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Michigan State’s Independent Voice

A SENIOR’S VICTORY LAP

Ahead of graduation, one senior takes a trip around MSU to revisit the memories one last time. PAGES 8-9

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CITY

BWL explores options for 100% renewable energy in East Lansing BY EVAN JONES EJONES@STATENEWS.COM

Presentations on potential sustainability strategies from the East Lansing Commission on the Environment and the Lansing Board of Water and Light, or BWL, made up what Mayor Mark Meadows called the East Lansing City Council’s “environmental evening.” Environmental services administrator Cathy DeShambo updated the council with the environmental commission’s initiatives and goals. The commission’s climate sustainability plan was adopted in 2012. The plan has five focus areas: Waste management, energy efficiency, renewable energy, transportation and water management. “We have political will, we have resident will and we have staff will,” she said. “When you have those three things together, there’s not a lot that we can’t do.” Two years ago, East Lansing was one of 10 communities to participate in two-week online “Resilience Dialogues” with climate experts, which discussed strategies for climate adaptation. Experts included officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and other federal agencies. “It was pretty amazing to be connected with

these folks and to be able to talk with them,” DeShambo said. DeShambo also presented to the council East Lansing’s gold certification in the Michigan Green Communities Challenge. The certification required actions such as tracking local energy and water use, incorporating sustainability metrics in city improvements and a community forestry plan. “This was actually a particularly heavy lift, but it was great because it really gave us some benchmarking,” she said. The city has been a strong participant in regional recycling — although the region does not have a materials recovery facility, a development the commission has been working on for years, Deshambo said. “All of our recyclables must be trucked elsewhere,” she said. That really equates to a loss of jobs in our community and a loss of economy.” DeShambo said a recovery facility, supported by an agreement between the City of Lansing and the City of East Lansing, is coming to fruition. A version of the agreement was previously recommended to the East Lansing City Council in 2015. Environmental commission chair Tom Alwin spoke to the council about the commission’s renewable energy subcommittee, saying its first task is to develop and approve an ordinance

to reduce the city’s electricity footprint. He said a specific resolution would be to council in the spring. The commission is strongly leaning toward a blended energy efficiency approach — both through purchasing green energy and increasing green energy production, Alwin said. But one obstacle is that the city doesn’t produce its own energy. Mayor Pro Tem Erik Altmann said he was against purchasing outside green energy. “If we invest in our own green infrastructure, then those dividends will ultimately come back to the city,” Altmann said. “If we purchase green energy, it’s money out the door.” BWL General Manager Dick Peffley spoke to the scope of the city’s investment to reach 100 percent renewable energy by 2030. An annual investment of $228,000 is required for East Lansing to reach total dependence on renewable energy, which amounts to a 7.8% increase in the city’s electric bill, Peffley said. One way to achieve the renewable energy goal would be to add the city to BWL’s Greenwise Power Plan available to any resident or community, he said. BWL would entertain a partnership with the city on solar energy development, Peffley said. Councilmember Aaron Stephens said he supported the push for clean energy.

GOOD LUCK ON FINALS!

Pictured are solar panels at the East Lansing Solar Park on Jan. 24 at Burcham Park in East Lansing. PHOTO BY CJ WEISS

“This is not in the future, this is right here, right now in front of us,” he said. Meadows said the city’s most likely annual investment would be about $100,000. “We have a strategic priority that says we need to move to 100% renewable energy in all of our city operations,” Meadows said. “This is just one element of what we should be taking a look at.”

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Vol. 109 | No. 28

THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2019

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OVER THE

Genetics junior Michaella Andersen a selfie at her home in East Lansing on April 15. Andersen started drawing elaborate looks on her face a year ago and usually spends 4 to 6 hours on them, with the longest look taking her 7 hours to complete. PHOTO BY NIC ANTAYA

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Marie Weidmayer

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DESIGN Lauren Gewirtz Shelby Zeigler Courtney McKown This week’s cover photo was taken by Anntaninna Biondo.

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The State News is published by the students of Michigan State University on Thursdays during the academic year. News is constantly updated seven days a week at statenews.com. State News Inc. is a private, nonprofit corporation. Its current 990 tax form is available for review upon request at 435 E. Grand River Ave. during business hours.

IN TODAY’S PAPER

“Everybody’s having a good time. We’ve got some boats flipping over. Everybody’s engaging in (a) non-traditional activity on a Friday night, which is pretty cool.” Ross Winter

Assistant director of Intramural Sports Read more on pages 12-13.

you remember archer 14-15 MSU 6-7 Do the polar vortex? dominates the competition A look back at what happened on campus during the spring 2019 semester.

WITH MSUFCU’S

Val Aten began shooting at age 9 and quickly grew to love the sport.

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RELIGIOUS DIRECTORY

MSU IN COURT: SCHOOL YEAR WRAP-UP

Stay up to date at: www.statenews.com/religious

All Saints Episcopal Church 800 Abbot Rd. (517) 351-7160 Sun. Worship: 8am, 10am, & 5pm Sunday School: 10am www.allsaints-el.org Ascension Lutheran Church 2780 Haslett Road East Lansing (517) 337-9703 Sunday worship: 10:00am Sunday Bible study: 8:45am Thursday Bible study: 2:00pm www.ascensioneastlansing.org Greater Lansing Church of Christ 310 N. Hagadorn Rd. (Meet @ University Christian Church) (517) 898-3600 Sun: 8:45am Worship, 10am Bible Class Wed: 1pm, Small group bible study www.greaterlansing coc.org Hillel Jewish Student Center 360 Charles St. (517) 332-1916 Services: Friday night 6pm, dinner @ 7, September–April www.msuhillel.org

The Islamic Society of Greater Lansing 920 S. Harrison Rd. (517) 351-4309 Friday Services: 12:15-12:45pm & 1:45-2:15pm For prayer times visit www.lansingislam.com/ Martin Luther Chapel Lutheran Student Center 444 Abbot Rd. (517) 332-0778 Sun: 9:30am & 7pm Wed: 7pm Mini-bus pick-up on campus (Fall/Spring) www.martinluther chapel.org The People’s Church Multi-denominational 200 W Grand River Ave. (517)332-6074 Sun. Service: 10:30am with free lunch for students following worship ThePeoplesChurch.com Riverview Church- MSU Venue MSU Union Ballroom, 2nd Floor 49 Abbot Rd. (517) 694-3400 Sun. Worship: 11:30am-ish www.rivchurch.com

Religious Organizations:

St. John Catholic Church and Student Center 327 M.A.C Ave. (517) 337-9778 Sun: 8am, 10am, Noon, 5pm, 7pm M,W,F: 12:15pm T & Th: 9:15pm www.stjohnmsu.org University Luthern Church (ULC) Lutheran Campus Ministry at MSU 1020 S. Harrison (517) 332-2559 Sun. Worship: 8:30am & 10:45am (Sept–May) Summer Worship: 9:30am www.ulcel.org University United Methodist Church 1120 S. Harrison Rd (517) 351-7030 Main Service: Sun: 11am in the Sanctuary Additional Services: NEW contemporary service Sundays at 9 am with band titled ‘REACH’ TGiT (Thank God its Thursday): Thur: 8pm in the Chapel of Apostles universitychurchhome.org office@eluumc.org WELS Lutheran Campus Ministry 704 Abbot Rd. (517) 580-3744 Sat: 6:30pm msu.edu/~welsluth

Don’t be left out of the Religious Directory! Call (517)295-1680 to speak with an Account Executive today

Former Michigan State President Lou Anna K. Simon waits for a preliminary hearing at Eaton County District Court to begin April 16. PHOTO BY ANNTANINNA BIONDO BY ANNA LIZ NICHOLS ANCICHOLS@STATENEWS.COM

Several criminal cases involving Michigan State have proceeded this school year.

ATTORNEY GENERAL’S INVESTIGATION

Three MSU employees in leadership positions have been charged in the Michigan Attorney General’s investigation into the university’s handling of reports of Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse. William Strampel, former dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine, was the first to be charged in the investigation. In June 2018, three women testified in court against Strampel, saying he sexually harassed and assaulted them. The witnesses were MSU students and Strampel’s coworkers. Strampel originally faced four charges: Two charges of willful neglect, one charge of misconduct in office and a felony charge of fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct. He was charged with an additional count of second-degree criminal sexual misconduct April 12. Included in the evidence admitted in Strampel’s criminal case were pornographic images found on his work and personal computers. Some of the images include semi-nude pictures of women wearing MSU apparel. Strampel is scheduled to go to trial May 28. The second individual charged in the Attorney General’s investigation was former MSU head gymnastic coach Kathie Klages. Charged with two counts of lying to a police officer, Klages told investigators she had no knowledge of Nassar’s abuse before 2016, when it became public. The Attorney General’s office says witness testimony indicates Klages lied about what she knew. In September 2018, two women — Larissa Boyce and an unnamed witness — testified that Klages manipulated them into not reporting Nassar’s sexual abuse in 1997 after the pair notified her. They were teenagers and aspiring gymnasts at the time. Klages’ next court date is May 13. Former MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon was the latest person to be charged in the Attorney General’s investigation. She faces four counts of lying to investigators and is now undergoing preliminary hearings in Eaton County court. Simon’s preliminary hearings have lasted four days as the Attorney General’s office brings witnesses into the case. The office says Simon lied about her knowledge of Nassar’s abuse prior to 2016, as she allegedly met with the head of the Title IX office to talk about Nassar in 2014. Simon’s next preliminary hearing is scheduled for June 11. 4

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OTHER CASES

A few MSU-related cases unrelated to the Attorney General’s investigation will carry into the summer. MSU health physicist Joseph Hattey is charged with one count of bestiality and is scheduled for a jury trial in Ingham County court. There were originally two charges against him, but a Mason judge determined there was not enough evidence for one of the charges. Hattey is accused of penetrating his basset hound with both his hand and penis. The dog is no longer in Hattey’s possession. In June 2018, Ingham County Animal Control and the Ingham County Sheriff’s Office conducted a joint investigation into Hattey after receiving a report about a suspicious Craigslist ad. Hattey exchanged emails with the ad’s author, who testified in court he was invited to Hattey’s home to commit acts of bestiality. The next court date for the Hattey case has not been scheduled. Two women testified in court in January against Michael Phinn, a former medical resident at the MSU Clinical Center who they say sexually harassed and assaulted them. Both women worked alongside Phinn. Phinn’s charges include: • One count of first-degree criminal sexual conduct; • five counts of second-degree criminal sexual conduct; • one count of assault as second-degree criminal sexual conduct; • one count of gross indecency; • one count of indecent exposure; and • three counts of aggravated indecent exposure. Phinn is scheduled to appear in Ingham County Circuit Court May 7. A few MSU community members have been charged in the deaths of two MSU students. In October 2018, 22-year-old food science student Isai Berrones was found wounded at an apartment on the 2500 block of Chandler Road and pronounced dead at the hospital. MSU student Ivan Keener, his cousin Angela Kelley and Kelley’s boyfriend Steve Washington are charged in connection with Berrones’ murder. All three are scheduled to appear in Ingham County court May 13. The other student death occurred in January, when salt truck driver Adam Young collided with 21-year-old Tiana Seville. Young, 22, is charged with a misdemeanor moving violation resulting in death and is scheduled to appear in court May 22. As summer approaches and cases move forward, stay with The State News for continued coverage.

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SEMESTER IN REVIEW

SPRING 2019: A SEMESTER IN BY KAITLYN KELLEY KKELLEY@STATENEWS.COM

Several changes and events took place at Michigan State in spring 2019. As the semester comes to a close, here’s a look back on some notable stories.

Students move out of the way of the snow plow while crossing the bridge on Bogue Street on Jan. 28. PHOTO BY CJ WEISS

ENGLER RESIGNS, SATISH UDPA REPLACES HIM

On Jan. 16, John Engler resigned as interim president of Michigan State. Engler’s resignation came after he made several comments about survivors of Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse — in one interview with The Detroit News Editorial Board, he said survivors were “enjoying” the “spotlight.” He also

Acting President Satish Udpa sits down with The State News Editorial Board. PHOTO BY ANNTANINNA BIONDO

Coach Tom Izzo smiles as the Spartans celebrate winning the Big Ten Championship. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

moved forward with the decision to discontinue the Healing Assistance Fund, a $10 million fund established in December 2017 to provide resources needed for counseling and mental health services to Nassar survivors. Survivors, student and faculty group Reclaim MSU and other members of the university community called for Engler’s resignation numerous times throughout his tenure.

Trustee Brian Mosallam made a motion at a June 2018 Board of Trustees meeting to terminate Engler from his position “for failing to uphold the standards of conduct expected from a leader of this university.” Only Mosallam and Trustee Dianne Byrum supported the motion — it failed, 6-2. At an emergency meeting on Jan. 17, the board unanimously approved Engler’s resignation —

effective immediately — and appointed former dean of the College of Engineering Satish Udpa as the university’s acting president. “A wrong has been righted today, and the first thing I have to say is I’m sorry it took so long,” Trustee Kelly Tebay said at the meeting. “To the survivors, to their families and this community: We hear you, and we’re listening, and we are sorry it took so long. I really hope this

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REVIEW

Trustees Nancy Schlichting and Brianna Scott listen to presentations at the Board of Trustees meeting Jan. 9. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

is the first step in a long road to really changing the culture of this institution.” Udpa has continued to apologize to survivors at board meetings. “I’ve also had an opportunity to meet with some of the survivors and some of the parents,” Udpa said to The State News Editorial Board in April. “I’ve personally met with them, acknowledged the issues that we’ve had in the past.” On Feb. 28, a temporary Healing Assistance Fund was set up for Nassar survivors with the goal of providing resources until a permanent fund is set up. The board is in the process of reinstating the permanent Healing Assistance Fund, Udpa told The State News. He said it will be reinstated “shortly” and that there have been extensive discussions among trustees.

MICHIGAN STATE SUSPENDS CLASSES AMID POLAR VORTEX

When Central Michigan University, Grand Valley State University and multiple other schools closed due to extreme weather in late January, Michigan State students still had to trek through sub-zero temperatures and a blizzard. Many students expressed frustration with the university for not cancelling classes initially. However, MSU cancelled classes Jan. 30 and Jan. 31 due to dangerously cold temperatures and poor road conditions — the first time MSU cancelled classes since 2014. This was also the seventh time in MSU’s history classes were cancelled due to weather. In an attempt to cut back on gas consumption, MSU Culinary Services also changed dining hall menus to require less cooking time and the university reduced the temperatures in academic and administrative buildings.

BASKETBALL GOES TO FINAL FOUR, CEDAR VILLAGE BURNS COUCHES IN CELEBRATION

After Michigan State’s 68-67 win against Duke in the Elite Eight on March 31, fans celebrated in Cedar Village by burning a couch and setting other small fires. The crowd consisted of 600 to 800 fans. The last time MSU beat Duke was in 2005. Members of the crowd burned coats, pizza boxes and a couch. People danced and jumped close to the fire. After a reported 12 fires were set after MSU’s win against Duke, Michigan State and the East Lansing Police Department warned that participating and attending “destructive gatherings” could result in consequences, like suspension or expulsion from the university in addition to criminal charges. Shortly after MSU’s 61-51 loss against Texas Tech in the Final Four on April 7, Cedar Village

was heavily monitored by police. Large crowds of disappointed fans were formed. Some people threw bottles and cans. As the crowd headed to the middle of Grand River Avenue, one person picked up a “Road Closed” sign. That person and several others were arrested that night.

LAST PUBLIC UPDATE ON PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH

Michigan State sent out a final update on the presidential search to the university community Feb. 7. In the update, Trustees and co-chairs of the Presidential Search Committee Byrum and Melanie Foster said the committee has assembled a diverse pool of candidates for consideration. According to the presidential search timeline, the committee has been collaborating with the Board of Trustees to review applications and conduct interviews with candidates since February. The interviews will be completed in May. It was decided in the fall that the presidential search would be closed to the public in order to “draw the strongest pool of candidates.” Reclaim MSU, the James Madison College Student Senate, news outlets like the Lansing State Journal, activists on campus and other members of the community have expressed concern with this, and more than 400 people have signed a petition on Change.org calling for an open presidential search. “There is no empirical evidence that a closed search yields ‘better’ results, even in normal circumstances,” the petition reads. “The circumstances at MSU are far from normal. There will be no confidence in a search that omits open dialogue between the community and the top candidates.” Byrum said she and Foster have tried to make the process as transparent as possible. The presidential search committee conducted more than 22 input sessions, compiled notes from these sessions and will use them to evaluate candidates. Once interviews are completed in May, the Board of Trustees will choose — and the committee will announce — who the university’s permanent president will be. Byrum said she hopes the chosen candidate will begin as MSU’s next president by June or the start of July. Udpa told The State News that the “one non-negotiable personal attribute” the next president should have is integrity. Before he or she is announced, Udpa said he wants to help in the transition. “I want to make his or her job as easy as possible because at the end of the day, we want that person to focus on things that are important,” he said. “That’s the goal.”

THUR SDAY, APRI L 25, 2019

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FROM THE COVER

A victory lap around MSU: One senior’s quest to relive college experiences BY MCKENNA ROSS MROSS@STATENEWS.COM

I stepped onto the lot behind Yakeley Hall by the corner and immediately went into panic mode. “I don’t want to do this,” I said to my boyfriend. He looked puzzled as if to say, “It’s just a building.” I wasn’t moving into my freshman year dorm — in fact, I was visiting it one last time as a student. “I don’t want to graduate.” With two weeks until I walk across the stage at Breslin Center, I thought it’d be a fun and cutesy idea to relive some memories. I made a list of things I wanted to reflect on and landmarks that have been special to ~ my Spartan experience ~ (to borrow a phrase), and I went on a mission to document my reactions to each space as I approach the next milestone. It seemed like a silly thing to do, to stop by some random MSU landmarks and reflect. But there isn’t really a better way to appreciate your time winding down — and I didn’t want to leave East Lansing feeling like I could’ve gone somewhere one more time. So, with my proverbial cap, gown and rosetinted glasses on, I stepped onto campus and began my journey.

VISITING THE MSU DAIRY STORE

McKenna Ross is pictured at Beaumont Tower April 22, 2019. PHOTO BY ANNTANINNA BIONDO

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My first positive memory of MSU was getting dairy store ice cream during a summer camp. It’s only natural to start this experience here. I say positive, because I will admit that I went to a Wolverine-favoring high school when I moved to the Midwest and did not have the best exposure to MSU. Walking around campus at that summer camp felt like a marathon — I remember thinking walking from our dorms in Shaw Hall to the Dairy Store in Anthony was a long walk. But, damn, did that creamy, high-fat treat give me the first taste of this beautiful campus. The day I went to revisit was 65 degrees and sunny in early April so the line was basically out the door at 2:45 p.m. on a Monday. The aroma of sugar, dairy and waffle cones filled the air, my heart and soon my stomach. Nothing says MSU like Sesquicentennial Swirl. This will probably be my first stop every homecoming. (God, look at me. I’m already talking about homecoming.) And if you’re looking to try something new, give the chocolate cheese a chance.

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My friends and I have gone nearly every week to drink cheap beer or mixed drinks and watch people scream an off-pitch rendition of “Man! I Feel Like a Woman” or “Take Me Home, Country Roads” into a microphone. We sit next to the vintage pinball machines or at the bar next to the karaoke star/Crunchy’s legend Dennis, and dare each other into getting on stage to some success. But in all my times ordering buckets of softpretzels or pizza rolls, I’ve never done one of the bar’s signature specials: A bucket of beer. Seven of us sat down for Miller Lite. It was good as a bucket can make light beer taste — not much to write home about. I will say this: 270 ounces later and we still could’ve gone for another round.

EATING IN A DINING HALL

No MSU food tour is complete without the Holy Grail of cafs, Brody Square. Perhaps nothing was more exciting as a freshman than the unlimited meal plan. Whatever I want to eat, at any hour I’m hungry? Anywhere on campus, plus ComboX-Changes? I was sure I could never eat enough to break even on the value of the silver dining plan. I once challenged my roommate to eat enough to make the $3,000 per semester charge a steal. Doing the math now, it’s pretty much the value of a Chipotle burrito. But I probably did waste $9.50 on mornings I swiped in to get a banana and cereal. Of course, the novelty of on-campus food wore off pretty quickly. It’s often not as warm as you want it or could use another dozen pinches of salt. This time, I liked my Beyond Meat burger (when did they get that? Back in my day, vegetarian meals at the grill were just fries). My friends thought they wasted their money on their swipe in. While I don’t long for the days of a premade menu, I do miss having food on demand, especially since the last time I went to Aldi was 23 days ago.

MSU MUSEUM’S “SISTER SURVIVORS SPEAK” EXHIBIT

It’s impossible to describe the last four years at MSU without the sister survivors and its relationship with the administration. The effect of the administration’s response to a serial predator on the average student was profound. Even the least involved students knew of the culture of willful ignorance between university officials and assault survivors. I would not be the same person or journalist without this event. Hearing about their traumas gave me a new perspective on how widespread plagues like this can be. Visiting the “Finding Our Voices: Sister Survivors Speak” exhibit at the MSU Museum, I re-remembered it all. The storyline was all too familiar – it brought me back to the stress of the 24/7 spotlight on MSU in late 2017 and early


FROM THE COVER Ross poses with Sparty during her first week of freshman year in 2015.

2018. But to see each glass panel representing a survivor displayed on a wall, highlighting the sheer number of people affected by one awful person, I felt the impact on these people and our community even further. We can’t let these memories fade. The MSU community recognized its ability to change dynamics and called for a leader with integrity, over and over. In a room full of photos, artifacts and evidence detailing a perpetrator’s faults and leadership that let hundreds of women and girls down, I realized the next fight will be continuing the momentum. We can never let the conversation stray from what happens when people ignore hard conversations.

“This victory lap was meant to provide resolution. And while it did do that, it also taught me one cliche lesson: don’t wish away these fulfilling years.”

MY FRESHMAN YEAR DORM

GRADUATING SENIOR

In hindsight, I should’ve realized this one would impact me most. I thought nostalgia would be a fun adventure and I’d be hit with all these lost memories like an amnesiac on a telenovela. But every step toward E143 in Yakeley Hall felt so familiar and yet so foreign. The bathrooms still smell a little weird and they still have posters of squirrels drinking. But, the hallway carpet looks and smells a lot better than three years ago. The

MCKENNA ROSS

ALL PHOTOS ON THIS PAGE COURTESY OF MCKENNA ROSS.

Ross poses with Sparty during her last week of senior year in 2019.

name tags on the door weren’t mine but I went there on autopilot anyway. It took a lot to refrain from knocking on the door. When I moved out of Yakeley in May 2016, did I think I’d come back? Did I realize I had my best friend one f loor above me? That three years later, a twisted part of me missed climbing into a lofted twin bed at night and waking up to the world’s loudest dumpster truck at 7 a.m.? Nostalgia is a hard pill to swallow. I started this list of all the places I wanted to hit one last time. I never thought I’d want to knock on an old door, desperately wanting to see if those girls set the room up like we did. This victory lap was meant to provide resolution. And while it did do that, it also taught me one cliche lesson: don’t wish away these fulfilling years. So, Class of 2023, throw on your greenand-white lanyard and enjoy the little things. Sometimes you’ll hate your cross-campus commute. Other times you’ll take the scenic route along River Trail. Remember the details either way. Nostalgia only makes moving on that much sweeter.

GRADUATION INFO Undergraduate convocation: 1 p.m., May 3 with speaker Kirk Cousins Advanced degree ceremony: 3:30 p.m., May 3 with speaker Gov. Gretchen Whitmer Ceremonies for individual colleges are May 3-5. Times can be found online at commencement. msu.edu.

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SPORTS

Water polo wins first title in 13 years BY CHANDRA FLEMING CFLEMING@STATENEWS.COM

The Michigan State women’s water polo club team won the Big Ten Conference April 14, its first win in more than a decade. The Spartans have not won a Big Ten Conference Tournament since 2006. For team members Jilian Eiken, Leslie Schuchardt and Sarah Daugherty — who also serve as president, v ice president and treasurer, respectively — this was an amazing feeling. Co-captain Eiken, a hospitality business senior, explained her feelings after the win. “Pretty indescribable feeling, honestly,” Eiken said. “We really felt like with this team, we had something special. ... Being a senior, all the girls I’ve played with before, all these years — they’re all my really good friends. It wasn’t just for our team, but for all those people who came before us. We finally won the Big Ten Conference.” Eiken described water polo as basketball in water, with a soccer net and the physicality of hockey. Players are not allowed to touch the bottom of the pool and must tread or swim the entire time. “Sometimes they don’t know the full extent of just how difficult water polo is,” Eiken said. “The first thing people ask me is, ‘Can you touch the bottom?’ and I’m like, ‘No, you swim the whole time.’” Not everyone on the team has been playing their entire life. Some started when they came to college, which Eiken said makes the team

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Michigan State women’s water polo team took home their first Big Ten Conference tournament win in in over ten years. PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHIGAN STATE WOMEN’S WATER POLO TEAM

different from other sports teams on campus. “That’s what’s so nice about (being a) club; we’re very inclusive about everyone, we don’t do cuts,” Eiken said. “ Whether you’ve been playing for 10 years like I have, or rather this is your first time ever playing, we include everyone.” Eiken has been playing water polo since she was 9-years-old on her local park team. Daugherty, a senior studying mechanical engineering, has been playing since her freshman year of high school. Schuchardt, a chemical engineering junior, has been playing since eighth grade. “(It’s) definitely a balance, but I think doing

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sports in high school teaches you how to timemanage,” Daugherty said. “Definitely worth it, very manageable, but some days are harder than others.” Schuchardt said she is enjoying playing and being on the club’s executive board. “Being on the board and being the VP is really cool because I get to see the back of what goes into being a club sport here at MSU,” Schuchardt said. “We’re completely self-funded and we have to fundraise a lot.” Winning the Big Ten was a shock for Daugherty since this was her first, she said. “I don’t t h i n k it rea l ly h it me r ight away,” Daugherty said. “I’ve never won a

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championship before. I never did in high school, this is our first in college.” The team was the top seed going into the tournament. The first team they played was the University of Michigan. “We played their B team. ... The score was 11-5,” Eiken said. “The most important one — in the final — we played (U-M’s A team) and we beat them 9-5. I’ll never forget that score.” A fter winning the Big Ten Conference Tour nament, t he team advances to t he national competition held at the University of Notre Dame from May 3 to May 5. “I have high hopes for our team with placing well,” Schuchardt said. “I think that’s going to be a really fun tournament, and I’m really excited to be there with my team.” Eiken and Daugherty are both graduating seniors, which means their journey as captain and co-captain is coming to an end. Both are unsure if water polo is in the futures, but Water Polo Masters teams — nationwide teams for those interested in continuing to play at a competitive, high level — are something they are considering. “I am searching for jobs now, so I’m not exactly sure where I’ll be, but I could see doing a Masters team, but probably not as competitive as what ’s going on now,” Daugherty said. Eiken is moving to Las Vegas and has already found a Masters team she is looking into. Her goal is to stay in the water and stay active.


SPORTS

Young talent future of Michigan State baseball BY MAISY NIELSEN

Boss decided to put Iverson on the mound for the ninth after playing most of the game at third base. Iverson threw 13 pitches against three batters and struck out two before securing the win. “We recruited him to be a two-way guy, we just haven’t been able to use him a whole lot,” Boss said. “And we need to figure out a better way to get him into the ballgame. When he does enter the game, we lose our DH, so for a team that’s struggling offensively that can be a tough thing sometimes. He’s got a good arm… I just need to find a better way to get more out of him on the mound.” Walker, a freshman, and sophomore catcher Adam Proctor led the way with three runs each and both scored on Justin Antoncic’s two-run double in the second to put the Spartans up 3-2. Mayes finished with a pair of runs went 1-for-4. Although this season may not have gone the way Boss and his veterans wanted, the youth of the team has high hopes for the future. “We try to keep everybody in good spirits and keep the momentum going,” Panaranto said. “Hopefully a 12-2 win will keep the momentum going.”

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Freshman Zaid Walker hits the ball against Central Michigan at McLane Baseball Stadium on April 3. PHOTO BY MATT ZUBIK

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Michigan State has struggled to find its rhythm this season, but one thing that has remained consistent has been the potential underclassmen continue to show. The Spartans (11-27, 1-10 Big Ten) have struggled mightily at times, but the endeavors a young team faces now makes for fruitful experience in the seasons to come. “I think the future is (bright),” MSU coach Jake Boss said. “... We have some young talented kids, I think the more they play, the more at-bats they get, the better they’re going to be.” Boss has 12 freshmen — three of which are redshirted — on the 36-man roster and of the team’s seven sophomores, three are also redshirts. The Spartans’ young talent was showcased in the April 23 matchup against Oakland University (10-27, 8-10 Horizon) at McLane Baseball Stadium. MSU defeated the Golden Grizzlies, 12-2, backed by a great outing by freshman pitcher Colten Panaranto to earn his second win of the year during his first collegiate start. “It took a little bit to just get the release point on all of my pitches and

just trying to be in the zone,” Panaranto said about his slow start. “I had to focus on that.” In the second inning, Panaranto gave up two runs, but the Spartans scored a season-high 12 unanswered runs afterward, including a six-run burst in the eighth. Panaratano finished a strong outing by allowing three hits in seven innings, stuck out seven and walked four and at one point retired 14 batters in a row. Undoubtedly, Panaranto admitted he was anxious but was able to relax and focus on what he knew rather than overthinking the sport he’s played most his life. In the third inning against Oakland, Panaranto found his groove and said he felt his confidence surge after striking out the side after allowing a leadoff double. “I just know to trust myself and just go out there and do what I have to do,” Panaranto said. Sophomore infielder Zach Iverson doubled to right field in the fifth scored Casey Mayes and Zaid Walker home, giving the Spartans the 5-2 lead to start the sixth. Iverson came home on a Bryce Kelley single during MSU’s six-run eighth.

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SPORTS BY GENNA BARNER GBARNER@STATENEWS.COM

BATTLESHIP: THE NEW SPORT IN TOWN

One team attacks the other two head on during a game of battleship at IM Sports West on April 19.

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The sound of splashing and laughter filled the warm air as Intramural Sports hosted a new activity- battleship. The recreational sport’s trial game was held April 19 at the IM Sports-West indoor pool. The activity requires of three players in a canoe. The goal of the game is to throw water into other teams’ boats using the two buckets provided. When enough water is in the canoe it will sink and the team in the water will be defeated. The rules of the game can be adjusted depending on how many teams are playing, how many are on a team and the level of difficulty the players would like. For instance, halfway through the match at Michigan State, referees decided to no longer allow players to bail water out of the canoe. One of the main twists in the game is that there are no oars. Players must cautiously paddle across the pool using their hands. If a canoe goes out of bounds or a member touches an opposing team’s boat or opponent, they must dump two buckets into their own canoe. Battleship is a new activity at MSU, but other universities offer programs with a few similar variations. “There’s actually a lot of intramural programs around the country that do this,” assistant director of Intramural Sports Ross Winter said. “I’ve heard about it from some of my colleagues across the country and they’ve had a lot of success with it. For example, Ohio State, they run an entire league of battleship. They have some dedicated pool time and they play a couple times a week with multiple teams.” Other universities that offer battleship are Iowa State, Florida State and Central Michi-


SPORTS gan; the latter is how some students first heard of the activity. “I’ve worked for IM Sports so I heard about it through there,” finance junior Brayden Ison said. “A couple of my friends that go to Central Michigan had it there last year. I was excited to try it because they said it looked like a lot of fun.” Other students found the activity on the IM Sports website and decided to try it. “I was scrolling through and I saw battleship and I thought it was the board game at first, and then I saw canoes and I was a little bit confused,” computer science sophomore Noah Pesta said. “I looked into it online and was like ‘Oh this seems pretty fun.’” With the success of the sport’s trial run, IM Sports is hoping to continue the activity and get more students involved. “As of right now, it looks pretty successful,” Winter said. “Everybody’s having a good time. We’ve got some boats flipping over. Everybody’s engaging in non-traditional activity on a Friday night, which is pretty cool. I’m pleased with it at this point. I would like to see a few more teams and a couple more boats.” Battleship is a game meant for any skill level. As the game continued, many teams adapted their methods to ensure better balance in the canoe and had better tactics to sink opposing teams’ boats. “It’s a good mix between skill and not knowing what you’re doing,” electrical engineering sophomore Zach Grycza said. “It makes it fun for anybody, even if you lose.” MSU was able to borrow canoes from The Power of Water, located in downtown Lansing for the battleship event. The Power of Water has a partnership with MSU’s Sailing Center. MSU is acquiring a new fleet of multi-purpose canoes that will be primarily used at the Sailing Center, but will also be used for battleship.

“It’s a good mix between skill and not knowing what you’re doing. It makes it fun for anybody, even if you lose.” Zach Grycza Electrical engineering sophomore

ABOVE: One team looks on as the other three play a game of battleship. BELOW: A boat tips during a game of battleship PHOTOS BY MATT ZUBIK

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SPORTS

MSU ARCHER WINS TITLES, SETS HIGHER TARGETS WRITTEN BY CHASE MICHAELSON CMICHAELSON@STATENEWS.COM PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATT ZUBICK

Archery, Val Aten explained, is a simple sport. For indoor archers who shoot with a modern compound bow, like Aten, there are only four variables. There’s the bow. The arrow. The target, set 50 meters away down the range. But the most important is the archer’s mind. “You have to do the exact same thing over and over, and even the slightest little thing can change it,” she said. No female college archer in the country was as good at doing the same thing over and over as she was in March when she won the National Field Archery Association freestyle championship in Cincinnati. She scored 112 points, seven points better than her closest competitor. After, the mechanical engineering sophomore from Cadillac said she felt “in the zone” that day. “I don’t think about anything,” Aten said. “I’m just like, ‘Oh, man, I can’t miss the middle today.’ You pull back and everything is just fluid.” Aten began shooting archery at age 9. She is the fifth of eight children, and her father Ed led the family in the Northern Michigan tradition of

rifle hunting every season — that’s where Aten got the urge to aim and shoot. “To fill the freezer, you gotta go out and hunt,” she said. Ed initially signed up only his sons for the archery program at the local 4-H club. But Aten,

who was so driven as a young girl that she trained herself to lose a speech impediment in order to avoid speech therapy, decided she’d better come along, too. She used her older brother Joe’s bow. “The first day she picked her bow up, it was unbelievable,” Ed said.

Soon, Aten was better than all the boys, not just in her family, but in her town. Her family drove far and wide looking for anyone capable of outshooting their daughter. They didn’t find them in Cadillac. They didn’t find them in the biggest state tournaments in Battle Creek, Michigan. When Aten was in high school, Ed said he realized those people would be hard to find anywhere. When it came time to pick a college, both the University of Michigan and Michigan Tech offered Aten full academic rides into their engineering programs. But neither school has an archery program. So Aten chose to pay her way to come to Michigan State and shoot for coach Glen Bennett’s team. The MSU archery program has produced 36 All-Americans in his eleven years at the school, one of the highest rates in the country. “You shoot, but you can’t always see what you’re doing. (Bennett) is an extra set of eyes,” Aten said. Bennett said archery is only 5% physical, but the mental difference is where Aten has separated herself. “I’ve seen people just totally fold up and throw their bows and quit archery period,” Bennett said. “That’s the way it goes. Some people can handle it, some people can’t handle it.” For Ed, who only hunts with rifles and says he’s only shot a bow three times in his life, seeing Aten hit the target is his greatest pride. He said when he watches her shoot, he no lon-

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SPORTS “I’ve seen people just totally fold up and throw their bows and quit archery period. That’s just the way it goes. Some people can handle it, some people can’t handle it.” GLEN BENNETT ARCHERY COACH

LEFT: Mechanical engineering sophomore Val Aten shoots at the Demmer Shooting Center. RIGHT: Political science junior Amber Arbegast (left) and advertising management sophomore Nick Massey shoot at the Demmer Shooting Center on April 22. BOTTOM: Advertising creative sophomore Nick Massey lines up a shot at the Demmer Shooting Center.

ger looks at the target to tell how well she’s doing. “(When archers are young), we’re looking through goggles or spot-scopes to tell them the score, so they always turn back towards the parents,” Ed said. “But then, the older they get, they don’t need us around. ... At about 13 or so, they’re doing things on their own, so they don’t turn around. So, you just watch their body language

or their bow and you can tell.” Aten recalled another tournament last year in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, that was televised and ended with a one-on-one matchup against Alexis Ruiz, a world championship medalist from Arizona. “They block all the lights out and it’s just you and your opponent 1-on-1, and there’s thou-

sands of people watching at home and in the stands,” she said. “I got off, I didn’t remember anything. You just get in the zone and you block everything out, I didn’t even know if I had won or not. I had to come off and I was like, ‘what happened?’” So what happened? She had scored three points below the maxi-

mum, defeating Ruiz, to win the championship. Her next goal is to represent her country and qualify for the U.S. Archery team, where she would team up with archers like Ruiz. “It’d be awesome,” her father said. “And I know she can do it.” After all, Val Aten has never had much problem hitting her targets.

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