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Massage Matters A

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Therapy for Therapists Ethics & The Law Physical inactivity


President’s Message

R

egistered Massage Therapists (RMTs) in British Columbia

were surprised with the July 23, 2009 announcement from the Premier and Minister of Finance that we would have a Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) effective July 1, 2010. As if the Goods and Services Tax (GST) that RMTs are currently required to pay, wasn’t bad enough. The new tax

Massage Matters

would marry the 7% PST to the current 5% GST making the new HST a 12% tax on all applicable goods and services including

A Journal for Registered Massage Therapists

visits to an RMT. Further, once this legislation is implemented RMTs become the only primary health care providers regulated under BCs Health Professions Act required to charge the tax. The HST will increase the cost of treatment for our patients by approximately $6.00 per visit. HST may cause British Columbians to reduce the frequency with which patients seek treatment because it will use up their extended health benefits and out-of-pocket disposable income. The Federal Government’s rule for GST exemption requires that a sector must be regulated in five (5) provinces. Massage Therapy is only regulated in three provincial jurisdictions, British Columbia, Ontario and Newfoundland, making this rule discriminatory to our patients and our profession. While our profession strongly supports all initiatives to promote personal responsibility for healthcare and wellness we see this tax as a detriment to that stated goal by government. “This obliges us to adopt new effective strategies that at once improve the health of our citizens, improve health delivery and protect our public health system for the long term.” BC Government Throne Speech 2008. The Association has received unprecedented support from our members and their patients in opposition to the HST as it applies to RMTs. We are further buoyed to receive significant support from health advocacy groups and interested parties. Thank you also to the MLAs and MPs who have taken the time to understand and support our position. RMTs are in a unique position in British Columbia, as are our colleagues in Ontario, should this tax be applied to our profession. We trust that the governments will see the health care impact that this tax will have on British Columbians. We are requesting that the provincial government ask that RMTs be exempt from the HST taxation formula. Damon Marchand, President

Please direct your comments to dave@massagetherapy.bc.ca, subject heading “Letters,” where they will be forwarded to the MTABC Board for review. Editor in Chief David DeWitt Editor Lori Henry Publisher Paul Holden 604-608-5154 pholden@biv.com Sales Victoria Chapman 604-741-4189 vchapman@biv.com Design Soraya Romão Editorial Board Bodhi Haraldsson Anita Wilson Brenda Locke Linda Thorpe Dee Willock Damon Marchand Mission Statement This publication is intended to provide a voice to BC’s Registered Massage Therapists, a source for the latest research and a vehicle for the general population to understand and respect the valuable work of our RMTs. Massage Matters is published three times a year for Registered Massage Therapists. Funding is provided from the MTABC and advertising revenues. Massage Therapists’ Association – MTABC 180 - 1200 West 73rd Avenue Vancouver, British Columbia V6P 6G5 Tel: 604-873-4467 Fax: 604-873-6211 Toll Free: 1-888-413-4467 Email: mta@massagetherapy.bc.ca www.massagetherapy.bc.ca

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contents in every issue: Self-care Reports

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Issues

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Law

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Injuries Classified

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Therapy for Therapists – The Importance of RMT Self-Care by karilyn kempton

Surveys of Musculoskeletal injuries amongst Canadian Massage Therapists 4

Physical inactivity: the biggest public health problem of the 21st century by steven n blair

by wayne j. albert, nadine curriejackson, carolyn a. duncan 10

Ethics & The Law by robert w. evans

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Cover photo credit: Katie Gravestock

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Self-Care

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Therapy for therapists – the importance of RMT self-care by Karilyn Kempton

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Self-care is an often-overlooked aspect of massage therapy, but why? Therapists may not like admitting that their bodies and minds are fallible, but physical and mental self-care is crucial to a sustained career as a Registered Massage Therapist. From yoga to selfmassage to sessions at the gym, every RMT has their own method for keeping calm and strong before, during and after time spent with patients. Massage therapists often suffer from repetitive strain problems in the forearms, shoulders, spine and hamstrings, and can experience problems with stress and anxiety because of the nature of the profession. Massage Matters spoke with several massage therapists across the province with varying opinions, motivations and techniques about what they do to stay as stress-free and healthy as they can in order to maintain a long and satisfying career in massage therapy. Peachland RMT Jennifer McGeorge notes that keeping a sustained, anxiety-free career as a massage therapist “can be a challenge because you tend to take on the stress of patients when you work with them,” she says. McGeorge’s message is fairly straightforward:“You have to do everything you feel that you can do for that person at the time through the treatment, and then release it and let it go,” she insists, admitting that it can be a challenge, since “we can be a sounding board for multiple people and multiple problems.” A method McGeorge uses at work is to simply see fewer patients. In order to get some time to decompress

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between massages, McGeorge refuses to see clients back to back.“I’ve worked in clinics where they’ve had people booked one after the other,” she says, but now she makes sure to book at least half an hour between patients. While she spends some of that time off on paperwork and bedding changes, she also makes sure to take a few minutes to herself:“Clear yourself in between patients,” says McGeorge. Her clinic is attached to her home, so she is able to take time between patients to water her plants or play with her dogs. McGeorge has been practicing massage for eight years, but wants to continue for many more.“It’s a full-body job,” she notes,“so it needs full-body maintenance.” She keeps healthy and pain-free with self-massage, yoga, stretching, frequent hot tub and sauna sessions, and paraffin wax treatments. McGeorge makes sure to massage her forearms and elbows frequently, and uses her elbows to massage her feet regularly. She works on her calves while sitting down and also does abdominal and neck self-massage. She often trades massages with other RMTs, which has the added benefit of helping her get to know other therapists and get new ideas for her own practice. McGeorge is in the unique position of being both an RMT and a yoga instructor, so it is no surprise that yoga factors heavily into both her own self-care regimen and also what she recommends to her patients. She teaches yoga between two and four times per week:“That’s a nice way of breaking things up between always doing Continued on page 6


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Self-Care

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massage therapy,” she says, adding that “it’s a way to spend a little bit more time with people.” She often encourages her patients to come to her classes, laughing that “[i]f you’re going to teach one person to stretch for a position, you may as well teach a few people that stretch.” McGeorge has made some other conscious lifestyle decisions to relax and stay healthy. She hikes every morning in the hills near her home for anywhere between one and three hours, calling it “cleansing for your body, your liver, your blood and your mind.” McGeorge has also been television-free for years:“At first it was difficult,” she laughs,“but now we don’t know how we ever had time for it.” She also avoids eating all meats and processed foods, because “[i]f you’re living a healthy life, it does help you with your stress as well- it’s far reaching.” She notes that a long career requires more than just a healthy body and she keeps boredom at bay by taking courses regularly. McGeorge admits that staying focused can be a challenge.“Sometimes if you’re seeing multiple people per day and you may see the same kind of condition, it can be difficult to keep that individual focus,” she notes. What McGeorge does to stay mentally focused is “realize that each person is different, and respond to those differences.” Her enthusiasm also helps her stay focused on each patient:“I’m excited to make a difference in people’s lives- that’s motivating to me.” McGeorge also takes on massage students from the Okanagan Valley College of Massage Therapy, claiming “it makes you more aware of how you are as a therapist.”

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Her final words of advice? “Surround yourself with good friends and people,” laughs McGeorge.“Take time to enjoy life and get away from work. Have fun with your friends and try to stay peaceful. If you get stressed out and unhealthy in your own life, I don’t think you’re going to be a very good example for people looking for a professional to get advice from.” Ben Kobayashi’s advice to both massage therapists and clients is simple:“Try to stay positive.”The Vancouver/Burnaby-based RMT makes it sound easy. He admits that the business side of being an RMT can add some stress to his life, but he manages it by “[t]aking it day by day... looking at the bigger picture. Month to month and year to year.” He advises therapists to “[t] ake the slow times when they’re slow and enjoy them, because busy times are going to be coming.” Kobayashi maintains a regular massage exchange with a colleague and includes chiropractic care and acupuncture in his regular regimen “to keep me from breaking down,” he laughs. What he has massaged varies from session to session, cycling from lower body to back and gluteus muscles to pecs, arms and abdominals. Unlike McGeorge, Kobayashi does not practice much self-massage, preferring to get treatment from other therapists instead:“[Self-massage] helps a bit,” he notes,“but it’s always better getting it than trying to do it yourself.” Kobayashi has spent the last year whipping himself into shape at the gym with a personal trainer because he admits that “I was getting tired at work and my back was getting sore.” He has been working on strengthening his back, rotator cuffs and stabilizer muscles, and says that “it helps for work but it also helps for my general health as well.” He does not work with heavy weights, but rather focuses on proper form and technique to ensure steady progress with a minimum of irritation. Kobayashi says that working with a personal trainer has added even more credibility to the self-care advice that he gives patients.“This is what I’m doing and I find it beneficial,” he tells clients. Even though he doesn’t recommend personal trainers for all of his clients, his message is consistent:“Focus on your health,” he says, because “nobody is getting younger!” Like all RMTs, he is a proponent of self-care, because “the more work you do on your own, the better off you will be.” As far as keeping positive during and after giving massages, Kobayashi tries to draw a line between his patients and his life.“I try not to take anything home Continued on page 8


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Self-Care

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with me from work,” he says, adding that “[w]hen people talk to me about their stresses and tensions, I try to empathize with them but I don’t really want to take on their stress or their tension.” He finds that his attitude often rubs off on clients:“I try to stay positive while I’m at work, and I keep [patients] positive too,” he says. The most important part is simply to keep “listening to their bodies, and listening to your hands and what they’re telling you.” This positive work attitude has helped Kobayashi keep his career fairly anxiety-free.“Life gets me more stressed than work does,” he admits. How does he deal with his life stress? “By going to work,” he laughs.“I’ve worked in other professions where I’ve been high stress, high anxiety,” he says, but notes with relief that he finds working as a massage therapist quite calming.“You’re helping people,” he says.“They’re not angry when they come to you- they’re happy that they are there to get better.” RMT Lalita Kuehn is a self-care advocate, but she is quick to note that she’s not unrealistic in her expectations. The Port Moody-based therapist continually recommends self-care to her patients, but often in small doses:“I like to plant the seed by starting with just one small exercise or one small stretch that might make a difference,” says Kuehn. Self-care, says Kuehn, just “helps each person achieve their most optimum heath,” no matter what optimum may be. She certainly lives by her own self-care mantra:“I think exercise is one of the key ways to decrease stress,” she says. Kuehn uses Bikram yoga, self-massage, chiropractic treatments and step aerobics to keep her back and body strong and healthy, but she feels that “if you can incidentally work physical activity into your life, that is a stress reliever too.” She says budgeting time to go to the gym can actually increase stress for some, so she suggests simple activities like gardening, walking and playing with your children or pets. Like Jennifer McGeorge, Kuehn is a big fan of yoga. She says that starting Bikram yoga a year ago has made a difference in her day-to-day pain management, as she used to suffer from low back pain after work.“I feel strong and I don’t feel tired at the end of the day,” she smiles.“I feel energized.” As with most of the Registered Massage Therapists in this story, Kuehn self-massages regularly.“I’m almost always stretching or self-massaging... it drives my

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husband crazy because I don’t sit still,” she laughs. Kuehn’s main techniques are fascial release on her neck and shoulders and trigger point release on her hands and arms, and she finds that contrast arm baths make a huge difference when she is feeling fatigued.“I love massage therapy!” she exclaims. She admits that stress is a factor in her life, just as it is in the lives of most people. However, Kuehn’s first line of defense is having a sounding board:“For me I feel like friends and family just lend an ear that I can bounce ideas off, or just vent and they’ll just listen sympathetically,” she says.“And it reminds you that things aren’t quite so bad.” She also makes sure to reward herself with occasional treats. Kuehn stays mentally alert at work by trying to stay organized.“I try to set short-term, attainable goals that let you feel like you’ve accomplished something,” she says. Kuehn makes a list of daily goals, and “then it feels so gooad scratching things off that list as they go by.” While she’s massaging, she attempts to stay anxiety-free by trying to “let all the other things that are concerning me stay out of the room.” However, like Kobayashi she finds work itself fairly calming:“We’re fortunate in that we work in a job that’s so relaxing. Even if you’re rushing or hectic, once you get there the environment is calm and peaceful and it kind of brings you into that state of mind yourself,” she notes, adding that even the most anxious of patients leave a different person. Taking breaks is also very important to a long career in massage therapy, says Kuehn,“and I don’t just mean breaks in the day.” She makes sure to take breaks between patients, but also to take holidays (even brief ones) to rejuvenate her body and mind. Kuehn’s final recommendation is to not getting caught up in the minutiae:“When you look at the big picture,” she notes, “those little struggles are so insignificant.” What resonates is the notion that RMTs must take care of themselves first. Massage therapists can keep themselves strong, limber and relaxed by using the same techniques they use on patients. While most RMTs admit that stress can be a problem, trying to stay focused on the bigger picture helps many to stay grounded and positive. Regular exercise is absolutely critical to both body and mind, and while strategies varied, the message was clear: self-care is crucial to the health and wellness of both therapists and their patients. •


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Injuries

Surveys of musculoskeletal injuries amongst Canadian massage therapists by Wayne J. Albert, Nadine Currie-Jackson, Carolyn A. Duncan,

Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies (2008) 12, 86–93 Submitted by Bodhi Haraldsson, the Research Chair.

SUMMARY. A survey was administered to registered massage therapists (RMTs) across Canada to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and discomfort to the low back, shoulders, neck, wrists, and thumbs associated with therapeutic treatments. A total of 502 RMTs responded to the survey. Despite most of the respondents indicating they received proper training in therapy postures and self-care, there was a high prevalence of pain reported to all areas of the upper extremity. The highest reporting of pain and discomfort was reported in the wrist and thumb, followed by the low

back, neck and shoulders. There were no significant gender differences in pain/discomfort reporting except for the neck. The results of this survey indicate a high prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and discomfort associated with delivering massage therapy treatments. Therapists must focus on proper technique and posture, and adhere to a regime of self-care to reduce the risks of pain and injury. Further, research is needed to determine the effects of neuromuscular fatigue and technique accommodation as it relates to pain risk. •

E-mail : robert@massageessentials.ca

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Issues

by Steven N Blair Professor, Exercise Science, University of South Carolina MTABC would like to thank the British Journal of Sports Medicine, Steven N. Blair and Karim Khan for allowing us to reprint this article.

Physical inactivity: the biggest public health problem of the 21st century There is now overwhelming evidence that regular physical activity has important and wide-ranging health benefits. These range from reduced risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers to enhanced function and preservation of function with age. As a member of the geriatric set, I am personally delighted that there is strong emerging evidence that activity delays cognitive decline and is good for brain health, as well as having extensive benefits for the rest of the body. I believe that evidence supports the conclusion that physical inactivity is one of the most important public health problems of the 21st century, and may even be the most important. This is not to deny the relevance of other health issues: we certainly need to pay much more attention to healthful eating habits, smoking prevention and cessation programs, and state-of-theart and evidence-based preventative medical care. My overriding concern is that the crucial importance

photo: shutterstock.com

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of physical activity is undervalued and underappreciated by many individuals in public health and clinical medicine. Figure 1 presents data that has helped lead me to these conclusions about the importance of being active. As I suspect most of you are aware, the attributable fraction is an estimate of the number of deaths in a population that would have been avoided if a specific risk factor had been absent. That is, if all smokers were non-smokers or all inactive persons were getting 30 minutes of walking on at least five days of the week. The data in figure 1 is based on follow-up of a large population of women and men in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study (ACLS). Attributable fraction estimates depend on the strength of association between an exposure and an outcome, and also on the prevalence of that particular risk factor in the population. Figure 1 shows that low cardiorespiratory fitness accounts for about 16% of all deaths in both women and men in this population, and this is substantially more, with the exception of hypertension in men, than the other risk factors. I ask you to consider how often each of these risk factors is evaluated in a typical medical examination, and how often each risk factor is treated if found to be elevated. I have no data, but I wager that the typical physician is 10–50 times more likely to measure cholesterol, blood pressure and BMI than to measure fitness. Fitness was measured in the ACLS with a maximal exercise test on a treadmill, so this exposure is based on an objective, laboratory measurement. Of course such an exercise test may not be feasible in many clinical examinations, but physicians and other clinicians could at least take a physical activity history and put physical activity on the patient’s agenda. Another example of the importance of fitness is illustrated in figure 2. In this study we followed 2,316 men with documented type 2 diabetes for an average of 15.9 years, during which time 179 of them died of


Attributable fractions (%) for all-cause deaths in 40 842 (3,333 deaths) men and 12 943 (491 deaths) women in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. The attributable fractions are adjusted for age and each other item in the figure. *Cardiorespiratory fitness determined by a maximal exercise test on a treadmill.

Risk of cardiovascular disease mortality by cardiorespiratory fitness and body mass index categories, 2,316 men with type 2 diabetes at baseline, 179 deaths. Risk ratios are adjusted for age and examination year. Black bars = low cardiorespiratory fitness, white bars = moderate cardiorespiratory fitness (in the obese category, the white bar includes both moderate and high cardiorespiratory fitness, and the grey bar = high cardiorespiratory fitness). (Adapted from Church TS et al. Arch Int Med 2005;165:2114–20) b c

cardiovascular disease (CVD). The data in figure 2 clearly shows a strong inverse gradient for CVD death across fitness categories within each BMI category. Note that the obese men who were moderately/highly fit had less than half the risk of dying than the normal-weight men who were unfit. Every day tens of thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes attend a medical evaluation. How many of these patients have their height and weight measured and their BMI calculated, after which they are assigned to the normal weight, overweight or obese category? Conversely, how many of these patients have their cardiorespiratory fitness evaluated, or even have a careful and accurate physical activity history obtained? My guess is that if the physician mentions physical activity, it may be to say, “I think you should take up some exercise, it will help you lose weight”. This is the wrong message. Of course regular physical activity will help with weight management, but the activity will be very important to the patient’s health, whether or not they lose weight. As you can tell, I am passionate about the importance of regular physical activity for individuals’ and the public’s health, and think we must focus much more attention on this issue. Therefore I was delighted when Professor Khan invited me to help coordinate a special issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine to focus on the topic. He and I have worked over the past few months to recruit an outstanding group of scientists and clinicians to prepare special reports on various aspects of physical activity and health. I am grateful that many of the top people in exercise science from around the world agreed to help with this special issue and I am very pleased with the high-quality and informative reports that they have provided. • Competing interests: None. This article has been cited by other articles: • Khan, K M (2009). Mid-year review: physical inactivity universally accepted as the biggest public health problem of the 21st century, shoulder exam challenges, and progress against the scourges of anterior knee pain and ACL injuries. Br. J. Sports. Med. 43: 469-470 [Full Text] • Dvorak, J, McCrory, P, Aubry, M, Molloy, M, Engebretsen, L (2009). Concussion sans frontieres. Br. J. Sports. Med. 43: i1-i2 [Full Text] • Khan, K M, Scott, A (2009). Mechanotherapy: how physical therapists’ prescription of exercise promotes tissue repair. Br. J. Sports. Med. 43: 247252 [Abstract] [Full Text] • Khan, K. M (2009). Another major win for physiotherapy -- curing patellofemoral pain. Br. J. Sports. Med. 43: 157-158 [Full Text] •Khan, K. (2009). Limiting our daily sitting/lying to just 23.5 hours: too ambitious?. Br. J. Sports. Med. 43: 79-79 [Full Text] Reprinted with permission from the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Correspondence to: Professor Steven N Blair, Department of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/ Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, South Carolina, USA; sblair@gwm.sc.edu

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Law

Massage therapy – ethics & the law by Robert W. Evans (robert.we@gmail.com), of Hamilton Duncan Armstrong & Stewart Law Corporation

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The Law is a set of written rules that govern behaviour. Ethics, on the other hand, include unwritten rules that we follow to avoid life obstacles, such as causing harm to others. By following the law and a solid ethical code, we, in theory, benefit ourselves by more easily navigating complex relationships with others in order to achieve our goals. Lawyers and philosophers may spend eternity refining how to apply laws and ethics to real human behaviour, but an agreeable place to begin may be something I once heard a Buddhist monk recite, as his entire sermon, “Do good things, don’t do bad things. Thank you for coming, goodnight.” What laws and ethics apply to massage therapists? The College of Massage Therapists of British Columbia’s Code of Ethical Conduct (www.cmtbc. bc.ca) prescribes a list of rules that govern ethical conduct. Most of the written rules are prohibitive, for it is easier to state what not to do rather than what one should do. The areas covered in the Code include: • general duties to patients; • general duties to the public and the profession; • prohibition of sexual conduct; • prohibition of practicing while impaired; • prohibition against guaranteeing a cure; • mandating the reporting violations; • and how to deal with conflicts of interest. In the past, the provincial government took a passive role in discipline and other regulatory issues. Government is now increasing its oversight of the self-regulated professions. Recent changes to the Health Professions Act have created a Health

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Professions Review Board, which will have authority to review and alter decisions made by the Inquiry and Registration Committees of colleges. If, while working as a massage therapist, you are charged with an ethics violation, your best advice should be sought from legal counsel. General Ethical Rules Looking at the big picture, general rules are far easier to create and navigate than specific rules. For example, a rule that forbids buying a box of chocolate bars from Costco makes it far easier to resist eating too many chocolate bars than would buying the box and making a specific rule to only eat one bar per day. This is because the general rule required only one temptation while shopping, while the specific rule would entail numerous temptations each time one were to walk past the box at home. For this reason, we should set general rules for ourselves. The choice of whether or not to engage in unethical behaviour is best made before a situation arises. Replace the box of chocolates with an inappropriate relationship with a client, and the application of these general rules remains the same. Boundaries in the Massage Room Massage therapy is a private and intimate experience for a client. It is therefore essential that a client feels safe in selecting a massage therapist who will maintain proper ethical boundaries inside the massage room. A simple general rule is to discuss and limit the areas of the body to

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A Isolated Stretching ( A ctive3-Day Seminar

AIS)

ctive Isolated Stretching (AIS): the Mattes Method is a cutting edge method of stretching used by today’s massage therapists, personal trainers, athletic therapists and fitness professionals. Working with the body’s natural physiological makeup, this method of stretching improves circulation and increases fascial elasticity which helps eliminate physical pain and improve human performance. AIS is an outstanding modality for improving posture, eliminating abnormal curvatures such as scoliosis and kyphosis as well as restoring proper body alignment and helping eliminate physical pain. AIS plays a crucial role in the treatment of diseases or injuries such as Spinal Cord Injuries, MS, Sciatica, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Thoracic Outlet Syndrome, Neck and Back pain as well as Shoulder and Rotator Cuff conditions.

This 3 day course will empower you with stretching and myofascial protocols that will compliment your current techniques and strategies. Instructor: Paul John Elliott, LMT, Certified AIS Instructor, Advanced AIS Practitioner

With national level AIS instructor Paul John Elliott

Banff, AB – Delta Banff Royal Canadian Lodge Dates: Oct 30, 31, Nov 1st ❙ Time: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Calgary, AB and Edmonton, AB AIS seminars – Date and location TBA Please check www.stretchingcanada.com for further details

British Columbia AIS seminars – Date and location TBA Please check www.stretchingcanada.com for further details

Course Cost: $500.00

NHPC – 15 Continue Competency Credits MTAA – 24 Primary Continuing Education Credits CATA – 9.0 credits for 24 hour course

For registration information contact: Denise Williams (403) 679-9221 ❙ denise_massage42@yahoo.ca Visit: www.stretchingcanada.com to fill out registration form See website for details and dates and locations of other future seminars


Law grey areas does not mean that a universal right and wrong do not exist. This can be shown with an example of something that is wrong, regardless of popular opinion: It is ethically wrong to push a child in front of a train. Even if that child grows up to be the next genocidal dictator, no one pushing the child would have access to that future information, and as a general rule, pushing random children in front of trains will not prevent more genocidal dictators. This demonstrates a flaw in the belief that all morality is relative and that there is no such thing as right or wrong. Working with the belief that some actions are ethically right, while others are ethically wrong, a massage therapist can then set boundaries for his or her own practice. It is the therapist’s duty to reasonably create a safe environment in which to practice. Careful thought and attention to the general rules of one’s own ethical code will benefit one’s business and personal life by fostering positive interactions with other people. Positive improvement to people’s well-being is a noble goal of massage therapy. •

be massaged before physical contact takes place. This is the easiest time to deflect any sexual implications. If sexual implications come from a client after the massage has begun, you can refer back to your prior discussion and promptly end the treatment. Is There a Right and Wrong, or just Popular Opinion? Some people believe that ethics do not exist, only popular opinion; ethics are personal and ethical codes are nearly as numerous as individual people. This belief may lead some people to disregard thinking about ethical issues. However, the existence of

classified Fall 2009

Robert Hackwood RMT CRANIAL THERAPY TMJ VISUAL ASSESSMENT

Fusion Works "It's all my favourite techniques from over 25 years of practising Eastern and Western modalities.”

2010 Dates

www.dynamictherapies.com 604-418-8071 It’s more than a massage, It’s an experience!

Certified CertifiedCourses Courseswith with24 24CEUs: CEUs Fusion Works Fusion Works: October 23–25 Thai Massage I & II November Thai Massage on the 20–22 table ~ Salt Spring Island ~

Dr. Fränzi Ng

Vancouver ~ Victoria ~ Salt Spring Island

Renew Your Passion for Healing.

Kristie Straarup, RMT 1-866-537-1219

TFT - Thought Field Therapy: 14 CECs • Reiki Levels 1 & 2: 7 & 9 CECs Workshops in Vancouver, Prince George & across B.C.

www.academyofmassage.ca

250.964.0118 • www.DrNg.net 16

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CCO Fall 09_FP.indd 1

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classified Fall 2009

Advertisement only. No endorsement by the MTABC intended or implied.

Adam DreamHealer 5 CECs Intention Heals Workshop Vancouver, November 8th

14 CECs

Work Smarter not Harder ! Sharpen your Tools !

“Adam is becoming one of the world’s most in-demand healers.” - Rolling Stone Magazine EXPERIENCE SELF-EMPOWERMENT as Adam orchestrates 2 unique group healing sessions at this full day workshop.

Vernon, March 27th, 28th: Course: Cervical and Upper Thoracic Balancing

ADAM, Molecular Biologist, BSc.(Hon) international speaker, author, and gifted Native American energy healer teaches techniques to focus intentions, embracing your healing powers.

Victoria, May 1st, 2nd: Course: Thoracic and Lumbar Balancing

New West, Oct 16th and 17th: Course: Cervical and Upper Thoracic Balancing

Has presented with world renown speakers at: -Edgar Cayce’s ARE -“What the Bleep do We Know?” conferences -World Qigong - Recipient of Young Visionary Award -First Nations Healing Gatherings -Nominated for the Dr. Rogers prize for Excellence in Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

• 100% Money Back Guarantee • Save $100 for 30 day advanced registration Don’t miss out join Mike Dixon & Steve Anderson for a fun & educational weekend

Register online at: www.dreamhealer.com

Register online: arthrokinetic.com or by phone: 604.802.9322

Rainer’s Health Academy Expand your treatment possibilities: Body EnERgy TREATmEnT Part A: Introduction to the foundation of the energy in the human body & topography of the Meridians. 24 credits may 7-10, 2010 at the Hills & Health guest Ranch, 108 mile Ranch, BC HoT-STonE-mASSAgE course April 30, 2010, 9-4 in our house. 108 Mile Ranch, BC. 7 credits PHySIo-moTIon-TAPIng course may 1-2, 2010 in our house, 108 Mile Ranch, BC. 14 credits

Continuing EduCation on LinE 2 hours per course for 2 CEU’s Nov/Dec 2009 courses are discounted from $45 to $40 (incl. G.S.T.). Easy and efficient way to accrue your CEU’s. — no traveling, no time away from work. www.cepd.ca • call 1-866-733-9017 for details

For further info call: RAInER’S HEALTH HoUSE & ACAdEmy Phone: 250-791-5663 • www.apmcanada.com

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PROFITABLE SPA FOR SALE IN GREATER VANCOUVER, INSIDE LARGE FITNESS CLUB; PRICED BELOW MARKET @ $275,000. IDEAL FOR R.M.T. PURCHASE.

REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPISTS Are you looking for a great job & lifestyle? Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing is one of the finest heliski resorts in the world. MWHS is located in Blue River, BC and operates in the hospitality industry which caters to an elite and exclusive customer base. This is a seasonal position which begins Dec. 2009. Availability to work during our peak weeks is also beneficial as our demand spikes between Jan. and Mar. Requirements: • Registered Massage therapist (or working toward) • Polished presentation and high level of grooming • Energetic and personable • Experience evaluating and adjusting treatments • Must be able to work in a team environment • Able to complete administrative tasks • Available to lead stretch classes

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CALL GRANT @

1-800-700-0852

Apply online www.wiegele.com, through email to jobs@wiegele.com, or by fax to 250-673-8464 18

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Touch for healTh with Janice Golub Levels 1-4 – 14 CECs for each level Level 1 – in Vancouver November 1 & 8, 2009 - March 27 & 28, 2010 To register: jgolub@telus.net 604-220-1992

Ann Sleeper

is offering private courses for 2-5 people in her home in central Vancouver. Review sessions are also available to improve your techniques. In these small groups, you can take any of the muscle energy or osteopathic technique courses listed in this journal or at www. massagetherapy.bc.ca/sleeper/

Dr. VODDEr MLD COUrSES Basic, Therapy I, Therapy II & III October / November 2009 April / May 2010 WWW.VODDErSCHOOL.COM TEL: 1-800-522-9862


classified Fall 2009

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AdvAnced Sport MASSAge

ANATOMY & YOGASANA, 12 CEC’s Maui, HI, February 11, 12, 13 Travel, relax and earn credit while studying the anatomy of the yoga body; apply what you learn in your massage therapy or yoga practice. A&Y I: The foundation up, from standing poses to inversions. $250 advance $300 after December 15th

his course is presented by the Canadian Sport Massage Therapists Association (CSMTA) and is ideal for Massage Therapists who would like to improve their knowledge and skills of working with athletes in any environment. It will provide participants with Sport Massage theory and practical techniques that can be utilized at sporting events, with athletic teams, or in their own clinic setting. The knowledge and practical experience that participants will gain would be of great benefit for anyone working with athletes at any level. January 16 & 17, 2010 • Victoria, BC For information or to register please contact: Kim Mark-Goldsworthy • LifeMark Sport Medicine @ PISE 204-4371 Interurban Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2C5 Phone: 250-479-9970 • Fax: 250-479-5502 • Email: kmg.rmt@telus.net RMT (Payment before January 1, 2010) $375 RMT (Payment after January 1, 2010) $400

YOGA SELF-CARE FOR RMT’s 6 CEC’s Tofino BC Retreat, June 18, 19, 20 Includes yoga, two nights, four delicious meals, guided nature walk. $550 advance $600 after May 1st. Take time to take care of yourself

SyStemic Deep tiSSue therapy®

Leigh A. Milne, RMT, RYT is an Iyengar certified yoga instructor. For course fees, instructor details and registration form visit: www.thesadhanacentre.com leigh@thesadhanacentre.com Leigh 902-273-YOGA

(alSo known aS SDtt) workShopS

Originated and developed by Armand Ayaltin DNM, RHP, RMT, and taught by him since the late 1980s. It consists of its own scientifically-based philosophy, therapist-friendly assessment and treatment, with ergonomically designed body and hand postures. Therapy takes its cue directly from the assessment. This innovative procedure is designed to minimize the mental and physical stress of the Tx room. Teaching focuses on the mapping out of the musculo-skeletal compensatory “grid”or “matrix”, of the body. This matrix is a factor and often the underlying “cause” of symptoms. Treatment focuses on collapsing the compromised musculo-skeletal matrix to return it as much to its“unconditioned” state as the body will allow, giving at times quick and long lasting results. Introductory Courses for 2010: March 6-7, 2010; September 18-19, 2010 Intermediate Courses for 2010: May 1-2, 2010; October 23-24 , 2010 CEC points: 14 per weekend. (All classes are assisted by a team of dynamic instructors trained by Armand Ayaltin.) Cost: $399 per course. To register please send $200. Monthly Mentorship programme available. CEC 3. $70 per session. Testimonials:

“Excellent course...” J.W. RMT. “Thank you so much for this amazing workshop. It will change my life!” W.M. RMT. “This course surpassed my expectations...” B.C. RMT “Thank goodness there is a way to read the body and respond to its core needs.” J.W. RMT. “Great coverage of biomechanics and application. I like these instructors, cool guys” J.L. RMT. “The assessment is clear, taking out the guesswork from it. It allows me to set a definite treatment plan...” H.B. RMT.

334, E. 22nd Street, North Vancouver, B.C. V7L 3C7

604 984 2611

Exploring the depths and the roots of the Manipulative Therapies

systemicdeeptissuetherapycenter.com

MALE OR FEMALE RMT NEEDED FOR VERY BUSY PRIVATE FITNESS CLUB WHERE WALK IN TRAFFIC HELPS YOU BUILD A SOLID CLIENT BASE. PLEASE SEND US A RESUME/CALL US FOR AN INTERVIEW TO DISCUSS YOUR TOP INCOME OPPORTUNITIES. e-FWdayspa@telus.net H.O.Tel: 604-986-0809 The Spa & Wellness Studio @ Fitness World 1989 Marine Drive, North Vancouver BC

www.fwdayspa.ca

ExcEllEnt opportunity

for a Massage Therapist to practice in Maple Ridge. New building dedicated for Healthcare businesses only in downtown Maple Ridge. Please contact Dr. Lotay at lotayoms@gmail.com for further details.

“SHAKE”

ONE DAY WORKSHOP with Patricia Pucher 604-879-1935 • SPIRITUUS.COM “...arrives at the core of injury through sound and movement.” Leslie Smith RMT

Stone therapy School Level 1-Massage with Hot and Cold Stones 14 CEUs Nanaimo - Nov 6-8, 2009 Vancouver - Jan 16-18, 2010 Contact Lisa Edwards: 250.896.7939 www.stonetherapyschool.com

SHIATSU TRAINING 24 CEC credits Zen Shiatsu School Harrison Hot Springs Toll Free: 1-866-796-8582 haroldsiebert@yahoo.com

MASSAGE TABLE FOR SALE:

UniCare table 28”x 72” Premiere model Weighs ~ 35lbs. Adjustable legs, Teal color, 3” foam. Removable tilt headrest. Comes with Earthlite AV30 travel bag. Paid $810.00 asking $450.00. In excellent shape. Call Jennifer @ 604 574 7918

Massage Matters If you have a product, service or course to advertise

call Victoria

Chapman at: 1-604-741-4189

vchapman@biv.com

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MTABC CEC Courses 2009 Registration at MTABC 604.873.4467 or mta@massagetherapy.bc.ca Or mail to MTABC 180-1200 West 73rd Ave, Vancouver, BC V6P 6G5. Provide name, phone and email. Cancellation 3 weeks before course, results in a 20% fine. Within 3 weeks, 40%; with 5 days or “no shows,” no refund. Intro to Anatomy Trains Manual Therapy Level 1 with Mark Finch. 14 Credits Vancouver – Nov 21-22, 2009 and January 30-31, 2010 MTA One Month Early $275, Regular $300 Non-MTA One Month Early $370, Regular $410 Fascia, Its Structure and Function– The Pelvic Girdle with Mark Finch. 14 Credits Vancouver – May 1-2, 2010 MTA One Month Early $275, Regular $300 Non-MTA One Month Early $370, Regular $410 End-Range Loading – A New Evidence Based Idea in Manual Therapy. 12 Credits With Dr. David DeCamillis, D.C. New Westminster – April 24-25, 2010 Sat., 10:00–4:30 and Sunday, 9:00–3:30 MTA One Month Early $275, Regular $300 Non-MTA One Month Early $370, Regular $410 Ann Sleeper’s Courses: 20% repeater discount for Ann’s courses. See Ann’s web page, www.annsleeper.com/ Introduction to Osteopathic Techniques, Part One. 12 Credits Victoria – WCCMT, Sat and Sun, Oct 24-25, 2009; 10am-5pm Vancouver – Holiday Inn, Sat and Sun, Feb 6-7 2010; 10am-5pm Introduction to Osteopathic Techniques, Part Two. 12 Credits Vancouver – Holiday Inn, Sat and Sun, March 20-21, 2010; 10am-5pm Vernon – OVCMT, Sat and Sun, May 1-2, 2010; 10am-5pm Victoria – MTA One Month Early $280, Regular $310. Non-MTA One Month Early $375, Regular $415 Vancouver – MTA One Month Early $245, Regular $270. Non-MTA One Month Early $330, Regular $365 Vernon – MTA One Month Early $280, Regular $310. Non-MTA One Month Early $375, Regular $415 Muscle Energy Technique for the Ribs. 18 Credits Vancouver – Holiday Inn, Sat and Sun, Nov 14-15, 2009; 9am–5pm and Mon, Nov 16, 2009; 9am–1pm. MTA One Month Early $365, Regular $400 Non-MTA One Month Early $490, Regular $540 Muscle Energy Technique for the Low Back, Part One –Lumbar / Ilia. 14 Credits Vancouver – Holiday Inn, Sat and Sun, Nov 28-29, 2009; 9am–5pm MTA One Month Early $285, Regular $315 Non-MTA One Month Early $385, Regular $425 Muscle Energy Technique for the Neck and Upper Thoracic. 17 Credits Vancouver – Holiday Inn, Sat and Sun, March 6-7, 2010; 9am–5pm and Mon, March 8, 2010; 9am–Noon MTA One Month Early $345, Regular $380 Non MTA One Month Early $465, Regular $510 Muscle Energy Technique for the Low Back, Part Two – The Sacrum.14 Credits Vancouver – Holiday Inn, Sat and Sun, April 17-18, 2010; 9am–5pm MTA One Month Early $285, Regular $315 Non-MTA One Month Early $385, Regular $425

Massage Therapists’ Association of British Columbia

For more course details, see MTABC web site www.massagetherapy.bc.c and the MTABC www.massagetherapy.bc.ca newsletter “Massage is the Message”

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Not a job, a Career. Develop your skills… Monthly in-house seminars help keep my clinical skills current, and it’s a fun way to learn and work as a Team. Vincent Lam, RMT Have a busy clinical practice… I don’t think I’ve ever given a relaxation massage since I’ve started at Legacies – and I love it! We have a close relationship with the medical community, and almost all our patients have softtissue injury. Sonya Trevisi, RMT Work with the best in Sports… To work with the PGA, BC Lions, and the Vancouver Whitecaps has not only boosted my confidence as a therapist, but has lead to opportunities with Teams that have taken me around the World – my last stop of which was the Beijing Summer Olympics! Erin Maxymchuck, RMT Be the Therapist… I love coming to work and not having to worry about collecting money, computer billing, pulling files, or even laundry! At Legacies, I focus on my patients and completing my charts – and that allows me to be a better therapist. Elli Klaus, RMT

Full-time RMT Positions Available This is not your average clinic! Our reputation in the community has made us highly sought after, and it is time for us to grow our Team. Our success is tied to a strong and simple message: We get our patients better. Almost 200 new patients per month are referred to our clinic, and we have excelled during the recent global recession. We work with the best in Sports, and our patients are proud to ““go where the Pro’s go!”. Led by our Clinic Director, Matt Furlot, our Management Team will work with you to help build a successful clinical practice and provide you with exceptional career opportunities. Most importantly, you will become part of a Team of likeminded professionals. Monthly skill-training seminars, a mentorship program, and many perks such as Bookkeeping, Direct Deposit, and a Health and Dental Plan are just a few of our standard services provided. You don’t need to be the “most skilled” therapist to apply; and in fact we welcome new grads to call for aan interview. Skills can be learned. We’re searching for the right attitude. If you strive for success professionally, financially, and have a strong desire to work in a Team environment, do not miss this exceptional opportunity! Please call to arrange an interview:

604-614-2936

* Legacies Sports Massage is located in a large medical district on the border of North Delta and Surrey.


Massage Matters, Fall 2009