofficial nature of the position was a concern of mine and I just wanted legislation to reflect what was going on … I just want the individuals who come after me to understand they can discuss concerns for regional campuses.” – rouchelle.brockman@gmail.com

Art: Three windows were damaged on the ground floor of Snow Hall -continued from page 1

She said the incident occurred around 3 a.m., according to the women who reported hearing a loud bang in the middle of the night. Christensen said the residents assumed it was just neighbors being noisy. A lot of people are not aware of what qualifies as vandalism, Christensen said. Recently

she found out that someone’s car had a halfgallon of milk dumped on it and had a sign attached to it reading “shit happens.” “Multiple residents have told me their cars have been egged in the Snow Hall parking lot,” Christensen said. “The same night the windows were broken, I assume it was the

same night, somebody took chalk and wrote on the east side walls.” She said often residents report things too late and she cannot call university police or write an incident report because the evidence has already been destroyed. Milne said any time graffiti or vandalism occurs, facilities employees are responsible for the cleaning and/or replacement. If a suspect is caught and found guilty, they are required to pay for the damage. “I do encourage all of my residents to tell me all about any vandalism that they hear about,” Christensen said. “A lot of them don’t give any kind of thought to it until something bad happens and that’s one thing that I have a problem with.” In the past, the “French fries” sculpture between the Biology-Natural Resources and Agricultural Science buildings has had ketchup squirted on it, Milne said. A tree near the Eccles Science Learning Center was found with more than 20 pairs of men’s underwear hanging from it. “No one wants to narc on anybody, no one wants to get involved but everybody wants it to stop,” Hanzalik said. “I think a lot of times

VARIOUS CASES OF VANDALISM HAVE included broken dorm windows, putting ketchup on the “French Fries” sculpture and paintings in the parking terrace. ALISON OSTLER photo

we’ve always been such a safe community, you see a bunch of kids out there, you’re really not thinking anything of it.” – daniel.whitney.smith@aggiemail.usu.edu

Club: Labels for female doctors still exist -continued from page 1 a medical career and success in family life are both attainable, she said. In medical school, Bishop said she learned keeping a healthy perspective is very important. While attending medical school, Bishop still found time to go skiing at Alta, where she met her current husband. The variety in her educational background helped her keep that perspective, and fellow students who also had that varied background seemed to cope better, Bishop said. “It’s easy to stop believing in yourself,” Bishop said. “Sometimes I would have to say to myself, ‘I’m a competent person doing something really freaking hard.’” After Bishop got her job in Evanston, she moved back to Cache Valley, where she now resides. Despite the commute, which can take more than two hours one way, Bishop said the schedule in the ER agrees with her personality and her family life. She said she will often work 24-hour shifts and then have three or four days to spend with her daughter without worrying about work. Bishop said even after leaving medical school,

she sometimes still found herself being stereotyped or disregarded because of her gender. “(Women) often get labeled inappropriately,” Bishop said. Since more women are attending medical schools and becoming doctors, issues arising from stereotyping are getting better, Bishop said. “There’s an important trend in the medical field right now where skilled, competent males are learning to respect and work with skilled, competent females,” she said. Danielle Reeves, a junior in nutrition science at USU, attended the lecture and said, “She made sure we know it’s hard, but we can do it.” Reeves said having strong female role models in the medical field is important to her, especially role models who are also successful in family life. “(Bishop) showed I can have it all if I work hard,” she said. – steve.kent@aggiemail.usu.edu


A&EDiversions Friday, April 8 2011 Page 5

Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Act your age at Logan’s Magical Moon Toys I’m grateful is around.â€? Since Shelton bought Magical Moon Toys nine years ago, the inventory, which houses everything from hand-made marbles to a rare collection of Steve Shelton’s office may be a child’s dream. Playmobil sets, has soared from 2,000 to 20,000. The small space is crammed with rubber ducks Shelton said he’s expanded the store to include and squirt guns. Boxes of unopened knickknacks more than 1,000 games, a division of sweets and reach from floor to ceiling. As if the toys aren’t an activity center for kids. enough, a box of gourmet chocoAfter Easter, the store will late sits on the floor. relocate from it’s current position “Should I go taste-test this behind Walmart to the Piano “The big payoff chocolate or should I test this Gallery on Main Street. The new comes when a water gun? Should I fly this location will nearly double the kid comes in ... helicopter or play this game so size of the store. The new store we can give it a review?â€? Shelton taking out penwill offer a mini-ice cream parlor, said. “It’s a tough job.â€? a Build-A-Bear wing, and a minnies and nickels In reality, Shelton, a USU town where kids can pan for and quarters and ers’ alumnus and owner of Magical pyrite in a sluice. wadded up dollar Moon Toys, has a job that never “I can go though a laundry list bills to get this ends. Being a small business of toys that have had meaningful owner in a small town is a seven- item they want, impacts in my life,â€? Shelton said. days-a-week job, one that makes “Knowing what toys do for kids, and they’re for many sleepless nights, he said. what they did for me, that’s some“When you eat drink and sleep beaming from thing I always wanted to be a part your business for so long ‌ I can’t ear to ear. That’s of.â€? imagine life without it. I figure I’ll what I do it for.â€? For those not in the market for do my sleeping when I’m dead,â€? toys, Magical Moon is also in the he said. business of sweets. Shelton, who – Steve Shelton calls himself a “closet chocolatier,â€? As customer Adesa Cox eyed the shelves of Magical Moon, she Owner owns the equipment to make points to a make your own gum anything from dipped Cinnamon kit. Bears to chocolate covered “How cool is that?â€? she said. Cheetos and Potato Chips, two of his best-selling Cox, a preschool teacher at Bear River Head items. The candy business has taken off so much Start, makes the 30-minute drive from Brigham that Shelton opened a separate candy business, City to visit the store a few times a year. When PeeWee’s Sweets, located on Main Street, last looking for specialty items like circuit boards and June. numeral dice, no one has selection quite as wide, Shelton traces his love for toys to his roots she said. in California, where as a 7-year-old, he saw Star “There are lots of interesting little things, Wars for the first time. odds and ends I can’t find anywhere else,â€? Cox “Seeing that on a big screen, in a drive-in said. “Really for the science stuff, there’s really nowhere else to get it. It gives that little extra that - See TOYS, page 7 By ALEXANDRIA EVENSEN staff writer

MAGICAL MOON TOYS OWNER Steve Shelton left a better-paying job working with clients like REI and Nordstrom because of his passion for toys. Today, his store carries tens of thousands of toys and games. Shelton has also branched off as a candy maker and chocolatier with his new store PeeWee’s Sweets on Main Street. KYLE PETT photo

Rewind fashion show returns with recycled ready-wear

Mozart and a magical flute By KATE MARSHALL staff writer

WINNERS WEARING FASHIONS FROM THE LAST from the last 10 decades stand with their prizes as Elizabeth Horne accepts the prize for the winning Rewind Fashion Show team. Made with pages from old Vogue magazines and black mesh, Horne’s dress was inspired by a popular style of photo red carpet couture. BENJAMIN WOOD photo

For the first time in four years, Sergio Bernal, conductor of the USU Symphony Orchestra and Lynn Keisker, associate professor and director of the USU Opera Theater, have combined forces for the major production of Mozart’s “Die Zauberflote (The Magic Flute)� They are also working with a guest stage manager Kim Mumford, who will be doubling as the Queen of the Night. The project involves more than 100 students, and guest artists from the Utah Festival Opera Company putting in hundreds of hours of rehearsal in hopes of putting on four dazzling performances in the Kent Concert Hall. “It’s quite a collaborative, big deal for all the undergraduates,� Keisker said. “They will only have one opportunity to do a full opera production once in their four years here, and this is it. It’s very special and unique.� Keisker also said the choice of “The Magic Flute� is interesting for the students and the community because of it’s messages of redemption and struggle in life. Written in 1971, this was Mozart’s last opera, written to save a friend’s theater from closing. The story begins with

- See OPERA, page 6

Do You Have Something To Say?

Microphone & Camera Verbatim Will be on DWthe /LEUDU\ Friday, $SULODWQRRQ. The

You’ll have 1 minute to speak your piece and have posted for all the world to see at www.utahstatesman.com. Congratulations, criticisms, sports, taxes, Obama, /LE\D, classes, transportation, gas prices, roommates .... Have some Fun! You look good on camera. Prove it!


A&EDiversions

The

Page 6

Pre-Emptive

Critics ‘Rio’

Brazil: known for beautiful beaches, soccer and Carnival. Now add an underdog – well, underbird – named Blu, who lacks the ability to fly, a search for what may be the last female Macaw, some crazy monkeys and kidnappers and what do you get? “Rio.� Some may be groaning at the idea of another animated film, but because this film was made by the makers of “Ice Age� (a pretty good movie, if I may) I would give this film a chance. It looks well-made with small incidental jokes thrown into a bright and colorful environment we can only dream about during those cold wintery Logan nights. Besides, everyone likes a story about an underdog rising up to a challenge, possibly falling in love and saving the day, right? Additionally, “Rio� has Anne Hathaway and Jesse Eisenburg teaming up to voice the main roles, with George Lopez and Wanda Sykes voicing some humorous sidekicks. Will.I.Am also delivers the movie’s theme song, “Hot Wings.� Overall, “Rio� seems like a pre-summer crowdpleaser suitable for all with its “G� rating. Also, I’m pretty sure no birds were harmed in the making of this film. I think. – jessie.a.sweat@aggiemail.usu.edu

‘The Conspirator’ This recreation of Abraham Lincoln’s infamous assassination brings a unique perspective to the well-known historical tragedy. The star-studded cast, including Alexis Bledel, Evan Rachel Wood, James McAvoy, Robin Wright and Justin Long seems to epitomize an intriguing twist to what history has told us about Honest Abe’s death. Perhaps I’ve been decieved, but I never knew about a female conspirator (hence the title) – Wright’s character Mary Surratt – in Lincoln’s assassination. Maybe I just was not paying enough attention. The trailer calls it “the true story you thought you knew,� leaving me quite curious about Surratt’s position in the theatre tragedy. We all know John Wilkes Booth, but the surprising addition of a woman is enough for me to want to see this film. Though the trailer gives off a made-for-TV vibe, I would still go. And, the all-star cast allows me to allow the film a certain amount of legitimacy. According to the clip, Surratt holds to her innocence despite accusations and her arrest. The defense by lawyer Frederick Aiken (McAvoy) seems intense and worth viewing. I am predicting innocence of the poor accused mother, maybe because of my unawareness of her existence in any historical literature or maybe because I think Wright is such a fantastic actress and could never kill my favorite president. I will have to see the movie to unravel its many mysteries. – natashabodily@gmail.com

*VMHE]%TVMP

‘Scream 4’

If they didn’t hear you scream the first three times, chances are they won’t hear you the fourth. Although, the nerdy-looking actors in the preview of “Scream 4� say the rules are changing, I’d expect this movie to be more of the same: Attractive women screaming their heads off while being chased by someone in a Halloween mask and wielding a knife. The nerdy boys say the rage is to film murders to make them more extreme but I’m pretty sure that’s already been done, too. My biggest question is how they got such a quality cast. The creators of “Scream 4� must have had an adventure finding filming dates when Kristen Bell (“Gossip Girl�), Lucy Hale (“Pretty Little Liars�), Courteney Cox (“Cougartown�) and Hayden Panetierre (“Heroes�) could all get together. And let’s not forget Anna Paquin (“True Blood�) or Nickelodeon star Emma Roberts. Clearly, audiences should prepare themselves for some high-quality acting. “The unexpected is the new cliche,� so should we expect to see ... the expected? One more twist – “virgins can die now.� So to the high percentage of readers who thought they were safe for this reason, you’d better watch your back. If you’re into stuff like this, a predictable sequel’s sequel’s sequel with creepy phone calls and unrealistic violence, I guess it’d be a good way to spend your Friday night. Otherwise, do something better with your hour and 43 minutes. – m.noble@aggiemail.usu.edu

8LITVIIQTXMZIGVMXMGW[VMXIORIINIVOEREP]WIWSJYTGSQMRK½PQWFEWIHWSPIP]SRLIEVWE] EHZERGITYFPMGMX]ERH°QSWXMQTSVXERXP]°QSZMIXVEMPIVW8LI]LEZIRSXWIIRXLIQSZMIW

Don’t forget to read

Regrettably yours, Alex or Taylor at utahstatesman.com This week they review “Tourist History.� by Two Door Cinema Club Getting

Married this summer? ULLKOLHS[OPUZ\YHUJLMVY`V\HUK`V\YOVUL`& -VYMYLLX\V[LZNV[VV\Y^LIZP[L!

^^^IYVHKILU[MZJVT VYJHSS



9H[LZHZSV^HZ HTVU[OMVY HJV\WSL

>*HJOL=HSSL`)3=+ 5VY[O)SKN( 3VNHU<;

ď&#x2122;˘ď&#x2122;Š

Our Editor is Leaving.

9ES ÂŞITSÂŞTRUEÂŞ 3ADÂŞBUTÂŞTRUEÂŞTHAT ÂŞFORÂŞSOME ÂŞ GRADUATIONÂŞREALLYÂŞDOESÂŞTAKEÂŞPLACEÂŞ 3PEAKINGÂŞOFÂŞTAKINGÂŞPLACE ÂŞIFÂŞYOUÂŞ THINKÂŞYOUÂŞHAVEÂŞTHEÂŞSKILLSÂŞANDÂŞ SUPERHUMANÂŞABILITIESÂŞTOÂŞTAKEÂŞHISÂŞ PLACE ÂŞPLEASEÂŞSEEÂŞTHEÂŞADVISERÂŞOFÂŞ4HEÂŞ 3TATESMAN ÂŞ43#ÂŞ ÂŞBEFOREÂŞ -ONDAY ÂŞ!PRILÂŞ ÂŞ.OON

STUDENTS PERFORM â&#x20AC;&#x153;DIE ZAUBERFLOTE,â&#x20AC;? Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last opera, which he wrote to help a friend who was about to lose his opera house. The USU Opera Theater and USU Symphony Orchestra have teamed up to present this German tale to the University. ARMEN HOVSEPYAN photo

Opera: Student production has relevant moral for today -continued from page 5 Prince Tamino, who stumbles into the land of the Queen of Night, where he is attacked by a giant serpent. He is rescued by three ladies, who show him a picture of the beautiful Pamina, and Tamino instantly falls in love. Protected by a golden flute, he sets off with the bird-catcher Papageno to rescue Pamina from the clutches of the sorcerer Sarastro. But, the sorcerer is actually a wise priest, who tells Pamina that though she and Tamino are destined for each other, they must first prove their love. Bernal said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was written long ago, But the moral messages were relevant in Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time, and are still relevant today.â&#x20AC;? Morgan Hall, a senior in vocal performance playing the priest, said there is a lot of variety in the emotions the opera provides to the audience. Love, solemnity, comedy, and spirituality are all united in one work. Kacee Cambron, a junior in vocal performance, plays Pamina. She said the whole opera is in German, but the department has translated each line and will set the translations up on the super-title screen so the audience can understand what the players are saying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very inspiring story,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;even though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not as plot-driven as others. The real purpose is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teaching a moral, which is to say that light will always conquer darkness. The comic Papageno, and the serious Tamino are both tested in their resolve to be good people, and they are rewarded with love.â&#x20AC;? Hall said one of the most challenging things about performing opera is that even though the whole thing is in German, you have to know what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re saying at all times, and what the other characters are saying, so you can respond correctly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really helpful for me to know what I was singing about the whole way through,â&#x20AC;? Cambron said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and to understand who my character is and what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going through. From day one, my number one priority was to make sure that I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just singing random German words without meaning.â&#x20AC;? Anthony Eversole is finishing his student teaching in Cache Valley and has his undergraduate degree in vocal performance from Utah State. He is playing the role of Papageno. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was kind of hard to decide where my character is coming from. Really, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bird-catcher that dresses up like a bird, which is a little weird. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intimidating to perform arias that are well known because the community already

knows them so well, even if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know they do,â&#x20AC;? he said. Eversole said the process of learning a part in German is very intricate, and carefully done. The leads translate the words from German to English, and memorize the English translations. Then they add the German and speak the text with Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rhythm. Afterwards, they sing the notes without the text, and then finally add the perfected German text to the notes. Jordon LeBaron, a senior majoring in vocal performance and business and playing the part of Sarastro, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The hardest part of any opera is being able to display the emotion of the piece, and focusing on portraying the character, but keeping that emotion married with the vocal technique required to sing these parts, especially in a huge venue like Kent.â&#x20AC;? He said individual rehearsal is huge for the leads. They may expect to get a lot of one-on-one coaching, but they are also expected to translate and do all memorization on their own. The members of the chorus also put in many hours of preparation for the performance. Kelsie Packham, a junior in vocal performance, said the chorus was required to attend seven hours of rehearsal every day the week before the performances. Eversole said there is bias against opera, and towards any classical music, that it is boring or out of date. He said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Society has become so fast-paced. We like going to a movie more than sitting back and meditating with the music. But this is what people did 300 years ago, and people would like it if they just let the music enrich them.â&#x20AC;? LeBaron said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;People go to watch operas for the wrong reasons, to be entertained or thrilled, but to appreciate the sound a human body can make and the skill that requires is a huge reason to attend an opera, and appreciate it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just like going to a sports event and witnessing what the athletes can do with their bodies, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something that excites people.â&#x20AC;? Keisker said that the greatest reward for all the hard work is having the opportunity to be the medium for an audience to receive joy and inspiration after all the puzzle pieces come together in the performance to create a beautiful picture. The opera runs April 7-10 in the Kent Concert Hall at 7:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; kmarshall222@gmail.com


Friday, April 8, 2011

Page 7

A&EDiversions

Toys: Shop owner happy with current occupation

Little wrong with ‘Source Code’

-continued from page 5

movie theater was beyond real,” he said. “I remember going to Bob’s Big Boy for dinner one night shortly after that, and sitting in the waiting room. There was a kid with a Kenner X-wing fighter toy. I have never in my life coveted anything as much as I did that kid’s toy. I remember so distinctly. It took a while, but I actually got one. I still have it today.” Moving from Seattle in 2003, Shelton left a publications job working with clients like Sears, Nordstrom and REI Sports for the toy business. He said he loved the job, not to mention the five figure bonus structure, but in the end he wanted to be in business for himself. Even though he’s making only a fragment of what he was, the toy lover said it’s worth it. “I’m not going to get rich off of this by any means,” he said. “The big payoff comes when a kid comes in the door and he’s been saving up all summer to get one particular item. They come in and open up their mason jar, taking out pennies and nickels and quarters and wadded up dollar bills to get this item they want, and they’re beaming from ear to ear. That’s what I do it for.” As Rhea Smith and Kendall Gurley, mother and daughter, wandered down an aisle of Magical Moon, Gurley inspected a selection of glass animal figurines no bigger than a fingernail. Smith, her arms full of Easter toys for her grandchildren, shifted her load to get a closer look. “You find things here you wouldn’t find in other places,” Smith said. “If you want something unique for your children or your grandchildren this is where you come.“ Although Smith frequents the store, it is her daughter’s first time. “It’s a novelty toy store,” Gurley said. “I’m 25 and I like it.” – allee.evensen@aggiemail.usu.edu

Reel

Reviews

SHELTON FIRST DISCOVERED HIS LOVE of toys after seeing Star Wars. Now, he finds satisfaction from bringing a smile to a child’s face or seeing them finally get that special toy. KYLE PETT photo

Required literature for every reader

The fact that I am an English major emphasizing in literary studies means I have 200 pages of reading – per day. Needless to say, this leaves little time for pleasure reading, or even when I do get that time, I’m a little tired of reading for the day. So, in light of my absence Kellyn Neumann of recent reading, I instead came up with my own list of books everyone must read before they die. There are a million top 10 or top 100 spanning the genres, but on my list, each one is completely different, so I promise there will be something on this list for everybody. Now, I would like to warn you this list is by no means comprehensive. I am only including books that I personally have read, and since I still have a list of classics to read, there could be many other novels that make the list in the future. If you disagree with my picks, check out that e-mail at the bottom of my column and tell me what you think. Oh, and by the way, if you have read any of these books in high school, I don’t care. Read. Them. Again. Reading a novel is very different when it is not required for a class, and I promise you will get more out of a book the second time, as opposed to back in high school when it was cool to hate everything. 1. Hamlet – A wise philosophy professor once told my class if nothing else, every person on this earth should read Hamlet at least once in their life, and while Hamlet is not my number one Shakespeare play, it IS number one on this list for a reason. Though the main theme of “Hamlet” is simple, the plot has great depth. The play is not just about revenge, and many classrooms have debated the multiple meanings behind Hamlet for days, weeks even. If the language scares you, at least watch the movie. I admit reading Shakespeare is not like reading Harry Potter, but once you get used to the language it does become easier. Plus, there are a multitude of books out there to help you tackle the Bard. 2. “Utopia” – For the political buffs out there, you should have read this already, and if you haven’t, start right now. This book will teach politics better than any textbook out there, I promise you. Thomas More writes of an island discovered by one of his characters to have an interesting and unique political sys-

Book

Review

Single and Pregnant? 3INGLE  0REGNANT

A Call for Help Explore your options. We’re here to listen. We’re here to help. FREE confidential services available to all.

175175 W. W. 1400 N., N., Suite A, Logan 1400 Suite A , Logan

4ODAYŽS 0UZZLE !NSWERS

If you Gyllenhaal’s would have uttered Staff name asked me six on the streets “Source Code” Guy XXXX months ago Grade: A everyday if I thought opposed to films made the ones who in the have been 21st cenaround much tury were longer. When original, I you did hear would have his name, his Anike Pullens movies were said no. H o w e v e r, lost in the fresh ideas have come to back of the mind. However, screen recently, and “Source when Jake Gyllenhall’s name Code” is one of them. is called again, people will “Source Code,” starring ask “Which movie was he in Jake Gyllenhaal and Michelle again?” and “Source Code” Monaghan (Eagle Eye, Made will be at the tip of their of Honor), is mind-boggling, tongues and edge of their intricate and remarkable. brains. Way to go Jake! Colter Stevens (Gyllenhaal) Michelle Monaghan, with is a soldier who wakes up her few lines, was excelon a train in another man’s lent as well. Her character, body, confused as to how he Christina, was a confident, got there. He is assigned to beautiful and sophisticated a special mission for the gov- woman. Monaghan perfectly ernment inside what is called depicted Christina when she the source code. was concerned, calm, playful The program allows a per- and just plain kind. son to cross over into anothWhile watching her role er’s identity for the last eight develop, I could not help but minutes of his life. Stevens’ think that Monaghan was mission is to find the bomber like that in person. She has of the train in order to pre- a simple elegance to her, vent a more massive bomb- exuded through Christina. I ing in Chicago. He relives have no negative note for the bombing over and over Monaghan. until he solves the mystery Vera Farmiga (Up in the and finds who’s responsible. Air, The Departed) played While in the Source Code, Steven’s commanding officer Stevens meets Christina in the source code program, Warren (Monaghan). After Colleen Goodwin. At first, all, what is a movie with out Goodwin appeared to be an a little romance? objective officer with no perThough a hint of romance sonal ties to Stevens. She was is most definitely included in just doing her job. “Source Code,” it is neither Over time, Goodwin feels the main theme nor the first sympathy for Stevens and priority of the film. Many are tries to help him more fully familiar with director Duncan understand his situation and Jones from his 2009 proj- duties. In those times when ect, “Moon.” Many were her character felt apprehenalso expecting that same sion in a small predicament, feel and positive feedback Farmiga effectively repreas “Moon,” and those same sented Goodwin. I have to people might feel disappoint- say that the cast in its entirety ed with “Source Code” in was chosen well. comparison. With all this positive feedFor me it was the oppo- back you may ask, “So, what site. “Moon” is a science fic- is wrong with it?” That is just tion thriller where as “Source it; there is very little wrong Code” is a thriller with just a with it. However, “Source hint of sci-fi. It is like compar- Code” was predictable. My ing apples and grapes. They favorite movies and books are under the same category, are usually ones that I cannot both being fruit and coming predict, like “Fight Club.” in more than one color, but Another negative is that it taste rather differently and is hard to decipher, but this therefore, should be judged is not much of a problem; differently. I like puzzles but because I Gyllenhaal has really thoroughly enjoyed it I have stepped up to the plate and to be nit-picky. proved to be an adequate A program called Source actor in the role of Colter Code does not exist in our Stevens. He found a perfect world. Therefore it is hard balance between perplex- to grasp an idea of someity, frustration and poignan- thing so far beyond common cy. Juggling emotions that knowledge. It is like thinking appear to be real can be of how little we are comdifficult to exhibit on screen pared to the rest of the unibut Gyllenhaal lacked any verse. It hurts my brain and such struggle for brilliance so does “Source Code,” but and really delivered. it is and will be near the top Viewers can not help but of the list of movies in 2011. sympathize for the muddled soldier and Gyllenhaal is to Anike Pullens is a junior blame. He was never that majoring in public relations actor that stood out to me and minoring in sign lanlike Leonardo DiCaprio or guage. She enjoys movies any Johnny Depp or even Brad day of the week of any genre. Pitt. You just do not hear Jake Anike can be contacted at

tem. While it may sound boring, describing the island of Utopia’s political system can actually be quite fascinating. “Utopia” conducts politics like none other, and by reading this book we can better understand flaws with our own political system. I’m telling you the truth; this book will change your life, just as it changed mine. 3. “Pride and Prejudice” – I already reviewed this one in the past, so if you would like to read about it, see my other columns. However, this novel is important and deserves to be on the list. While “Hamlet” is great for the psychologists, and Utopia is good for the politicians, Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” is for anyone, man or woman, who happens to be romantically inclined. It has a wonderful story, and presents both strong male and female characters. Guys – if you have some time this summer and want to impress the girls, read this book. Ladies – while laying outside on a beach up at Bear Lake getting that nice summer tan, read this book. 4. “To Kill a Mockingbird” – You may have noticed that the rest of my books come from European literature. I have a love for it, and so that is mostly what I like to read. In spite of this, “To Kill a Mockingbird” is the one piece of American literature I think should be read over anything else. Harper Lee’s novel is brilliant. Not only is it extremely well-written, but it shows of a time period every one of us can learn from. There is a reason it is just about impossible to graduate from high school without reading this book. Kellyn is a junior in English and The Statesman’s features editor. She loves reading both her Kindle and paperback novels and can be reached at kellyn. neumann@aggiemail.usu.edu


Friday, April 8, 2011 Page 8

FridaySports Utah State University • Logan, Utah • www.utahstatesman.com

Men’s basketball has holes to fill, players to fill them By MATT SONNENBERG sports editor

Prior to last season, the returning players on the USU men’s basketball team had started a combined 292 games, a mark of continuity unprecedented during head coach Stew Morrill’s tenure at Utah State. The combined number of career starts for next season’s returners? Forty-one. The loss of six seniors, including two four-year starters and another three-year starter, all from the winningest senior class in USU’s history, has left quite a few question marks. A handful of returning players, as well as a quality group of incoming recruits will look to provide the answers to those questions. “I always look forward to trying to mold a team and figure out who can do what,” Morrill said. “I think it will be a whole lot of challenge and hopefully a lot of fun. I don’t think we know yet how talented we are.” Outside of point guard, where senior Brockeith Pane stands as the team’s lone returning starter after earning first team all-Western Athletic Conference (WAC) honors last season, the only other spot on the court that appears to be

USU BASKETBALL PLAYERS PRESTON MEDLIN (LEFT) and Brady Jardine looking to step up to much bigger roles in Utah State’s rotation next season, filling in for the six seniors who graduated this past year. Medlin returns following a redshirt season, while Jardine enters his senior year after spending the last three seasons as one of the team’s primary sparks off the bench. TODD JONES photos

solidly claimed is the power forward position. Senior Brady Jardine looks to step into a starting role at the same spot where he has been one of Morrill’s goto players off the bench for the past three seasons. Jardine averaged 7.5 points

and seven rebounds per game last season, but showed early on that he was up to the task of playing starters’ minutes. With Nate Bendall out with an injury early last season, Jardine started seven games for USU, averaging 10.4 points and 8.9 rebounds

per game while shooting 57 percent from the field. Morgan Grim also looks to be right in the mix down low after a solid first season at USU where he averaged 2.6 points and 1.6 rebounds in limited minutes last year.

Grim and Jardine will be joined by redshirt freshman Ben Clifford, junior college transfer Kyisean Reed and freshman Jordan Stone, returning from an LDS mission, in 2011, each bringing their own different style of play from what fans have

Wagner, Gallagher anchor strong linebacker unit By MARK ISRAELSEN staff writer

What’s better than having one returning senior who was also a key defensive leader? How about two? Well, that’s exactly the scenario for the Utah State linebackers. Seniors Bobby Wagner and Kyle Gallagher come into spring training for the final time, ready to lead a deep, young, talented linebacking corps that looks to be an anchor for the ever improving Aggie defense. “They need to be big leaders,” USU head coach Gary Andersen said. “They need to be vocal leaders at times and they’re doing a much better job at that then they have in the past, which is highly encouraging.” Since his freshman year, Wagner has been a key contributor to the Aggie defense, appearing in all but one game since coming to USU. Last year, Wagner notched his second straight season with more than 100 tackles and now needs just 24 tackles to break into the USU top 10 list. He was also named to the All-WAC first team following both his sophomore and junior seasons, the first Aggie to win back-to-back awards since Kevin Curtis in 2001 and 2002. Wagner enters this spring focused and ready for his final season in an Aggie uniform. With performance up to par, he could earn a third-straight All-WAC first team honor this season. “It means a lot, not a lot of people have done that recently and I would love to leave my mark,” he said. That one honor, though, is hardly

his only goal. “My goals for the season are to win a WAC championship, go to a bowl game, finish my senior season off right,” Wagner said. “Of course I want to get a lot of tackles, but if I get 50 tackles and a WAC championship, I’ll take it.” Alongside Wagner is fellow senior linebacker, Kyle Gallagher. Gallagher has been an iron man for the Aggies, playing in every game since he was a freshman. Gallagher is an emotional leader for Utah State and during his time as an Aggie has been a force to be reckoned with on the field as he is just shy of 200 tackles for his career. Although these two returning stars are crucial for the Aggies, arguably the biggest story for the linebackers is the depth they’ve added for the upcoming season. Besides Wagner and Gallagher, USU should get major contributions from a number of players, including Zach Vigil, Jake Doughty, Tavaris McMillian, Parker Hausknecht and junior college All-American Bojay Filimoeatu. These young, talented players look to make an impact right away, something that definitely excites Wagner. “I think we improved by adding a lot of depth,” Wagner said. “Last year me and (Gallagher) had to take a lot of reps, I think this year we definitely have a wide range of players who can play. It’s going to make me and Kyle’s job easier, so we get a little bit of break.” McMillan especially has generated hype thus far. A redshirt freshman from Miami, Fla., McMillan is performing well in spring practices and

- See NEW ERA, page 9

Friday football scrimmage to be postponed BY USU ATHLETICS

AGGIE LINEBACKER BOBBY WAGNER sheds a block in pursuit of the ball-carrier during a game last season against Fresno State. Wagner, along with fellowsenior Kyle Gallagher, are the backbones to what looks to be a very strong group of linebackers for Utah State in 2011. TODD JONES photo

looks to be a big contributor during the season. “My goal is, first of all, to help the team out however I can,” McMillian said. “I want to be the best player I can be on the field and off the field.” Other key pieces in the Aggies’ “D” are two sophomores, Doughty, from Sandy, Utah, and Vigil, from Clearfield, Utah, both of whom have impressed Wagner and the coaches with their play during the spring.

Grad Fair April 12

9 am- 4pm TSC Ballroom If you are unable to attend the Grad Fair order online at AggieGear.com by April 11, 2011

seen over the past several years with the likes of Bendall and Tai Wesley. “Clifford is a really, really good perimeter shooter for a post player,” USU assistant coach Tim Duryea said. “I think (Clifford) can help us because he’s a really smart player, he shoots the ball well from the perimeter and he’s a really good rebounder along with being a very good passer.” Clifford is happy with the chance to have redshirted this past season to learn under a pair of all-WAC caliber players as he faces the responsibility of playing a major role for next year’s team. “This year was great, learning from the best really from (Wesley) and (Bendall), playing against them every day in practice,” Clifford said. “We’ve for sure got some big shoes to fill, especially in the post.” Like Jardine and Clifford, coaches anticipate that Reed will add plenty to the athleticism down low for USU next year. “He’s a guy that can step out and shoot it, he can put it on the floor and go by you. We think he can score some in the post because he’s so athletic an so we’re looking for him to jump

“I definitely think that (McMillian), Doughty and Vigil are going to come in and make a contribution as soon as they play,” Wagner said. That contribution can be seen even now, as most of the time is given to the young guys. During these spring practices, Wagner and Gallagher see limited practice and playing time for several

- See DEPTH, page 9

Due to inclement weather in the forecast for Friday, Utah State’s football scrimmage has been postponed from Friday until Monday. The Aggies will take to the turf of Merlin Olsen Field at Romney Stadium for the scrimmage from 3-4:30 p.m. on Monday. Monday’s scrimmage is open to the public and all practices are tentatively open to the public, but they must remain off the field. When the Aggies are on Merlin Olsen Field at Romney Stadium, fans must remain in the stands at all times. All open practices are subject to change. All practices are scheduled for Merlin Olsen Field at Romney Stadium, but will shift to the Stan Laub Indoor Facility if there is inclement weather. Practices are currently scheduled to be open to the public, but are subject to change. USU will have a regular practice on Friday as part of the Aggies’ spring drills, which conclude with the annual Spring Game on Saturday, April 23. The Spring Game will kick off at 2 p.m. at Merlin Olsen Field at Romney Stadium. Admission will again be free to the public and further details along with events surrounding the Spring Game will be released at a later date.


StatesmanSports

Friday, April. 8, 2011

Page 9

Morrill honored as Jim Phelan national Coach of the Year By TYLER HUSKINSON assistant sports editor

In a season where, despite history-making efforts, Utah State men’s basketball once again failed to advance in NCAA Tournament, anyone but head coach Stew Morrill could have received the 2011 Jim Phelan Coach of the Year award. However, Morrill was awarded the prestigious honor during the Final Four in Houston, Texas, the Jim Phelan Coach of the Year award is given each year by CollegeInsider.com. The award is voted on by a committee of media members, coaches and athletics administrators. “The funny thing about it is I was honored to be nominated,” Morrill said. “When I looked at the guys nominated, I said to my wife we won’t have to worry about not being at the Final Four because I have no chance to

win this award.” Morrill was definitely qualified to win the award, however. The 13-year head coach lead USU to its fourthstraight regular season Western Athletic Conference (WAC) title with a 15-1 league mark to go along with its second WAC Tournament Championship in the last three years. USU finished the year with a school-recordtying 30 wins and played in its third-straight NCAA Tournament. Even though Morrill was more than qualified to receive the honor, he wasn’t able to attend the Final Four to receive the award. “It is certainly something you feel humbled by and not really sure you deserve, but it was an awfully nice honor by College Insider for sure,” Morrill said. “Then I felt bad that we weren’t going to be at the Final Four. We had family obligations in Colorado so

Depth: Linebackers play intense -continued from page 8

we weren’t there to receive it. I offered to have them give it to somebody else where I wasn’t going to be there and they kind of laughed at me on that one.” The coaching carousel of college basketball spins often, and coaches of successful teams seem to take a ride to find greener pastures. Morrill receives plenty of offers year after year, and the end of the 2011 season was no exception. Morrill’s named was tossed around as a possibility for many vacant head coach positions, but for the most part, they were only rumors. “We have had some success and there is always things that pop up,” Morrill said. “When someone gets real serious with you, which is what happened this spring, then you have a decision to make. I have not pursued anything and really haven’t for a number of years, and I

don’t plan on it. Every once in a while somebody pursues you and then you have to decide what you want to do, but it usually doesn’t take me very long. This is where I plan on finishing my career; I have said that for a long time.” Aggie fans can breathe a sigh of relief as it seems there is no price for which Morrill can be bought and moved to a different school. “I said 13 years ago when I came here that this would most likely be my last coaching job,” Morrill said. “Every year I feel more and more like that, of course I am getting older and older. It is flattering when someone shows serious interest and that was the case, but there was really no serious interest on my part. I am happy where I am at and feel fortunate to be here.” – ty.d.hus@aggiemail.usu.edu

UTAH STATE HEAD COACH STEW MORRILL hoists a piece of the net during the Feb. 26 game against Idaho. Morrill was honored by CollegeInsider.com as the nation’s Coach of the Year at the Final Four last weekend in Houston. STERLING BOIN photo

Hayward starting to put things together

Alright, raise your the Clippers in December but also hasn’t even found hand if you expected the the floor in 11 other games. Eye Jazz to beat the Lakers Yeah, he’s been hot and cold, sometimes really cold, on the on Tuesday night. Please but sometimes, like Tuesday night, really hot. That’s just keep your hand raised if Hardwood what you’ve got to expect with most rookies. Many you expected that win times though, fans don’t think that way, and they get to come mainly due to frustrated because they don’t play well. Although it the efforts of Gordon might not really make them feel better, fans should Hayward, the baby-faced know that he is hardly the only one struggling. 21-year-old rookie. Yeah, I’m pretty sure that nobody’s Of all the rookies drafted in 2010, only two are hand is still up. scoring in double figures, John Wall of the Wizards, Well, believe it or not, it happened. Hayward not and DeMarcus Cousins of the Kings. Many of the only scored a career-high 22 points to go along with other picks have struggled just as much or more than six boards and five assists, but he also hit the go-ahead Hayward. free throw and kept Kobe Bryant from even getting a Take former Kansas center Cole Aldrich. Picked shot off in the final seconds. Hayward’s heroics pro- by the Hornets at number 11 and then traded to the pelled the Jazz to their first win in nine games, and their Thunder, Aldrich was expected to do big things for first win over the Lakers in the Staples Center since Jan. OKC, but instead has played in only 18 games, putting 1, 2006, a stretch of 17 games. up averages of 1.0 points and 1.8 rebounds per game. The kid’s on fire. Just two days before his perfor- Naismith player of the year in 2010 and highly touted – mark.israelsen@aggiemail.usu.edu mance against L.A., he scored 19 points, his career- coming out of Ohio State, Evan Turner has struggled in high at the time, in a loss to Sacramento. The Jazz have the NBA, only posting averages of 7.1 points and 3.9 got to be loving his performance, but I’ll tell you one boards. Ekpe Udoh, drafted number six by Golden State thing, Butler sure could have used their old superstar in scores only 4.0 per game and grabs 2.9 rebounds. -continued from page 8 the championship game on Monday. The concept of rookies struggling to adjust to the Hayward’s departure to the NBA may have surprised NBA game is not new. Hayward has had some rough right in there and get going,” tion with their skill and athletisome people. He was only a sophomore when he left patches, but I think all Jazz fans should be excited Duryea said. cism, making for a competitive and the Bulldogs had come within inches of winning with his potential. In fact, let me relate to you a quote For the 6-foot-11 Stone, the scenario on the wings. a national championship. Who can forget Hayward’s from the one and only Kobe Bryant concerning young staff isn’t predicting as much The staff also hopes to redhalf-court heave at the buzzer in last year’s game that Hayward. of an immediate impact rather shirt Danny Berger, another was so close every Duke fan watching it nearly had a “I’m very, very fond of him,” Bryant said. “He’s a than bigger things down the wing player who will be returnheart attack? very skilled, all-around player. I think he’s going to have road as his game progresses. ing from an LDS church misBut rather than return for his junior year and try again a very bright future in this league. He reminds me of a “We knew when we signed sion. for a championship run, which the Bulldogs did without more talented Jeff Hornacek. Jeff couldn’t put the ball him that he was a big developThe 2011-12 season leaves him, coincidentally, he decided to go pro. In the 2010 on the floor as well as (Hayward) can.” mental guy and we’re excited several starting positions wide draft, Hayward was selected ninth overall by the Utah That kind of praise from one of the best players to about his potential,” Morrill open for competition for the Jazz, the Jazz’s first lottery pick since 2006 when they ever play the game isn’t a bad start for any rookie. said of Stone. “I like Jordan a lot first time in several years, but chose Ronnie Brewer with the 14th pick. So have faith in Hayward, and maybe even believe physically. I think he’s raw in there’s nothing but optimism So, with our 20/20 hindsight, let’s examine how sucKobe on this one, even though I know how hard that terms of his skill level.” among the staff. cessful Gordon Hayward’s rookie year has been. is for Jazz fans. It’s true that he didn’t have the greatest When it comes to replacing “We think we’ve got some As of Wednesday night, Hayward is averaging 4.7 season, but player success isn’t defined by a single seaa trio of Tyler Newbold, Pooh talented guys there that are points per game, 1.9 rebounds per game, and 1.1 son. Williams and Brian Green, the just waiting for their chance to assists per game in 15.8 minutes per game. He has first name to pop out of the earn a spot and earn minutes appeared in 67 of the Jazz’s 78 games so far this year Mark Israelsen is a freshman majoring in mechanical coaches’ mouths is the only and keep the tradition rolling,” and has started 13. Hayward’s performance, like most engineering. He has also been a lifelong fan of the familiar face among next year’s Duryea said. “It’ll be a new era rookies, has been sporadic. He’s been held scoreless Utah Jazz. He can be reached at mark.israelsen@aggiwings, redshirt sophomore in Aggie basketball.” 22 times this year, but has also scored in double figures email.usu.edu Preston Medlin. Ad4 7.5x5 7/23/10 2:40 PM Page 1 12 times. He played a career high 44 minutes against “Preston Medlin is obviously, – matt.sonn@aggiemail.usu.edu of those guys, probably the most proven since he played last year,” Duryea said. Medlin emerged as a scoring threat early during his freshman season at USU in 2009-10, scoring 17 points in just his fifth college game against Southern Utah, followed by an eight-point Œ performance at home in a 71-61 win over BYU. Medlin said redshirting was difficult after playing the previous year, but not without its benefits, such as playing on the scout team. “You get to work on your offense a lot,” Medlin said. “You get to do things that you might We are proud to introduce our Romance Bridal not normally do.” Entering his third year in Collection... inspired selections, created with the program, the coaching staff stunning quality & relentless attention to is excited about how Medlin’s every detail. So celebrate your timeless love game has developed since he last took the court. with the lasting gift of exquisite diamonds. “We think he’s got the ability to score the ball in all different ways,” Duryea said. “He’s probably the best passing two-guard that we’ve had here in my tenure for sure.” Medlin will be joined on the wings by a pair of junior college All-Americans in Antonio Bumpus, who redshirted for USU in 2010-11 and Norvel 930 North Main Street Arnold, who will join the team this summer. Logan, Utah Duryea said that both (435) 753-9755 Bumpus and Arnold should be able to jump right into the rotareasons. One, it reduces the risk of them getting hurt, something that is especially important after the injury to star running back Robert Turbin last offseason. Secondly, it gives the young guys a chance to get in and get lots of practice time. “They’re (Wagner and Gallagher) getting very limited reps,” linebacker coach Kevin Clune said. “We’re trying to work on a lot of the younger guys; Vigil, Doughty, Parker and Forrest Dabb.” The talent is there and the intensity is there, but most importantly, the unity of purpose is there. These guys know what they are playing for and they are all on-board, something that is obvious when Doughty echoed Wagner’s goals saying, “We want to compete at the highest level we can, win a WAC championship and go to a bowl game.” Wagner, Gallagher and a group of other guys hungry to contribute seems like a pretty good formula for something special to happen. It’s still early, but with the pieces Andersen and the Aggies have assembled, the future for this upcoming season is looking bright.

Mark Israelsen

New era: Medlin set to shine

Romance

Diamond Bridal Collection

+FSSJDL’T'JOF+FXFMFSZ


World&Nation

Page 10

Friday, April 8, 2011

12 children killed in Brazil school shooting RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) – A gunman roamed the halls of an elementary school in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday and killed 12 children, lining them up against a wall and shooting them in the head at point-blank range as he shouted, “I’m going to kill you all!” It was the worst school shooting in Brazil – and would have been deadlier if the gunman had not been shot in the legs by a police officer, who said the man then fell down some stairs and shot himself in the head. Images taken with a cell phone and posted on YouTube showed students fleeing wildly, screaming for help, many with their white and blue school shirts soaked in blood. Rio de Janeiro state’s Secretariat of Health and Civil Defense said in a statement on its website that at least 12 other students were injured, many by gunfire, and taken to hospitals. At least two were in grave condition. Officials earlier reported 18 injured. The dead included 10 girls and two boys, plus the gunman, according to the Health and Civil Defense depart-

ment. Those killed were between the ages of 12 and 15. One of the boys died at a hospital about 12 hours after the shooting. “He came in shooting,” said Andreia Machado, recounting what her 13-year-old daughter, Thayane, told her before going into surgery. Thayane was hit by three bullets and lost feeling in her legs because one hit her spine, said her mother. Crying as she spoke, Machado wondered if her daughter would ever be able to return to school – or walk. “She’s such an active child,” she said. “That’s the biggest fear I have, her not being able to walk again. But we have to trust in God.” The gunman was identified as 23year-old Wellington Oliveira, who had once attended the Tasso da Silveira school in a working-class neighborhood in western Rio. No motive was known, but authorities said the shooter left a rambling and mostly incoherent letter at the scene indicating he wanted to kill himself.

The letter also explained in detail how Oliveira wanted his corpse to be cared for – bathed and wrapped in a white sheet that he left in a bag in the first room where he said he would start shooting. The letter also states that the gunman should not be touched by anyone who is “impure” unless they wear gloves. “If possible I want to be buried next to my mother. A follower of God must visit my grave at least once. He must pray before my grave and ask God to forgive me for what I have done,” read the letter, portions of which were posted on the Globo television network’s website. Edmar Peixoto, the deputy mayor of western Rio, said the letter also stated the gunman was infected with the AIDS virus. The public school was in the midst of celebrating its 40th anniversary, and students’ handmade posters commemorating the day could be seen through school windows. Rio Police Chief Martha Rocha said that when Oliveira first entered the

A BOY WHO WAS WOUNDED in a school shooting lies on a stretcher as he is put in an ambulance in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday April 7. A gunman opened fire at an elementary school in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday and killed at least 11 adolescents before killing himself. AP photo

school he told staff members he was there to give a lecture. Shortly afterward, he opened fire. Rocha said he was carrying two pistols and an ammunition belt. He fired off at least 30 rounds. Rio is a city rife with drug-gang violence in its vast slums, but school

shootings are rare. The gunman had no criminal history, Rocha told a news conference. About 400 people were inside the school when the shooting began about 8:30 a.m. local time . The school serves grades one through eight.

Some U.S. troops may stay in Iraq if requested BAGHDAD (AP) – Even with the burdens of combat in Afghanistan and unrest in the Arab world, the U.S. would keep American troops in Iraq beyond the agreed 2011 final withdrawal date if Iraq’s government asked for extra help, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Thursday. His comments give weight to an idea that is politically sensitive in both nations and which Iraq officially rejects. During what he said would probably be his final visit to Iraq as Pentagon chief, Gates urged the fractious Iraqi government to decide “pretty quickly” whether it wants to extend the U.S. presence beyond Dec. 31 to enable continued training of its security forces. Gates shares the view of many in the U.S. military that a longer U.S. stay would be useful in ensuring that Iraq’s security

and political gains do not unravel, but publicly he has insisted that the decision is Iraq’s. “We are willing to have a presence beyond (2011), but we’ve got a lot of commitments,” Gates said during a question-and-answer session with troops at a U.S. military compound on the outskirts of Baghdad. He cited U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan and Libya and noted that few people realize that 19 U.S. Navy ships and about 18,000 U.S. military personnel are assisting in earthquake, tsunami and nuclear reactor relief efforts in Japan. “So if folks here are going to want us to have a presence, we’re going to need to get on with it pretty quickly in terms of our planning,” he added. “I think there is interest in having a continuing presence. The politics are such that we’ll

just have to wait and see because the initiative ultimately has to come from the Iraqis.” The American military presence is broadly unpopular in Iraq, even though many Iraqis say they are glad that the U.S.-led war toppled dictator Saddam Hussein. Many Iraqis say the visible presence of U.S. forces is a slight to their national pride, and unnecessary eight years after the start of the war. Iraq’s perpetually squabbling politicians are wary of suggesting that the country cannot stand on its own, for fear that rivals could exploit such a statement. Gates’ press secretary, Geoff Morrell said it was clear from Thursday’s talks that al-Maliki does want US troops to stay beyond 2011. “It is our sense that there is a recognition on

the part of Iraqi leaders that there is still a need for US forces in some capacity,” Morrell said. The main problem is selling an extension to a skeptical Iraqi public. There are persistent rumors on the street that the U.S. has ulterior motives in Iraq, and wants to stay to keep a better foothold in the Middle East instead of as a backstop to Iraq’s national defenses. U.S. officials reject that outright, saying they have no desire or plan for a permanent military footprint in the country. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki told Gates that he expects all U.S. troops to be out of Iraq by the end of the year as required under a 2008 security agreement between Baghdad and Washington, said Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh.

News feed for Campus News? More info about local businesses? Perks, like coupons, discounts & stuff?

There’s an APP for that!

Download the FREE iPhone app for onetouch access to updated campus news and videos. You can also check for local businesses and pinpoint their location, specials, phone #s and more. Easy to find. Just search the app store, keyword “Utah Statesman!”


World&Nation

Page 10

Friday, April 8, 2011

12 children killed in Brazil school shooting RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) – A gunman roamed the halls of an elementary school in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday and killed 12 children, lining them up against a wall and shooting them in the head at point-blank range as he shouted, “I’m going to kill you all!” It was the worst school shooting in Brazil – and would have been deadlier if the gunman had not been shot in the legs by a police officer, who said the man then fell down some stairs and shot himself in the head. Images taken with a cell phone and posted on YouTube showed students fleeing wildly, screaming for help, many with their white and blue school shirts soaked in blood. Rio de Janeiro state’s Secretariat of Health and Civil Defense said in a statement on its website that at least 12 other students were injured, many by gunfire, and taken to hospitals. At least two were in grave condition. Officials earlier reported 18 injured. The dead included 10 girls and two boys, plus the gunman, according to the Health and Civil Defense depart-

ment. Those killed were between the ages of 12 and 15. One of the boys died at a hospital about 12 hours after the shooting. “He came in shooting,” said Andreia Machado, recounting what her 13-year-old daughter, Thayane, told her before going into surgery. Thayane was hit by three bullets and lost feeling in her legs because one hit her spine, said her mother. Crying as she spoke, Machado wondered if her daughter would ever be able to return to school – or walk. “She’s such an active child,” she said. “That’s the biggest fear I have, her not being able to walk again. But we have to trust in God.” The gunman was identified as 23year-old Wellington Oliveira, who had once attended the Tasso da Silveira school in a working-class neighborhood in western Rio. No motive was known, but authorities said the shooter left a rambling and mostly incoherent letter at the scene indicating he wanted to kill himself.

The letter also explained in detail how Oliveira wanted his corpse to be cared for – bathed and wrapped in a white sheet that he left in a bag in the first room where he said he would start shooting. The letter also states that the gunman should not be touched by anyone who is “impure” unless they wear gloves. “If possible I want to be buried next to my mother. A follower of God must visit my grave at least once. He must pray before my grave and ask God to forgive me for what I have done,” read the letter, portions of which were posted on the Globo television network’s website. Edmar Peixoto, the deputy mayor of western Rio, said the letter also stated the gunman was infected with the AIDS virus. The public school was in the midst of celebrating its 40th anniversary, and students’ handmade posters commemorating the day could be seen through school windows. Rio Police Chief Martha Rocha said that when Oliveira first entered the

A BOY WHO WAS WOUNDED in a school shooting lies on a stretcher as he is put in an ambulance in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Thursday April 7. A gunman opened fire at an elementary school in Rio de Janeiro on Thursday and killed at least 11 adolescents before killing himself. AP photo

school he told staff members he was there to give a lecture. Shortly afterward, he opened fire. Rocha said he was carrying two pistols and an ammunition belt. He fired off at least 30 rounds. Rio is a city rife with drug-gang violence in its vast slums, but school

shootings are rare. The gunman had no criminal history, Rocha told a news conference. About 400 people were inside the school when the shooting began about 8:30 a.m. local time . The school serves grades one through eight.

Some U.S. troops may stay in Iraq if requested BAGHDAD (AP) – Even with the burdens of combat in Afghanistan and unrest in the Arab world, the U.S. would keep American troops in Iraq beyond the agreed 2011 final withdrawal date if Iraq’s government asked for extra help, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Thursday. His comments give weight to an idea that is politically sensitive in both nations and which Iraq officially rejects. During what he said would probably be his final visit to Iraq as Pentagon chief, Gates urged the fractious Iraqi government to decide “pretty quickly” whether it wants to extend the U.S. presence beyond Dec. 31 to enable continued training of its security forces. Gates shares the view of many in the U.S. military that a longer U.S. stay would be useful in ensuring that Iraq’s security

and political gains do not unravel, but publicly he has insisted that the decision is Iraq’s. “We are willing to have a presence beyond (2011), but we’ve got a lot of commitments,” Gates said during a question-and-answer session with troops at a U.S. military compound on the outskirts of Baghdad. He cited U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan and Libya and noted that few people realize that 19 U.S. Navy ships and about 18,000 U.S. military personnel are assisting in earthquake, tsunami and nuclear reactor relief efforts in Japan. “So if folks here are going to want us to have a presence, we’re going to need to get on with it pretty quickly in terms of our planning,” he added. “I think there is interest in having a continuing presence. The politics are such that we’ll

just have to wait and see because the initiative ultimately has to come from the Iraqis.” The American military presence is broadly unpopular in Iraq, even though many Iraqis say they are glad that the U.S.-led war toppled dictator Saddam Hussein. Many Iraqis say the visible presence of U.S. forces is a slight to their national pride, and unnecessary eight years after the start of the war. Iraq’s perpetually squabbling politicians are wary of suggesting that the country cannot stand on its own, for fear that rivals could exploit such a statement. Gates’ press secretary, Geoff Morrell said it was clear from Thursday’s talks that al-Maliki does want US troops to stay beyond 2011. “It is our sense that there is a recognition on

the part of Iraqi leaders that there is still a need for US forces in some capacity,” Morrell said. The main problem is selling an extension to a skeptical Iraqi public. There are persistent rumors on the street that the U.S. has ulterior motives in Iraq, and wants to stay to keep a better foothold in the Middle East instead of as a backstop to Iraq’s national defenses. U.S. officials reject that outright, saying they have no desire or plan for a permanent military footprint in the country. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki told Gates that he expects all U.S. troops to be out of Iraq by the end of the year as required under a 2008 security agreement between Baghdad and Washington, said Iraqi government spokesman Ali al-Dabbagh.

News feed for Campus News? More info about local businesses? Perks, like coupons, discounts & stuff?

There’s an APP for that!

Download the FREE iPhone app for onetouch access to updated campus news and videos. You can also check for local businesses and pinpoint their location, specials, phone #s and more. Easy to find. Just search the app store, keyword “Utah Statesman!”


TimeOut

Friday, April 8, 2011

Page 11

All But Dead â&#x20AC;˘ sarah.a@aggiemail.usu.edu

Pearls Before Swine â&#x20AC;˘ Steve Pastis

Friends by Default â&#x20AC;˘ Trevor.Stewart@aggiemail.usu.edu

Loose Parts â&#x20AC;˘ Dave Blazek

Breaking the Mold â&#x20AC;˘ Kenneth.Locke@aggiemail.usu.edu

Dilbert â&#x20AC;˘ Scott Adams

Bound & Gagged â&#x20AC;˘ Dana Summers

Out on a Limb â&#x20AC;˘ Kopervas

Rhymes with Orange â&#x20AC;˘ Hilary Price

&REE #LASSIFIED ADS FOR 535 3TUDENTS #HECK OUT WHATÂ&#x17D;S THERE AT WWWAGGIETOWNSQUARE 0LACE YOUR OWN AD   )TÂ&#x17D;S EASY "E A PART OF THE !GGIE4OWN3QUARE COMMUNITY

www.a-bay-usu.com

ClassifiedAds

Utah State University â&#x20AC;˘ Logan, Utah â&#x20AC;˘ www.utahstatesman.com

Help Wanted

+(/3:$17('

(DUQ  D PRQWK WR GULYH RXU EUDQG QHZ FDUV ZLWK DGV SODFHG RQ WKHPZZZ$G&DU'ULYHUFRP (DUQ([WUD0RQH\ 6WXGHQWVQHHGHG$6$3 (DUQXSWRSHUGD\EHLQJD0\VWHU\ 6KRSSHU 1R([SHULHQFH5HTXLUHG &DOO

Misc. 4 Sale 0,6&)256$/( $)))25'$%/('(17$/352*5$06 21/< 0217+  <28 6$9( 83 722))21$//'(17$/:25. &$//12:)25,1)2:::0<%(1 (),763/86&20%:$55(1 (0$,/0$,/.*2#$2/&20

Answers elsewhere in this issue

$3$570(176)255(17 Apartments 6LJQXSQRZ%URRNODQH$SDUWPHQWVRQO\  VXPPHU FRQWUDFW GLVFRXQW 66< FRQWUDFW SULYDWH EGUPV GLVKZDVKHU VHOIFOHDQLQJRYHQV&ORVHWR868VWD GLXPDQGVSHFWUXP&RPHVHHDW( 1RUFDOO

2297 North Main, Logan 753-6444

&$0%5,'*(&2857$3$570(176 :HKDYHLWDOO1RZILOOLQJIRU)DOO)5(( +($7 0DQDJHPHQW 6SRQVRUHG 6RFLDOV ,QGRRU 3RRO  +RW WXE 6XQGHFNZ%%4JULOOV6RFLDO&HQ WHU 1LFH &RXUW\DUG 6HWWLQJ -XVW  EORFNVIURP&DPSXV&DOO RURUYLVLWXVDWZZZFDP EULGJHFRXUWQHW 1LFH FOHDQ EHGURRP EDVHPHQW DSDUWPHQW PRQWK LQFOXGLQJ KHDW &ORVH WR FDPSXV   52200$7(6:$17(' Roommates 6SDFLRXV3ULYDWH5RRPV1HDU868 /RRNLQJ IRU  PDOH URRPPDWHV IRU D VSDFLRXVKRXVHEORFNVIURP868 3ULYDWHURRPV ODUJHEDFNGHFN EDWKVWKURXJKRXWKRXVH URRPVWRWDO 'XSOH[

*DUDJHFXUUHQWO\XVHGPRVWO\DVVWRU DJHSOHQW\RIVSDFHOHIW ZDONLQJGLVWDQFHIURP868VKRSSLQJ SDUN 8WLOLWLHVFRYHUHGLQUHQW &DOO6FRWW# RU6WHIIDQLH# 6PRNH'UXJ IUHH DQG QR SHWV SOHDVH (PDLOVFRWWBN#\DKRRFRP 6725$*( Storage 0RYLQJ"1HHG6WRUDJH" 6WRUDJH8QLWVVWDUWLQJDWSHUPRQWK 9LVLWZZZ&DFKH9DOOH\6WRUDJHFRP RUFDOOIRUPRUHLQIR $11281&(0(176 Announcements

Open Sun-Fri at 3:45 | Saturday 11:30 for Matinees

;(5.3,+7.

1<:;.6>0;/0;

!! ! 564(;65:(; :<5

7.!  ! 56 !65:<5+(@

/(99@76;;,9

)(;;3,6-3(

;/,+,(;/3@ /6336>:7;

7.!  ! 56 !65:<5+(@

7.! ! 56!:/6>65 :(; :<5

),(:;3@7.!

;9<,.90;7. !56 !65:<5

4(9:5,,+: 464: 7.

<5256>57.

!! ! 56! !65:<5

.564,6 1<30,;

0(45<4),9 -6<9 7.!

!56 !65:<5

.!! ! 56! !65:<5

0HFKDQLFDO(QJLQHHU$WOHDVW\HDUV RI H[SHULHQFH LQ 6ROLG ZRUNV DQG SURILFLHQF\LQ0LFURVRIW:RUG3RZHU 3RLQW ([FHO DQG 2XWORRN +DV DELO LW\WRVNHWFKRXWFRQFHSWVDQGLGHDV DQGVLPSOLI\SURGXFWVWRPHHWWDUJHW FRVW6HQGUHVXPHWRMREV#VWDQGHU FRPZZZVWDQGHUFRP (PDLOMREV#VWDQGHUFRP

&DFKH9DOOH\¡V most RULJLQDO XQLTXH restaurant with â&#x20AC;&#x153;to die for breadsticks!â&#x20AC;? ~Pasta ~Steak ~Pizza

~Sandwiches a&DO]RQHV a6DODGV

Open for Lunch on Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s!

Students get

15% OFF everyday with student ID 54 North Main, 6PLWKĂ&#x20AC;HOG|435-563-9179


Today’s Issue

Page 12

StatesmanBack Burner

Friday

April 8 Today is Friday, April 8, 2011. Today’s issue of The Utah Statesman is published especially for Matt Anderson, a sophomore majoring in law and constitutional studies from Bountiful, Utah.

Almanac Today in History: In 1994, rock star Kurt Cobain was found dead in his home outside Seattle, Washington, with fresh injection marks in both arms and a fatal wound to the head from the 20gauge shotgun found between his knees.

Weather High: 43° Low: 32° Skies: Rain and snow showers.

Friday, April 8, 2011

- Alphatraz, TSC Patio, all day - Women’s indoor 6-on-6 Volleyball Tournament, HPER, all day - Scout Friday, Stokes Nature Center, 1-4 p.m. - College Awards Ceremony, TSC Auditorium, 3-5 p.m. - Collecting Clothes fro Families in Need, 4-9 p.m. - Music at Pier 49 Pizza, 6 p.m. - “Knockout” basketball game, Spectrum, 7 p.m. - Swing Dance Showcase, Kent Concert Hall, 7 p.m. - The Magic Flute, Kent Concert Hall, 7:30 p.m. - ‘90s Night, Haight Alumni Center, 9 p.m.

Saturday

April 9 - Women’s indoor 6-on-6 Volleyball Tournament, HPER, all day - Roller Hockey, 10 a.m. - Collecting Clothes fro Families in Need, 4-9 p.m. - Music at Pier 49 Pizza, 6 p.m. - Peanut Butter and Japan Jam Carnival, Fieldhouse, 7-10 p.m. - The Magic Flute, Kent Concert Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Monday

April 11 - National Volunteer Week - Math and Stats Tutoring, TSC, all day - Interior Design Senior Exhibit, Tippetts, 10-4 p.m. - Collecting Clothes for Families in Need, 4-9 p.m. - Logan Canyon Winds Concert, Performance Hall, 7:30 p.m.

Volleyball

You need to know....

Deep End•tyson.cole@aggiemail

Hey girls! The USU Men’s Volleyball is sponsoring a women’s indoor tournament (6-on-6) April 8-9 at the HPER Building. Get your team together and start practicing now to compete against some great teams from all over the Utah/Idaho/Wyoming area! Cost is $15 per student with ID, $20 per person for nonstudents. Check our website for the registration form: https://www.usu.edu/camprec/htm/clubsports/mensvolleyball/womens-tourney

Alphatraz: Locking Out Domestic Violence” April 8 at 8 a.m.-5 p.m. on the TSC Patio Members of Alpha Chi Omega will “arrest” your friends and put them in a jail cell on the TSC patio for $3 for a warrant of your choice. Help bail out your friends for $10. Prisoners can raise bail any creative way possible. Although we will not force anyone to be in our jail or raise bail, we are asking for everyone’s help in this fight against domestic violence! Come to the Fringe Film Festival on April 15 at 8 p.m. at the Logan Arthouse and Cinema Come celebrate the ‘90s located at 795 N. Main Street in with the Student Alumni Logan. Pre-show entertainment Association April 8 at 9 p.m.! will begin at 7 p.m. Directors of We will have a dance party the top four films will share their with hits from the ‘90s, as well comments between films. Tickets as music videos, movies, and are $10 for general admission or 2 video games from this much for $15. under-celebrated decade. USU Extension will present Make sure to dress up, prizes their monthly Eat and Educate will be given for the best ‘90s class on April 14 at 11 a.m. at 179 outfit. We’ll be at the Alumni N Main in Logan. April’s topic House, next to the LLC. will be “Easter and Springtime Traditions and treats.” A light lunch will be demonstrated and Peanut Butter and Japan served. The cost is $3 at the door Jam Carnival on April 9! or $2 if you pay 24 hours prior to Performances by PSU, Velociti the class. For reservations phone and a fashion show featuring 435-752-6263. traditional Japanese apparel The American Cancer Society and modern Japanese fashion. Relay For Life will be held on Raffle with great prizes. Free Friday April 15 from 6 p.m.-8 food. Face painting, Cake a.m. Saturday in the Fieldhouse. Walk and more! Help USU There will be free food, games, reach its campus-wide goal of activities, and many bands and raising $15,000. 7 -10 p.m. in performers.Visit relayforlife.org/ the Fieldhouse! utahstateuniversityut for more information and to donate to the American Cancer Society. Come the a Music Therapy Come to “About a Girl: It’s Forum April 12 from 11Complicated” presented by the 1p.m. Join the music therapy USU Women’s Choir April 22 program for live music and at 7:30 p.m. in the Performance walk away knowing a bit more Hall. Tickets are $8 for adults and about how music therapy $5 for students. is being used in the Cache County Jail and Avalon Hills Eating Disorder Program.

‘90s Night

Strange Brew•Peter Deering

Carnival

Music therapy

More Calendar and FYI listings, Interactive Calendar and Comics at

www.utahstatesman.com

Friday, April 8, 2011  

complete issue

Advertisement