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F E AT U R E S

SPORTS

An in-depth look at MSU Extension

Should you take that breathalyzer?

Hockey freshmen stepping up for team

Oakland University was once MSUOakland. Read more about MSU’s reach across the state of Michigan.

MSU students and police officials talk legality of taking a breathalyzer when asked.

Freshmen forward Mitchell Lewandowski and defenseman Tommy Miller talk Spartan hockey.

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T HU R S DAY, DE C E M B E R 7, 2 017

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News

HANCOCK Home of MSU’s 4-H extension for Houghton and Keweenaw counties

Brigid Kennedy Campus editor campus@statenews.com

Off-campus programs connect MSU with the rest of the state BY MAXWELL EVANS MEVANS@STATENEWS.COM

Mike Schira is stationed eight and a half hours from East Lansing — in Hancock, a city of less than 5,000 near the northern tip of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula — but he an MSU employee just like any other. As a district educator with the MSU Extension program in Houghton County, Schira is a part of a wide-reaching initiative. MSU Extension is a program that brings the university’s research and resources to the general public, with offices in every Michigan county except one. Houghton County’s Extension also oversees programs for Keweenaw County, Michigan’s northernmost and least-populous county. “It gives us a chance to connect with the population of the whole state rather than just a small sample of the state,” Schira said. “By being out this far, these counties out on the far western end of the Upper Peninsula, it gives the university an avenue or a network to talk to the folks up here.” 4-H, a non-profit youth organization known for its focus on science and agriculture, is run through the MSU Extension in Houghton and

Keweenaw counties. Its focus on yout h involvement means the extension in those counties can serve not only as a resource for local residents, but also as a sort of recruitment tool for the university in one of the most remote parts of Michigan. “They have a program they call 4-H Exploration Days, where the counties send contingencies of youth down to campus for a couple of days,” Schira said. “That is well received, so it exposes our youth to MSU’s campus and the campus resources down there.” Schira said 4-H is the “highest-profile” program run through his county’s extension, but far from the only one. As a natural resources educator, he is personally involved with invasive species and forest resources programs. Houghton County provides a natural base for this type of work as the Ottawa National Forest makes up most of the county’s southern portion. Despite the distance from campus, Schira said his program still functions within MSU’s guidelines. Online conference calls can seamlessly connect East Lansing to Hancock. However, the distance does make it difficult for his exten

THE

MSU ASIAN STUDIES CENTER

FLAS

ANNOUNCES THE

Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship Program APPLY NOW!

Fellowship awards are available for undergraduate and graduate students under the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) program. Academic year fellowships can provide up to $15,000 for undergraduates and up to $33,000 for graduates. Summer fellowship awards are up to $7,500. Fellowships will be awarded to students enrolled in a program that combines the study of a modern Asian language and Asian studies; or research in an stage. Application Deadline: February 9, 2018

For full details and application visit: asia.isp.msu.edu

THE

MSU ASIAN STUDIES CENTER ANNOUNCES THE

S.C. Lee Scholarship & Paper Competition In honor of the late Professor Shao-Chang Lee, an advocate of U.S.-East Asia relations, the S.C. Lee Endowment is proud to sponsor students with outstanding accomplishments in Asian studies. Three scholarships up to $5,000 are available and prizes up to $1,000 will be awarded for research papers focusing on Asian topics. The scholarship is open to enrolled undergraduate students only. The paper competition is open to enrolled MSU undergraduate and graduate students.

APPLY NOW!

Application Deadline: Application Deadline: February 2, 2018 February 2, 2018

2

THE STATE N E WS

ForFor fullfull details and application visit: details and application visit: asia.isp.msu.edu asia.isp.msu.edu

THURSDAY, DECEM B E R 7, 2 01 7

ILLUSTRATION: ALEXEA HANKIN

MSU’S REACH MSU has an extension office representing almost every county in the state. Here’s a map of just some of the offices manned by MSU employees, offer to their communities.

sion’s staff to attend on-campus events, so their attendance largely depends on the usefulness of the event to his locale. “They have oversight over what we do, and there’s still more contact than you’d think, especially with new technologies,” Schira said. “The downside to being this far is a lot of the programming ROCHESTER that’s offered on-camHome of MSU’s pus is a challenge to once-satellite EAST LANSING get to. It’s expensive, campus, Home of Michigan it’s a long way to go, Oakland State University and it’s quite a commitUniversity ment in time.” The extension program DETROIT is only one of the many outHome of MSU’s lets MSU has for extendDetroit Center ing its influence beyond East Lansing’s city limits. In theory, MSU’s Detroit Center is very similar to the MSU Extension in Houghton County; it’s a way for the univerdistricts. sity to directly con“You’ve nect with Michgot a cadigan residents re of differoutside of the ent state uniLansing area. However, Detroit, a city whose versit ies t hat population is more than double that of the entire have co-located since the U of M and MSU cenU.P., has far different needs than rural Hough- ters have been established here,” Baker-Calloton County. way said. The Detroit Center predictably has far less As expansive as the MSU Detroit Center is, no of a focus on agriculture, focusing instead on current off-campus program is quite as ambithe issues residents of a major urban area face. tious as the one started 60 years ago, when MSU MSU’s College of Education has a unit at the broke ground on an entirely new university – at Center, at a time when the city seems to con- the time, a satellite campus. In 1957, Mathilda stantly struggle with teacher shortages and oth- and Alfred Wilson, after whom Wilson Hall is er educational issues. The Detroit Area Pre-Col- named, donated their Oakland County estate to lege Engineering Program, a non-profit that MSU, and with the help of then-President John the Center has a long-term partnership with, Hannah, assisted in the creation of a satellite brings Detroit’s under-served youth in contact campus. MSU-Oakland became Oakland Uniwith STEM programs they otherwise might not versity in 1963 and became fully independent have been able to experience. from MSU seven years later. Director of MSU Detroit Center Jena BakShirley Paquette, archives assistant with OU er-Calloway said that she believes programs Libraries, said historic Meadow Brook Hall, an like these reaffirm the center’s purpose as an 88,000-square-foot mansion on campus that was “investment” in the city. the Wilsons’ former home, and other landmarks “The university’s decision to have this center at Oakland serve as reminders of the connecis really paramount in terms of how they view tion between the two universities. the city of Detroit and its relevance to the future Although she said she didn’t know exactly of the state,” Baker-Calloway said. “It’s a long- what material was covered during OU’s freshterm vision, a long-term view of what kinds of man orientation, she was confident Oakland stucollaborations and activities can happen.” dents at least have some knowledge about their Baker-Calloway said that, along with the Uni- university’s history and beginnings as an offversity of Michigan, MSU was one of the first shoot of MSU. universities to establish a center in downtown “I think it’s pretty safe to say that during the Detroit. That decision kicked off a trend among orientation, OU’s roots are brought up at some Michigan colleges. point.” Paquette said. In addition to Detroit’s hometown university, In 2011, Oakland began to offer programs Wayne State, other schools like Central Mich- through a repurposed office plaza in neighborigan and Lawrence Tech have followed MSU’s ing Macomb County. MSU now has a family lead, bringing resources and faculty from state tree, as its former satellite campus now has a universities to Detroit’s downtown and Midtown satellite of its own.


Contents

McKenna Ross Managing editor mross@statenews.com

ONLINE AT STATENEWS.COM

Study abroad deadlines

Attorney General asks to see Title IX report

Men’s basketball takeaways

Those deadlines are looming. Two MSU students give their advice on how to handle the application.

Bill Schuette sent a letter to MSU calling for the internal investigation that looks into Larry Nassar’s impact at MSU.

Basketball reporter Michael Duke breaks down the MSU’s win over Rutgers and what the team still needs.

15

BY T H E N U M B E R S

Number of days with sporting events during the break See Page 4

“I would just say my parents just with the support to put me through it. They never missed a game and all that cheeky stuff. They have always been there.”

Mitchell Lewandowski Freshman hockey forward See page 10

City Council OKs medical marijuana BY MARIE WEIDMAYER MWEIDMAYER@STATENEWS.COM

Medical marijuana is coming to the City of East Lansing. After almost three hours of discussion, the city council passed an ordinance with a vote of 4-1 to allow growers, processing, safety compliance and secure transfer facilities within city limits. Councilmember Ruth Beier was the only dissenting vote. “While I support medical marijuana, I think it’s a great idea and it’s helped a lot of people,” Beier said. “I do not support that the idea of helping the few developers who want to use our industrial areas to grow and process this product that we don’t know what the impacts are going to be and try to regulate them. I’m just not comfortable at this time, so I’ll be voting no.” During public comment, community members spoke for and against passing Ordinance 1395. The biggest objection was concerns about the

odor and possible increase in crime. The ordinance outlines odor regulations and consequences for not following the regulations, including the fact that marijuana cannot be smelled outside of the structure it is “cultivated, grown, manufactured or processed” in. “There have been a lot of studies coming out that say the crime is usually not associated with an increase when medical marijuana is present,” Councilmember Aaron Stephens said. “There have been also several studies that say drunk driving goes down. I don’t believe this to be an issue after having conversations with members of our East Lansing Police Department.” The facilities are only allowed in two different types of zoned areas, manufacturing industry and office industrial park. They also have to be at least 1,000 feet from the lot lines of “any licensed facility with after school programs, child care centers or daycare centers.” Provisioning centers will be addressed in late December.

DeWitt resident Patti Wilkins pets the horses in between carriage rides during the annual Winter Glow Festival on Dec. 2 at Ann St. Plaza. The free festival featured carriage rides, music, an outdoor holiday farmer’s market, marshmallow roasting and other seasonal activities. PHOTO: SYLVIA JARRUS

VOL . 108 | NO. 14 CONTACT THE STATE NEWS (517) 295-1680

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rachel Fradette

NEWSROOM/CORRECTIONS (517) 295-5149 feedback@statenews.com

MANAGING EDITOR McKenna Ross

GENERAL MANAGER Marty Sturgeon ADVERTISING M-F, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADVERTISING MANAGERS Mia Wallace, Raquel Mishaan COLOPHON The State News design features Acta, a newspaper type system created by DSType Foundry.

CAMPUS EDITOR Brigid Kennedy CITY EDITOR Riley Murdock SPORTS EDITOR Sam Metry FEATURES EDITOR Sasha Zidar PHOTO EDITOR Jon Famurewa COPY CHIEF Blair Baeten

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during the academic year. News is constantly updated seven days a week at statenews.com. One copy of this newspaper is available free of charge to any member of the MSU community. Additional copies $0.75 at the business office only. State News Inc. is a private, nonprofit corporation. Its current 990 tax form is available for review upon request at 435 E. Grand River Ave. during business hours. Copyright © 2017 State News Inc., East Lansing, Michigan

DESIGN EDITOR Alexea Hankin T H U RS DAY, DE C E MB E R 7, 2 01 7

STATE N E WS .CO M

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WINTER BREAK MSU SPORTS CALENDAR December 2017 10

11

12

Exam Week Begins

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14

15

16

MSU Men’s Hoops vs. Oakland (2:30 pm at Little Caesers Arena) MSU Hockey vs. 18U Development team (7:05 pm) in Plymouth, MI

MSU Women’s Hoops at ETSU (7 pm)

17

18

19

MSU Men’s Hoops vs. Houston Baptist (6 pm)

20

MSU Women’s Hoops vs. Quinnipiac (9 pm)

24

21

MSU Men’s Hoops vs. Long Beach State (7 pm)

MSU Women’s Hoops vs. USF (8:30 pm in University of New Orleans Tourney at New Orleans)

25

26

27

28 MSU Women’s Hoops at Indiana (7 pm) MSU Football vs. Washington State (9 pm in the Holiday Bowl at San Diego)

22

23

MSU Women’s Hoops vs. Mississippi Valley State (6 pm in University of New Orleans Tourney at New Orleans)

29 MSU Wrestling (all day at South Beach Duals in Deerfield Beach FL.)

30 MSU Wrestling (all day at South Beach Duals in Deerfield Beach FL.)

MSU Men’s Hoops vs. Cleveland State (6 pm)

January 2018 31 MSU Men’s Hoops vs. Savannah State (12 pm) MSU Women’s Hoops vs. Rutgers (4 pm)

01 MSU Ice Hockey vs. Michigan Tech. (2:30 pm at Little Caesers Arena in Detroit)

07 MSU Men’s Hoops at Ohio State (Time TBA) MSU Wrestling at Minnesota (2 pm)

02

03

MSU Ice Hockey vs. Bowling Green or Michigan (Time TBA, will take place at Little Caesers Arena)

MSU Women’s Hoops vs. Northwestern (7 pm)

MSU Men’s Hoops vs. Maryland (8 pm)

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10

11

08

04

05 Women’s Gymnastics vs. BGSU (6 pm)

06 MSU Ice Hockey vs. Ohio State (7:05 pm)

MSU Ice Hockey vs. Ohio State (7:05 pm) Wrestling at Iowa (8 pm)

12

13

Spring Semester Begins

MSU Women’s Hoops at Minnesota (4 pm)

Public Skating

Munn Ice Arena 12:15pm-1:45pm

Monday December 18

3:30pm-5:00pm

Saturday December 9

7:00pm-9:00pm

Tuesday December 19

3:30pm-5:00pm

Sunday, December 10

4:30pm-6:00pm

Wednesday, December 20

Monday, December 11

12:15pm-1:45pm

Thursday December 21

12:15pm-1:45pm

Tuesday December 12

12:15pm-1:45pm

Friday December 22

12:15pm-1:45pm

Wednesday, December 13

12:15pm-1:45pm

Saturday December 23

11:00am-1:00pm 4:00pm-6:00pm

Thursday, December 14

12:15pm-1:45pm

Tuesday December 26

3:00pm-5:00pm

Wednesday, December 6

Friday, December 15

12:15pm-1:45pm

12:15pm-1:45pm

Saturday, December 16

5:00pm-7:00pm

Wednesday, December 27 12:30pm-2:30pm 6:00pm-7:30pm

Sunday, December 17

4:30pm-6:00pm

Thursday December 28

6:00pm-7:30pm

Admission: $6.00 General Public $5.00 with MSU ID, and anyone under 18 $2.00 skate rental Also $8-Freestyle Skate $7-Open Hockey (14+, Full gear required) see website for times

All skaters must pay in Pro Shop prior to taking the ice. All times are subject to change. Please call 353-4698 to confirm times.

Please visit our website: www.munnicearena.com 4

THE STATE NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMB E R 7, 2 01 7

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Opinion

Editorial: An open letter to the MSU administration

54th 57th Anniversary Sale!

BY THE STATE NEWS EDITORIAL BOARD FEEDBACK@STATENEWS.COM

OPEN ‘TIL 8

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20% OFF ALMOST EVERYTHING* INCLUDING THE GREEN & WHITE SHOP *EXCLUDES TEXTBOOKS, CLASS RINGS, CALCULATORS, COMPUTER SOFTWARE, SPECIAL ORDERS, AND SALE ITEMS.

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McKenna Ross Managing editor feedback@statenews.com

I

n the aftermath of Larry Nassar, John T. Madden and reports of 19 sexual assaults taking place in Greek Life over the past five years, The State News would like to ask one thing of President Lou Anna K. Simon, the board of trustees and anyone else who considers themselves an authority figure on MSU’s campus: Do something. Show us you are working to solve these problems. Of all the issues at MSU, that should be the biggest complaint — the university’s inability to communicate with its community effectively. The State News reported there were 19 sexual assaults at registered Interfraternity Council, or IFC, chapter houses in the past five years. And yet, we haven’t been able to get any type of comment from MSU on the situation. Nassar was first accused of sexual assault in September 2016. You didn’t officially comment until February 2017. MSU spokesperson Jason Cody sent a statement to other universit y of f icials regarding Madden’s sexual harassment in October 2016 in anticipation a story would soon surface, according to documents obtained by The State News. It has been almost t wo years since Madden’s sexual harassment investigat ion broke, making waves. And yet again, Simon and the university has remained silent. MSU has no right to be silent about allegations of sexual conduct nor should the university sit back and allow these issues to boil over until the administration is forced to address them. St udent s a nd member s of t he MSU community deserve to have the administration and the president acknowledge a problem when it persists. When the university remains silent on issues of sexual conduct, it shows us it is again acting only in the defense of the brand, not for the students who comprise the community. When the Lansing State Journal called for Simon to resign on Sunday, the board of trustees released a statement just hours later to defend her. Where is that level of timeliness for actual problems affecting students?

We want to believe MSU is doing the right thing. We want MSU to be a safe campus. You were hired because, overall, you want to make students feel safe. Sometimes discussing negatives can be a positive, leading people to feel more secure. MSU needs to be more transparent. That might not paint MSU in the best light. However, an open environment allows the young, impressionable adults on campus to trust the university more. In turn, that leads to the betterment of the community. Except when you operate through a veil of secrecy, people are left to make their own assumptions, which is how the face of Nassar defined the past two years of MSU’s history — because that’s the only face there is. Maybe the Lansing State Journal is right. Maybe Simon does need to resign. This silent attitude is all the administration knows, as we’ve seen.

“What we do know is the university needs to do right by its students, faculty, the survivors of sexual misconduct, among others. There is no maybe here, it’s a black and white issue.”

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T H E STAT E NE WS

But as of right now, we don’t know if she’d be replaced by anyone better. What we do know is the university needs to do right by its students, faculty, the survivors of sexual misconduct, among others. There is no maybe here, it’s a black and white issue. Do something so we can all move forward. The State News Editorial Board is made up of the Editor-in-Chief Rachel Fradette, Managing Editor McKenna Ross, Campus Editor Brigid Kennedy, City Editor Riley Murdock, Features Editor Sasha Zidar, Sports Editor Sam Metry, Copy Chief Blair Baeten, Staff Representative Madison O’Connor and Inclusion Representative Souichi Terada. Inclusion Representative Souichi Terada did not sit in on this editorial. TH U R S DAY, D E C E M B E R 7, 2 01 7


City

Riley Murdock City editor city@statenews.com

RELIGIOUS Net neutrality: How its repeal DIRECTORY might affect you Stay up to date at: www.statenews.com/religious

BY PETER ATKINS PATKINS@STATENEWS.COM

After the Federal Communications Commission, or FCC, announced two weeks ago it intends to repeal Obama-era nondiscrimination internet protections, known as net neutrality. The internet as it’s known is set for a revision. Drastic changes to internet policy by the FCC are expected in the near future, according to professor Johannes Bauer, chairperson of the media and information department at MSU. “Net neutrality is a set of principles that oblige internet providers not to discriminate by type of information, by type of user, by type of device, or by type of source of information,” Bauer said. “Net neutrality in its current form was introduced in 2015.” Bauer has been an MSU faculty member since 1990. A native of Austria, he first studied in the U.S. as a guest doctoral student at University of California, Berkeley and Columbia. He holds a doctorate in economics. In 2005, the FCC announced policy intentions for basic, nondiscrimination protections for internet users. “It had no legal force,” Bauer said. “It was not a law that congress had passed, nor was it a formal regulation.” By the late 2000s, internet providers began to take advantage of the loose policy. Providers were slowing down internet services for specific groups. Comcast sued the FCC over a dispute with BitTorrent, a file sharing service. Comcast had slowed down the speed of the platform. A federal appeals court ruled in favor of Comcast, stating the FCC did not have the authority to regulate provider content. This led the FCC to include net neutrality rules into its Title I framework in 2010. “The first round tried to implement net neutrality in the Title I framework,” Bauer said. “(It had) weak powers to enforce nondiscrimination.” Title I framework under the FCC is reserved for information services, which included the internet at the time. Common carriers under Title II framework are subject to regulation. Common carriers include telephone companies and other telecommunications services. In 2015, the FCC finally gained the ability to regulate internet content by reclassifying internet providers as a common carrier. The FCC put nondiscrimination policies in place under Title II, which led to net neutrality. Internet providers could not limit internet access to any of its clients. “Many network operators did not like that movement,” Bauer said. “They thought it was going back to a time where it was more intrusive. They felt it was not compatible with the

open free-wheeling spirit of the internet. At the same time, Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, Twitter, Netflix, were very much in favor of those rules because they felt it would give them a better position in the market to make sure their information would reach to consumers without discrimination.” Spartan Net Operations Officer and co-founder Richard Lang does not expect the internet service to be impacted by repealed nondiscrimination polices. Spartan Net services over 75 communities in East Lansing, including DTN Management and Cron Management. “We don’t discriminate against anybody; we work with anyone who wants to work with us,” Lang said. “Our position is that we want to give the very best experience to every subscriber that we have, so we’re not going to discriminate against the way you want to use our network.” Lang believes the major service providers are more likely to be impacted by a repeal. “If a service provider, say Comcast, decides that they don’t want AT&T Direc TV content to come across their network and discriminate against that, to me that’s where it was impacting,” Lang said. “Net neutrality is not necessarily going to impact the way that our pricing is. I don’t see it to increase because we are a net neutral network.” With the nondiscrimination policies likely to be repealed, MSU students are worrisome of the prospect of a fragmented internet. “For student start-ups, I can see that being pushed into slow lanes or providers not privileging your content could be damaging,” experience architecture junior Katie Musial said. “Especially if they don’t support what you’re doing.” Musial is a member of MSU Hatch, a start-up incubator for student entrepreneurs, and she works as a web consultant for the group. “Free speech would decline under these rules,” Musial said. “These companies would be able to say what they want seen and privilege that.” Bauer expressed similar views on the possibility of providers limiting information flow. “Unless you have these nondiscrimination protections in place in one form or another, it might well be that the network access providers become gatekeepers,” Bauer said. “They will organize information for you.” Though there are students at MSU who feel the internet and shouldn’t be governed like it will under net neutrality. “I feel like the internet should be a free platform for everybody,” computer science junior Austin Roberts said. “I don’t think the ISPs should be the ones. It’d be like if DTE restricts your energy for certain appliances.” There could likely be many changes to FCC internet regulations in the years to come.

Chabad House of MS 540 Elizabeth St. East Lansing, MI 48823 (517) 214-0525 Prayer Services: Friday night services followed by traditional Shabbat dinner @ Chabad. www.chabadmsu.com Eastminster Presbyterian Church 1315 Abbot Rd. East Lansing, MI 48823 Phone: (517) 337-0893 Classes for All Ages: 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:30 a.m. Website: www.eastminsterchurch.org Greater Lansing Church of Christ 310 N. Hagadorn Rd. East Lansing, MI 48823 (Meet @ University Christian Church) (517) 898-3600 Sunday: 8:45am Worship, 10am Bible Class Wednesday: 1pm, Small group bible study Students call for rides. www.greaterlansingcoc.org Hillel Jewish Student Center 360 Charles St. East Lansing, MI 48823 (517) 332-1916 Services: Friday night 6pm, dinner @ 7, Sept.- April. www.msuhillel.org

Martin Luther Chapel 444 Abbot Rd. East Lansing, MI 48823 (517) 332-0778 Sunday: 9:30am & 7pm Wednesday: 9pm Mini-bus pick-up on campus (Fall/Spring) www.martinlutherchapel.org River Terrace Church 1509 River Terrace Dr. East Lansing, MI 48823 (517) 351-9059 Service Times: Sundays, 9am & 11:15am www.riverterrace.org Riverview ChurchMSU Venue MSU Union Ballroom, 2nd Floor 49 Abbot Rd. East Lansing, MI 48824 (517) 694-3400 Worship Times: Sundays 6:30pm, Fall/Spring semesters www.rivchurch.com St. John Catholic Church and Student Center 327 M.A.C Ave. East Lansing MI, 48823 (517) 337-9778 Sundays: 8am, 10am, Noon, 5pm, 7pm M,W,F: 12:15pm T & Th: 9:15pm www.stjohnmsu.org

University United Methodist Church & MSU Wesley 1120 S. Harrison Rd. East Lansing, MI 48823 (517) 351-7030 Sundays: 10:30am Thursdays: 8:00pm Sept.- April www.universitychurchhome.org WELS Lutheran Campus Ministry 704 Abbot Rd. East Lansing, MI 48823 (517) 580-3744 Saturday: 6:30pm www.msu.edu/~welsluth University Baptist Church 4608 Hagadorn Rd. East Lansing, MI 488423 (517) 351-4144 uinbapt@gmail.com www.baptistel.org Main Service: Sunday, 10 a.m The People’s Church, multidenominational 200 W Grand River Ave, East Lansing, MI 48823 517-332-6074 ThePeoplesChurch.com Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. with free lunch for students following worship.

READ MORE AT STATENEWS.COM

without net neutrality

INTERNET

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THUR SDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017

STAT E NE WS .COM

7


Spotlight

McKenna Ross Managing editor mross@statenews.com

BY DEBBIE MISZAK DMISZAK@STATENEWS.COM

Throughout the past semester, MSU has been the topic of many important stories. Here is a look at some of the biggest stories of the semester: Richard Spencer’s lawsuit

A National Policy Institute, or NPI, representative sued MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon for denying request for Richard Spencer to speak on campus on Sept. 3. Cameron Padgett, an organizer for NPI filed a request to rent space at MSU to host NPI Director Richard Spencer following the violent events that transpired at his University of Virginia speech in Charlottesville, which culminated in the death of counter protester Heather Heyer. Simon denied the request citing security concerns, which prompted Padgett to bring a lawsuit against Simon and the MSU board of trustees for free speech violations.

He cited a case involving Auburn University which was decided in favor of the alt-right group. The board of trustees was eventually dropped from the lawsuit, but the case against Simon remains. None of Simon’s lawyers were able to comment on the case at this time because the matter is now in civil litigation, and MSU Spokesperson Jason Cody declined to comment. Attorney Kyle Bristow, who represents the NPI declined an interview but offered one comment. “I’ll let the pleadings speak for themselves,” he said when asked where he saw the case

CAMPUS CENTER CINEMA

East Lansing Mayor Mark Meadows is sworn in on Nov. 21 at the 54B District Court. PHOTO: CARLY GERACI

NOW FEATURING

heading in the future. MSU law associate professor Nancy Castello offered insight into how the trial might play out. “I think there’s a chance that he could win,” Castello said. “He is trying to speak on a college campus, which traditionally has been a public forum that has very much protected speech under the first amendment.” Castello said Spencer is probably aware of

Dec. 7-9 Battle of the Sexes

Wind River

Thurs: Wilson Aud 8:30 PM

Thurs: Conrad Aud 9:00 PM

Fri: 115 B Wells Hall 7:00 PM

Fri: 119 B Wells Hall 7:15 PM

Sat: 115 B Wells Hall 9:15 PM

Sat: 119 B Wells Hall 9:10 PM

Dec 14-17: Winter Break- No Films 8

THE STATE NEWS

THURSDAY, DECEMB E R 7, 2 01 7

speech or fighting words, the government can shut it down without penalty.” Castello said incitement speech usually takes place in the moment, so it would be difficult to argue in court that Spencer will engage in it prior to his speech. She did note if a speaker riles a mob of people up to the point of violence, it counts as incitement speech. “Incitement speech is like shouting, ‘Fire!’ in a crowded theater when there isn’t a fire and knowing that you could incite kind of a riot of people trying “We have a tradition of controversial run out, and in speech being performed on college cam- to so doing, people could get harmed,” puses.” Castello said. Castello also Nancy Castello, explained the MSU law professor on the National Policy Institute’s lawsuit definition of fighting words, which she said is when one the rich history of college campuses respecting invites another person to a brawl. free speech, particularly in the instances of “Say I am really angry at the George Bush anti-Vietnam War protests during the 1960s administration for invading Iraq,” Castello and 1970s. said. “And I started lighting the flag on fire and “So, we have a tradition of controversial somebody stepped up and said, ‘Hey Professor speech being performed on college campuses,” Castello, I’m a military vet and I really respect Castello said. “That’s probably what Richard the flag … you can’t light that flag on fire,’ and Spencer’s relying on. On the other hand, if I say, ‘Yes, I can….You don’t like it? You come speech could be seen as either incitement down here and show me how much you don’t speech or fighting words ... if it’s incitement like it!’ ... those are called fighting words.”


Spotlight

McKenna Ross Managing editor mross@statenews.com

BY DEBBIE MISZAK DMISZAK@STATENEWS.COM

Throughout the past semester, MSU has been the topic of many important stories. Here is a look at some of the biggest stories of the semester: Richard Spencer’s lawsuit

A National Policy Institute, or NPI, representative sued MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon for denying request for Richard Spencer to speak on campus on Sept. 3. Cameron Padgett, an organizer for NPI filed a request to rent space at MSU to host NPI Director Richard Spencer following the violent events that transpired at his University of Virginia speech in Charlottesville, which culminated in the death of counter protester Heather Heyer. Simon denied the request citing security concerns, which prompted Padgett to bring a lawsuit against Simon and the MSU board of trustees for free speech violations.

He cited a case involving Auburn University which was decided in favor of the alt-right group. The board of trustees was eventually dropped from the lawsuit, but the case against Simon remains. None of Simon’s lawyers were able to comment on the case at this time because the matter is now in civil litigation, and MSU Spokesperson Jason Cody declined to comment. Attorney Kyle Bristow, who represents the NPI declined an interview but offered one comment. “I’ll let the pleadings speak for themselves,” he said when asked where he saw the case

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East Lansing Mayor Mark Meadows is sworn in on Nov. 21 at the 54B District Court. PHOTO: CARLY GERACI

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heading in the future. MSU law associate professor Nancy Castello offered insight into how the trial might play out. “I think there’s a chance that he could win,” Castello said. “He is trying to speak on a college campus, which traditionally has been a public forum that has very much protected speech under the first amendment.” Castello said Spencer is probably aware of

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THURSDAY, DECEMB E R 7, 2 01 7

speech or fighting words, the government can shut it down without penalty.” Castello said incitement speech usually takes place in the moment, so it would be difficult to argue in court that Spencer will engage in it prior to his speech. She did note if a speaker riles a mob of people up to the point of violence, it counts as incitement speech. “Incitement speech is like shouting, ‘Fire!’ in a crowded theater when there isn’t a fire and knowing that you could incite kind of a riot of people trying “We have a tradition of controversial run out, and in speech being performed on college cam- to so doing, people could get harmed,” puses.” Castello said. Castello also Nancy Castello, explained the MSU law professor on the National Policy Institute’s lawsuit definition of fighting words, which she said is when one the rich history of college campuses respecting invites another person to a brawl. free speech, particularly in the instances of “Say I am really angry at the George Bush anti-Vietnam War protests during the 1960s administration for invading Iraq,” Castello and 1970s. said. “And I started lighting the flag on fire and “So, we have a tradition of controversial somebody stepped up and said, ‘Hey Professor speech being performed on college campuses,” Castello, I’m a military vet and I really respect Castello said. “That’s probably what Richard the flag … you can’t light that flag on fire,’ and Spencer’s relying on. On the other hand, if I say, ‘Yes, I can….You don’t like it? You come speech could be seen as either incitement down here and show me how much you don’t speech or fighting words ... if it’s incitement like it!’ ... those are called fighting words.”


Sports

Sam Metry Sports editor sports@statenews.com

FRESHMEN STEPPING UP

Hockey forward Mitchell Lewandowski and defenseman Tommy Miller reflect on playing in top six lines BY KARA KEATING KKEATING@STATENEWS.COM

ACROSS

1 British bloke 5 Title for a fictional fox 9 Pancake syrup tree 14 Prefix for “six” 15 Coleridge’s “The __ of the Ancient Mariner” 16 Partners of pains 17 Many Manet works 18 Like a grand-scale fail 19 __ Islander: small-state resident 20 Earnings before the government’s cut 23 End in __: come out even 24 French street 25 Cops’ orgs. 28 Fave pal, in 67-Across 31 German pastry 33 Question as to technique 34 New Haven collegian 36 Cribbage piece 37 Gossip columnist Barrett 38 Words on a “No Trespassing” sign 42 Rockers’ sound machines 43 Speck in la mer 44 Coloring cosmetic 45 Chessmen and board, e.g.

46 Squeaky clean, as hospital supplies 49 Alternative to grass seed 50 “No seats” initials 51 Big __: trademark burger 52 Gunk 54 Invention that revolutionized book production 60 First appearance 62 Promises at the altar 63 __ Hari 64 Smidge 65 “Me neither” 66 Getting people out of harm’s way, for short 67 Cellphone messages 68 Secluded valley 69 __ of the woods

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1 Lamb serving 2 Will beneficiary 3 Rod on which wheels turn 4 Rotini or rigatoni 5 Secession approved in a 2016 U.K. referendum 6 Jack the __ 7 Arab leader 8 Piccolo relative 9 Actress Hemingway 10 German eight

11 Element in matches 12 Conducted 13 Language suffix 21 On the Caribbean 22 En __: on a hot streak, slangily 26 “Stick around” 27 Influenced 28 Road that avoids the city center 29 Crop raiser 30 Container with an attached cover 32 Michigan’s __ Peninsula 35 Drips in a hosp. 37 Classic roadster 39 Giant 40 Putting in office 41 Surg. holding area 46 Workers with anvils 47 Pay no mind 48 Begins a computer session 53 Ad agency guys responsible for 20-, 38- and 54-Across? 55 Oxidation damage 56 Beloved star 57 Roof gutter locale 58 Like short, clipped notes, in mus. 59 Burlap container 60 Va. summer hours 61 __ out a living

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Freshman defenseman Tommy Miller (12) passes the puck during the game on Dec. 1 at Munn Ice Arena. The Spartans fell to the Fighting Irish 3-1. PHOTO: SYLVIA JARRUS

Freshmen forward Mitchell Lewandowski and defenseman Tommy Miller are creating a new surge within the men’s ice hockey program. “It’s kind of crazy I didn’t jump into the year thinking with high hopes like that,” Lewandowski said. “It’s good how things worked out.” Before coming to MSU, Miller started out at the USANTDP where he tallied 20 points in his first season and helped the team win a gold medal at the IIHF U18 World Championship in Slovakia with two assists. Lewandowski played for the USHL’s Chicago Steel, who won the 2017 Clark Cup and produced 12 points in 13 playoff games. Head coach Danton Cole knew he was going to have one or two freshmen playing in the top six lines. He chose Miller because of his mature character and continual improvment. With Lewandowski, he’s set up with sophomore forwards Taro Hirose and Patrick Khodorenko, displaying his skill. “I asset them outstanding,” Cole said. “They have been outstanding and we needed them. Thank God they had a great start to their careers.” According to Cole, Miller played over 30 minutes of ice time when they faced Penn State on Nov. 24-25. This season he tallied three assists. Miller began the season playing with senior defensemen Carson Gatt and continues still. He feels Gatt has helped him begin his college hockey career. “It’s nice to play with him,” Miller said. “He’s played three more seasons of college hockey than I have and he took me under his wing and showed me how to do things. He makes playing hockey easy out there.” Communication is what Miller credits as one of their strong points together. When he feels he does not understand something, Gatt guides him through the process. Cole paired the duo to help Miller learn from the veteran defenseman. For the first-year coach, he feels Miller has proved he deserves the ice time he plays. “When we looked at our group, we put him with Carson early on and we said, ‘Hey you can learn a lot from a senior’ and they click real well,” Cole said. “Players decide ice time and he has made his plan.” Currently, Lewandowski leads all freshmen nationally in goals and points. He has scored nine goals in 16 games and produced 18 points. Among Spartans, he’s tied with Hirose in points to lead MSU. Before starting his Spartan career, Lewandowski played along with his current linemate Khodorenko with the Honeybaked Hockey Club. “I’m happy with the way I’m playing with linemates on the first line here,” Lewandowski said. “I try not 10

T H E STAT E NE WS

to think about it too much. I just keep playing my game and not get caught up in all that, but it’s been great so far.” Cole credits him as an impactful player with the numbers he has put up this season. On the first day of practice, he put Lewandowski with the two sophomores to see how their skills would work out and he has yet to alter the lines once. He calls it a smart move. “The first day I think anyone could have seen those three play together, the chemistry they have and how they moved, you would have been crazy not to leave them together and then things go right,” Cole said. “Sometimes being smart is just not doing anything so we kind of left them alone.” To improve his game, the point-producing freshman feels he can focus more on getting a better stick angle and working as more of a threat on the defensive side of the puck. On the other hand, he credits his linemates on his current success of where he is right now. “I think just a combination of just working hard and getting stronger and playing with my linemates Patty and Taro, who have helped me a lot,” Lewandowski said. “They find me all over the ice and have played strong games together.” For Miller, he feels he can produce more shots. One of the things he looks to work on is turning his passes into shots. His main improvement he feels that has gotten better is making easy passes to Gatt along with his break outs. “I’m really happy with the break outs that I’ve been making, you know, putting pressure on the puck, just the easy bump to Gatt or something like that,” Miller said. “I have really improved and I’m happy with that.” Lewandowski credits his successful hockey career to his previous coaches in the pass from Honeybaked to the Chicago Steel. After playing for the Steel, he believes the team has helped him transition well into his college hockey career. He also credits his parents who have supported him and never missed a game he has played in. Miller credits his coaches and family members, but especially his older sister, Margot Miller, who played college hockey at North Dakota from 2008 to 2012. He said he feels she and her boyfriend have taught him the things he needs to know to in college hockey to make things easier for him, and thus shining on the ice for MSU. “My oldest sister Margot went through college hockey and kind of showed me the ropes and told me how to do things,” Miller said. “Makes life easier and made me more comfortable going into an uncomfortable situations.”

T H U RS DAY, D E C E M B E R 7, 2 01 7


Features

Sasha Zidar Features editor features@statenews.com

Should you take that breathalyzer test? New law does not require it BY JAMESON DRAPER JDRAPER@STATENEWS.COM

In a recent State News article about avoiding a minor in possession charge, an anonymous student claimed to have made a mistake when agreeing to be breathalyzed by a police officer during an impromptu MIP stop. The prevailing belief among college students is that if a cop stops you in suspicion of being intoxicated, you have to take a preliminary breath test, or PBT. The truth is you don’t have to agree to blowing into a PBT if you’re not behind the wheel of a car. That’s a constitutional right. Due to section 436.1703 of the Michigan Legislature, an MIP is now a civil infraction, not a misdemeanor. It will not show up on your record as a first offense. In 2016, Casey Guthrie, a senior at Grosse Ile High School and soon-to-be student at MSU, sued a cop for unlawfully giving her a ticket after refusing to be breathalyzed.

There was a local amendment allowing police officers to perform PBTs on those under the age of 20 without a warrant. Guthrie argued this was a violation of the Fourth Amendment, which allows one to be free from unwarranted searches.

“It’s unconstitutional. And federal judges have said that it’s unconstitutional but police still get away with it.” The same thing happens at MSU. According to the anonymous student from the previous article, the police randomly selected her out of a group to be

And they kept forcing me to breathalyze. The girl next to me refused, so she didn’t blow anything. Everyone else that I was with did blow because they were, like, coercing you into blowing and then so I blew. And they handcuffed everyone, whether you blew or not and took you to a holding cell.” The source said not to use MIP is now a civil infraction in Michigan – a breathalyzer if stopped, not a misdemeanor. It will not show up on as there was your record as a first offense. another girl in the mix with her — allegedGuthrie was a passenger in a breathalyzed. She was sitting in ly clearly more intoxicated than car that was pulled over, and front of Spartan Stadium wait- our subject — that didn’t get when she refused the breatha- ing to get into a football game administered a breathalyzer lyzer, the police officer wrote when the event happened. and therefore wasn’t written her a ticket. That’s unlawful, so “He said, ‘Okay, you’re com- up for an MIP. Guthrie challenged it. ing with me,’ then dragged “I think she got a $180 ticket “You got the police detain- me into the stadium into this for nothing. It was, like, a liting people underage and mak- room,” the source said. “They tering ticket or something like ing them blow into the PBT made me take off all my hair that,” the source said. machine without a warrant,” ties, everything. They startThe student also said during Michael Rataj, a Detroit-ar- ed taking my information. the process, the cops repeatedea lawyer that represently told individuals things would ed Guthrie in court, said. go “easier” and “smoother” if they breathalyzed. The source advised against blowing into a PBT machine, and Rataj echoed a similar sentiment.

FACT

PUBLIC ACT

He said even though the prevailing wisdom is to listen to police and follow what they say, sometimes standing up for yourself is the right decision, even if it comes with some repercussions. “Most of you are afraid to lock horns with the police, so you go ahead and do it,” Rataj said. “And if you don’t, they take you to jail.” Some students, though, said they would not fall for something the cops told them. “I would not breathalyze because they have no right to breathalyze me,” education junior Kyle Penny said, in reference to a hypothetical instance. “I wasn’t driving the vehicle. It doesn’t matter whether I’m drunk or not, I wasn’t driving.” Penny said he’s been breathalyzed before behind the wheel, but understands that it is constitutional for police to do that. As for how he knew that it was unconstitutional to force a breathalyzer upon

a minor, Penny had a simple answer. “Just common sense. Like, that just sounds like it’s not right,” Penny said.

GRAPHIC BY CHRIS BROWN

The bill allows an officer to request, rather than require, the minor to submit to the breath analysis. A minor who refuses to submit to a breath analysis is responsible for a State civil infraction and may be ordered to pay a civil fine of up to $100. The bill deletes those provisions.

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Thursday 12/07/17  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

Thursday 12/07/17  

The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during fall, spring and select days during summer seme...

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