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Treating with Thyroid after Pregnancy I was diagnosed at around age 6 with a goiter and hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto’s. When I was twenty I had a baby and ever since then I don’t seem to be able to get my thyroid ‘under control’. Does it seem that having a baby can literally make things worse for my condition? My son (my only child) will be ten this year. Over the past few years I have had trouble maintaining a constant TSH. Recently I quit my meds and my TSH shot up to 23. I started back on meds at .150 mg and went back to the doctor. I went down to .125 mg/Levoxyl and my TSH is within range (around 3) but I still have symptoms of hypothyroid. Does adding T3 really help some people with symptoms? When you have a baby, your body undergoes major changes. One of them is a significant reduction in autoimmunity. If you have chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis), you may stop producing as much blocking autoantibody and may not need as much or any thyroid for the duration of the pregnancy. (Similarly, people with hyperthyroidism may stop making stimulating antibodies, decreasing their hyperthyroidism in severity during the pregnancy.) Usually both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism come back like before once the pregnancy is over. If you were last pregnant ten years ago, the pregnancy probably isn’t playing a role in your current thyroid function. Antibody levels can rise and fall, and your disease may worsen, requiring more thyroid hormone, or improve, requiring less thyroid hormone, as your antibodies rise and fall. In addition, be careful of changing your type of thyroid from one brand to another; the brands may not be biologically equivalent. Your TSH and free T4 need to be tested six to eight weeks after starting a new brand. Try never to stop thyroid on your own without consulting your doctor. Thyroid takes weeks to build back up in your body, leaving you hypothyroid as it does. Additionally, as I mention in Chapter 5, a TSH of 3 may not mean you have normal thyroid function, even though a TSH of 3 is within the normal range. The severity of autoimmune thyroiditis can wax and wane, and different brands of thyroxine have different potencies, so stabilizing your thyroid function may be difficult.

Explaining Joint Problems I was wondering if you can tell me (and I have found little research on this) why thyroid troubles can result in tendon troubles and trigger fingers. (Author’s note: Trigger finger is a catching feeling in a finger due to obstruction of the free movement of the tendon that moves the finger) I have had a huge flare-up of deQuervains Tendinitis, and a few triggerfingers develop, and have found other women with the same problems (or

Thyroid for dummies  
Thyroid for dummies  
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