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E A R T H DAY S P E C I A L E D I T I O N

As the world recognizes Earth Day, the MSU community takes a moment to reflect on the university’s conservation and sustainability efforts


Earth Day | T H E STATE NE WS | M O NDAY, AP RI L 22, 2013 | STATE N E WS.COM UNIVERSITY

C O N S E R VAT I O N

MSU officials work to make campus recycling accessible By Samantha Radecki radeckis@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

According to Dave Smith, Earth Day represents many opportunities to reduce waste and recycle. And as reducing waste is a goal and part of MSU’s sustainability initiative, Smith, MSU’s waste reduction coordinator, said the accessibility for students to recycle on campus is apparent. “There are many ways to reduce our overall waste — recycling is just one of those components,” Smith said. He said MSU has recycling containers at Sparty’s Cafes and other convenient campus locations, promotes recycling and reuse and recently participated in RecycleMania, a recycling contest against other universities. MSU recycled 1,015,341 pounds from the beginning of February to the end of March in the contest. The MSU Surplus Store and Recycling Center facilitates reuse on campus, he said. Smith said the residence halls have recorded the highest recycling rates on campus. Although MSU’s bright green recycling bins are easy to spot, kinesiology junior Kristen Scali thinks students can do more.

Improving student participation is a goal for MSU recycling officials, who hope to bolster the school’s efforts and increase recycling on campus “I try to take advantage, but I think a lot of people don’t — even though they are right there,” she said, adding students might not be informed or might not care enough to pay attention to the resources available. Ann Erhardt, assistant director of the Offi ce of Campus Sustainability, said some students aren’t aware that recycling is beneficial. She said recycling is an

MSU recycling stats MSU recently participated in RecycleMania, a recycling contest, against other universities. MSU recycled 1,015,341 pounds from the beginning of February to the end of March in the contest. According to RecyleMania results, MSU increased the campus recycling rate to

35.84 percent.

MSU also contributed to the contest’s reduction of carbon emissions. The overall reduction through the contest was equivalent to taking 382 vehicles off the road. According to MSU Recycling, members of the MSU community recycled 36 percent of all stadium waste from Spartan Stadium in 2012. SOURCE: RECYCLE .MSU.EDU AND RECYCLEMANIACS.ORG

out ward act. Mak ing students aware in the “Be Spartan Green” campaign and making bins available to students — even if all aren’t versed on the importance of using them — are steps in the right direction. “Understanding the barriers that we have for throwing something in the recycle bin and not in the trash bin — it’s just getting more materials into a recycling station and not a landfi ll,” she said. She said improving student participation is her fi rst goal, which can be done with outreach and education. The question is how to make recycling convenient for everyone on campus, Erhardt said. “It is important for me on Earth Day that people become familiar with these issues that impact us,” she said. “(It’s) that awareness that we need to continue to put out there every year so we can continue to protect our resources for the planet.” State News reporter Robert Bondy contributed to this report.

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PHOTOS BY JULIA NAGY/THE STATE NEWS

Fisheries and wildlife junior Rob Emelander pulls a bike from the Red Cedar River on Sunday. Volunteers helped pull bikes from the river, while also working to collect trash off the banks.

River clean-up recognizes 2013 Earth Day By Brytanie Killebrew killebr6@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

Earth Day is here, and some students spent the past weekend focusing on environmental clean-up on campus. Each year, Earth Day rolls around leaving many students contemplating the difference they’ve made on the environment. To focus on campus conservation, the Fisheries and Wildlife Club organized the Red Cedar Clean-Up, which took place Sunday. Club president and fisheries and wildlife junior Kirsten Johnson said students and members of East Lansing can participate in the biannual event. “We do it twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall,” Johnson said. “It’s something that the Fisheries and Wildlife Club thought would be a good way to reach out to the East Lansing community.” Although the goal is to remove as much litter and debris as possible, Johnson said bikes and beer cans are the two most common-

ly found items in the river. Sunday, one of three groups found 10 bikes along the muddy riverbed within an hour. Adrienne Adamczyk, fisheries and wildlife junior, said she was surprised by the number of bikes she and the other volunteers pulled from the cold, murky water. With this being her second time volunteering for the event, she said she continues because she enjoys giving back to one of MSU’s most iconic landmarks. “It’s just nice to help out your own community,” she said. “The Red Cedar is obviously a big part of campus so it’s nice to be able to clean it out.” “It’s unbelievable really,” Adamczyk said. “How did it get here (and) why do so many people throw their bikes in the river I don’t understand.” How exactly such a large amount of bikes ended up in the river was a mystery to many of the volunteers at the event. Regardless, they are part of a collection of items the group cleaned up. But, Johnson said bikes aren’t the strangest things she’s found during the cleanup. “We’ve found the police barriers they use during the football games.” Johnson said. “I’d

Fisheries and wildlife junior Adrienne Adamczyk looks at trash pulled from the Red Cedar River on Sunday. Adamczyk and other volunteers used a grappling hook attached to a rope to pull trash out of the river.

“Cleaning out the river is great for MSU’s environment. One bike at a time, we’re going to make this place a better place.” Quan Blunt, food science sophomore

say that was probably the most unusual thing we’ve found.” Food science sophomore Quan Blunt, was one of about 30 volunteers participating in the cleanup. Blunt said the actions of the volunteers will positively impact

EARTH DAY 2013 Scholarships up to

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our environment. “I think it’ll impact it a lot,” Blunt said. “Cleaning out the river is great for MSU’s environment. One bike at a time, we’re going to make this place a better place.”


Don’t be a drag, just b be a queen: Annual Drag S Show

Disc golf seeks to make comeback at MSU

Check out photos from Green and White game

CAMPUS+CITY, PAGE GE G E5

FEATURES, PAGE 6

SPORTS, PAGE 8

K ATIE STIEFEL/THE STATE NEWS

Drag queen Batty Davis performs during the Official MSU Drag Show April 19, 2013, at the International Center.

Weather Partly cloudy High 64° | Low 34° Michigan State University’s independent voice | statenews statenews.com com | East Lansing, Mich. | Monday, April 22, 2013

Three-day forecast, Page 2

CAMPUS

STUDENT GOV FUNDS FROZEN, EXPECTED TO BE WITHHELD By Robert Bondy bondyrob@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS

STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

Containers of food waste from MSU cafeterias sit in front of the anaerobic digester.

STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

ADAM TOOLIN/THE STATE NEWS

Solar panels on the roof of the MSU Recycling Center provide an alternative energy source.

Then-special education freshman Michael Schon scrapes uneaten food off of a plate in Brody Square.

■■

ASMSU, MSU’s underg r aduate st ude nt government, is expecting to receive a memorandum from the university officially alerting the organization that its student tax funds will be withheld until current funds are moved to an on-campus account, ASMSU President Evan Martinak said. MSU Vice President for Finance and Treasurer Mark Haas confi rmed the funds have been frozen since ASMSU missed its April 5 deadline established in a memorandum sent to the group Feb. 26. The memorandum sent from Haas and Interim Vice President for Student Affairs and Services Denise Maybank said ASMSU must transfer offcampus funds to university accounts no later than April 5. Neither Martinak or Haas were aware how transferring the funds would effect various ASMSU services to students, such as blue books and legal services. Haas said the process of moving the funds to oncampus accounts is being suggested after issues were discovered through internal and external audits. “In addition to external auditors seeing there were problems, the internal auditors who review ASMSU also had problems,” Haas said. “The issue was that ASMSU was not taking steps to follow their own procedures See ASMSU on page 2 X

CLIMATE of UNCERTAINTY

STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

Then-human biology junior Tiffany Cotton during a demonstration at Administration Building.

STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

MSU Greenpeace activists are arrested at the Administration Building for sitting in after hours.

STATE NEWS FILE PHOTO

A pile of coal rests at the base of the T.B. Simon Power Plant.

One year after the Energy Transition Plan passes, MSU still unsure of how to meet goals outlined in plan By Simon Schuster schust61@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

T

his Earth Day, MSU is making progress on many fronts toward sustainability. The university significantly has reduced landfill waste and energy consumption while almost quadrupling in weight the amount of items reused in the last five years. Recycling also has increased, and numerous research studies into alternative fuels and energy sources are occurring. Although sustainability is a broad, multi-faceted concept, the contention surrounding MSU’s efforts toward sustainability is centered around a single building at the south of campus: the T.B. Simon Power Plant. Running on a mix of coal, natural gas and biomass, the plant powers the entire East Lansing campus, providing electricity to power MSU and steam to heat and cool the university’s buildings. It is an efficient and reliable infrastructure — one that both the universi-

W E AT H E R

ty and activists are working to change. But while MSU works to reduce its dependence from highly-polluting fossil fuels, the university has encountered a number of challenging realities. A goal, not a guide A little more than one year ago, the Energy Transition Plan was approved by the Board of Trustees. The plan’s ultimate goal is to transition MSU to 100 percent renewable energy, but to the chagrin of student environmental groups on campus, the plan doesn’t set a date for the goal to be met or a specific strategy to achieve it. According to Jennifer Battle, who is director of the Office of Campus Sustainability and one of

the document’s authors, the members of the plan’s Steering Committee never intended to create a step-by-step operational plan. “We thought it was important to set the targets and set the objective and be as flexible as possible in how we get there,” Battle said. “The charge was to create a framework, create a longterm general strategy and make suggestions. What we decided was the big, hairy, audacious goal was 100 percent renewable energy, but to say ‘we know exactly how to get there by this timeline,’ I don’t think it would have been responsible of us because it would have been a guess.” Harder to reach However this uncertainty is not limited to only the plan’s loftiest

goals. On page eight of the Energy Transition Plan, a table captioned “MSU’s plan for their transition to 100% renewable energy,” provides benchmarks for MSU’s performance until 2030. The first benchmark, set for the 2015 fiscal year which will begin July 1, 2014, calls for MSU to be powered by 15 percent renewable energy and to reduce the university’s greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent. As of the 2012 Environmental Stewardship Report released at the end of last year, MSU is powered by approximately 2 percent renewable energy and has reduced greenhouse gas emissions about 14 percent. See ENVIRONMENT on page 2 X

CITY

Community members remember Boston through Lansing Marathon By Isabella Shaya shayaisa@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

JUSTIN WAN/THE STATE NEWS

The water level of the Red Cedar River rose above 7 feet, flooding part the bank from the Main Library to Kellogg Center on Saturday.

Rain, rain go away: Red Cedar highest since 2001 By Michael Koury kourymic@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

Brought on by the wettest month in the history of April in the Lansing area, the flooding of the Red Cedar River reached 7.69 feet this weekend, the highest level since February 2001. On Sunday, the Botanical Gardens partially were drowned in

flooded waters. Trees sprouted from a pool of water engulfing Old College Field, and the Red Cedar River became a new practice ground for student surfers. As of 2:45 p.m. Sunday, the Red Cedar River was at 7.4 feet, said William Marino, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Grand Rapids. Dietetics freshman Jackie Winkler said she’s been surprised by

how much higher the Red Cedar River has gotten during the past week. “Every time I go over there, it gets bigger and bigger,” she said. The highest the Red Cedar River has been was 13.4 feet, dating back to March 1904. “MSU officials have been closeSee FLOOD on page 2 X

Less than a week after the tragic events at the Boston Marathon, Lansing hosted the nation’s first marathon since the incident, but not without mention of the events and an increased security for the event, according to race officials. On Sunday morning, members of the Greater Lansing community stood together to remember the lives lost and those injured in 2013 Boston Marathon. There were about 2,200 participants in the half or full marathons, which started and finished in front of the Lansing Center, in downtown Lansing. On April 15, two explosions were set off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Three people died and countless others were injured as a result, according to the CNN’s website. Before the race Sunday, participants and their families and friends gathered for a ceremony to remember the Boston Marathon victims, which included singing the national anthem, a moment of silence and recognition of alumna Vir-

K ATIE STIEFEL/THE STATE NEWS

Lansing resident Dennis Weinstein runs with a Boston flag during the Lansing Marathon on Sunday on Kalamazoo Street.

ginia Beard. Beard had only a half mile to go in the Boston Marathon before she was stopped by security because of the bombs. “There was a ton of us who sat at the last half mile mark figuring out what to do,” Beard said. “It was overwhelming (and) emotional.” At the Lansing Marathon, Beard was part of the ceremonies and allowed to run the last half mile of the race and received a medal. “They let me represent Boston,” Beard said, dressed in her Boston Marathon finishers jack-

et and wearing ‘Boston’ ribbons in her hair. Rather than stay away from marathons after the incident in Boston, runners came to show their support, and the Lansing Marathon’s number of participants rose about 15 percent since the Boston incident, said Pam Jodway, Lansing Marathon assistant race director. “A lot of people came out to pay tribute to Boston,” Jodway said. There were about 100 volunteers who signed up after the Boston Marathon bombing, LanSee MARATHON on page 2 X


2 | T HE STATE NEWS | MONDAY, APRIL 22, 2013 | STATENEWS.CO M

statenews.com AC A D E M I C S A N D A D M I N I S T R AT I O N B L O G

Study shows stress helps squirrels survive With the help of their mothers, MSU squirrels are fit for campus survival. According to a press release, a recent study led by researchers from MSU and the University of Guelph in Canada showed how female squirrels can improve their babies’ survival odds by increasing how fast the offspring will develop. The researchers discovered that squirrel mothers use social cues to prepare their young for the world beyond the nest and confirmed that red squirrel mothers will experience increased production levels of stress hormones during pregnancy. This allows the offspring to grow larger and gives them a greater survival chance. “Natural selection favors faster-growing offspring, and female red squirrels react accordingly to increase their pups’ chances of survival,� said Ben Dantzer, who was formerly associated with MSU’s Department of Zoology. “Surprisingly, squirrels could produce these faster growing offspring even though they didn’t have access to additional food resources.� SAMANTHA RADECKI | STATENEWS.COM/BLOG

ENVIRONMENT To meet targets, MSU considering buying renewable energy credits FROM PAGE ONE

With less than 18 months until the beginning of the 2014-15 fiscal year, university officials working closely with the Energy Operations Committee, the group formed to oversee the implementation of the plan, still are not certain how the most immediate benchmark will be achieved. Lynda Boomer, the energy and environmental engineer at Infrastructure Planning and Facilities, said the goal for greenhouse gas reductions likely could be met by 2015 by switching from coal to natural gas or biomass at the power plant, and making buildings more energy efficient. The renewable energy goal, she said, would be harder to reach. “That’s because of the economics,� Boomer said. “Do we

buy green energy? Then we’re not generating it ourselves, (by) buying green electricity on the grid. Or do we buy renewable energy credits to meet the first short-term goal? We may end up having to do that for 2015. I don’t know the answer yet. We’re working hard to figure out if there’s another way that we can actually invest to be able to generate ourselves, but if we don’t have that answer by 2015, it might not be until 2020 that we have the technology in place to achieve that renewable goal.� Being aggressive MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon sees the current uncertainty as an affirmation of the plan’s boldness. “When you have an aggressive benchmark, it’s not always guaranteed that you’ll meet it.� Simon said. “That’s why the plan is very aggressive. There was not a clear path to meeting those short-term benchmarks and so when we talk about this being an aggres-

Continued sive plan and holding ourselves accountable, it really isn’t about a date, it’s about a target that really is difficult to meet but yet we think achievable to meet.� Yet, according to members of MSU Greenpeace, the plan is not nearly aggressive enough. MSU Greenpeace is the organization perhaps most boldly opposed to the plan as it stands today. Members have been arrested protesting the plan and have conducted a number of what the organization deems “direct actions,� including dropping banners and delivering letters to Simon’s office. Recently, MSU Greenpeace has displayed a potential shift in tactics, meeting last Monday with Battle and MSU Vice President Bill Beekman in an hourlong meeting where the orga-

nization asked MSU to commit to 100 percent renewable energy by 2020. MSU Greenpeace coordinator Laura Drotar, history, philosophy and sociology of science sophomore, didn’t feel the meeting made much progress. “I think (the meeting) made me feel like we’re not getting through to them. The urgency of this issue is not a priority of Michigan State University,� Drotar said. “I feel like MSU is taking small steps to address issues with climate change, but I feel like these steps are more to cover their image and not genuine steps to address the real issues with climate change.� Reporting and interviews for this article were initally gathered as part of an undergraduate research project.

Three-day forecast

ASMSU Tuesday Rain High: 63° Low: 37°

Wednesday Rain High: 46° Low: 36°

Thursday Rain High: 46° Low: 34°

Funds have been frozen since April 5, unknown how transfer of funds would aect student services FROM PAGE ONE

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as far as money concerns.� The dispute about the group’s funds was not related to recent problems with the cancelled NeYo concert, Haas said. Haas added MSU is not looking to turn ASMSU into a university department or control how the organization conducts business with its funding. “They’re not being asked to be an MSU department, they are being asked to follow all of the same rules that people in the university are asked to do,� he said of the allocations that have been made. “They are receiving $1.5 million in tax revenue, that’s a lot of money, and all we’re asking them to do is to follow the procedures in place.� At press time, Haas could not be more specific about which procedures ASMSU failed to follow. Martinak was surprised to hear the funds had been frozen since April 5 and said the group has been working under regular financial operations. He said the organization is mainly funded by the $18 per student per semester tax, which

adds up to a grand total revenue of $1.5 million. Without the student tax revenue, ASMSU will use their emergency funds created for situations such as this. Vice President for Student Funding Mike Mozina said the organization has around $500,000 and can last about nine months without the student tax. Martinak said the university is allowed to withhold student tax funding from the organization because they are the ones originally collecting it. “They collect the money, it goes through the university accounts and that’s how they can stop it,� Martinak said. “It’s sort of like the gray area of a policy.� The ASMSU general assembly elected to turn down a bill at last Thursday’s meeting, which would have moved all of its funds to a university financial system. ASMSU general assembly member Nate Pasmanter, similar to nearly all of the representatives, voted against the bill last week because he is worried what the organization would become if the funds were moved. “Frankly, I don’t think the university should be responsible for ASMSU funding,� Pasmanter said. “I don’t trust them to handle the money appropriately and that it would give them a huge amount of leverage over us on who to fund and what to cut.�

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FLOOD

MARATHON

Water covering walkways, areas near river

Boston recognized via shirts, increased security

FROM PAGE ONE

FROM PAGE ONE

ly monitoring weather developments this week and the potential for flooding on campus,� MSU spokesman Kent Cassella said in a statement. “At this time, flooding has been limited to several walkways and open areas along the Red Cedar River.� Since the beginning of the month, 6.76 inches of rain has fallen, beating the previous record of the wettest April with 6.49 inches, set in 2009, he said. Marino said by April 28, the river might be down to 5 feet and at this time of year, the normal height of the river is around 3 feet. “At the rate it’s flowing, it would take three or four weeks to get down to that level,� he said. Marino said the rain started falling April 8 and continued almost every day through April 19. From April 8-11 and April 16-19, about 3 inches of rain fell in both time frames. “The thing that counts the most is the amount of rain fall versus the amount of time it took to fall,� he said. “If (the rain was) distributed evenly over the month, it would be a different story.�

sing Marathon coordinator Ariniko O’Meara said. “To be deterred by an act of violence in one city, you have to keep going,� O’Meara said. Human biology junior Nicole Soules and actuarial science junior David Brown ran the half marathon wearing “Runners for Boston� shirts they purchased for $20. All the proceeds go to the Boston Marathon. Participants wore Red Sox gear, the Boston Marathon’s colors of yellow and blue, and shirts with a variety of sayings to remember Boston. They also held signs in remembrance of the deceased. “It was great,� Brown said about the Lansing Marathon’s ceremony. “Cold, but a pretty good course.� Jodway said there was an increased security presence at the race Sunday, and police dogs walked the course before anyone else stepped foot on it.

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Campus+city MEMORIAL

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Friends and family talk after the memorial service for National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory founding director Henry Blosser on Friday at MSU Alumni Chapel.

Cyclotron founding father remembered By Darcie Moran morandar@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

Though best known as the reason MSU will be home to the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, or FRIB, to friends and family, Henry Blosser was a gardener. Whether he was growing a multimillion-dollar nuclear physics project out of nothing or tending his famous “Blosser tomatoes,” friends and family said almost everything the founding director of MSU’s National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory touched blossomed into a legacy that could be enjoyed for years by people around the world. Blosser’s influence on those he met was evident by the packed memorial service Friday at the Alumni Memorial Chapel where friends, family and former colleagues met to remember him. Blosser died March 20 in a Lansing hospice from complications from dementia, just four days after turning 85 years old. “Henry had many dimensions — a scientist, an artist and a caring human being,” longtime friend and retired cyclotron laboratory nuclear scientist David Scott said during the eulogy. “Like the powerful superconducting magnets he built, Henry was himself a super-magnet and a superconnector, attracting the brightest and the best into his ever-widening orbit.” Both Scott and Lois Lynch, Blosser’s wife, said condolences

have come from around the world. “He had a wonderful sense of humor,” Lynch said. “He was a special person. High energy. Interested in everything.” While at MSU, Blosser developed initiatives to fight cancer with cyclotron technology. FRIB Laboratory Director Konrad Gelbke said although Blosser was retired, he was active in the MSU cyclotron laboratory — encouraging Gelbke to ignore his fear of failure and develop a proposal for MSU’s Coupled Cyclotron Facility. Even as he fought dementia, Henry Blosser’s son Gabe Blosser said his father’s mind shined through as he continued his old habits of constantly calculating numbers and figures for projects. Days before his death, Gabe Blosser said although he could understand only a few of the words his father said, he’s certain he was attempting to give him advice on buying stocks. Lynch said he enjoyed spending time with his four children, three step-children and 16 grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Blosser will live on in the facilities he created, in the “Blosser tomato” seeds he passed on to friends and family, and in those who knew him, family and friends said. “His legacy will never die,” Scott said.

Crossword

ACROSS 1 Switchblade 5 French revolutionary who was murdered in a tub 10 Hard to outwit 14 Trumpet muffler 15 Rolled out of bed 16 One-named Gaelic folk singer 17 Bear in two constellations 18 Pro cager 19 Folksy Joan 20 Behavior of a community 23 Martini liquor 24 AOL chat components 25 Turkish __: spas 28 24-hour auto race city 30 “Star Trek” catchphrase 33 Standing straight 34 Aim for pins 35 “How come?” 36 Storage items near outdoor faucets 40 Satisfied sigh 43 Sox player, e.g. 44 Preface, briefly 48 Military officer’s ride 51 Attempt to cool, as steaming hot soup 52 Prefix with foam 53 Maglie or Mineo 54 Unlock, poetically

The East Lansing Public Library hosted its secondannual Books, Bites and Bids Library Fundraiser on Friday. About 350 East Lansing community members attended and thousands of dollars were raised. Along with a silent auction, the fundraiser featured food, live music and children’s activities. The money will go toward East Lansing Public Library’s materials budget because of the reduction in the budget for the 2013 fiscal year, as well as the summer Maker Programs, which provides children, teens and adults an opportunity to learn, design and create. The programs include activities, such as model rockets powered by water, do-it-yourself microscopes, sewing and clothing design. Funds also will be used for Code Camp, a four-week long computer-programming course for children. East Lansing Public Library Director Kristen Shelley said they hope to create a digital lab for writers and photographers in the East Lansing area as well. As of Sunday the total raised during the event had not yet been calculated, although it will be close to $10,000, according to Shelley. Elementary education junior Aubrey Makara uses the East Lansing Public Library every few months to create lesson plans with the wide selection of children’s books the library offers. Makara said there are more children’s book options than the Main Library offers. “Depending on the assignment, I use it as the basis of my lesson plans,” Makara said. “I took a music class and I had to find books that had like a rhythm to them to create lesson plans off that rhythm and describe how I would use it.” Books, Bites and Bids also concluded National Library Week, a nationwide celebration sponsored by the American Library Association. HOLLY BARANOWSKI

L.A. Times Daily Puzzle

55 Nurturing network of family and friends, and a hint to the starts of 20-, 30-, 36- and 48-Across 60 Corncob pipe part 62 “The First Time __ Saw Your Face” 63 Speech problem 64 Stay fresh 65 Dig artifact 66 Send out, as rays 67 500-mile race, familiarly 68 Phones on stage, e.g. 69 Contradict

DOWN 1 Bring across the border illegally 2 One in a rush 3 “Your money’s no good here!” 4 Calf meat, in Provence 5 Coated buttonlike candies 6 “Slicing Up Freshness” fast-food chain 7 Reddish horse 8 On the ocean 9 __ paper: school composition 10 Device for a Skype chat 11 Very agitated 12 Soap ingredient 13 ‘60s-’80s Red Sox legend, familiarly 21 Ford named for a horse

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

22 Selectric maker 26 “Whadja say?” 27 Double agent 29 “Oh” de Cologne? 30 Drilling tool 31 Potter’s pitcher 32 Tavern brew 34 Lugosi who played Dracula 37 Cul-de-__ 38 Pharmaceutical giant Eli 39 __-Globe: shakable collectible 40 Balaam’s mount 41 Lawyer: Abbr. 42 Country bumpkin 45 Double-cross 46 Lures by phishing, say 47 Afraid of running out, gas gauge-wise 49 Drably unattractive 50 Ascot wearer 51 Fundamentals 53 Word after comic or landing 56 Cop’s suspect 57 Eggs __ easy 58 Move, in brokerese 59 Winter toy 60 Tackle a slope 61 Olympic diver’s perfection

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STAT E NE WS.CO M | T HE STAT E N EWS | MON DAY, A PRIL 22, 2013 |

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CHARITY

SPARTANS RELAY FOR CANCER FUND By Robert Bondy bondyrob@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

For Department of Psychiatry professor James Hillard, it was obvious how important events such as Friday night’s Relay For Life of Michigan State University were in his battle against cancer. “I would not be alive if it wasn’t for herceptin, herceptin wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the support of their American Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society would not exist if it wasn’t from the support of you,” Hillard said during the opening ceremony Friday night. “I’m yours for life.” Hillard was one of the many who shared stories of their battle with cancer at the Relay For Life event at Jenison Field House, which began Friday night and ran until Saturday morning. The event was put on by Spartans Fighting Cancer, with many other student groups on campus in attendance in a competition to see who raised the most money for the American Cancer Society. “Cancer never sleeps, so neither do we,” Spartans Fighting Cancer President Devin Amez said. “It’s an all-night event, not a run, not a race. It is a time to remember who we lost and continue to fight cancer.” Relay For Life started with a handful of survivors sharing their stories. The event continued with many more upbeat and emotional events, such as the survivor and caregiver walk, luminaria lighting and 7-Up Flip Cup Tournament. The organization raises money year-round, and raised $95,000 prior to the event, with an ultimate goal of raising $140,000. Prior to the event, the orga-

DANYELLE MORROW/THE STATE NEWS

Nursing senior Devin Amez celebrates Relay for Life during the opening ceremony Friday at Jenison Field House. Participants walked the track until 9 a.m. to raise money to fight cancer.

nization had a total of 900 people preregistered, but Amez said she wouldn’t be surprised if that number was doubled. Ashley Wood, communication junior, was one of the thousands of students in attendance, and she had a personal motive for attending the event. She was diagnosed with cancer in May 2012, but four or five months and two surgeries later, she’s cancer-free. “You never know what everyone is battling, and fighting can-

cer gave me a new outlook on life,” Wood said. Similar to Wood, Lyman Briggs freshman Danielle Puckett felt a strong pull to attend the event, noting she lost her grandfather to skin cancer before she was able to meet him. “I don’t want to see it happen to any more people than it has to,” Puckett said. “If we could just continue to keep raising money for cures for cancer that would be awesome.”


4 | THE STAT E N E WS | M ONDAY, AP RI L 2 2, 2 01 3 | STATEN E WS.COM

Opinion

Featured blog MSU Football Blog

OU R VOICE | E DITORIAL

“The MSU football team added another player to the program’s list of recruits for the 2014 season. Brian Allen ... verbally committed to MSU on Saturday.

COLLEGES MUST FIND BALANCE WITH SPORTS EDITORIAL BOARD Emily Wilkins MANAGING EDITOR Greg Olsen OPINION WRITER Derek Blalock STAFF REPRESENTATIVE Omari Sankofa II MINORITY REPRESENTATIVE Michael Koury STAFF WRITER Simon Schuster STAFF WRITER

A

competitive athletic program is a commodity valued by colleges and universities across the board.

From enormous amounts of revenue generated in ticket sales and memorabilia, to the prestige connected to national publicity, sports have cemented a place in the framework of many successful colleges. This increased emphasis on furthering sports programs has been a trend observed by colleges of all sizes, but not everyone is embracing this shift with open arms.

Kansas State football head coach Bill Snyder is one of the most outspoken opponents to the movement he believes is plaguing college sports. During a radio interview Wednesday, Snyder said college athletics, particularly football, is in a “bad place right now.” The 73-year-old coach criticized universities for allowing sports to become money driven, and for failing to adhere to the values one should expect of an educational institution. The K-State coach also said he feels overpaid for the work he does, incidentally coming just months after signing a five-year contract worth $14.75 million. For a person of his professional stature, Snyder’s attack at the direction of college athletics is an unexpected breath of fresh air. The new face of college athletics seems like a shell of what once existed. Instead of catering to the needs of student-athletes, current athletic programs appear to have deflated much of the passion once prevalent. College athletes are milked for their tal-

— Zach Smith, State News reporter

ents and sold for their skills. During their time at school, bigname recruits — often in football and basketball — become the faces of their specific programs, but see none of the money their athletic prowess brings in. In time, this money-based system often breeds a familiar result. For star athletes, the temptation to make money and avoid suffering an injury lead many into leaving school early to pursue a professional career. Instead of leaving their institutions with a degree, many of these athletes are forced to sacrifice their educations to pursue a more fruitful lifestyle. At many universities, college athletics have become a business where traditional values have been sacrificed for dollars and cents. This slide can even be observed at MSU. At MSU, the money generated from the football and men’s basketball programs are in a league of their own. Last year, MSU’s football program produced 62.9 percent of the overall revenue for the athletic department. Not to be out-

Read the rest online at statenews.com/blog.

done, during that same period, MSU’s basketball revenue was $19,228,130 and was highest in the Big Ten, according to figures from the U.S. Department of Education . These numbers are significant, but they also can be misleading. The main source of revenue for both sports come from private donors, and this money is essential to the survival of other non-revenue sports. But the immense amount of money these programs bring in serve as a testament to the potential magnitude of this problem. Unless universities are able to figure out a way to reverse the direction their sports programs are heading, this tendency we are observing only will continue to worsen. Regardless of how much money they might stand to lose, a university’s top priority should always be to adhere to the needs of the school’s students, and most certainly hold them above athletics.

OPINION COLUMN

EDITORIAL CARTOONIST

Search for love, fulfillment difficult

W

you back. We are part of a generation of go-getters, which I think is amazing and wonderful. Despite our generation’s appreciation for love and affection, are we waiting for it to one day take over once we are “grown ups” and have our life in order? We might thoroughly enjoy stilted flirty text messages and overnight friendships, but deep down, we crave the warm embrace of all-consuming love. Or, at least the hopeCollege is a crazy time. I’m less romansure most of you who tic in me does. are reading this colGUEST COLUMNIST Now, I’ve had umn are completemy own fair share ly aware of that. of break-ups and It’s a time when make-ups. I’ve been you’re on the jourhead over heels in ney to finding and love, lost in lust and discovering who numbed by indifferyou are personally ence. For me perand professionally. sonally, I don’t think Some of us choose PAIGE BOLEN this new modern to take part in this bolenpai@msu.edu type of love rests journey with a sigentirely on socinificant other. ety’s shoulders. I While we are think it also has going through this a lot to do with growing from crazy time, we are sharing a our own personal experiences. part of ourselves with someone During my freshman year, I else in the very same position. was madly in lust and in a longSo, what is love? Not the fairy distance relationship. After flytale kind of love, more like modern ing across the country to visit this boy, I ended the trip sinlove; college love. gle and stuck at the airport with What is it becoming? Is it lust? Is it nothing but a dead cellphone and some curly fries from Arby’s. romance and pasAs traumatic as this experision? Like an epience was, I honestly can look sode of “Sex and While we the City,” my girl- back on it and be grateful. I are going friends and I try know it sounds odd, and a little bit crazy, to be grateful but to answer this through I honestly am. After a few trips rhetorical questhis crazy tion and what we to Dairy Queen and a box of tissues later, I made the decision have come to find time, to not feel sorry for myself. is that the world we are As much as I really wanted to, may never know. I had decided that I absolutely In the current sharing couldn’t and wouldn’t. Throughage we are a part of cyber out the experience, I really disall living in, the ourselves relationship game covered who I was. I grew mentally and emotionally, and for has become one with that, I am forever grateful for the with no rules. someone Hookups are a heartbreak that came with it. I won’t lie, although I was over Facebook click else...” the anguish of my previous relaaway, and friendtionship, it took me a while to ship can morph completely open my heart again. into a sexual encounter and then back to friendship in a single day. For a while I thought I was going to fall victim to the “college love” We also have access to comso many I knew took part in. munication 24 hours a day, sevNot because that was a bad en days a week. Epic poetry thing at all, but deep inside I and love letters might no lonstill wanted an unconditionger be the case. Casual is sexy. al love, whether it showed up Caring too much is unsettling. on my doorstep the next day Maybe you don’t want to or 10 years down the road. open yourself up too much, Life and love gets crazy someand you certainly don’t want times. Although we might live anything casual to be seriin a stage of life where love ous. At least until you become might be scorned as an illusion, a grown up and get married. I still have hope. Every expeBut, maybe that’s what it is rience, even the bad ones, can all about. You’re single and free. allow for growth from within. You don’t want anything to hold e’ve all been there. From that tingly feeling you get after an amazing first kiss to not being able to listen to your rainy day iTunes playlist without incessantly weeping — we’ve been there.

ANDY CURTIS curtisa7@msu.edu

Comments from readers

FRIDAY’S POLL RESULTS

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JUST SO YOU KNOW No 30%

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None 74% 35%

One 23%

35% 30% 0

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Yes, I love supporting local artists No, but I would like to some day No, and I don't plan on it Total votes: 53 as of 6 p.m. Sunday

TODAY’S STATE NEWS POLL

“ASMSU in jeopardy of losing student tax funding” Once money is tucked away in MSU accounts on campus, it’s almost impossible to get it back off again. This would severely limit where ASMSU could hold events... (comment continued at statenews.com). It’sMyMoneyAndINeedItNow, Friday

Can a student government really represent the students if the University is telling them what to pass and holding funds hostage until they comply? No... this is disappointing but very typical... (comment continued online) Kristy Currier, Friday

To share your thoughts on this story or any other stories, visit statenews.com.

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We want to hear your thoughts. The State News welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must include your year and major, email address and telephone number. Phone numbers will not be published. Letters should be fewer than 500 words and are subject to editing.

How to reach us Questions? Contact Opinion Editor Katie Harrington at (517) 432-3070. By email opinion@statenews.com; By fax (517) 432-3075; By mail Letters to the Editor, The State News, 435 E. Grand River Ave., East Lansing, MI 48823


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STAT E NE WS.CO M | T HE STAT E N EWS | MON DAY, A PRIL 22, 2013 |

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Mardi Gras drag show draws hundreds 2

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By Christine LaRouere larouer4@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

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Drag queen Hershae Chocolatae performs during the Official MSU Drag Show on Friday at the International Center. Chocolatae has been performing for about 12 years. Drag king Dice Santana performs during the Official MSU Drag Show. Santana has been performing as a drag king, a woman who dresses like a man, for three years. Drag queen Ace DeVille does her makeup before the drag show. DeVille has been performing as a drag queen for five years. ALL PHOTOS BY K ATIE STIEFEL/THE STATE NEWS

More online … To watch a video of the drag queens and kings strutting their stuff at the Official MSU Drag Show, visit statenews.com/multimedia.

Eleven professional drag kings and queens strutted their stuff down Bourbon Street at the Official MSU Drag Show on Friday in the International Center. With a Mardi Gras theme, the Crossroads Food Court was transformed with green, purple and yellow decorations, such as feather boas hanging from the ceiling, spotlights and a stage. “This is a tradition that UAB looks forward to put on every year,” said Stephanie Strawska, arts director of the University Activities Board, or UAB. “This is just something different that is open to so many different people, and everyone loves it.” In partnership with Respecting Individuals on Neutral Ground and the Residence Halls Association the show attracted more than 600 people to watch the performers dance, lip-sync and interact with the crowd. Strawska said all students should attend the show for the unique experience. “There is always a fun, outgoing and contagious energy going on this night,” Strawska said. “It expands on a different kind of experience that you normally wouldn’t have.” Hershae Chocolatae, one of the drag queens and emcee of the show, said the crowd’s energy is what made her get involved with drag shows about 12 years ago, and coming to MSU is anoth-

er opportunity to express a different identity. “The crowd’s reaction is what hooked me and for this show, that is one of the things that keeps me coming back,” Chocolatae said. “When I am on stage, I become a character. The performance, the moment and nothing else matters.” While getting ready backstage with the other performers, Chocolatae said although it takes time getting ready and a couple hours to drive to East Lansing, coming to college shows is rewarding. “For me, most colleges are very energetic and go through a great deal of effort to put these shows on,” Chocolatae said. “The hardest part is preparing, but I know it is one of the greatest feelings in the world and I know that’s why I keep doing it.” Theatre freshman Savannah Kolodziej said she was impressed by the performances during the show. “I am surprised at how talented the performers are, and the costumes are phenomenal,” Kolodziej said. Kolodziej said the show is not only a chance to experience an upbeat and positive event, but also an opportunity for students of all sexual orientations to come together. “I have noticed that this brings a sense of community among people who are (lesbian, bi, gay and transgender) LGBT and their straight allies,” Kolodziej said. “It is really awesome to see.”


6 | THE STAT E N E WS | M ONDAY, AP RI L 2 2, 2 01 3 | STATEN E WS.COM

Features

FEATURES EDITOR Matt Sheehan, features@statenews.com PHONE (517) 432-3070 FAX (517) 432-3075

R E TA I L

R E C R E AT I O N

E. LANSING CELEBRATES RECORD STORE DAY By Katie Abdilla abdillak@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

Collecting records has become a family tradition for MSU alumnus Dave Molner. Ever since visiting his brother in San Francisco after he graduated high school, his hobby only has grown. “(My brother) had me listen to some of his records, and when I came home, I took my mom’s old record player, and now it’s one of my favorite things,” Molner said. On Saturday, many collectors, like Molner, paid a visit to Flat, Black & Circular, or FBC , East Lansing’s oldest record store, for Record Store Day. FBC offered giveaways, new releases and live entertainment in celebration of the holiday, celebrated by independent record stores nationwide. Jon Howard, the manager for FBC, said the store began participating about six years ago. “It was the major (record) labels and some independent labels trying to give a boost to small stores, with independent stores closing up and failing,” Howard said. “They wanted to help everybody out.” Howard said Record Store Day reached its peak at FBC Saturday, with the highest local success rate since the holiday kicked off. With vinyl sales reaching an all-time high since the last spike in the late ‘90s, Howard said it’s a good sign for store owners and faithful collectors. “Lack of CD sales brought vinyl back up,” he said. “A couple companies started making turntables again. With the initial spike five or six years ago, I think those people started playing it for their friends, and their friends are now catching on, so it kind of snowballed from there.” Joe Hertler, frontman of Joe Hertler & the Rainbow Seekers,

DANYELLE MORROW/THE STATE NEWS

Horticulture sophomore Rheanne Pecsenye flips through a section of records at Flat, Black & Circular, 541 E. Grand River Ave., on Saturday during Record Store Day.

“The commitment that buying and listening to vinyl brings is something that is important and something for me to grasp,” Joe Hertler, singer and record collector

performed as a solo act Saturday afternoon at FBC. As an avid record collector who has spent hundreds of dollars at FBC, Hertler said buying vinyl brings back a more personal listening experience. “Spending money on vinyl and taking the time and effort to listen to a record, put it on the platter, is something I think a lot more people should be able to experience,” Hertler said. “The commitment that buying and listening to vinyl brings is something that is important and something for me to grasp onto, personally.” Howard said the task of buying vinyl shows more of an appreciation for the artist and their hard work. “We always loved the artwork of it and feel of it and the social aspect of it,” he said. “When you really like a band, you’ll buy something that’s a product of the band that they put some

work into. It’s kind of a tactile thing, and a collection thing for us. We like having a little library.” Despite the rise of mediums, such as Pandora and Spotify, Hertler said he gets more out of the experience from listening to vinyl. “I have a Spotify account, and it’s great because you have access to everything, but I find myself not appreciating the music as much on Spotify,” he said. “It takes away something in that listening experience.” For Howard , there’s no greater feeling than seeing younger generations upholding his love for vinyl. “It’s great because we always stuck with it,” he said. “We always said in the initial Napster, digital age, that vinyl was here to stay. It’s been something we’ve always championed.”

PHOTOS BY JUSTIN WAN/THE STATE NEWS

Civil engineering junior Drake Veitenheimer attempts to get the frisbee into a hole Sunday at the Agricultural Exposition site off E. Crescent Road during a fundraiser for the MSU Disc Golf Club.

Disc golf club looking to bring sport back to university scene By Omari Sankofa II sankofao@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

When students Nate Ross and Ziggy Bierekoven brought back the previously inactive MSU Disc Golf Club in October, the idea was to reintroduce a sport that hadn’t had a presence on MSU’s campus for several years.

Disc golf follows many of the same rules of golf. However, on MSU’s disc golf course, every basket is a par three, meaning reaching the basket in three ... is par Yesterday, the club hosted a fundraising disc golf tournament at MSU’s disc golf course at Farm Lane and Mt. Hope Road. The idea behind the fundraiser not only was to raise funds for the club, but to put the club back on the map. “Here at MSU, they used to have a club, but it disbanded a few years ago,” Ross, an

Mechanical engineering freshman Jeremy Reisig walks with a bag of frisbees, Sunday, April 21, at the Agricultural Exposition site off East Crescent Road during a fundraiser for the MSU Disc Golf Club.

applied engineering sciences sophomore and vice president of the club said. “This year, we got together with a few people and decided to start another one and get the course back, so it’s been a good year.” The club is responsible for the upkeep of the course. Currently, the course has 15 baskets, so part of the fundraiser’s goal was to raise enough money to buy three more baskets. Disc golf follows many of the

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same rules of golf. However, on MSU’s disc golf course, every basket is a par three, meaning reaching the basket in three throws is par and reaching the basket in two is a birdie. “Baskets can be up to $300 each, so for three (more) we would need $900 dollars,” Ross said. T he tournament included three divisions — members, non-members and an open division that played for money. More than 20 people made it to the tournament, and Ross deemed it a successful outing. “We had a lot of non-members come out and a lot of members as well,” he said , adding he was pleased with the level of participation from those at the event. Club member and psychology junior Steven King said his performance was less than par. However, when playing with the group, he said performance isn’t everything. “It’s not just about playing, competing, which is a big part of it,” King said. “It’s also hanging out with another group of people.” Club member and mechanical engineering freshman Jeremy Reisig organized the event. He said disc golf provides a different sort of challenge. “People see it as just throwing frisbees, but there’s a lot of variety to it,” Reisig said. “A lot of variety in the shots and the different holes you see, so the variety of the things you see around Michigan and the things you see in the sport bring people back to it.”

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STAT E NE WS.CO M | T HE STAT E N EWS | MON DAY, A PRIL 22, 2013 |

Sports SPARTAN FOOTBALL

STEPHEN BROOKS brook198@msu.edu

Inept oense on display in spring game Spring football has come and gone for the seventh time in head coach Mark Dantonio’s tenure. A disappointing 7-6 season in 2012 can be attributed to a variety of factors, but one of the most glaring problems was the inconsistent and, at times, anemic offense. After then-freshman quarterback Connor Cook led the game-winning drive in the Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl, a legitimate battle with senior Andrew Maxwell was born and redshirt freshman Tyler O’Connor joined the fray this spring. With spring practices finished after Saturday’s Green and White game, it seems MSU only has made incremental improvements from that

SPORTS EDITOR Kyle Campbell, sports@statenews.com PHONE (517) 432-3070 FAX (517) 432-3075

each of the bigger variety Dantonio and company have preferred recently, and a burner in R.J. Shelton. On multiple occasions, Dantonio stressed the need for the current backs to be more consistent and affirmed his willingness to play true freshmen at the position. Perhaps it will end up being a true by-committee approach with three or more ball-carriers sharing the load.

December night. Who is going to be the quarterback? Who knows? Just as Cook’s performance in the last game of the season thrust him into the discussion, his performance in the spring game — the final day of 15 practices — likely narrowed the gap to Maxwell, who previously appeared to have a comfortable hold on the job. The fact that Cook was MSU’s most impressive quarterback Saturday while only completing slightly more than 38 percent of his throws is troubling. What about the running backs? No clue. Pick a straw on this one. There’s four tailbacks on the roster right now: juniors Nick Hill and Jeremy Langford, redshirt freshmen Nick Tompkins and Riley Bullough, recently converted from linebacker. None of them have separated themselves in the eyes of the coaching staff this spring, and the fact that Bullough has led the team in rushing the last two scrimmages after just a handful of practices at that spot says a lot about the status of the position. It’s hard not to believe the job ultimately ends up in the hands of some true freshmen. The Spartans add three more runners in the fall in Gerald Holmes and Delton Williams,

For more coverage of the Green and White game, visit statenews.com “I like to have things set. Here’s my guys at all these positions,� said Dave Warner, co-offensive coordinator and running backs coach. “At the same time, it’s going to provide a lot of competition through the summer, drive guys probably a little bit harder to prepare for August when the jobs will be won.� Whoever takes the job should be able to find success running behind a veteran offensive line. Even with two projected starters out in the spring game, the unit flexed its muscle with players split

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among both teams and came away as the most consistent offensive position group. The defense will be fine. In fact, the Spartan backups likely could field a team that would finish in the top half of the Big Ten defensively. There are few concerns on that side of the ball outside of getting more pressure from the

defensive line. The extremely deep and talented back seven should carry the torch for another top-10 defensive unit this season. If MSU hopes to improve upon last season — when the Spartans dropped five games by a total margin of 13 points — the offense needs to carry its share of the weight. It’s that

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Today is a 9 — Celebrate Earth Day your way. Set priorities, and then stick to them. Avoid distractions. Disconnecting from social media temporarily may not be a bad idea. Optimism increases, especially when you get out in the sun. Taurus (April 20-May 20) Today is a 9 — Find happiness in relationships, rather than possessions, even though work would like to interfere with romance. Find the sweet spot. What you’re learning clashes with your old routine. Listen to all the considerations.

simple. This spring provided few, if any, answers to the questions surrounding the program — nearly all of which fall on the offense’s plate. The pads have been hung up until August, and the Spartans essentially are in the same position as day one of spring practice.

by nature.

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Junior linebacker Taiwan Jones, left, and senior defensive end Denzel Drone, right, tackle running back Nick Hill during the Green and White Spring Game Saturday at Spartan Stadium. The White team won, 24-17.

Horoscope By Linda C. Black

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Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Today is an 8 — Focus on service, cheerfully, and the money will follow. Don’t take it for granted; you don’t know what you’ve got until it’s gone. Once this conict is resolved, you’ll be stronger. Enjoy a peaceful sunset. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Today is an 8 — Stand ďŹ rm, despite bothersome regulations or criticism. Teasing could cause jealousies. Don’t throw away something you’ll need. Practice makes perfect, in work and in love. Set priorities, and don’t overbook. Leave time to play.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Today is an 8 — Don’t count your chickens just yet ... there’s more work to be done. Changes at home are required, and they lead to more changes. Don’t spend money you don’t have. Share your love instead.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Today is an 8 — Let family take precedence over your career. Follow your heart, and be patient. Repair a neglected item. Read the instructions. Use resources you have. Separate yourself from an argument. Let the small stu go.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Today is a 9 — Your mind wants to play, but work takes precedence. Make it fun and your productivity increases. Stick to your budget, and stash away the surplus. Reward yourself by getting outside somewhere beautiful.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Today is a 7 — Tried and true methods work best. Cash is delayed, so curtail spending. Barter could work. Consider consequences. Watch where you’re going. Reschedule an outing, and make apologies. Get restored

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Today is a 9 — Accept coaching from a critic, and put in the correction respectfully. Save some of your earnings for mad money or seed funds for a new project. You feel more optimistic afterward. Love deeply. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Today is an 8 — List the pros and cons of a project, and deďŹ ne your terms. Sidestep a challenge or disagreement. Together, you might beat City Hall, with a lucky break. Make positive changes without touching savings. Use imagination. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Today is a 9 — There’s more work involved than you thought there’d be. Confront ďŹ nancial barriers. Set up a private conversation, and be respectful. Accept coaching. A mountain ďŹ gures in your thoughts. Things look up. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Today is a 9 — Notice what stops your partner. There may be a conict to resolve. Work interferes with playtime, as you double-check data and procedures. Don’t expect others to provide everything. Keep in communication.

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SURVEY INTERVIEWERS NEEDED. MSU’s Survey Research Lab is hiring telephone interviewers to conduct computerassisted interviews in English and Arabic for health and public policy studies. P/T, flex work schedule, evening and weekend hrs. req. Paid training. $8.28/hr. Higher rate for bilingual interviewers. To apply call 517-353-5404 or come to Room 10, Berkey Hall with your resume.

WEB DESIGNERS needed at The State News. Our web team is looking to hire those who are willing and eager to learn. Design and help develop websites for college media groups across the country. Applicants must be available during the summer. Send resume to webmaster@statenews.com

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AWESOME JOB! Looking for College Students to raise money for NonProfits. Earn $8-$13/ hr while building your resume. Evening hrs to fit around your school schedule. Call 332-1501 today to reserve your spot! BE A part of the energy in EL. El Azteco East,now hiring for the roof. All positions avail. Positions are filling fast so apply today. 225 Ann St. 517.351.9111 stop in or email Johnny at Johnny@ elazteco.net for app. BLOOMFIELD HILLS Rental Co. needs summer help! Up to $12/hr, May-Aug. Outdoor work, lifting req. Call Wayne, (248) 332-4700. BOOK SALES associate needed p/t. $10-$15/hr. Must be avail. 4/27-5/3. Send resume to straightabookstore@gmail.com for info.

GENERAL LABORER for local construction company. Email office@ ebhandyman.com Great Summer/student employment! Get paid to be a climate change activist! Work outside, make a difference, build your resume. Ft/ Pt Avail. Call today! 517-203-0754. HASLETT FAMILY seeking special ed/ed student to be a summer mentor for a 14 year old female w/ mild CP. Needs own reliable transportation, room + board included. Evenings and weekends free. Email resumes w/ contact info to gomayes@sbcglobal. net by 5/10/13.

HIRING SERVERS/ cooks at Reno’s East Sports Bar. Apply in person, 1310 Abbot Road. MARRIOTT HOTEL. Hiring Dining Room/Banquet Servers. Great work experience! P/T. Apply at 300 M.A.C. Ave. PET CARE looking for hardworking individual P/T days and wknds. Animal exp preferred. Resume to Melissa @ PO Box 277 Haslett 48840.

SUMMER WORK $14.50 base-appt. Customer sales & service. No experience necessary, we train. Apply now, start after finals. Call 517-3331700 or apply at www. summerbreakwork.com

PLAY SPORTS! Need camp counselors for summer. Call 888-8448080 or campcedar. com.

Go State!

RECYCLE this newspaper, please.

THE STATE News distribution department is looking for responsible, reliable drivers to deliver The State News between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. M & Th beginning May 2013. Attractive pay. Applicants must be an MSU student: have a reliable vehicle & good driving record. To apply go to: www.statenews.com/ work (under distribution link) or pick up an application at 435 E. Grand River Ave., East Lansing, between the hours of 9-5. Applications accepted until April 24th.

WEB DEVELOPERS needed at The State News. Our web team is looking to hire those who are willing and eager to learn. Applicants must be available during the summer. Send resume to webmaster@statenews.com WORK ON Mackinac Island this summer. The Island House Hotel and Ryba’s Fudge Shops are looking for seasonal help in all areas: Front Desk, Bell Staff, Wait Staff, Sales Clerks, and Baristas. Housing, bonus, and discounted meals available. 1(906)847-7196. www. theislandhouse.com

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3 BDRM luxury apts avail Aug ‘13 from $585 incl TV & internet. Located near MSU athletic events. Each apt features gourmet kitchens with granite countertops, in-home washer/dryer, furnished living room, 2 full baths, parking garage, large balcony and intercom entry, internet and sat TV incl in rent. 517-2688624 ACROSS FROM campus. Avail Aug. 1st. 2 bdrm, fully furn, balcony, heat, water, internet + video included. Lic for 4. Special 3, or 4 ppl rates. Delta Arms 517-5073679. Only 1 available.

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Duplex/Rent 2-3 PERSON house available 595 Spartan Ave. this summer. 2 bedrooms, washer/dryer, kitchen. 1 yr available for $1,100 for unit. Call/text Peter Tepler 517-9447800 for info. 4-6 PERSON house available this summer 595/597 Spartan Ave. 4 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, 2 kitchens, 2 living rooms. 1 yr lease available for $2200.00. Call/text Peter Tepler at 517-944-7800. peter. tepler@gmail.com

557 VIRGINIA lic. 3, $1200 + util. 517-4494141. 704 E. GREENLAWN Lansing, 2 bdrm! New Paint & Carpet! Gorgeous! (3 miles from MSU) $775 email Jenjgenerous@gmail.com HOUSE FOR Rent. 4 bdrm, 2 bath. $1500/mo. 517-482-3624 LARGE UPDATED 4 bdrm near Sparrow Hospital. Avail May. Boydrentals. com 517.896.2247 MSU/ SPARROW near. Lovely 2 bdrm. 314 S. Howard. $750 + utils. Avail Aug. Call 517-3495827. REDUCED PRICE $440 each. 1230 Lilac. Lic 5. Aug ‘13. Near Breslin, w/d. 927-1338

Misc. For Sale MENS SUITS 38 trim-cut, name brands only $49. Kellie’s next Meijer in Okemos. 574-4523

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Happy Earth Day!


8 Sports | T H E STATE NE WS | M O NDAY, AP RI L 22, 2013 | STATE N E WS.COM

THE ONLY COLORS

Football team finishes spring practice with annual Green, White scrimmage

JUSTIN WAN/THE STATE NEWS

JUSTIN WAN/THE STATE NEWS

Sparty runs for a three-yard gain, April 20, at Spartan Stadium. The White team defeated the Green team, 24-17, during the annual Green and White Spring Game.

Senior linebacker Kyler Elsworth tackles junior running back Nick Hill on Saturday, April 20, at Spartan Stadium. The White team defeated the Green team, 24-17, during the annual Green and White Spring Game.

F

ans were bundled up and snow fell for much of the game as the White team defeated the Green team, 24-17, in the annual Green and White Spring Game. The game saw brothers Max and Riley Bullough — both normally defensive players — draw up an offensive play before the game started and then execute it to the delight of the fans, and the establishing of a starting quarterback in senior Andrew Maxwell. A few running backs made some moves, including Sparty who totaled three yards. The State News was on the field documenting the exhibition, here are some of the best images from the day. ZACH SMITH

More online … To see a photo gallery from Saturday’s game, visit statenews.com.

JULIA NAGY/THE STATE NEWS JULIA NAGY/THE STATE NEWS

Head coach Mark Dantonio smiles during the Green and White Spring Game on Saturday at Spartan Stadium. The White team won, 24-17.

Sophomore safety Chris Laneaux, 35, smiles after scoring a touchdown during the Green and White Spring Game on Saturday at Spartan Stadium. Laneaux scored the touchdown after intercepting the ball.


Earth Day

STAT E NE WS.CO M | T HE STAT E N EWS | MON DAY, A PRIL 22, 2013

N AT U R E

CAMPUS

Earth Day Extravaganza goes on in spite of chilly weather

K ATIE STIEFEL/THE STATE NEWS

Lansing resident Bob Hodges looks at flowers on Saturday inside the greenhouses on the corner of Bogue Street and Wilson Road. The sale was organized by the MSU Horticulture Club to raise funds for next semester.

Annual spring show funds MSU’s Horticulture Club By Milan Griffes PHOTOS BY NATALIE KOLB/THE STATE NEWS

Graduate student Amber Goguen, right, lifts a tray for 9-year-old Holt resident Brenna Klaver to drop a worm into during Earth Day Extravaganza on Saturday at Fenner Nature Center. Klaver found multiple worms in the pond, along with a few insects.

By Caleb Nordgren nordgren@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

On a cold April morning, amidst occasional flurries of snow, about 150 volunteers gathered at Fenner Nature Center in Lansing for the center’s Earth Day Extravaganza. The event featured a number of nature-related events, such as pond dipping and building bluebird nests, among others. This is the second year of the Extravaganza, Fenner Conservancy Program Manager Katie Woodhams said, although the event existed in a much different format in years prior. Originally, the event was smaller and focused mainly on efforts by the MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Club to reach out to the community, Woodhams said. “We made it explode accidentally,” she said, smiling. MSU was well-represented at the Extravaganza, as the MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Club partnered with the center to organize it. The MSU Herpetology Club also was there, and while they couldn’t do a planned herpetological survey the group had planned because of the weather, co-president Hayley Sisson said she still enjoyed teaching “It’s been a good day,” the zoology junior said. “It’s just fun to come and to have the live animals and teach the kids. (Reptiles are) not gross. They’re integral, necessary parts of ecosystems. They’re really cool animals.” The concern with the survey was that since many reptiles work hard to fight the cold of winter, mainly by hiding underground, surveyors likely wouldn’t fi nd anything particularly interesting, and if

Graduate student Amber Goguen holds up a beetle she fished out of a pond during Earth Day Extravaganza hosted by Fenner Nature Center and MSU Fisheries and Wildlife Club on Saturday at Fenner Nature Center.

“Overall, it’s just seeing all the people here contributing (to a) multi-faceted educational experience. To see such a diverse set of people working together is ... heartwarming.” Katie Woodhams, Conservancy Program Manager

they did find some reptiles, the disturbance could kill them. Instead, they set up a table inside where visitors could observe live reptiles up close. A ways down the trail from the center proper, MSU graduate student Amber Goguen was set up at the pond dipping station. Pond dipping simply is the act of using nets to sift through the debris of a pond to see what organisms inhabit the pond. Goguen explained that certain insects that live in ponds are bioindicators. By observing the insects in one pond against the same insects from a different pond, scientists can learn about the degrees of pollution in one area or another. Goguen said her favorite

parts of pond dipping are the act of discovery in it and that kids love doing it. She said kids love learning about new and different types of insects and organisms that inhabit various ponds. There are a number of goals for the Extravaganza, Woodhams said, such as restoring habitats, staving off invasive species and generally raising awareness. But she said her favorite part was seeing all the volunteers come out and give their time to the event. “Overall, it’s just seeing all the people here contributing (to a) multi-faceted educational experience,” Woodhams said. “To see such a diverse set of people working together is really heart warming.”

griffes4@msu.edu THE STATE NEWS ■■

The Horticulture Club welcomed the change of season with its annual spring show this weekend in the greenhouse at the corner of Bogue Street and Wilson Road . Attendees of the show purchased plants for their gardens and viewed a sculpted landscape display. Horticulture senior Nick Calderone, the show’s designer, was in charge of crafting the landscape. “(With) the display, the point is to showcase plants in their landscape,” Calderone said. “We always have a spring show theme. This year, we’re doing ‘Sensory Overload.’” Calderone said the landscape was divided into two sections — one that exhibited shade-loving and sunloving plants, and the other showcasing plants exciting to particular senses. The ‘touch’

category displayed Lamb’s Ear, a plant with notably soft leaves. The ‘smell’ category hosted an array of Fragrant Geraniums, which emit a strong odor similar to that of lemon. Head grower Arianna Wilcox, also a horticulture senior, supervised the growth and care of the plants at the show. “I make sure all the plants stay watered, are pruned and get deadheaded,” Wilcox said. The annual show is the main source of income for the Horticulture Club. Wilcox, who has helped organize the show for four years, said the club begins preparing for the show about nine months in advance. He said that the weekend-long show brings in approximately $50,000 for the club each year. “This is the only fundraiser we have for the club all year,” Wilcox said. “It gives our students more situational experience – things they might face in industry.” Marcus Duck is one of the faculty advisors of the club. He has been involved with the show for

10 years, always in an advisory capacity. “The most amazing thing about this is that the students do it voluntarily,” Duck said. “They work tremendous hours on top of their classes and jobs.” Duck also noted the occupational benefits students take away from organizing the show. “Putting together the show is a nice networking opportunity for the students,” he said. “It’s a way to introduce students to jobs.” The Horticulture Club, which has about 35 active members, uses the money raised at the spring show to fund trips to events across the country. This year, the club attended the Student Career Day of the Professional Landcare Network , or PLANET, at the University of Auburn in Alabama. Horticulture sophomore Emily Consigli, a first-year member of the club, placed in the top25 in her category, Interior Plant Identification. “It’s like the landscape Olympics,” she said.

Clean Commute 5K

CHECK OUT THE STATE NEWS ON TWITTER:

www.twitter.com/thesnews

Includes a free 1-Mile Multimodal Excursion and Clean Air Fair

Saturday, April 27 Hawk Island Park, Lansing All proceeds benefit Mid-Michigan Asthma Coalition

cleancommute.org


THE STATE N E WS | M O N DAY, AP RI L 22, 2 01 3 | STATENEWS.COM

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

SPARTANS GET GREEN CERTIFIED

Congratulations to the following Be Spartan Green Student Pledges: Aaron Aguirre

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Campus Sustainability recognizes campus spaces that have proved they are Spartan Green

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Alex Busch

Jasmine Knight

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Alexander Redmond

Jasmine Patrick

Alexander Underwood

Jayson Kirkland

Content Provided by Campus Sustainability

T

Alexandra Gregor Alexis Downes Alexis Parker Alexus Harris Alicia Partynski Allisa VanMaren Allison McGinn Allison Westerheide

Congratulations to the many units that completed Green CertiďŹ cation during the 2012-2013 academic year:

43 Kitchens 4 Information Tech 3 Laboratories 70 For the complete list of certiďŹ ed units, please visit: bespartangreen.msu.edu/greencert

Jasneet Jhita Jeanette Bay

Nicholas Tazziolo Nick Everett Nicole Lewis

Jennifer Aldridge

Nicole Mannino

Jennifer Hurand

Nicole Sanchez

Jennifer Thach

Nicole Wandtke

Jeroen de Vor

Nitasha Cox

Jesse Stamann

Noah Julyk

Jessica Camburn

Nyasha Makoni

Jessica Greathouse

Patricia Kim

Jessica Kaczmarek

Peter Cernak

Alyssa Crough

Jessica Morrison

Alyssa Kelly

Jewell Bell

Andrew Tyus

Jiajun Lan

Anna Wright

Joanna Kukla

Porscha Taylor

Anthony Russel

Joe DeLaVergne

Preston Myles

Antonio Hamilton

Joey Vanderbosch

Qian Wang

Ashley Osentoski

Jon Woo

Rachel Karanja

Assane Niang

Jonathan Dowdall

Rachel Suggs

Athena Antonis

Jordan Donnelly

Rachel Tate

Austin Childress

Jordan Hensley

Rajiv Vutukuku

Austin McCann

Jordan Rivett

Ben English

Jorrian Whaley

Benjamin Hesskamp

Joseph Trubiano

Billy Winbush

Joshua Willard

Blair Pitcairn

Joshua Wilson

Brad Siemen

Justin Briggs

Brandi Juengel

Justine Becker

Brandon King

Kani Caldwell

Ruoxuan Wang

Brian Vella

Katelyn Pluff

Ruth Bauer

Briana Williams

Katharina Freiberger

Ryan Diamond

Brianna Gerondale

Josh Shafquat

Kathryn Kaleth

Peter Colasanti Peter Drent

Ray Simon Rebecca Ellis Rhiannon Pokriefka Robert Paquette Robin Smith Runsheng Wang

Ryan Kimball Ryan McCarthy

Brianna Hui

Kathryn Stegeman

Brion Thomas

Katie Hanlon

Caitlin Ramsey

Ryan Winkler

Caitlyn Przybysz

Katlynn Beerbower

Cameron Sova

Katy Gwizdala

Samantha Kortas

Cara Whinnery

Kayla Davis

Carolinne Ogura

Kayla Parvizi

Samantha Mitchelson

Casey Hogarth

Kaylee Denink

Samantha Roberts

Chantel Romero

Kelly Ferguson Kendra Caldwell

Samantha Van Atta

Kennisha Williams

Sami Schmidt

Chris Wolfenbarger Chrissy Portera Christina Ignasiar

Kevin Banducci

Ryan Smith Ryann Gustafson

Sanders Aspelund

Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hagan

Sandy Sanchez

Kevin White

Sapna Bhalsod

Cody Harrell

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Courtney Roberts

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Shaun Hetu

Kody Day

Sherilyn Rong

Kush Patel

Shobana Ganganithi

Christopher Churay

Daniel McKenna Daniel Thomas Darian McCathern

Kyle Kerrick

Dayna Atkinson

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Devan Cohen

Kyle Siporin

Sitong Sai

Devine Carson

Kylie Gowell

Sivaram Murthy

Diana Jasser

Lane Vogt

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Somalia GandyDix

Dillon Jaghory

Leanna Lim

Stephanie Jones

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Timothy Christensen

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Meghan Huynh

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Michael Burger

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Michael Murphy

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Heather Hoffmeyer

Michael Sullivvan

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Mitchell Treadwell

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Wesley Mathews

Mohammadreza Bidar

Xiao Ling

J. Andrew Stables Jack Stephan Jacob Burr Jacob Gibson

Madison Lathem

Michaela Wallace

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Jacob Muckley

Monique Daignault

Jake Beachum

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Steven Lyszczarz Steven Moran Tamara Patterson

Trevor Drost Trevor Kearns Tyler Cunningham Tyler Defrain Veronica Morris Victoria Bujny

Ye Bin Yoon Zachary Smith Zak Fields Zuwei Li


Monday 4/22/13