Page 1


Memories of

Greenwood School /

aL

1921-1984


E',______..____________________________________llh,

Cop� right © J 98-a by Meeks Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this work in any form whatsoever without permission in writing from the publisher, except for brief passages in connection with a review. For information write: Meeks Enterprises, Inc., P.O. Box 39, Crozet, Vir�inia 22932. ( 'nwr dt>o;ign by Robert j. Kirchman.

We dedicate 1 Colonel Will profound ins crossroad in


0'

We dedicate this "Memories of Greenwood School" to a FRIEND and LEADER, Colonel William R. Washington, whose keen interest, unselfish devotion, and profound insight served as an inspiration to the school and community at every crossroad in the struggle to keep Greenwood Elementary School open.


Ackno� In preparing in

having

recognized

Contents ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

7

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

A HISTORY LESSON

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

local

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

8

has also

Betty G. have

in

greatly enhanced 1 It

. FORWARD

the

Clayton,

been

compil•

identifying pictuJ I am gratefu

10

designing the cov•

1920's

21

1930's

44

I

encouraged who

1940'S

AND

1960'S

AND

1950'S

70

1970'S

102

am

please, by

attended

the or

transcribed his

t �

I appreciate

1983-84 Greenwood

1980's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 ADDENDA

132

Finally,

I

a

submitted their P' Since

its

b1

source of pride � this book will se


Acknowledgements In preparing Memories of Greenwood for publication, in

having

recognized

the

invaluable

local

help

historian.

of

Steven

His

G.

technical

Meeks,

I have been fortunate

a

assistance

Crozet and

resident

suggestions

and have

greatly enhanced the final product. It has also

been

Betty G. Clayton, have

been

my privilege

to

Jo Anne Cheatham,

compiled

without

their

work with three

excellent secretaries: This book could

and Mary Ann Tomlin. countless

hours

of

typing,

revising,

not and

identifying pictures. I

am gratefu]

to Robert

J. Kirchman for donating his time and talents in

designing the cover for this book. I

am

pleased

encouraged by

that

Benjamin

the project to

who attended or taught at

Sojka,

a

fourth

independently

Greenwood

grader

interview

School.

nt

Greenwood,

was

several notable persons

His mother,

Mrs. Eleanor

Sojka,

transcribed his interview tapes into type-written form. I appreciate the encouragement,

inspiration,

and generous support of the

1983-84 Greenwood School P.T.O., faculty, and staff. Finally,

I

am

deeply

indebted

to

all

the contributors ,.;rho so

graciously

submitted their personal memories for this book. Since

its

beginning,

Greenwood

School

source of pride and loyalty to its students,

has

been

staff,

a

community

and community.

effort

and

Hopefully,

this book will serve as a lasting memorial to this great schcol.

Joyce A. Wright Principal

7


"Look,

the

her hair pile

ďż˝

youn:

neatl)

don't we know them?

Fore ward

How well-kept tl as a gray-haired man The bree?.e.

flag,

beari

A community

DOWN MEMORY LANE Sit with me

on

By nothing of rushing, Betty Garwood Clayton to l0ve,

smell

The fly

in

of

dance-like

peach

and

rhythm

apple blossoms

from

one

blossom

fill

the

early

to another.

In

spring the

air.

Bees

distance,

the

sound of the spray wagon can be heard coming up the gravel road. The ladies are busy in their yards,

admiring the colorful array of spring

flowers that are blooming forth in testimony of the resurrection of life after the death of winter. Down

the

road

the

sounds

of

the

blacksmith's

sheds the finest horses from miles around. garage and a minor problem

anvil

can

be

heard

as

he

An old Model T pulls into the busy

is quickly fixed by one who has done

this so many

times before. An often

elderly

to

get

a

black

man

glimpse

of

sits

on

the

Country

what

is

hA.ppening

in

Store the

He

porch. community.

there would be a Donkey ballgame on the school playground on

sits "Did

Sunday?

there he

say

My!

how

people love to flock around and watch the excitement!" The outside on

sound to

sturdy,

of

play on

the

school

the wooden

hand-made

swings.

others play marbles nearby.

8

bell

can

be

heard

and

students

come

orderly

merry-go-round and swing away to tree-top land The

children

skip

rope

to

happy

jingles

while

Others walk around and talk with one another.

and to reme1


"Look,

the

young

girl· in

the

pretty

her hair piled neatly on top of her head, don't we know them?

Gibson

Girl

blouse

-

the

girl with

and the boy with the blue knickers -

Haven't they been sweethearts for years?"

How well-kept the school lawn is!

The click of a push mower can be heard

as a gray-haired man trims the grass under the blooming dogwood trees. The bree7.e.

flag,

bearing

forty-eight

stars,

waves

gently

in

on

the

front steps of the well-kept school building.

nothing of rushing, and there is plenty of time to pause,

•ring

air.

spring

to speak,

l•!e know

to listen,

and to rememher------

Bees

distance,

te

lovely

A community is at peace and all is well.

Sit with me

to love,

the

the

d.

d

'"\¥; 0 .1

i

'

array of spring on of life after

be

heard

as

he

ls into the husy me

this so many

He :y.

sits "Did

Sunday?

. ts

come

there he

say

My!

how

Sonya Crawford, Latanya Carr, Felicia Fisher, Ruth Judge- teacher, and Dana Carr. April, 1980 .

orderly

to tree-top land ?Y

jingles

while

one another.

9


A History Lesson The name Greenwood was given to a portion of the property owned by Issac Hardin (1736-1820).

Part of the tract of land was later owned by Mr. Thomas

C. Bowen, who gave j_t for use by the railroad.

Sometime in the late 1850's,

near the tunnel built by Colonel Claudius Crozet for the Blue Ridge Railroad (now C

&

0), a railroad station and a post office were established.

Although

widely scattered, the people who get their mail at this post office consider themselves

members

of

the

Greenwood

Co��unity.

The

various

schools

established there over a period of time took the name of this community. In 1889, the year that free public schools were developing nationwide, a few enterprising citizens of the Greenwood community united in establishing a free public school for the Greenwood section.

The only available space at

that time was one room in a small log house located on the property now owned by the H. H. Tiffany estate. The following year,

in 1890,

the school was moved to a more desirable

building on Stony Run near the Beagle's Gap Road.

The school averaged about

five pupils per day, but was finally closed for lack of pupils. In 1903, the school was reopened in a building on the present site� with a Miss Carter serving as the teacher.

In 1907 another member was added to the

faculty and taught in a small building nearby.

In 1908 a larger two-story

Bruce S

frame building was constructed and again the faculty was increased by one. This building had a pot-bellied stove and a water cooler where students got All the ab•

water in paper cups made from waste paper. 10

There were no indoor facilities.


� �-

r�-

owned

by

:i by Mr. he

late

Ridge

Issac Thomas

1850's. Railroad

.shed.

Although

office

consider

arious

schools

�-

' ' t ,,

�.;...-�,-�.;i,;.;._..._... _...,.,..�.-.--:...,.,.,:,..)._,<;,;>.,·:·N"""'.'�·;·

dz;;;..:.".;.;.;,,->.;,.-

:ommunity. g nationwide,

a

establishing a Llable

space

at

•perty now owned

more

de sirable

averaged

!Sent

about

site,

with

�as added to the . arger

two-story

creased re

by

students

Bruce Store and house at Greenwood Depot, locat ed at top of Greenwood hill .

one. got

Jr facilities.

All the above photos were submitted by James L. Woodson and E. 0 . .Woodson, Jr.

11


During Mrs.

the

Beverly Munf

lunch program,

pr

to Charlottesvill activities

bu

to

better place for

The Greenwoo many

competent

Boswell, M.L.

Mrs. Reďż˝

McCue. A

Mrs.

coinmittee

Ella Smith,

operated This view, taken around 1910, shows the old frame Greenwood High School that was built in 1908 facing Jarman Gap Road. Behind the school, in what is now the playing field for the school is an apple orchard. The

house to the right of the school, still stands beside the County Store. school.

P'

from

ar

Critzer serving

Horses and buggies are in front of the

When the present building was built in 1921/

1922 this school was dismantled.

a Model T truck

c

By 1918-1911 with four of tho: lost.

The ambit

the high school this plan was Hr the

school

year

accredited statu Batesville students,

schoo the sc

the school to be In Greenwood High School

1908-1921 All the above photos were submitted by James L. Woodson and E. 0. Woodson, Jr.

12

1919-20,

Chesterfield

Cr

accredited high


---

During Mrs.

the

19001 s,

early

Greenwood

Community

to

organized

by

The League began a school

provided school health inspections,

took stu�ents on the train

to Charlottesville to correct health problems, activities

League,

did much to help the school.

Beverly Munford,

lunch program,

the

buy

equipment,

materials,

and

and sponsored many fund-rais:i.ng

other

things

that

made

school

a

better place for children. The Greenwood many

competent

Boswell, M.L.

Mrs.

public-spirited

fnrtunate in having the leadership of

persons.

Reginald Brooks,

Mrs.

Guy

The

charter members were:

Corbett,

Miss Dorothy

Mrs. H.R.

Earp,

and Hrs.

McCue. A

Mrs.

committee

Ella Smith,

operated

, still stands beside the :gies are in front of the [Jing was built in 1921/

Community League was

from

of

the

Greenwood Community

League,

under

the

leadership of

raised money to rent Hr. Allie Critzer's canvas-covered wagon

around

1911

to

Critzer serving as drivers.

1918 with J.D. In

Humphries,

vJine,

S.W.

and

Allie

1918, the first motorized school bus used was

a Model T truck converted into a bus-like body,

driven by Allie Critzer.

l.

By 1918-1919,

enrollment at Greenwood School

with four of those in the senior class, lost.

had climbed to 125 pupils,

whose names,

The ambition of the community was to

unfortunately,

. change the unaccredited status of

the high school to that of a four-year accredited high school. this plan was Nrs. H.G. the

school

year

as

Coville,

who had

Presiding over

just been hired at the beginning of

Greenwood 1 s first principal.

She

accredited status by attracting students from Midway, Batesville schools to complete their education at students,

have been

helped

Greem.,ood

Edgewood,

Greenwood.

obtain

Hillsboro,

and

Thus by adding

the school was able to meet state enrollment requirements which led

the school to being accredited by 1920. In

1919-20,

Chesterfield

odson, Jr.

five

Critzer,

students: and

Hattie

Linwood

Pugh,

Rogers

Clotilde

were

Rodes,

graduated

Gladys from

Yancey,

the

fully

accredited high school.

13


The rocl the pres.

Convict labor crushes rock for pavement of Jarman Gap Road. Building to left background is the Country Store; center building was the Blacksmith Shop; the house is the Woodson house (last lived in by Tobe Moyer). Note that the photo was taken before the construction of Greenwood School which would have been in center background.

All the 14


The rock crushing equipment was located where the present Greenwood Post Office is located.

tckground �Woodson

nstruction Excavation Steam Shovel worthy of print even though exact location is uncertain.

(Greenwood­

.Jarman Gap area.) All the above photos were submitted by James L. Woodson and E. 0. Woodson, Jr.

15


of

oJ

1920-21 consi.s ted of only three members - Meta Ellinger, Alfry Critzer, and

1~

Although

Edward Pugh.

the

student

population was

rapidly

increasing,

the

class

This has reigned the smallest class at Greenwood since 1918.

Due to the increase in size of lower grade levels, five students - grades

tl

four and five, went to school in a barn loft owned by George Gill, with Mary

Fe

Lee Carmichael as

pl

teacher.

Reportedly it was a spacious classroom but had

1~

very horsey odors. In order to accommodate the growing enrollment, the conununity 路 set out to build a new and adequate school building.

tl

Six thousand dollars was raised by

public subscription with an equal amount added by Mrs. Ronald Tree.

Randolph

HE

Ortman, o"f Blue Ridge Farm, gave outright twenty-one thousand dollars and an

We

interest

free

loan

of

twent y -four

thousand

dollars

towards

the

school's

construction.

St:

At first the land was purchased from Armistead Shirley further down the road from where the school now stands.

A trade was made with H.R. Boswell for

four acres adjoining the original two acre site. 1921 with C. Purcell McCue, Sr. presiding.

The cornerstone was laid in

older

completion adjac ent

of

3C

it,

two-story its

frame

replacement .

remained

su

In 1922 the first class graduated

from the new building. The

an

in use

as

referred to as "Little Greenwood."

building However, a

was

dismantled

the

earlier

primary school

after

In

building

rna

and was

au

reportedly one-story

for many years

It was finally razed in the mid 1960's.

re

Mrs. Coville remained at Greenwood until 1924, at which time she accepted a

position

Virginia.

Staunton,

th

Her status as the school's only female principal was shattered in

un

at

the

Virginia

School

for

the

Deaf

and

Blind

in

February, 1984 with the arri.ral of Mrs. Joyce A. Wright. school year before

we

accepting the position of Albemarle County School Superintendent in 1925, an

he

Archie F.

16

Robertson

resigned as

principal for

one


office which he also held for one year. 1925.

~n

He was

George F. Dunn . followed Robertson in

turn followed by R. Claude Graham in 1928.

Throughout this period and especially under Graham, Greenwood won many of the county athletic championships conducted among the county high s .c hools. For

the

younger members

of

the

school

primarily through a community effort.

the

playground was

much

improved

The present equipment was acquired in

1961 through the kindness of Hrs. Gordon Smith and Mr. Ashby Fox, trustees of the Ortman Fund from which came the money for the equipment. In the early 1930's the entire Greenwood school ground was graded and its use increased by two-thirds through work done by the first of the Federal Works Programs. Graham

became

county

school

superintendent

in

1935.

Paul

H.

Cale

succeeded him both as principal and later, in 194 7, as superintendent.

In

1969, Leslie H. Walton, a former teacher at Greenwood became superintendent and

likewise,

Clarence

s.

McClure,

a

former

Greenwood

teacher,

became

superintendent after Walton in 1970. There had been a steady increase in the pupils at Greenwood.

By the mid

30's enrollment had reached over 300, and by 1947 enrollment was 402 students. In 1938, the second floor auditorium was divided into made

for

an

addition

and

on

October

auditorium/gymnasium and two classrooms.

20,

1938

t~vo

rooms.

work

Plans were

commenced

on

an

As in the past, the Community League

remained a steadfast partner in added improvements for the school. The year 1953 marked the end of Greenwood High School.

In the fall of

that year, all county high schools, with the exception of Scottsville, were united under one roof at Albemarle High School. Greenwood's principal, Benjamin F. Hurt, who had succeeded Paul Cale, went to AJbemarle High School in 1953 to become assistant principal.

In 1954,

he became principal of A.H.S., a position he held until 1984.

17


Richard Strafford became Greenwood Elementary School's first principal; he left the t;ext year. Robert Wood,

He was followed by John W. Massie, William Bullock,

Charles Wallace,

successive one-year terms.

and W.

Harold Walker;

all

of whom served

In January 196?, Harry W. Kent carne to Greenwood.

He left in 1966 to become principal of the new Brownsville Elementary School. Roland Zimmerman succeeded Kent and remained until 1974. by James D. Sledd who led Greenwood until early 1984.

He was followed

As if to come full

circle, Greenwood's last principal was as its first, a woman, Joyce A. Wright. Colonel William R. Washington, a Greenwood resident who led the battle to keep Greenwood School open, sums up the events prior to the closing in June, 1984: In January 1983 the people in the Greenwood area lParned that a county-wide appointed committee had recommended that the Greenwood school be closed. A local committee of seven volunteers was formed at the behest of the parents and citizens to ward off closure of the school. The people rallied and hundreds attended several public hearings in the county office building to show support and state their reasons for keeping the school open. The effort resulted in a one-year extension of time. Continued protests in the Winter and Spring of 1984 failed to influence the School Board, who had singled out the Greenwood School for closure, in defiance of the stated objections of the Board of Supervisors and the earnest ann genuine pleas of the people of a community that felt the action to be inconsiderate, unnecessary, and short sighted. They sincerely regretted the loss of an institution that had provided high quality education for children in an atmosphere of warmth and a sense of belonging. The spirit of Greenwood, the vital life center of the community, has been one of vision and progress.

At no time content to remain in the ranks of

mediocrity, she has risen step by step to take and maintain her place as a leading school in the county.

The young men and women who have left her doors

have taken places worthy of respect and admiration.

May her standard of truth

and honor ever live in the hearts of graduates and her highest and worthiest ideals go with her boys and girls to Brownsville and Red Hill Elementary Schools. Steven G. Meeks

18

May 1984

Ref en


References: "The Echolite 1953" "D.e velopment of Public Schools in Albemarle County" a project of the Retired Teacher's Association of the County of Albemarle

-

Steven G. Meeks, technical advisor and histo.r ian and Benjamin Sojka, student interviewer.

19


1 -

room-

Alben

the Luti1

the Carre Mode :

Schoâ&#x20AC;˘

larg Laps

Scho

of C

she


1920's Lutie Williams Garwood Class of 1924

I

attended

a

room--"Edgewood"

one

School.

room

school

After

in

l.Jestern

finishing

there,

Albemarle, the

later

children

in

n

two

Western

Albemarle had no \vhere to go. The then chairman of the School Board, Mrs. Robert Page (Batesville) said the county could not furnish a bus

to Greenwood.

Lutie W. Garwood, drove his "Stuart" truck the

children rode

in the back of

the

e;~ch

truck,

Percy Williams,

father of

day (5 miles) to Greenwood and rain or shjne.

Later he and

Carroll Alexander had Woodson's Garage at Greenwood build a body for Carroll's Model T Truck.

The children rode on boards with no cushions all winter.

Later the county paid half and the parents half for a bus to Greenwood School (5 miles). Some of the children graduated from Greenwood P.igh School in 1924.

The

~iss

Gene

largest class--27. Lapsley.

This class was taught in the seventh grade by

This class also put many things in the cornerstone of the Greenwood

School. Mrs. Robert Page also wanted a man as principal but in those days parents of Greenwood School worked well together and kept Mrs. Hmmrd Coville until she finished her job and was ready to leave.

21


Some of the 27 members of the graduating class of 1924 are: Lillian Gill

Dorothy Forbes

Hyant Wharton

Gerald Coville

Helen Rea

Richard Yancey

Frank Ye.ncey

Frasier Lapsley

Irene Lapsley

Charlie Haven

Tommy Haven

Elizabeth Burton

Edith Pugh Cook

Nellie Garwood

Aubrey Ferguson

John Clayton

Edna CJayton

Harry Block

Leittie Cloud

Mary Bowen

Marie Lineton

Haus Vanderburg

William Young

Russell Young

Charles Young

Tiggs Veal

Lutie

William~

Garwood

Henry Henrichs (died in 1924, baseball lick to the head) The first class to graduate in this new school was the class of 1922. Sadie Williams won the scho]arship cup and gold medal (essay on government). Other graduates of Greenwood have taught and some are fine lawyers. cooperation and wonderful way parents and

tea~hers

The

worked together vli th so

little money made the students want to do their best.

Virginia Rogers 1929-1934

I came to Greenwood High School in 1929, when I was twenty years old. taught the sixth and seventh grades with about forty-five pupils. was $72 a month.

We had very few problems and complaints.

years that I spent teaching there.

22

I

My salary

I enjoyed the five

"

1' g


1922 Baseball Champs

"Click" (Clifton) Farrar, 1923. Notice lack of store in background. ve

Lillian Woodson

23


3$

1 .

I I

Sa M Gâ&#x20AC;˘ su

WI

Greenwood High School, built in 1921-22. Take note of the chicken in the bushes. All landscaping was donated by area farmers under the direction of Mrs. W. R. Massie of Rose Hill. Photo courtesy of Virginia Rogers.

Class of 1922. Helen Rea

24


- '~

Sadie & . Lutie Williams' car. Mrs. Genevieve Corville and Miss Gene Lapsley, teachers. Photo submitted by Lutie Williams Garwood.

Model T Car driven by Sadie and Lutie Williams 5 miles to Greenwood High School. It is proudly stated that they had almost perfect attendance for two years. The car had no self starter and had to be hand cranked. Memory recalls that one boy broke his arm cranking just such a car. (1-r) Bessie Campbell, Bessie Smith, Clatilda Rodes, Dot Pugh, Aileen Woodson, Reba Critzer, Bessie Critzer. Genivieve Forbes, Sadie Williams and Hattie Pugh. Photo submitted by Lutie Williams Garwood.

Basketball Team, 1922 Front (1-r): Irene Lapsley, Dorothy Pugh Ball, Martha Burnley, Mildred Rea. Back (1-r): Mable Brooks, Edith Young, Bessie Smith, Dorothy Forbes, Lutie Williams.

Class of 1923. Mrs. Genevieve Coville, principal.

25


G.R EEN,VOOD BUZZER GREENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

Published Monthly by

Vol. 1

FEBRUARY

WITH APOLOGIES TO MESSERS. GALLAHGER AND SHEAN.

"JUST WATCH US."

No. 5

1923 SOME TRIP.

\\·,., tht: mnry junior , ,

~I

r" . l'ovilk! () :'II r ,;. l 'ovilk! \\' hat 's on your mind thi s ntmn · ing, ~I r . Brown: l·:yny hod y',; making fnn ( )( thr way our. Sl'hool ts rnn .\nd tht• Buzzer 'ays wt· 'll run it in l hl'

II

~roun' .

Why ~I r . Brown! \\ ' hy ~I r . 1\rown! Thr nl hrr day I ntoton·d clown 1" town; llt•nurtt, with a ~milt·. Saicl wt• ht·at thr r •·,t a miltol'ositively, M r~ . Covillt·! Ah>'nlutC"Iy , :'llr . 1\rown! A Junior .

"r.

UPWARD. 'l'h<· hig lll!·tt 11i the world hH\"t' nto. tl<tht·ir Sll<'l"t' SS J.y l'llllti11111111' toil n<tl h.1· on<'

hiu

lt·sso tl.

\\'~

ltrr inclitlt'd t•·

think th:~t itt ordrr to hr ~o mehod y " ''' havl.' got to do tllll' hilo( t'onspicuou, dN•<I. It i ~ not till' ft·w hig thing~ th;.l t:outtt hut the numerou, little d!'t•d, . <\ht· l.inroltt was not 01 r:.~il-~plittu ;. n Munday and · pr esi dl.'nt o n Tuesd:ty. To rnukc il ~uccrss in life wt h:iVr to krl·tt t:outinunus ly at our purpust. It i~ not the: pupil that l(tts his lr sso n s well Mometimcs ilnd not lit all ut other time s that rnakl's ii guod marie on his studir,. ·ro malce the he~t grade~ he .h:.~~ to ht· 11ruent rvery day :111d prt1>11rc every tilly's les An n. The long distance runner that wins docs not run f:.~st at first :uul Ait down and rest :a~ the rahhit tlid , hut like the turtle he stRrt~ with ii gait tha! he can holrl to the goal. "Height~ hy l(rcat men rr:.~rh!'d aut.! ktptWM"t not :~ttllined hy ~utlden Right : llttt th,.~· whilt' thC"ir <'Otttp'tnion• slrn!. \\ '•"1' "; t;'llol upw:trtl thrPttl(h th•·

26

Charlie Haven.

I lnt· tbry tht· hoys and girls of Greenwood , dtap<"ront·d hy th<' Dt~ ane c1f the Try hard tu plc:.~se the s~nior>. ><·hool, hired a St:.~igc to take a .Joy Hut all in vain . we st·t·. ride. Tht~ douds lookt•d Bla1·k and thinking it mi~ht Snow, they sought a \\ ' hen we he~ome ~o:rautl Sl·nior, quit·t II avcn where th<'y had pintirk .. t! In uinett•t:n twt·uty-iour. 'l'\'t'ral Mays hefort· . \ , t • rd~ ttl ~trt'ngth and wi~1l1•tn Tht·y \HI'c hun~o:ry "" \\' illiam callc·•; I· ront 1111r lip' will pour . out, "\\'attn Kl'l SOilll' \Voocl. son. \\ ·,. want to roHst some V<"al. " Thc·.1 \\ .t·' ll ,how till' one> that iollow had a grt•at Thurst on and Eclison ~Uio! · Ju,;t huw tht:y ought to act, g<"st<"d \Vim•. But H usscll cxclaimrd , :\ nd 't:l a ~>:<><HI t•xample" Doni say that a (;ann; you'n· '"" .\ thing we ,;atlly lack. Young. :\itc·r t·ating tlwy all J.:ol in :ntd \\ ",,' ll ht· "·clatl' and proper, 'IHrtt•tl. hut when Courtney tried tn :\nd Hll that ,.;ort of thin~ . Turtll'r a \\'hcl'i n something hrukt· Hut there ' ll h<· some tJep ht•hitHI it :n11l john hunted Still!(' Birch to lll<'nd To kt·t·p us in tin· tlin~ . it. Tlwn what did \'an ct·y but his hig SIH'plll'rd, with a llt·ll on his neck . iol· \\ ' ht·n it rome' to e ntt·rtainnH·Ht " : fnwing thl' \ 'an. I lt-n lll'rl{ ht· rail , . \\' ht•n tht•re's candy 111 he mad•·. "Tlll're's ~·our Car, mark, out lt.1' dt· \\ ,.'ll Sl' t' that all tht· hard w .. rk l..:irh ; h .. qukk and we will go in that. " h not on oth<·rs laid . This ~o:in·s Hamilton :.1r his Cut· anti he says: "\\'y, ant arc you ahoarct:" After four mort: month s of ntist·r _,. Tht'y all started shouting and it to••;.; \Ve'll give yo u sonwthing ttt·w; a I ;o"'l man to •tuiet thrm . Tht·fl Fo• \\'l' .fnniors will he Srnims Thonta' 'aid "Didn't El lingt•r?" "lla" And you' ll ht· happy ton. _,., •u st•t•n E 1.. hert ,.. Tht·y had ahc•ul Dorothy Forbes. dt•ridt·d to 1urn and llunt t·r. when l>o• ;a id sht.' didn ' t eOJill'. So .Vt·rnon said, "Co l.:.~ing ." Sin~o: ­ ing "Carrit.' me hark to old Virl{inia ... GLEANED FROM RECENT 1ht•y arrivt•<l home without further rt·· l.aps. l.t·y took Burt on with hint. EXAMS. I >a viti saitl, "Mann, hut we had a ··hampion timt•." Gerald E. Coville. " \\'ornts havr diet! front time to tirm. :tnt! men hav~ !'atcn th<·m. hut not for lt•V<'. - Shahspt•are. SPECIAL TO THE BUZZER. "T his was a happy marriai(C'. Shr clitl not live lon~.e . " Warninr to Juniora. "T ht· braditt·s wt·rr so raln·d ht t·aus!' tht·y wt·rr lt-d out of Eg.~ ' lll i>y Stop-Loolc-Listenli..:ht ~ ... Stop at your rcspe<"tive ~eat . "It l' ttrltod h:tt;pily in th~ t·nd." l.ook straiJlht at :'lliss (;cnit•; "C haut·t•r was an Anl(ul!tr So~on." l .i~ trn to :rncl ahsorh C\'t·ry w!trcl that "'l'ht· nil th;tt lllt'n do liH~ :.fl " t \O''C' !"a~·s. tl1t·n·. ·!,.. t•nt•d i' oitt·n intt·rit•rt•d with l'•n:rl• .1' for Ill'· I' ·,.Jatinn •·i th ' I .. th·ir Jt, ·11''' ... warninJ:. To h ~ H Junior a~o:ain in IH : · I Jj

ntlll"ll'~n

twt·nty-thrt:~.

,.

(L-

Re: 192


I

tOL

I

F

. ~·

=:\ '

No.5

..··; ../

4

:# Greenl)f the a .I") rk and ~lltl{h I a intid... cl 11

call<·•;

d.

son .

TIH".I .on Sllll ·

claimr<l. t·n·

too

in

;nul

ried

'"

:

hrokt· o ttH:II d his hig l'Ck. iol11' rail .- . I h.l' dt· in !hat. " . ... uc.· ancJ thoard : ..

Greenwood 's first school bus from William's Store Henry Hinricks and Harold Mays 1923-24

..

tot'~

it

Tht·H

" "lla11 d ah(llli

hen I>"' Sin~-: ·

irginia .· ther n ·· h ltin1. had a

(L-r) Nellie Garwood, Lutie Williams, Mildred Rea, and Helen Rea playing hooky·ne.ar Crozet in 1924.

oville.

ER.

Dorothy Rodes and David Wine on steps of Greenwood High School. Note buildings in background.

rd that

·i 'h :n l!t : ·.

27


whol

meet

How

by 1

Rex Alexander's Model T 1924.

of

Shit

friE

Mr. D. R. Brown, Assistant Principal of Greenwood High School taken April

was

192-'.

who : and

exi:

Edith Pugh and Catherine Alexander seeking knowledge on the school steps.

who

lif

sch

and

fiv Sch nun

The Junior Class of 1924.

Miss Gene Lapsley, teacher of 1924 class. Looking west toward Greenwood Depot.

spj


Frances Mann Young Student 1926-1938

Greenwood High School was the center of my life and certainly that of the whole community which used

the

school's

facilities

as

the nucleus

for

all

meetings and entertainment by the Community League among other organizations. How I loved all of the delighted plays directed by Miss Dorothy Earp and also by Mrs. Harrison Waite. of

the

community,

They had a terrific Thespian group played by

including

mv

Shirley, Mr. McCue and Mr . Waite.

father,

Mr.

Robert

Turner,

Mr.

m~mbers

Armistead

I realize how fortunate I was along with my

friends to alway s be a part of community activities at Greenwood School. pal of April

4 class. pot.

was

a

rich

heritage

of

a

closely

knit

community

dedicated

to

the

Ours good,

wholesome fun - supported by families who really cared about their community and about their school which was the main core of it all.

This will never

exist again which is a great loss to this present generation. I must get away from the serious side but I could weep for those coming who will never know again a school like Greenwood and its 5.ntegral part in the life of the whole communit y . To be able to go from the first grade through senior high school in one school and with the same friends is something that I've cherished all my life and the fun we "old" alumni have at our get togethers is indescribable. five

of

School

us

have

students

our birthday or celebrations we and

numerous to state.

the

tales

that

are

remembered

revert and

to

When

Greenwood High

J aughed at are too

We thought them naught y at the time, mostly we were high

spirited, full of devilment but never malicious or destructive.

If you could

29


get

Elizabeth

Turner

(Hobbs),

Helen

Mensing

(O'Donoghue),

Margaret

knew

McCue

(McCullough) and Frances Mann (Young) gathered

since

at one of their birthday celebrations then you would really be able to get

games

(Washington), Caroline Maphis

some good stories. I

seem only

to remember the happy,

punishments don't seem so bad now.

carefree times,

see t

even the deserved

12

to go

We were

publi

My senior class consisting of only

students was a constant source of worry to Mr. Paul Gale (principal).

per so

full of high spirits and devilment but we also, to the chagrin of a ll, were excellent students and our grades were high above average.

I

seemed to be 0

always the one in trouble, look.

the innocent "goat" since I

always had a. guilty

My friends would somehow see to it that I was in trouble.

We had a.

spontaneous knack of knowing just what to do to annoy our teachers.

Books

at

tj

Miss

books

would slide off our desks one at a time with us assuming complete surprise, creating a wonderful noise.

I was always being sent out of the room with

Helen and ordered to stop giggU.ng.

and

1

Chri~

This we loved and howled even louder.

Our senior class was finally put on probation for our mischievous and fun

you

The la.st day of school, Harleth Wiley gave me a ball

repo1

and I 路 broke a window, since I could never throw a straight ball. ' 路 The esprit

Cons!

de corps of our class came forth and with a collection taken up, we marched to

they

the country store and bought the glass and presented it to the principal who

marcl

loving sense of humor.

righ

was touched and pleased and not surprised! I remember so vividly all the extravagantly produced plays.

Each May we

had a very special play and I loved all the costumes and excitement and our parents worked so hard and so willingly.

I

also remember the great square

dances that were held at Greenwood with dancers coming from miles away. was a real tradition.

The school was an integral part

It

of everyone in the

community besides providing such a good basic education, a quality that ceases to exist.

We didn't have all the frills and electives and equ:ipment, but we

admi woul路


knew how to read, write, spell and to do arithmetic and were taught to think since we weren't distracted by so many diversions.

We made our own fun and

games and were given a chance to use our own imaginations (maybe too much). A school like Greenwood not only taught but built character and when I see these huge schools, especially high schools, I realize how fortunate I was to go to a country school and to be able to partici.pate in the debating tea.m s, public

speaking

and

other

contests

between

the

schools

and

to

have

such

personal attention from dedicated teachers. Naturally we had our fun with some teachers making their life miserable

~ 0

'I

a s

at times. Miss

must not leave out my elementary teachers--Miss Lucy Moon and

I

Ruby Moon.

\<!hnt

great

teachers

and

I' 11

always

11

remember

Baby Ray 11

books--my first reader. My sister Ann Mann and her best friend Molly Marvin were full of giggles

:h

11

0nward

Christian Soldiers, Onward Christian Soldiers, Marching down the sheets.

When

and mischief.

Jn

you get

11

reported

it

Constitution of the United States or to be suspended from school.

to

they

ho

marched up to the principal and

we

mr

re

to

They '.rere caught singing in assembly t0 the tune of

8S

decided

right,

but

the bottom,

please

don't

tickle my

feet!"

They were

promptly

being sacrilegious and were then commanded to write the whole

to

this

be

suspended.

time

she

My

mother

for

the

first

time

I

in her

think life

told him that she believed the school was

thought

the

"tattle

tale"

should

be

punished,

admitting it was a childish and silly thing for Ann and Molly to do but she would have punished them for tattling. Thanks heavens I had a Greenwood School!

It

he

ses

we

31


Cr

Gre

SoJ

spe

Interview: Mr. Shield Critzer

of

By Benjamin Sojka

Cri

March 1984

..

~1he

Sojl

Benjamin Sojka: "Did you start first grade nt Greenwood School?"

路~路

Mr. Critzer: I started in the f:i.rst grade in a little one room school known as the Razz Rea House, thnt' s been torn down now.

I went to school there two

Crit

Sojka: "That was your first school."

in

Critzer: "Yes - in 1916."

Critzer: "Yes, it was on the same property that the school is on. over in the corner, right near the Toms' house.

路It was \.ray

I went to school at least two

Critzer who lived up the road,

drove the school

wagon, which was a covered wagon pulled by two horses, "t-Tith benches up and down the sides just like the old covered wagons that went out west."

scho Sojk Crit Sojk

Sojka: "That was like a school bus." Critzer: "Well, it was the same as a school bus. Then my uncle got an old Ford truck.

was

Crit

Sojka: "What was the school wagon?" A.C.

fran

Sojk

years and maybe three in what was called the school wagon."

"My uncle,

That was at least for two

He put canvas on that for a year

or two, and then he bought some sort of a wagon, I guess you might say, to put on this old truck. It had seats up and down." Sojka: "Is that how you got to school by yourself?"

Crit Sojk Crit Sojk the Crit:

32

f

higl

Sojka: "Was that close to where Greenwood is now?"

years.

Cri1

Sojl

years."

Critzer:

you


Critzer:

"Oh no!

The old

school wagon picked up

children

from here

to

Greenwood which is about four miles and a half." Sojka: "Were 'you one of the first students to go to Greenwood?" (Benjamin is speaking of Greenwood School as he knows it today, and Mr. Critzer is thinking of the village of Greenwood.) Critzer: ~

"Oh no! The school was in operation when I went there. I don't know

't<Then it started."

_..,

~

<!"

Sojka: "So, the school that is there now, Greenwood, was there.

But why did

\.路

you go to the smaller school?" Critzer:

"Well, that was the only school we had anywhere in the area."

Sojka: "That was before the big school was built?" Critzer: "No, there was an intermediate school.

While I was going to school

in this little one room building there was a large frame bujJding which was a high school, located where the ball field is nmo,1. frame building.

I

It was a large, great big

was over there several years, and then the present school

y

was built and dedicated in 1923, wasn't it?" '0

'!,.

Sojka: "Last year it was sixty-one years old." ...

Critzer:

"Well, you can figure it back, but I think it was 1923 that the

school was dedicated.

)1

I graduated in that building in 1927."

Sojka: "Were your diplomas given out at the University?"

tld

Critzer: "No. I got my diploma down here at the school." Sojka: "How many years did you go to the school that's there now?" Critzer:

"Probably four years."

wo Sojka: "So, you were one of the first classes to graduate?"

!ar

Critzer: "Yes, that's right."

>Ut

Sojka: "When you went to Greemvood were the elementary grades downstairs and the high school upstairs?" Critzer: "Yes, the seniors were upstairs."

33


Sojka: "Did you have the upstairs auditorium?"

Sojk

Critzer: "Yes, we had a senior play, just like they do today, except on a small scale. ' There were thirteen in my graduating class- six boys and seven girls in 1927."

Critzer: "There was a curtain across the stage. height from the auditorium and that

~ms

The stage was about normal

curtained off."

Critzer: "I believe they did.

lunc

Crit

Sojk

Sojka: "Did you have a class on the stage?"

Cri

Yes, I think they did, but there were at least

three or four classrooms off the side of the auditorium.

Then they had roll

away doors on the back of the auditorium, and I think they had a class back there."

Sojk

Crit

Sojk

Crit

Sojka: "Was there a class inside the auditorium?" Critzer: "Not that I recall. Sojka: "Did you have a science

equipment.

the

It could have been."

Sojll

l;~b?"

Crit

Critzer: "Yes, of its kind and for that day, yes.

楼7e had test tubes and

I still remember 'osmosis'!"

Critzer: "Yes." "I know you had

Cri1 Sojl

running water, but did you have little potbellied

stoves in the hall?" Critzer: "Not in the big new building.

Over in the small building and in the The new school had some type of

heat."

Sojka: "Was Greenwood a normal sized county

sho路 Soj Cri

s~hool?"

Critzer: "Yes, there were eight hj_gh schools in the county at that time and Greenwood was one of them."

Cri路 out

large frame building that was all they had. w;~ter

was Sojl

Sojka: "Was the library at that time in the principal's office?"

hot

Crit

Sojk

Sojka: "Was the auditorium partitioned off with a curtain or something?"

Sojka:

time

Soj Cri Rhc pre


~

E

d

Sojka: "The store that is right next to the school - was that there at that time?" Critzer: "Oh, yes indeed." Sojka: "Do you remember ladies coming in to make big kettles of soup for lunch?" Critzer: "No, not in my day that I recall." Sojka: "Since you took your lunch to school did you eat in the classroom?" Critzer: "No, we had recess and you could eat anywhere you wanted." Sojka: "You could eat in the classroom or outside?" Critzer: "I don't know what the others did, but I always ate ontside." Sojka: "Did a truck come to dump coal down a chute to the furnace room?" Critzer: "We had a man, I guess a janitor, who fired the furnace and cleaned the building." Sojka: "When Greenwood School was built was the frame building torn down?" Critzer: "Yes.

It wasn't located where this building is.

The frame building

was about where the baseball field is." Sojka:

"'~;..Then

you rode in the wagon to school, did any one ride a horse?"

Critzer: "Yes, several did." Sojka: "How did you get water to the old one room SC'hool?" Critzer: "They brought it in buckets from a spring.

There were two outhouses

out back in the woods and a big coal pile next to the building.

They li70uld

shovel it up and take it inside." Sojka: "Did they always use coal?" Critzer: "Yes, I think so -even in the little school." Sojka: "Do you remember the names of the people in your graduating class?" Critzer: "I can name only four or five of them. Rhoads,

who died about two or three months

The ones I know were Dorothy ago,

Eddie Elinger, who died

probably ten or fifteen years ago, Buck Yancey (that's Frank's brother), who

35


died four or five years ago, Rusell Wade, who is still living at Batesville,

Scot

Raleigh Mann, who is a Methodist Minister and I think is still living.

scho

Now

the girls - I named Dorothy Rhoads - were Algy Elinger, George's sister. believe she is still living.

I

Then there was Velma Rogers, and I just can't

remember the rest of them, but there were thirteen of us.

on t

hund

Do you want to hear a little incident that is kind of funny?

Well, we

what

used to sleigh ride on a steep hill that went down from the school to where

place

One snowy day we were sleigh riding and

broad

~aw

still

the Community Center is located now . I

looked

dow~

in a little open place and I was about to go crazy because I

a twenty-five cent piece, a quarter. fifty-five years ago!

Well, you can imagine what a quarter was

So, I loved peanuts and I went down to the store, Mr.

Sojka

Gill's store, and you can imagine the peanuts that you ce_n get today for a quarter in the hull.

But I was just a little boy, and '\oJhat I _wanted was just

a handful of p_e anuts - what you could have gotten for a penny then. I was just a little chap. about so h:.g, and _I put the quarter on the counter and said, 'Some peanuts, Mr. Gill.' Well, he took the whole quarter and gave me a bag of peanuts about that big around! imagine

I

And I didn't have a qua.rter. got

a

My quarter was gone!

good peck of peanuts or more.

remember what I did with them.

This was

Well, you can 1918!

I

don't

I know I bought a whole lot of them home, but

I cried all afternoon because my quarter was gone! We had a

track team,

a baseball team and a basketball

team and we

competed with the other seven high schools." Sojka: "Did you say football team?" Critzer: "Oh no!

1-le didn 1 t know the shape of a football.

baseball and track.

I played on all three.

team and we had a real team.

l-TE~

had basketball,

I was captain of the baseball

We won an awful lot of games.

\路le

played

I ::.:::::::s

B

F1

"'

r)

p

D

36


--Scottsville,

Crozet,

Meriwether Lewis,

Alberene,

Earlysville and all

those

schools. Each year ' in the spring we had a county track meet down at the University t

on the old Lambeth Field. hundred yard dash,

All those eight schools would come in.

two-twenty,

four-forty, high jump, broad jump, relay and

e

what have you.

e

places out of ten events.

:d

broad jump and high jump and the relay.

tW

still have it.

iS

r.

Anyway,

I

went I

We had the

down to the track meet and won five fj_rst

won the hundred yard dash, the two-twenty, th~ They gave me a gold shoe.

I

think I

When I graduated in 1927 I went to Hampton-Sydney College." Sojka: "Thank you, Mr. Critzer."

a

st

:he

:tat

c:an

n' t

but

we

all,

ball

yed

1927 Ball Team. Front row (1-r): Eddie Ellinger, Robert Black, Russell Wade, Buck Yancey and Shield Critzer. Standing (1r): George Gill, Cecil Wade, Hunter Rogers, Sam Pugh, Raleigh Mann, Jack Apperson, and George Dunn, principal. Photo submitted by Shield Critzer.

37


Augu

firs Senior Class Play 1924 Back (1-r): Nellie Garwood, Lutie Williams, Charlie Haven, Wyant Wharton, Mary Bowen, Harry Black, Dorothy Forbes, Julie Shirley, Louise Coleman, Hans Vanderburg, Mary Yancey, Helen Rea. Front (l.r): Virginia Pugh, Dettie Cloud, Charles Young, Edith Pugh, Gerald Coville, Elizabeth Burton.

rail

NcCu

and Anne Virginia Pugh Class Valedictorian 1924

conm

comrr

was were pen

garc plun thiE schc

Class of 1924. Back (r-1): Harry Black, Marie Lenington, Richard Yancey, Russell Young, Nellie Garwood, Aubrey Ferguson, Lutie Williams, "Miss Genie", Cornelia Lang, Gerald Coville, John Clayton, Mabel Brooks, Rex Alexander, and Yancey. 2nd row (1-r): Charles Young, Virginia Pugh; Dean Foster, Edna Clayton, Tommy Haven, Julia

38

Shirley, Frances Lapsley, Lillian Gill, Wyant Whorton, Edithe Pugh, Jean Baber, and John Veal. Front row (1-r): Bill Young, Lutie Burch, Elizabeth Burton, Helen Rea, Elbert Gill, Irene Lapsley, Charlie Haven, Mary Bowen, Dot Forbes, and Henry Henrichs. Photo submitted by Lutie Williams Garwood.

who sel1 to c


R. Claude Graham 19 28-1935

I

I~ l

My wife, Burr Wolfe Graham, and I came to the Greenwood community in late

1

August 1928 and we left in mid-August 1935 .

We lived with the Gill fanily the

first year, in a small apartment in the rear of the store building near the railroad station for two years and j_n a six room house rented from Mr. Purcell nt ir-

NcCue for four years.

a.

We were received most graciously by the community folk.

ith

The graciousness

and the kindliness lasted throughout the seven years that we were in the community.

We

often

commented

that

we

probably

would

never

live

in

a

community that we liked as well as we liked Greenwood. There was an active organization, Community League, in the community. was not a PTA. were

It did things for the community, the school included.

several people

in

the

community who were

skilled

persons helped the school with problems "to.•hen they arose.

tradesmen.

It

There These

For example,

a

gardener would trim the planting around the school bujlding and carpenters, plumbers and electricians were available in emergencies without

pa~' ·

With all

this, I do not remember an instance of a local person attempting to tell the school personnel how to run the school. We were fortunate to have teachers who took pride in the school, teachers

nt m

,

e

r-

y

who would share in solving mutual problems and teachers who were interested in self-improvement.

I cannot recall an instance of a teacher refusing to speak

to or work with another teacher.

39


The connnunity spirit and the good school

~pirit

on

the

part

of

faculty spirit combined contributed to a the pupils.

The

total of

it all made

Greenwood a great place to live and work.

sec ta

an< in ha

co路 we pr

Senior Class of 1928-29. Front row (1-r): Alfred "Jack" Apperson, Annie Grinstead, Catherine Burch, R. Claude Graham, Nancy Apperson, Edith- Pugh, and Irene Claydon. Top row (1-r): Leslie Walton, Phyllis Graves, Massie Clayton, Lucille Burch, Grant Rogers, Bessie Young, and Mrs. R. Claude Graham. Photo submitted by Lady Boggs Walton.

The faculty of 1929 included (1st row, 1-r) Mr. & Mrs. R. Claude Graham, Leslie Hughes Walton, Dee Cloud, (2nd row, 1-r) Lillian Foster, Dorothy Pugh, Ruby Moon, and Lucy Moon.

c1

lj


Phyllis Apperson Maphis Class of 1937 (1927-1937)

I

have many

fond memoriP.s

second grade (1927-28).

of

Greenwood

School.

first

Hy

was

in

the

This was my first year at Greenwood, NY mother having

taught me for the first grade.

Mv teacher was Ruby Moon.

best "start" in school th a t one could have.

I think she was the

I always enjoyed going to school

and I know that my first teach er played an important role.

Our annual plays,

in which we turned into crepe paper flowers, were directen by Miss Moon and a happy time for all the young students. J loved all of my teachers and I think Greenwood had some of the best.

I

considered Virginia Hughes, "Porky" Smith and Elizabeth Sutherland friends as well as teachers.

I had the highest regard for Mr. Graham and Mr. Gale, my

principnls. The

highlight

Timberlake and I

of

won't

school

years

was

the

debates

in

which

Frances

brought honor to our school and our selves by winning the

class "C" championship. I

my

We were proud to bring the Literary Cup to Greenwood.

overlook the

fact

little credit--I met my husband Greenwood in the eighth grade;

that my happy

adult

(of almost 43 years) J was

in the seventh.

life there.

owes

Greenwood

a

George came to

His sister,

Caroline

Maphis, was a classmate and friend.

41


the

bowl Report of Interview with Mr. Lewis Toms, Jr. 1927-1938

For

Ry Benjamin Sojka, Fourth Grader (1983-84)

on a Mr. Lewis Toms, Jr. was a student at Greenwood School from 1927 until he graduated in 1938.

But he lost a year and a half because of illness.

The buildinp, was finished Randolph Ortman of interest. The

in

1923.

Half of the money was

the Blue Ridge F?.rm.

He

donated by

abou

loaned the other half without

stru

The portion that was built Cit that time did not include the gym.

gym wns

started

in

1938,

the

y ear Mr.

Toms

graduated.

It was

a

WPA

project under the Roosevelt administration to give people work to do. Since upstairs.

the

gym

was

not

there

at

that

timÂŁ!

there

was

;m

<tuditorium

The one room that made it up has now been split into two.

At the

ti.me that Mr. Toms was going to Greenwood there wRs R weekly c:tssembly in the nuditorium. The library was the first grade and the lunch room was the second grade. Third and f0urth grades were on down the hall. hall facing the road. office.

The

Fifth grade was across the

The library was in the Sf!me room with the principal's

principal's

office

teacher wc:ts Miss Virginia Hughes.

is

in

this

Today

room now.

Mr.

Toms'

favorite

she is Mrs. Grant Rogers of Yancey

Mills. The mountain.

school 1 s

Hall

water

supply was

piped

by

a

spring

The spring was owned bv Mr. Purcell McCue â&#x20AC;˘

.

at

the

top

of

the


In the winter months a lady would come in and make a big pot of soup, for the less fortunate children.

The other children could pay a nickel and get a

bowl of soup to go with their brown bag lunch. The sports activities consisted of basketball, volleyball and baseball. For a few years in the winter months the sc.hool had a boxing team. For graduation the commencement exercises and baccalaureate services were on a Sunday night in the auditorium. i l he

The diplomas were given out at Cabell

Hall at the University by each school's principal. Mr. Toms feels 'rery sad on the closing of Greenwood.

~d

by

thout

about it.

I do not think the school should be closed.

"I'm rea l ly hurt think it is more

J

structurally sound than some of our more modern schools."

gym. '!.

WPA

orium .t the

1\lbrmarlr Jubltr

.n the

~rqnnls

HONOR CERTIFICATE ;rade. s

the

%

~

~ pal's

rorite

the

/J

-

IDF

· ~~

n:;/-11"¥ ... ~·· . jllrm~

j 6r

rancey

f

(;

/j lhiJ rln.~v /1/J.rr>n lo

QUtis Ql:r:rtifi.rafr: ttf ltllttl}:t'

~

. r·r>JI(,.j / i11

i11 1/u

.cf/A,.,mo,r/r< 'lb~u"/,_1f·

~ r~-: _:_ - 7r JMn·~ k~L~ ~r-y ~/

(lU.-J'f.~n,fj- lhr> //r> aJ- ry //J ~ 1

/}

,..-:"

.. -,

~

9.- ,

)

~~_;_z_ ___L!_ __ 11 t·J~---

0

TEACHER

A

q

~J ~'~ t'

/}

-

-

?fl ._~ _ --·-

SUPERVISOR

43


1930's

h.:

m)

Sc

Louise Tharpe Burton

pE

1934--1:)65

er

Two annual events at the Greenwood School were the May Day programs and the Operettas.

The May Day was held on the lawn in front of the auditorium

Wl

with music sounding from a loudspeaker for each grade's dance and the maypole dance.

The

operettas

were

held

in

the

auditorium

and

the

stage

c:

was St

beautifully decorated.

The teachers were kept busy teaching their children a

dance and the songs in the operetta. mothers helped the teachers

~vith

There were costumes to be m?de and the

them.

called "The Princess and the Frog."

I

recall one operetta particularly

At that ttme, Dr. Robert Raynor, now

practicing at Afton, Virginia, was in my fifth grade and he was the Frog because he had a good singing voice for the solo part. \\"'hen we had the high school, He participated in the Albemarle County choral

contest

at

Cabell Hall.

Each

school

chorus

sang

the

same

songs.

Virginia Hughes Rogers and myself directed and our school was pleased to be

Wl

wl

chosen the winners when we sang "I' 11 Take You Home Aga:l.n, Kathleen" and "The Bells of St. Mary ."

Cc (I

Rc

44


George Ernest Maphis Memories of Greenwood Class of 1936

When my family moved to Albemarle County from Charlottesville in 1932 I had misgivings about attending a small high school in the country. I remember my first trip on the bus, from where we lived near Edgewood, to Greenwood High School to begin the eighth grade. friends

made

personable.

with

other

A short time after attending Greenwood, I

students

and

found

my

teachers

to

be warm and

At this point my original apprehensions were disspelled and I

entered 路a very happy time in my life. I still think that Greenwood had some of the best teachers in the county. When I look back on Greenwood, three teachers stand out in my thoughts--R. Claude Graham, who was my history teacher as well as principal; Elizabeth Sutherland, my english teacher and Plummer Jones, my math teacher.

Geraldine Fray Haney Teacher 1936-1937

While at Greenwood I taught Latin Ii. written on the board, I would put Finis.

After each Latin test which was One day a Seventh Grader asked me

why I always left off my "h" on finish? I

taught with seven others who had trained at Harrisonburg Teachers

College,

now

James

Madison University.

These

(Durrer) Detamore, Belle (Dunn) Bing, Anne

popular

seven are:

Bertha

(Holsinger) Dunn, Mary (Lupton)

Robinson , Margaret Fowler, Louise Burton, and Bernice Critzer.

45


: .;... ;...-·. \~.::; ~, :~:--;..~::. ·.·. "· .

.,.,._" ~' .; ;.~·:• ,• ·.. ~·

..

.

Greenwood High School as landscaped by Mrs. W. R. Massie of Rose Hill. This photo was taken in the early 1930's.

Greenwood Faculty in the early 30's.

1903 marked the beginning of "Little Greenwood" which was a wbite frame dwelling located beyond the present playground ball diamond. After 1908 it was used for many educational purposes. It housed Special Education, Woodshop classes, Commercial classes. It was later used as a dwelling for the school caretaker. The building no longer stands. This is one of the classes that met in ''Little Greenwood." WEDDING BELLS

If you want a husband, come to Greenwood and teach school. That's what happened in 1934. Three of us got married in June of that year. Louise Tharpe married Hunter Burton; Lucy Ann Dinwiddie married Edison Gann; and Virginia Hughes married Grant Rogers. Virginia Rogers

46

;:.


Farm Project 1938; note the men working on the new gym addition in the background.

%11

The Senior Class of 1932

The school faculty of 1934 consisted of (sitting 1-r) Lady Boggs, Katherine Smith, Virginia Hughes, Louise Tharpe, (standing 1-r) Plummer Jones, Elizabeth Sutherland, Lucy Dinwiddie, Ruby Moon Young, and Claude Graham. Photo courtesy of Elizabeth Sutherland.

I tau.P,ht in the Greenwoo d Hi p)1 School :from 1 931 throup:h 193 7. It was the depth of the Depression. My salary , as I recall was

~> 8 10

for 9 months. Elizabeth Sutherland

47


cla

ele

hel Paul H. Cale

the

Memories of Greenwood School

two

1935-Nov . 1946

bee

I came to the Albemarle County Public School System in September, 1931 and served through June 30, 1969.

I

began my principalship at Greenwood High

School in September, 1935 and continued until the end of November, 1946.

Mrs

for

The

our

eleven years plus at Greenwood were among the happiest of my thirty-eight

ope

years' service in the county.

tea

My first salary as principal of Greenwood High School was $1400 for nine

I have always

wel

felt that the faculty and pupils at Greenwood were among the best anywhere.

mov

There was an occasional exception, but very few.

gra

months.

When I left I was being paid $3900 for twelve months.

I also taught several classes each year. I

I was not only principal but

Until Ben F. Hurt joined us in 1940,

was coach of the boys basketball team, the baseball team and for several

years I also coached the girls basketball team. good win and loss record.

These teams ususally had a

In addition I sponsored the debate teams.

One year

pos dis to

both our affirmative and negative teams won the state championship for class

sta

III schools.

R.

I am sure this sounds like I am "blowing my own horn" but I can

truthfully say that our successes were largely due to the skills, enthusiasm,

Sc'h

determination and cooperation of the students.

Hi~

After a few years we became very crowded.

The upstairs of the building

anc

consisted of an auditorium, a stage and a folding partition in the back of the

Ber

auditorium

to

three

Sd

classrooms

adjacent

school

thE

48

close

off to

a the

section

for

a

classroom.

auditorium which

were

used

There for

were high


classrooms.

After

a

few

years

we

had

classes

in

the

auditorium

elementary class on the stage separated only by the stage curtain. help of the community, we petitioned the school board for relief.

and

an

With the Ultimately

the county built an addition on the west side of the building, consisting of two classrooms and a small gymnasium.

Years later one of these . classrooms

became a cafeteria. There was very close cooperation between the community and the school. Mrs.

William Massie and her daughter ,

Mrs.

Ella Smith, were

always

forefront leading many other parents in support of our program.

in the

As a faculty

our motto was three F's: "Be Fair, Be Firm, Be Friendly (not familiar)". operated on the fact that as teachers, "what

you~

We

teaches some, what you do

teaches more but what you are teaches most." Many of our graduates continued their education after graduation and did well.

A larger number settled in the community and in our county while others

moved

away.

If my

memory

serves

me

correctly,

I

have yet

to

hear

of

a

graduate of Greenwood bringing disgrace to this school. Pupils and teachers from Greenwood have often moved into administrative positions in education.

It is always risky to mention individuals in such a

discussion for fear of leaving some out, but I will designate a few who come to mind.

Frank Critzer, a former pupil, was superintendent for years in our

state; Archie Robertson, former principal, became superintendent in Virginia; R. Claude Graham, former principal , became Superintendent of Albemarle County Schools,

Leslie H.

Walton,

former

teacher,

became principal of Scottsville

High School and later served as superintendent of Albemarle County Schools; and I had the privilege of being Superintendent of Albemarle County Schools. Ben

F.

Hurt,

former

principal,

was

appointed

principal

of

Albemarle

High

' School in 1954 and has performed so effectively the

outstanding

high

school

principals

in

that he is regarded as one of the

state

of

Virginia.

Two

4g


graduates of Greenwood who are currently in administrative positions in the county are Charles Witt, Principal of Crozet Elementary School and Harry Kent, Principal

of

Brownsville

Elementary

School.

Both

of

whom

are

doing

an

excellent job. I think I can summarize my feelings concerning Greenwood by relating the fact that when I was asked to become the Assistant Superintendent of Albemarle County I declined the offer.

I told the authorities at that time that I did

not want to lenve the pupils at Greenwood High School.

Two weeks later the

Superintendent, Mr. Graham, urged me to accept his offer on basis.

~

le.a ve qf absence

He said, I v7ill put Ben F. Hurt in as principal in your pl a,ee and i f

you are not satisfied at the end of the year you can return and things will be as they were.

Before the year ended Mr.

Graham had accepted the job of

brat the

chi:

lucl

chi:

Director of Research and Planning in the State Department of Education and I was appointed Superintendent of Albemarle County Schools.

Tho,

In conclusion, I want to pay tribute to the former pupils of Greenwood High School who are now substantial citizens in our area.

Many of whom are

leaders in civic organizations and churches, and in general making Albemarle County a better place in which to live.

pri1

pri: the the

the路

cou wor

spo hel Gra str Paul Cale out on the playing field.

50


Margaret McCue Washington Class of 1938-1939

My first memory of the inside of Greenwood School was when I went with my brother, Purcell McCue, his last day in the first grade. the room seemed and how important I children.

I remember how big

felt sitting in a desk like the BIG

Later, as a student through high school I was always aware of being

lucky to attend a pretty school with high ceilings and big windows, room for a child to breathe. I have only happy memories of all the time I was at Greenwood School. Though there was firm discipline, Mr. Claude Graham and Mr. Paul Cale were i ~

=

principals,

there were

large amounts of kindness and consideration.

The

principal and teachers took a special interest in each child, as evidenced in their memories of indivjdual students years later:

There was an esprit among

the students that has continued through the years--and makes them proud to say

II

they attended Greenwood. Mr. Cale taught a Government class to seniors that was a college freshman course.

How lucky we were to have such an introduction to government and

world affairs. The faculty, of course, were the athletic coaches and they truly enjoyed sports.

They had faculty games after school and they spent their own time

helping students become better athletes. Graham didn 1 t

It certainly wasn 1 t

because Mr.

try to teach me that I couldn 1 t jump more than a few inches

straight up!

51

\

I


Greenwood childhood.

School

was

the

center

of

community

activities

during

my

Sometimes there were amateur productions directed by Miss Dorothy

Earp and later by Mrs. Harrison Waite.

There were plays or variety shows, the

latter featured our dignified fathers dressed in "beach pajamas" doing the Can Can.

The teachers and parents staged a Fall carnival with a parade, games,

bake sales and a supper.

In the Spri ng t here was an operetta with all of the

elementary children taking part.

There was one unforgettable year when Mrs.

Ruby Young was my teacher and I was the spirit of the Redbud tree.

Just at

the time the parents were to bring their children to dress for the program there was a

storm and a power failure.

I

remember riding around the dark

school with my Mother and Father saying, "There is no use in your going in, there can't be a play without electricity . " were to be here no matter what."

I replied, "Mrs. Young said we

Thanks to several fathers who held lanterns

to light the stage the show did go on!

This was on the small stage when the

auditorium was upstairs. Every year the Girl Scouts, who also had their meetings at the school, painted pine cones and decorated a community Christmas tree on the lawn in front of the main door.

Members of the community and local choirs came and

sang carols on Christmas Eve .

Colonel William R. Washington and his future bride at VPI in 1940.

52


t

n

k

e s e

n

d

Faculty of the early 30's.

Coach Virginia Rogers, far right, and her 1933 Girls Basketball Team. 1st row (1-r) Bertha Rea, Virginia Dowell, and Lavonia Burch. 2nd row (1-r) Louise Ellinger, Edna Kirby , and Elizabeth Skillman.

Class of 1940

53


During the early 1930's the land behind the school was leveled using WPA funds. Tennis courts were constructed near "Little Greenwood." A ball diamond was laid out just east of the courts. Along the eastern perimeter of the property basketball courts 路 were constructed, which were later replaced by the construction of the gym in 1938-39.

Ben

Mrs

Buc

yea

tra1

'

Soj l Wal or

dow:

The Ladies of Greenwood High prepare for Rally Day in 1939.

doo gat

tau

Strike!

dep

was

six

We had

whi Batter up!

fir Bench warming.

54

imp


Interview: Mrs. Leslie H. Walton By: Benjamin Sojka March 1984 Benjamin Sojka: "Where did you go to school?" Mrs. Walton:

"I went

Buckingham School. year.

I

to

Scottsville High School and before that

I went to

In elementary school I went to school four months of the

attended a

small

college

in West

Virginia for

one

quarter,

then

transferred to Farmville State Teacher's College in Farmville, Virginia." Sojka: "When did you first teach at Greenwood?" Walton: "The building was very different because we didn't have the gymnasium or the cafeteria or the library. downstairs.

We had four rooms upstairs and four rooms

There was an arrangement whereby two rooms upstairs had folding

doors and could be opened up together.

This is where all the students would

gather when we did have them together. At that time there were three teachers in the high school. taught some seventh grade and some high school.

One teacher

They had the seventh grade

departmentalized just as the high school was. Another thing that was quite different when I was there in the thirties was

that

there was

so many,

many students

in the classes.

I

think I

had

sixty-three first graders, and most of the classes above that had over fifty. We tried to do the best we could for them.

During the 1933-1934 year we also

had WPA painters come in and paint our classrooms while we were all in there, which made a very difficult situation. first

graders

important

that

people

in

year our

have

become

society.

I

But, we survived, and some of those business

leaders,

think perhaps

teachers

because we

and

had

very

such a

55


dreadfully hard time in those days, which was in the depth of the Depression,

he]

that we fought harder to make things happen that we wanted to happen. One thing that is quite different

in schools

today is

supplies except what the teachers themselves bought.

that we had no

And with the very low

salaries we had it was quite difficult to buy any supplies; in particular for so many students.

But we had some plusses too.

We had wonderful supervisors

and all three years I was there in the thirties we had wonderful principals. We

had Mr.

Claude

R.

Graham who went

on

to

become

the

Superintendent of

tee

alJ

slj

fo1

Albemarle Count y Schools and was later the assistant state superintendent of schools.

The last year I was there we had Mr.

Paul Cale, who later became

bar

Ruperintendent of Albemarle County Schools. 路.

One of the wonderful things that we had during those dark days of the thirties

was

that

the

people

Practically all of the time

of

~,.e

the

community

were

perfectly

wonderful.

That

was one of the little thin g s that would brighten up the room, and it made us think that they considered us important people.

Also, the same people would

It's hard for anybody to understand today how very hard it was to get food,

enough of

anything

in

y ou

would

hardly

believe

this

happened

ren

leE

gn

because

the

health

department rules wouldn't allow it, but we had an old oil stove in the big center hall, and on that stove in the mornings we cooked oatmeal.

The cereal

for that came in great big burlap bags which I haven't seen since that time. I don't know if it would be sold that way at all today.

dif

those depression days.

But, those people would come and they furnished us with supplies. Today

whj

yec

gather at the school and ask what they could do to help.

enough

tin

had a blooming plant of some kind in every

classroom that came from the greenhouses of one of the wealthy families.

enough clothes,

anc

We cooked oatmeal for

the children who had not . had breakfast at home and at lunchtime we had soup.

bej

sd

yec to SUl

ei~

up The

56

federal

government

furnished money to pay some ladies who came in and


l,

helped a little bit with that.

Of course, all this was served right on the

desks in the classrooms. 10

In the classrooms there were not many attractive things.

)W

)r

rs 3.

Jf Jf ne

There was the

teacher's desk, some desks for the children, a blackboard and that was about all the equipment that we had.

There was no such thing as movie

slide

even

projectors.

We

didn't

have

a

Victrola.

But,

pr~jectors

we

were

or

very

fortunate to have some teachers who were pretty good at leading children in music.

I wasn 1 t

one of them.

We combined first and second grades and had

bands and all kinds of singing groups and enjoyed it very much. As bad as a lot of these things sound it was really a wonderful school

he

1. ry at us ld

,et

路s.

.th

dg

!al

and it was one of the outstanding schools in the County of Albemarle at that time. Now going up to the time that I came back to Greenwood in the fifties, which was different.

not

quite

thirty years

later,

but

things were

somewhat

At that time we still had lunch served in our own rooms.

I don 1 t

remember what year the cafeteria came, but I year or two later.

almost,

don't believe it came until a

At least a gymnasium had been built and we had many, many

less students in classes than we had in the thirties. I

am one of the few teachers in the county,

grade from first

grade through twelfth grade.

I

think, who taught every

In doing that I moved from

being a first grade teacher the first time I was at Greenwood to being a high school teacher the last time I was there.

I went back in the middle of the

year when Mr. Hurt lost one of his teachers because she was ill. to teach seventh grade and I think I had forty-two students.

I went back

I'm not exactly

te. sure of the ages, but I think they varied in age from about twelve up to about

' or eighteen or nineteen.

When those people were promoted to eighth grade I moved

tp. up to eighth grade,

and they following year when they moved up to ninth I

md

moved up to ninth grade with them.

Some of those are my favorite students of

57


all because I knew them so well and had them for so

long~

Of course, I didn't

teach them all of their classes in the eighth and ninth grades.

I taught them

was t

history and geography, and when they were seniors I had them in government

team,

class.

there

Sometimes I taught English in high school too.

It was a wonderful

experience."

Sojka

Sojka: "When you taught there the first time there were just eleven grades?" Walton: "There were eleven grades both times.

Walto

We didn't have twelve grades

could

until we moved to Albemarle." Sojka: "I know that the boys played baseball and basketball. play

anythin~

Did the girls

like that?"

Walton: "Yes they did.

very

respo

But I can't tell you much about what was going on when

I was a first grade teacher for the simple reason I had so many children to

perio

coach

look after I didn't know what went on in the upper grades! I do know that Mr. Graham coached the girls basketball team,

which was

that.

He was

a

else .

four-letter man at Emory and Henry University and he was quite a good coach.

howl

The boys had equally good teams, but I can't remember i f he did all the

Sojk;

one of

the best

in the

county and usually won

coaching or whether Mr. Jones helped him. when I went there.

their

games.

Mr. Jones was the other man teacher

Later on when Mr. Cale came he did some coaching.

as his helper Mr. Ikenberry.

He had

Greenwood always had outstanding athletic teams.

Back in those days we had what was called Rally Day.

Rally Day was a big

athletic event held on what was then the athletic field at the University. All the schools in the county participated and everybody in school could take part in some game or other. the way up. basketball something

They had games geared for first graders and all

For people who were not athletic enough to be on baseball or teams

like

there were that.

Every

games

student

Greenwood often won those Rally Days.

58

of

rolling balls or running games or had

an

opportunity . to

participate.

Univâ&#x20AC;˘ Walt1 abou coun spea peop was only grad grot Sojl


-- - . . . . .

t

n t

1

-

....-:::-

'};'

I remember more about baseball when I was there in the fifties because I was teaching in the high school and I was usually at the games. team, I remember, was outstanding.

The baseball

Mr. Hurt was the . principal when I was

there in the fifties and he did a lot of coaching." Sojka: "Were there bleachers around the ball field?" Walton: "Yes, although they were very simple ones with boards and supports we

s

could sit on.

As you face the school they were in the back left hand corner.

There was also girl's and boy ' s basketball, and there were a good many s

very a-thletic people. responsible for

n 0

period, but

~•e

We did have physical education.

some game.

We did play volleyball in physical education

didn't play other teams outside of school.

a

I happened to have

coached v olleyball and I remember that. Mr. Hurt insisted on good, strong sportsmanship.

s

Each teacher was

He always stood for

that.

He always believed that you didn't protest referee's calls or any thing

else.

You accepted it.

I can remember a great many times when we

wonder~d

how he was able to control his feeU.ngs, but he has always been able to •"

.e

:r

.d

Sojka: "When you were teaching high school did you have graduation at the University and did they receive diplomas there?" Walton: "Yes, they received diplomas there. about 1928 or 1929 .

.g

county together. speaker.

:e

.1

people.

That was started in the county

They started holding graduation exercises for the whole

The reason for that was that they could have an outstanding

They could have a better program because it was for a number of Before, when they had graduation at the seven small high schools, it

was hard to have very much of a graduation ceremony when some of the schools

'r

only graduated ten or twelve students each year.

r

graduation in Cabell Hall at the University it was a big improvement.

When they started having Each

group marched in together and all the principals took part in the ceremony." Sojka: "Did you have physical education teachers?"

59


Walton: "No, we had no phy.s ical education teachers as such.

the

little

folks,

as

I

remember.

the

Everybody in the high

hook

We had staggered classes for

Sojk

other classes took the phys;lcal education period. school had physical education at the same time.

The teachers of

We had only outside playgrounds,

sometimes the weather wasn't so that we could get out at all.

so

But, in those

Walt in

t

days the first, second and third grade teachers would combine and take their

Cent

children out at one time.

You can see how many there were from the numbers we

scho

Then we would come back in and the rest of the elementary

mean

have talked about.

children would go out.

The high school had their physical education at a

Sojk

different time. One thing that has changed about Greenwood is that some area was added to the playground. '

thin

It wasn't nearly as large in the thirties as it was when I

Gree

Walt

In the fifties we sometimes took the students over

mone

to the Greenwood Community Center on bad days because there was room for us to

some

have various things, and they usually let us come and use that building."

days

路Sojka: "Was this during the fifties?"

seen

Walton: "Yes.

The Community Center was built between the two times I taught

to C

at Greenwood.

It was built as a memorial to the people who were in World War

Scot

came back in the fifties.

II.

It hadn't been built very many years when I was there.

I think, in 1948 or 1949, but I don't remember exactly.

It was finished,

it "

I was there when it

Sojka: "Had the gym been built when you were at Greenwood in the fifties?" Walton: "The gymnasium had been built before 'I went there in 1951.

I think it

migl

had been there some time before that.

One reason

Lad~

I'm not sure on this is .that I stopped teaching when I left Scottsville and

sevE

moved to this side of the county.

tha1

I'm not sure about that.

I

My husband came to the Central Office and I

had not planned to go back to teaching.

Had Mr. Hurt not lost that teacher in

thit


the middle of the year, I suppose I wouldn't have.

But, bnce I got back I was

hooked again, so I did stay on for a long time after that." Sojka: "Why didn't you have physical education in the gym?" Walton: "I believe it must have been because the regular teams were practicing in there.

If the boys were practicing we would take the girls over to the

Center and do folk dancing or something like that. school groups up.

We did divide the high

When I say we had physical education at the same time I

mean the same period of time, but every teacher had a group doing different things."

~

\

Sojka: "Was the one room school house still there when you went to teach at Greenwood?" Walton: "No, I don't even know where that was.

Mr. Ortman had given some

money to the community as a gift to help build Greenwood. some money to help the county huild other schools.

Mr. Mcintire gave

Those people back in those

days helped so much, but when you think today of what they gave it doesn't seem like so much money.

I don't know exactly how much money Mr. Ortman gave

t

to Greenwood, but I know Mr. Mcintire gave twenty-five thousand dollars to the

r

Scottsville School.

That was a great deal of money in those days; and today

it wouldn't even build one classroom. t

Greenwood

is

one

of

the

prettiest

county

schools,

and

I

feel

very ~

.

distressed that it will no longer be used. When we go back and talk about the thirties, as depressing as that period

.t

might seem to people today, there were many interesting things that happened â&#x20AC;˘

1n

Lady Astor and her sister, Mrs. Brand, came and spoke to my first grade class

td

several times and were so interested in us.

I

that they could be.

Ln

think about their willingness to come and help us, it made things a lot eas i er

They were most helpful in any way

All the people of the Greenwood community were.

When I

than it might have been under the circumstances.

61 .

l


Lady Astor was the

pe~son

who helped dedicate the Community Center.

also came for a visit to my high school classes. people,

like Mr.

C.

Purcell McCue,

She

Then there were other

Sr. , who came and spoke.

He was the

Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Albemarle County at the time.

He VOL.

spoke to my government classes on government in Albemarle County.

There was

also a gentleman, Mr. Hugh Clark, who was connected with the school system and

ToM was also very knowledgeable about government.

and fo "Green

He spoke to my classes, but was

For

very reluctant to do so because he had not had the opportunity to attend high school.

He knew so much about Albemarle County that we benefitted a great

deal by his visit." Sojka: "In the thirties - was there an upstairs auditorium?" Walton: "Yes.

Wean

The first grade classroom that I had is now the library.

that room and the office were two rooms.

room.

Over

That was

Then you went down a little way and you were in the other

There was no hall there.

You just went into that room.

When we needed

to use it as an auditorium there were folding doors between the two rooms that were opened up.

principa wish the

As you went upstairs on the left end

of the big hall you came right to a door that turned to the left. one of those rooms.

princip time M will nev efforts a Wood th today.

' The ba pointmen triumphit The girb cup. 1MJ promisin( ferent res The sc<

When we had a special speaker, or something like that, the

doors were opened.

There were two other classrooms up there.

Ea Mt

The sixth grade

Sc<

cr.

was the one right over my first grade room.

Re Stc

In those days we did some fun things too.

Mr.

Shield Cri tzcr and a Ea Mt

number of other community people put on a musical and dance program that was known as a minstrel show.

Cn Re Stc

They charged a little admission, and that helped

the school to have some things that we couldn't have had otherwise. their dress rehearsal for

Sec

the boys at Miller School.

They had

I helped with the

costumes for the minstrel show." Sojlta: "Thank you, Mrs. Walton."

For ovt subscripti was divid grades, w prize was the most

At

)

62

th~ ,

first plac school. , 1 place. 1 Along v advertiser place agai A . tota.

about SlC


.

-

-

-

.e

,r

Greenwood Echoes

Le le

VOL. I, No.1

GREENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL, Greenwood, Va .. December, 1935

lOc a Capy

lS

ld iS

~h

3.t

er nd

as .er ed Lat

:he tde

a .ras

ped rtad

the

)

DEDICATION

CARNIVAL

To Mr. R. Claude Graham, our very dear friend and former principal, we dedicate this first issue of "Greenwood Echoes." For seven years Mr. Graham was a teacher and principal of Greenwood High School. During that time Mr. Graham established many principJes which will never be forgotten. It was through his unerring efforts and his deep interest in the welfare of Greenwood that our school has grown to be what it is today. We are proud that we have had Mr. Graham as a principal of Greenwood High School, and for him we wish the ~st that life can give.

The annual school carnival was held November 16, beginning at six o'clock. Although the rain held back many, a large crowd of patrons and friends attended . The first event was a supper served by teachers and school girls. Food was furnished by the local community folk. The next attraction was an interesting entertainment in the way of music, by a group including Mr. Chisholm. Then came the main event of the evening, a one act play entitled , "The Teeth of the Gift Horse." Our last attraction was a short minstrel directed by Mr. Harrison. Added attractions were bingo, the faculty baby show and a popularity contest. An approximate sum of $75.00 was cleared.

The Basketball Season The basketball season ended this year as a disappointment to all. Neither of the teams succeeded in triumphing over the other county teams this year . The girls were especially unfortunate in losing the cup. However, the material for next year looks very promising and we are looking forward to seeing different results next year. The scores for the games are as follows: GIRLS

Earlysville, 20; Greenwood, 13. Meriwether Lewis, 46; Greenwood, 6. Scottsville, 2l; Greenwood, 13. Crozet, 46; Greenwood, 16. Red Hill, 43; Greenwood, 8. Stony Point, 18; Greenwood, 16.

BOYS Earlysville, 37; Greenwood, 22 . Meriwether Lewis, 3.?; Greenwood, 10. Scottsville, 33; Greenwood, 23 . Crozet, 31; Greenwood , 11. Red Hill, 21 ; Greenwood , 15 . Stony Point, 22; Greenwood, 19.

Subscription Campaign For over two weeks Greenwood High School held a subscription campaign for this paper. The contest was divided into two groups-the high school and grades, with each group competing within itself. A prize was given to the pupil in both groups getting the most subscriptions. At th~ close of the contest 拢.1u1Jis Apperson rated first ph~ce with Julius Craig as second in the high school. I In the grades Theodosia Shirley won fir'st place. Along with the subscription contest a campaign for 路 advertisements was held. Phyllis ~pp_enu:m_ won first place again with Julius Craig as second. A . total of 123 subscriptions was obtained with about $100 in advertisements:.

Physical Education Our physical education class natut;;~lly falls intn two groups. The first group consists of all girls in the high school not interested in basketball. The second group consists of all boys in the high school not interested in the same sport. Shortly after school opened, each group was orga.tized into teams. The girls are divided into four teams with about ten on each team . Team A, the " Ambitious Alligators", is led by Bertha Kirby. Team B, the "Bears", is led by Edyth Kirby. Team C, the "Champions", is led by Eleanor Anderson. Team D , the "Dangerous Ducks," is led by Irene Clayton . The boys are divided into two teams with about ten on each team. Team A chose James Garwood as captain , and team B, Eugene Black as captain. The athletic equipment consists of two volley balls, two nets, two play ground balls with several bats, a football and a ball used for dodge ball. The two classes meet every day for a half h~u ~, just before lunch. During this period the teams ih each class engage in the various games with Miss Smith directing the girls, and Mr. Ikenberry directing the boys.

ENROLLMENT This year Greenwood has a total enrollment of 346 pupils. The enrollment by grades: First Grade, 50; Second Grade, 55; Third Grade, 38; Fourth Grade, 33 ; Fifth Grade, 30: Sixth Grade, 34; Seventh Grade, 33; Eighth Grade, 34; Ninth Grade, 18; Tenth Grade, 10; Eleventh Grade, 11.

63


Imm Remembering

I

By James Clifton Garwood

l

beca

Class of 1938

fam

scar I

started

in

school

at

Greenwood

in

1930,

in

the

fourth

grade.

My

(whe

mother, who was self taught, had taught me the rudimentary ABC's and numbers

gues

and how to read and write so that after going to the old Blue Ridge School in Nelson County a couple of years, I was able to go on to fourth grade when we

clas

moved to Albemarle.

part

Not much of teachers' Foster,

the

early years

stands

out vj_vidly.

names: Ruby Young, Louise Tharpe

a well known and respected fixture

high school

there was

Paul Cale replaced R.

Virginia Hughes,

I

do . remember

some

Hele

(Burton), and of course, Lillian

memo

for many years.

of a

Later in early

Kathryn Smith and Miss

Claude Graham as principal.

Plummer F.

Sutherland. Jones taught

he I the

chemistry and math as did John W. Ikenberry, whose sister Ruth, taught with my

wart

wife in Fairfax County years later.

Jun:

There was music. that

he

teach

the

He used to lead the assembled classes in a sort of cheerleading song

not

had

a

fellow named Gates who came in weekly,

adapted

from

Skinner-Ma-Rink-A-Dink-A-Dink.

some

folk

rhyme.

It

Skinner-Ma-Rink-A-Doo.

went

I

think

to

something

like:

whe

Greenwood we love you.

We love you in the morning, and we love you in the evening when the stars are

was

seem to remember that Gates

tiu

shining bright.

Skinner-Ma-Rink-A-etc.

etc.

I

died of ptomaine poisoning from a can of potted meat, quite unconnected with the song, but it doesn't take much imagination to recall the parodies or the words some of us boys used to sing.

64

thE


Junior

Toms

was

a

real

strong

presence

and

influence

Immensely popular, he had a sense of prankish humor. I

looked up

to him and

because there was a

family car was a 35 Chevrolet.)

my

life.

Being somewhat younger,

loved to buddy around with him,

car in his family.

in

mainly I'm sure,

(He later had a Model A,

but the

He always seemed to be able to rustle up

scarce money for gas and refreshments, both of which was pretty cheap in 1938 [y

(when I

路s

guess.

~n

re

graduated).

The

I' 11 never forget

gas was

generally ESSO,

the refreshments you can

one time not too long before graduation,

the senior

class was in a study period on the second floor which had a stage and could be partitioned off.

At any rate, we were all up there:

Junior, Frances Mann,

ne

Helen Mensing, Harleth Wiley, Tom Wyant and others (who pray should forgive

3.n

memory), when Junior decides to put on some entertainment.

ly

of a girl's lower basketball garment, not shorts, more like old "bloomers" and

d.

he proceeded to pull them on, up over his britches and cavorted around before

ht

the

my

warned him that Mr. Cale might come up the back stairs at any moment.

class

with

predictable

and

loudly hilarious

~y

He had gotten hold

results.

Well,

somebody But,

Junior said not to worry because Mr. Cale always clears his throat approaching

lCh

mg

~e:

JU,

tre

tes

ith

he

the top landing.

Well, this time Mr. Cale didn't run true to form, at least

not audibly, and Junior might as well have been caught with his pants down when Paul popped onto that scene. But Paul Cale was never the strict disciplinarian that R, Claude Graham was, so the prankster was probably made to feel more shame than pain by the time the punishment was meted out.

I don't remember.

Any way, looking back, it would be hard to say frankly whether those were the best or happiest years of my life.

But, then again, what else.

With fondest regards to all of those from that, old school, among us now.

65


Anne (Holsinger) Dunn 1938 to 1971

Nestled in the valley below the Blue Ridge Mountains is the little community of Greenwood where I taught school for thirty-three years. I had heard stories, native to East Virginia people, such as (tote the water, carry the children to school, stop up the chickens and drive to pasture) which always amused me.

the hoss

Although my family teased me, I never

acquired these expressions but soon became accustomed to these localisms. I chose to live in the community while teaching there so I have quite a few memories of these years. Greenwood was a nice community to teach and I found the patrons very cooperative and interested in their work.

Several years of my teaching there,

I visited each home of the children represented in my room. visited more than forty homes.

One year I

These visits were made after school hours and

some were quite a distance from the school.

This seemed such a worth while

project as it helped us to know and understand the children better and also it gave teachers a chance to get together, as we usually shared rides. The first 10 years of my teaching at Greenwood was done in the second grade.

The first grade teacher, (who was Miss McLaughlin at that time) and I

worked

closely

together

and we

had

a

few

unusual

experiences which we

i

reminisce on occasions. One day when our principal (Mr. Paul Cale) was called away from school, a snake crawled into the girls' restroom.

A little second grade girl, thinking

it was a belt, attempted to pick it up and was bitten on her wrist.

The high


school boys killed the snake and Miss McLaughlin and I 'took the little girl to the Crozet doctor in my two-passenger Dodge.

That night I got a .call from my

principal saying that the child was in the UVA Hospital quite ill and "Where is the snake?"

The snake was found and it turned out to be a copperhead.

â&#x20AC;˘

The

little girl recovered and she too, still remembers the experience .. Another experience which stands out in my mind also happened when our principal was called away from school. arm.

One of my second grade boys broke his

We were told to take the boy to the clinic at UVA Hospital.

So Miss

McLaughlin and I started to the Hospital in my two-passenger Dodge.

Imagine

two green horns trying to find the clinic at UVA Hospital today.

Well, we got

him through the clinic and started to his home which was far up the ridge. The boy was too sick to walk so Miss McLaughlin and I picked him up and made our way to his home . There is a jovial side to one of the stories which my family and friends used to tease me.

I often wore a black dress or suit to school as black was

one of my favorite colors.

One day a little first grade boy (trying to pay me

a compliment) said, "Miss Holsinger, when you wear black, you look just like a witch." Maybe that sort of fixed my love for wearing black.

i

[

~

a

g

h Boys basketbaU team 1938-39.

67


It

WI

the I Elizabeth Turner Hobbs play Class of 1938

schoc I, Elizabeth Massie Turner, graduated from Greenwood High School in 1938 along with 12 other young people. first

entered and

Mr. R. Claude Graham was principal when I

then when he became Superintendent,

Mr.

Paul Cale was

playE

busec

Principal. In the early school years, which were depression years, many children

the

sunbl would come to school hungry.

I distinctly remember a group of mothers got

together and prepared vegetable soup and hot cocoa on alternate days. who could, paid a nickel and it was delicious (the soup). right there in the front hall on an oil stove.

Ones

It was all fixed

There was no cafeteria, of

course, so on good days we ate outside, on the grass or on the curb.

On

rainy

days we sat at our desks. I also remember we had no gymnasium (all sports were outside) so you can imagine the level of noise inside on rainy days with hundreds of restless bodies.

Discipline was strict. \<1e expected it and behaved ourselves and the

only time I remember being sent to the principal's office was for reading my English book i? history class.

I was so humiliated, I wet my pants.

In the eighth grade in Latin Class, under Miss Geraldine Fray, it was so tempting to be mischievous.

Ginger snaps were passed around at one time and

every time someone took a bite, the noise was so audible, she would jerk her head up and stare.

We did not keep that up long, too strenuous.

Going back to the grade school days--3rd, 4th, and 5th grade eras--every spring time was a big production of a play in which every child was included.

68


It was a marvelous gathering of the families and everyone took such pride in the participants.

Mrs. Ruby Moon Young was mostly responsible.

As teenagers, 13 and 14, we tried to be very smart and thought we would play bridge dmm behind a clump of weeds way over in the NE corner of the school yard.

Someone tattled on us

Such

and our cards were confiscated.

indignation! Rally Day every s pring was a nother event we all looked forward to.

We

played games and relay s at L<'!mbeth Field at the University and we were all bused down for the day. the

County.

Pre-runner

There was competition with the other high schools in of

phy sical

fitness

and

what

a

bunch

of

tired,

sunburned, but happy kids that night.

Girl's Basketball Team 1938-1939 1st row: Margaret Woodson. 2nd row: Helen Bailes, Peggy Foster, Mary Virginia Tomlin, Jack Shirley, and Bertha Collins. 3rd row: Margaret McCue, Louise Grasty , Dorothy McQuenn, and Katie Barksdale. Photo submitted by Mrs. Geraldine Haney who coached the team.

69


p

rn

a I REMEMBER

w

By Bertha Durrer Detamore

I remember my five years

(1937-1942) at Greenwood High School as being

very special in my teaching career.

While there I matured as a teacher of

young children through the wonderful help of my principal, Mr. Paul Cale, and all of my co-workers. I remember my large first grade classes there. the forties and fifties.

Those classes averaged in

The great interest and good behavior of my students

highlighted these years. I grade

remember

the operettas produced by the

Rhythm Band,

my helping with

the

High

elementary grades, School Chorus,

building of an addition right on the end of my room.

and

my first even

the

I can almost hear the

drilling and pounding even after all these years. I

remember living in the

activities there.

How could I

Gr~enwood

Community and attending church and

ever forget a sleigh riding party one night

which resulted in a banged up knee for me! We had many happy experiences boarding together.

When there were seven

or eight of us boarding at the McCues we would sometimes have . a game or two of "set back" right after dinner.

70

But, then, it was "back to work" again (daily


plans, grading papers, making seatwork, etc.). And I remember the many influential people in the community who did so many things to help make Gr.eenwood an

outstandin~

school •

Those five years were happy day s for me! I am glad I had the opportunity and privilege to have been there. I

have taught many years and at several different schools but Greenwood

will always be "special" and evoke many fond memories .

.ng of md

in

tts

~st

:he

:he

md

Bertha Detamore's first grade class of 1939-40. Her classes averaged between 40 and 50 pupils; this class totaled 43 .

~ht

ren

of

ly '·

Greenwood School's Rhythm Band of 1941-42.

71


(3~EE~ft'()()()

f£11()Ei HIGH SCHOOL

GREtNWOOD GREENWOOD. VIRGINiA

. ......... . ... . . . .. . .. .. .. .. ... . . ........ . .... . ... .

•••• • ••• •••• •••••• • • •

. . . ........ . ...... . . . . .. ... ..... .. ... ... . . ......... .. .. .. u

(31

I

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • . •• • • • • •• • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • •

··· · · · · ··-········.

•• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • •

••• • • • • •

November 1942

··-· · ·· · ·· · "' '" ' ' ' ' '''' '''' ' '''' ' ' '' '''''

................................................................................. "'················-···· ········-···························································· ············· ···· ····· ··············

L I T ERARY P AGE November 1942 United States of America November 10, 1942 Dear Adolf, By now you must know we are fighting for something, but not what .you think we are fighting for. We're not fighting for world conquest--we're not fighting for more weaJth to our own country--we're not fighting to whip your storm troopers-We're fighting for the ideals of the little people of the world. We're not just fighting to win the war but to preserve the freedom of thought, freedom of speech, freedom of press, freedom of religion and the pursuit of happiness. We're fighting so Joe and Emma can raise all the chickens they want; so that George can work in the factory all day and come home at night to a good meal and read the newspaper about his son who is the captain of the high school's football team and about what the President is doing; that Jimmy and Jane can go to see Mickey Rooney on the screen at their favorite theatre. We don't ask for much. All we want is a good steady job to work at--A wife and children to take care of--A good home where a fellow can live in peace and quiet to be left alone, because he will mind his own business if the next fellow leaves him alone. We want friendly neighbors. A neghbor isn't just the person who lives next door to you who borrows sugar from you, he's your

neighbor whether he lives far or near, no matter what race or nationality he is. Our forefathers thought this country worth fighting for, so they fought for it. Some of them· lived to gain fame and some were killed. They didn't fight because they thought they would get a medal--They fought because they thought this country was worth preserving so that their children arid their children's children might enjoy the freedoms they themselves so desired. Yes, some of them· died, but not in vain. We have those freedoms. This country has been a haven for millions of peoples who have been oppressed and tortured by your kind of government. Ask them what they thinkof your so-called "New Order"! It has been said that democracies are weak, that your kind of government is all powerful, that your race is destined to rule. Has it been proven? No! It has also been said that we democrats are slow--that the dictator governments are masters of speed. Yes, you've broken all records and set a new one, because no one has ever seen the speed with which your soldiers are retreating in Egypt. So we're weak are we? What about the Marines at Guam and Wake Island? At Guadalcanal? No, Adolf, it hasn' t been proven and it never will be. As Ever Yours, Sam By John W. Page

'1

before begine ends c be the

J

be pi Those Deane Doller the re I

repreE

1

and w: are ir

1

will · the ti

have Mr. H now i1

great and 1 perhaJ progr•

some ; Afric; Bates' Baber

1

the Greem


(31<fE~W()()()

ICI1()fi HIGH SCHOOL

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.

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.. .. . .

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... .

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.

. .

GREENWOOD GREENWOOD. VI RGINlA

. . . . . . . . 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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• •• •• ••• • •• •

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• • •• •• • •

December 1942-January 1943 -·-······························ .. ········ ................ ········· ··· · ..................... ...................... ............... ....................................................................................................................... .. L I T E RARY

P A GE

Jan. 1943 CHRISTMAS PAGEANT WILL BE CLOSING FEATURE

IF WE COULD ONLY GET LICENSES TO DRIVE OUR TONGUES

The closing feature of school before the Christmas holidays, which begins December 23, 1942 at 4:30 and ends on January 4, at 10:00 A.M. will be the annual Christmas Program. A Pageant, "Christ is Born" will be presented by the high school. Those having the leading parts are Deane Wade as the Madonna , Alfred Dollens as Joseph and Ann Wiley as the reader. Each of the grades will also be represented in the program. The program will begin at 3:30 and will last one hour. All parents are invited to attend. Through this year's program, we will try to leave with the audience the true Christmas spirit.

When you stop and think of the comparison between an automobile and the human tongue, we find they are very similar. Both, if handled with care, are very precious objects, and we can think of the many benefits derived from them, but the real good derived is found in the driver himself. We often find we're getting both in tight scrapes. Carelessness, in the case of the automobile, and thoughtlessness in the case wHh the tongue is the hardest to control. With some, they wish no better than to converse with a friend. To me, personally, if deprived the use of the tongue I would be as a ship without a sail; although I am often guilty of running my tongue in a side ditch and most commonly too fast. We can think of many such instances when our tongues have caused much trouble. We must learn to drive our tongues wisely if we wish to make advancement in this world, since every day we are putting our -tongues to tests, and as with the car, the more we drive it the better. So the more we use our tongues to advantage, the more pleasant are our speeches for others to hear. Many times we speak our thoughts without having one second's thought, and many times were are regretful. The tongue if used to an advantage, is one of our greatest assets, but if misused, can prove our worst liability.

NEWS FROM MR. HURT January 1943 During the past week two letters have been received at Greenwood from Mr. Hurt, our former teacher, who is now in North Africa. From his letters he has seen a great deal of action. He said rains and mud there are plentiful, and perhaps prevent the allies from progressing as they would otherwise. It may be of special interest to some that on his trip from Ireland to Africa he met a Baber boy from Batesville, who must have been Elmo Baber. He said he is looking forward to the time when. he can get back to Greenwood to see his friends.

Nancy Shepherd Tenth Grade

73


(31 Annie Mae Butler Wade's Memories of Greenwood

1942-1947

Many memories

come

Greenwood High School.

to mind when

I

think back to my

five

years

at

This was my first teaching assignment and I did not

know the teachers and was not familiar with the Greenwood Community. I remember meeting many fine students and teachers many of whom have been friends since , that time.

Some of the teachers I will always associate with

Greenwood are Mrs. Ruby Young, Mrs. Louise Burton, Miss Genie Shirley, Mrs. Belle Dunn Bing and Mrs. Anne Holsinger Dunn.

The advice and expertise of

these and other teachers and Mr. Paul Gale, who was principal, have meant a great deal to me in my years of teaching . The community and school (teachers and students) worked very closely to promote a school with high ideals and a good education for the students.

Many

speakers, assemblies, clubs, student programs and sports events were provided to

enhance

the

academic

curriculum.

Patriotism was

very

evident with

a

"Victory Corps," the sale of war bonds and stamps and paper drives just to mention a few of the many activities. I

remember sponsoring a singing club, a knitting club, a folk dancing

club, organizing junior and senior picnics and parties, helping with senior plays,

and the yearbook,

coaching basketball with one county championship

team, playing basketball games with teachers against former students and the list could go on and on.

Dear

rollE much hard: pal .figh1 Inst• for and' 1

name I ha·. do k to lett you know go in all they thou of Than folk than land brav of free enot thar peoi wort« and in e

its is c he bet1

74


(JI<fE~W()()()

I£11()Ei HIGH SCHOOL

GREENWOOD GREENWOOD. VI RGINlA ........................................................................ ........................................................................................................... November 1943

··-···-·- ................................. ····-··········· ············· ..................................................... ......................

L I T E RARY ears

at

d id not

tve been t e with Y, Mr s . t i se of meant a

se ly to Ma ny •rovided with jus t

a to

dancing seni or i on s hip

and the

P AGE

Batesville, Virginia November 8, 1943 Dear Jim, As the first day of November rolled in, I started thinking of how much we have to be thankful for. It hardly seemed possible that my best pal would be over in the Pacific fighting Japs this tinie last year. Instead, I dreamed of your being here for the usual holiday and the turkey an~ the gravy with the fixins! There are so many things I could name we have to be thankful for that I hardly know where to begin. Well I do know that I'm thankful to be able to sit down and write you this letter, knowing that it will reach you safely some day. I'm thankful to know that though there is a great war going on, our service men will get all the turkey and gravy with fixins they want, even though they are thousands of miles away in theaters of war. They will get their Thanksgiving letters from their folks, wives and sweethearts. I'm thankful that this country is "the land of the free and the home of the brave", I'm thankfu l that the people of this great country have their freedom and realize it and are brave enough to fight and die for it. I'm thankful for the fact that the people of America have learned to work together for their common cause and to go forth with their great task in spite of all difficulties. Labor has the right to choose its own working capacity. If a man is dissatisfied with his work or pay , he may either quit or strike for better hours and wages.

... ···· ·············· ......................... .................................................. ..... .

The working man in America has many prospective agencies to help him throughout life. We are certainly all thankful for that. There are labor unions, life and accident insurance policies , social securities , old age pens i ons and many others. These are a comfort to every working man and promote his prosperity. Above all, I'm thankful that thi s country is so based on the foundation of freedom and liberty that the people still carry on with the usual ceremony and celebration of Thanksgiving Day, because it means so much to them--even in time of war. A Thanksgiving Day has been set aside as a holiday because the people of today feel that it is an ample time to thank God fo r his goodness in maki ng possible a good harvest as did the Pi lgrims centuries ago. We're going to keep it that way. May your harvest of Japs be plentiful and your stomach . full of good old American turkey! Affectionately yours, Joe , P.S. Don't forget the "fixin's". By John Page

~

"Wise people know good manners in The h ome pay steady dividends, So they work just as hard to win Their families as they do their friends."

75


(JI<fl~ff()()()

l£11()li GREENWOOD . HIGH SCHOOL

···-·································································

. ...G-~-~-~-NY.!..9.9 .P. . . Y...!..~§.I _N .~-~·-· · · · · · ·· · · · · · · ..· ·· -··· · ···· · · · ·· ·-·· · · · · -· 1943/1944

··-········································ ....................................................................................................._.... ....

MR. HENRY CHILES SPEAKS TO THE STUDENT BODY December . l943 A talk was given by Mr. Henry Chiles to the students of Greenwood, on December 1st, in which he pointed out why we should be honest and truthful. ' He used an illustration of a king who was very rich, but he was still unhappy. He was told to wear the shirt of an honest man, and he would . become happy. When the honest man was brought to the king he was not wearing a shirt because he had given it to someone who needed it more than he did. This proved that the man was very honest. He also said to help your friends in any way you could. You are made happy by rendering help rather than receiv;d.ng it, I think the students were/ benefitted by his speech.

··············································· ·····························

L I T ERARY

P AGE

April 1944 SUCCESS Success is speaking words of praise, In cheering other people's ways; In doing just the best you can,

During the past week, Mr. Cale received a letter from Mr. Hurt, our former teacher, who is now in Tunisia. He says the valley which he is in is simply beautiful and he is stocking up many experiences which he plans to relate when he makes his return to Greenwood.

rc

With every task and every plan. It's silence when your speech would hurt, Politeness when your neighbor's curt; It's deafness when the scandal flows,

tl

And sympathy with other's woes. It's loyalty when duty calls,

d;

It's courage when disaster falls; It's patience when the hours are long,

NEWS FROM MR. HURT April 1944

w;;

01

s'

It' s found in laughter and in song, It's in the silent time of prayer, In happiness and in despair;

b

In all of life and nothing less; We find the thing we call success. Joanne Witt Eighth Grade

t t

a d

76

1


e

MEMORIES By Addie Gentry Milton

As I crossed the Blue Ridge Mountains in the spring of 1942 I was sure I was making the right decision corning to Albemarle County to teach. roses and honeysuckle were in bloom.

The wild

The country side was a picture.

I was_ having my final interview with Mr. Graham, the superintendent and my first with Mr. Gale, the principal of Greenwood School, as I was graduating from Madison College in June.

It was pointed out to me that day by Mr. Gale,

that he expected my first grade class to be well disciplined. Later that summer I carne to Crozet by bus and was met by Mr. Gale and daughter Suzanne at the drug store.

Suzanne announced that her mother had

gone to the hospital that day to get a baby brother.

I felt I should return

on the next bus but Mr. Gale took me on the Greenwood.

After seeing the

school, "the Country Store", blacksmith shop and garage, I asked to see the town, but was informed "this was it." vle

went over to the Purcell McCues and made arrangements for room and

board as that was where "teachers roomed and boarded." Dad and Mother bought me the first of September to McCues.

They took me

to the Post Office at the railroad station, as I knew that was so far away that I would never get stamps again. As I entered the Post Office a grey bearded gentleman took one look at me and remarked loud enough for me to hear, "Look, there goes one of those new d

school teachers."

He was the railroad agent Mr. Justice, whom I later

learned to know as a "fine gentleman."

77


Pre-school conference consisted of one day.

Purcell McCue, Jr. and I

went to Mcintire School auditorium for this occasion.

Purcell was going to

teach but his career was interrupted that year by a call from Uncle Sam.

playi

Bourne Wayland filled the year out.

child

Mother and I had labored over a navy blue crepe dress with lots of tucks which I wore with a red hat for this one day conference at Mcintire School. This was the appropriate dress for the occasion.

rare

As strange as it may seem

now, I fitted in with the rest of my appearance. By the time I

devel

indiv

lived through the first day of school and "all those

fell

children" I wondered many times if I still had not been better off in Monterey raising chickens.

A chicken farm had been my ambition when I was told I had

to go to college by my parents.

a $4.

some

My enrollment during my Greenwood teaching years from 1942-1955 was in the 40's.

Perhaps in the last years I was at Greenwood the upper 30's.

I had

52 in my class one year and 48 on another occasion. I

Henry

regret that I did not keep a permanent copy of each year's enrollment,

also a dairy.

from

I know the diary would have made a "best sellers" list.

no to was rr

Teaching then was so different than it was in the latter part of my 35

Chile

years as a teacher. We only had one record player (Victrola) for the entire school and a box of records where you signed up to use them. supply as now.

a bag

Easy books were not in abundant

The floors were oiled and reoiled during the year.

We had a

part time librarian.

She r "shop

The principal taught and coached. Teachers had lots of extra duties--bus duty, plays, suppers, May Days and P.T.A. programs.

P.T.A. meetings were such a bore to me through the years.

High school students would help the primary teachers at times because of our heavy

te~ching

spott traff commu

load. close

78


I

to Lm.

We did not have any physical education teachers.

It was such a pleasure

playing with the children; also it was a time you gave special help to certain children.

The children could play unsupervised.

I feel some real leadership

:ks

developed that has carried over to these children's later years.

11.

rare but when one did develop, it got a lot of attention.

~em

Out

of

those

years

we

produced

outstanding

individuals and genuine citizens for our country. >se :ey 1ad

leaders,

Fights were

professional

Oh yes a few (very few)

fell by the way side. Teachers' pay then, as is now, was on the low scale. a $4.00 or $4.50 raise for the year.

Once we got either

We all joked among ourselves as to what

some did to get a 50¢ yearly raise more than another. in 1ad

I have carried in my mind the memory of the first afternoon I came in from teaching so vividly.

Mr. McCue and Purcell, Jr. were going to see Mr.

Henry Chiles over near Batesville in their "Model T" or "Model A" .truck with rtt,

no top.

Mr. McCue asked "Little Mac", as he always called me this (McLaughlin

was my maiden name), if I wished to ride along. 35

What a thrill that was!

Chiles gave me some beautiful red apples. Apples for the teacher was a daily routine by the children.

box

ant

d a

Mr.

I always had

a bag full each day. Mrs. McCue was a marvelous cook.

Her Sally Lunn was one of my favorites.

She roomed and boarded six teachers that year -- one bath and almost too much "shop. II A teacher's life was an open book with the 24 hour manned air plane

and

of

spotter's station (war time) in the corner where the post office is now.

All

traffic

the

visitors

and night

time hours

was

a

known

event

to

community. The children were so respectful of the teachers and to this day I feel close to these grown men and women whose grandchildren I have also taught.

79


With my first pay check I bought a jar of olives, not the gallon I had always promised myself if I ever had a paycheck; also a second hand bicycle. I rode my bike and visited the country side. genuine and so great. cooperative.

The parents

The people in Greenwood were so

respected us as teachers and were so

If a child got disciplined at school, he could expect the same

when he got home. Dr. Gifford (dean at Madison College) advised me before my trip for my ·interview in Albemarle to sign the contra.ct if offered.

He said Greenwood was

considered "Top" and it was. I have not named any pupils, community folks or teachers by name as I could not ·do justice to all the "GREATS" that I had the pleasure of working with and knowing. To this day I am grateful for the genuine friendship and devotion shown to me then (1942-1955) and through the years by folks in the Greenwood School area.

Alber the Wedn1 subj1

imp01 to 1 were : publ: and ' cert< becat qual : care• that the spel: cant• havit Grah< a gn

:\ inth grade class of 19-' l. SUCCI

To symbolize their having reached the top, it was customary for the senior class to climb to the roof of the school on their last day. Seen here is Eleanor deBalbian in 1943. Trips to the top of the school were not uncommon for the original flag pole was to be found on top. This, of course, required someone to climb the ladder, located on the second floor, to the roof daily.

80

the four $848

over peri· SUCC •

for call


had le. so

f31<1E~W()()I)

ICI1()fi HIGH SCHOOL

GREENWOOD GREENWOOD. VI RGINlA

•• • - • • •·•• ••• • • •• •• • oo••• •• •••oo•o•n •• •••• • • • • • • • • • ••••••• •• • • •••••••·••· • •••• • •• • •• •••• • •••••· • •oono ou .. • • •••••oooo oo o•••• • · • • •••• ••hooooooU• •• • • •• •• • • ••• •• OOo••• •• • •••• · ••• ••••• · • •·• • • • •••• • •• • • ••·• ••-•• •·•••••• · OO••• ••• · •• • ••• • • •••• •• • • • •••

so

1944 . , - . ,,. , ••••• •••o • o.•••• •• •• • ••• • •• •••• • • • • • • • • •••••••• ••• •• • •••· · ••• ·• • ·••U•• • •• • · •••• •· ·· · ••• •••••• · • • • •• •· ·• •·• ••••••• •• •••·•••• •oooo .. oH•••• •• ••

· · •• •• ••• • •• • ••• ·• • ••••·•·••••• •· o.••···•• •••••••••• • •••• • ••• •• ••••u•• •• •·• · ·•· · • •• ••••• ·•• • • •

;ame

: my was

as I ·king

;hewn ~heel

HR. GRAHAM SPEAKS TO STUDENT BODY January 1944 Mr. Graham, Superintendent of Albemarle public schools, spoke to the student body of Greenwood, His Wednesday the 5th of January. subject was, "Personal Qualities." The talk was centered around six important qualities necessary for one to hav~ a successful life. They were: ambition, loyalty, respect for public property, politeness, honesty and ' doing work well. His talk certainly concerned all the students because everyone needs all six of the qualities to have a successful career. So interesting was his talk that the whole student body, even in the lowest grades, seemed spell-bound. They enjoyed both the contents of the talk and the honor of having him visit the school. We always enjoy seeing Mr. Graham, and his talk will ever remaj_n a great inspiration.

songs, written to familiar tunes. We have also been doing some marching. With Mr. Wayland's assistance, the sergeants have been drilling their individual squads. Everyone is much interested and we hope to accomplish much!

A DREAM OF THE WAR WEARY I stood on the war torn hill of today, And gazed in the sky of tomorrow, A sky that was filled with sun and warmth, And held for me no sorrow . Into a new and warless world, Would I and others sail; To live there peacefully always, Where no hardships prevail. I climbed aboard a fairy ship; board are those I hold dear. We heard this world I visualized, And never was there a tear. On

TWO MORE WEEKS TO PAY FOR OUR JEEP April 1944 The Victory Corps has been quite successful in the war stamp drive for the jeep we are planning to buy. In four weeks, we collected a total of $848. 15. We are hoping to go way over our $900 goal in the six week period. The Victory Corps was also very successful in collecting coat hangers for the Red Cross. In two weeks we collected 288 hangers. We have been singing patriotic

But then I woke and was in my bed, 'Twas a happy thing I'd dreamed. And reality proved itself: For the bombs around me screamed. Someday a world like this will exist, One that is happy and free, Never again to gaze upon, Those horrible dictators three. Caroline Page Eighth Grade

81


VICTORY CORPS ORGANIZED October 1944 Friday, October 6, 1944, the High School met for the organization of Victory Corps. The boys and girls were divided into two groups and co-captains were elected. Seven girls and four boys were chosen as sergeants, and each will be in charge of a squad consisting of about ten privates. Clara Lamb was elected as captain of the girls and Howard Toms was elected captain of the boys. The girl sergeants were elected as follows: Barbara Layman, Lois Crowder, Betty Page, Betty Jean Fox, Marjorie Rea, Caroline Page and Verdell Hardjng. The sergeants for the boys are Wilson Shifflett, Lav7rence Baber, Arthur Layne and Armistead Shirley. The students' aims in this organization are to pledge themselves to do their best for the war effort. The greatest interest will be the sale of war bonds and 8tamps. At the end of the year the boy and girl squad having the best records and the two captains will be guests of the faculty at a movie-party.


Print the complete i~ddress in plain letters 111 the panel below, and your return addr~n In t•e space provided on the right. Use typewriter, dark l11k, or dark pe11eil. Faint or small writing Is not suitable for photographing.

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83


gt af

MEMORIES SHARED (I

By

<~

Betty Garwood Clayton

Mi The farm hands were already busy at work, the apple pickers had filled many apple baskets and the old black cook stove had been tidied-up from a big breakfast of grits, apples and bacon, hot biscuits and butter, when sounds of,

tb fr gr

"It 1 s coming!" could be heard as the old yellow school bus came to a stop outside

A

humble home (in September, 1941).

I l-7alked with hesitation in my

ma

heart, but confidence in my steps and outward appearance as I boarded the bus (while being gently prodded by my older sister Margaret, who was eager to show off her little sister).

I

proudly wore a little plaid gingham, pleated skirt

which was buttoned to a white blouse, adorned in hours of smocking and lace -a labor of love and much sacrifice by my Mother.

I showed off a big, new red

ribbon in my hair and gently flopped long curls, so as not to dare rumple

au re Ch 1i

Bl wa

them, but make sure they were noticed. We were headed toward the school of my sister Margaret, and my older brothers Arthur and James. -- Greenwood High School.

They had always talked so proudly of their school I

De

felt confident that all would be well because my

brothers had been there a few years before and my sister was in the Fifth Grade then. After a twenty-five minute ride, I carefully brushed down the pleats of my skirt and felt my curls to see that they were all in proper place, and departed the old yellow bus

(carrying a little new,

blue lunch box which

contained jelly biscuits, graham crackers and cheese and an apple). I had the

84

ch in

mo 路 me anc


greatest assurance my sister would see that I got back on the right bus that afternoon. I

was met at the school door bv a lovely, young lady, Bertha Durrer

(Detamore), my first grade teacher.

I

(who became my very best

Betty Pugh,

friend),

quickly mixed in with Winnie Louhoff Joan Napier,

Patsy Baber,

Mildred Tomlin, Charles Witt, Vernon Anderson, to name only a few. illed

through school together and graduated in 1952. friends during our school days.

We went

We were joined by other dear

(There were a total of 43 of us ih the first

a big s of,

grade.) The days went and carne, and I grew in knowledge and concern for my fellow

stop in my

man. Dear

~r.

Paul Cale was our Principal.

He had regular assemblies in the

e bus auditorium.

I had a feeling of great awe as I went in to an assembly.

We had

show regular Christian programs led by ministers of various denominations.

We sang

skirt Christian and patriotic songs and saw sol'te of the most wonderful movies a ce -little child could dream of -- Heidi, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm,

Lassie,

w red Black Beauty, Little Women, Peter Pan, to name a few.

I knew I was loved and

urnple was an important part of Greenwood High School --my family's school. A knock at the door interrupted our usual early morning activities in

older December, 1941.

A message, which turned out to be a mistake, carne to us that

chool my older brother was killed in Pearl Harbor.

(He was blessed with life during

se my a long service in the Army. He married a lovely Wornens Army Corps girl and

Fifth they have a wonderful family of seven children who are all grown and have children of their own.

Arthur became an ordained minister and has traveled to

ts of interesting

places

doing missionary work.)

That

incorrect

telegram

that

, and morning in December of 1941, may have been the beginning of a deep faith for

which me and the beginning of a feeling of pride and love for my family, my country

d the and my community.

Mr. Cale talked to us a lot about the war and showed us war

85


news on a screen in the auditorium.

We collected tin cans, newspapers and

magazines; raised gardens to help provide soup for us at school, participated in a response to mock air raids and were taught that our country was the best and the safest.

dear brothers were

America.

"over there" making peace

for

all

the

people

of

The years went by so quickly! There is so much I could

inscri~e

about my

There was Miss Holsinger (Dunn), my second grade teacher, who

had the most beautiful black hair and would

han(

pulJ

sta~

How I loved to sing out, "God Bless America!"

school days.

beat

Mr. Cale supported what my Mother taught us at home, that we

could lie down in safe sleep because God was in control of the world and my two

capt

tolerate

this

flowers being tucked into the sides of Miss Holsinger's hair.

little girl's I

remember the

country stores we set up in her room and the many homeless rabbits we took in.

latf

Cam]

Rel:

namo

son:

When she and I were seen together people would ask her if I was her little girl.

They would go on to say I looked like her and that pleased me so much

(Bi

because I thought she was the prettiest and most gentle person in the world. My third year in school introduced me "swanky" beauty -- Miss Genie Shirley.

I

to one I

thought was another

see her in my mind today as clearly

as I did forty years ago when I walked into her room and there she was, in a rose

colored,

two

piece

dress with white

stitching

on

it.

She

had

the

on

spectator pumps and I vowed that day, when I got big I was going to wear shoes

gra Fre and as bow narr

like Miss Shirley's. My sister had prepared me for a teacher whom neither she nor I can ever forget -- Mrs. Ruby Young.

She was the best story reader in all the world!

I

to I

:

The stories became

thE

alive and I could hardly wait to get home and tell Mama and Daddy about what

tee:

could have listened to her for hours, and hours and hours.

she had read that day. arm as she read.

I

I

dearly loved to stand beside her chair and hug her

would try not to get out of my seat, but invariably I

would find myself, spell-bound, beside her, hugging her, as she continued to

86

te< Wa~

Ga1


capture

our

attention,

and

send us

on magic

carpets

to

some of

the most

beautiful lands the mind could imagine. Mrs.

Louise

Barton greeted us

handsome prince,

at

the

fifth

grade door where

Sonny Clayton from Mid-Way School.

He

pulled my hair through the ink well on top of his desk. stay in at recess time.

Camptown Races,

met

sat behind me

\-le

a

and

would both have to

This seemed to please him more than me.

later I married my prince!

I

Nine years

I remember the songs we sang in the fifth grade --

Chickens Crmving on Sourwood Mountain,

Clementine,

Old Time

Religion, I've Been Working on the Railroad, Battle Hymn of the Republic, to name only a few.

Mrs.

Burton could sing "so pretty" and taught us so many

songs. My sixth year in school took me up the tall steps of Greenwood School to the

sixth

(Bing).

grade

where

I

was

embraced

into

a

cheery

room by

Isabell Dunn

I was verv close to her and her sister Sarah, who became my seventh

grade teacher. Free Union.

They often invited me to their beautiful, big farm house in

My! How I loved to spend nights with them!

I loved their Daddy

and brothers, and all the animals they had.

I loved their green fields almost

as much as those of my own dear Afton home.

I got to bathe from a china wash

bowl and not my usual tin wash pan.

The Dunns gave me a little bull dog puppy

named, "Archibald." While in the sixth and seventh grades I dreamed of going

to Paris to study fashion designing or becoming a science major or a writer. I

liked to write poems and stories and outline lessons.

these years

Many times during

the Dunns allowed me to be in charge of a lesson,

conduct the

teaching and ask the questions. During my eighth through eleventh years in school, I had manv memorable teachers.

There

was

Prince

Woodward

(now

deceased

President

of

Marv

Washingt on College), Lady Walton, Miss Snook, Miss Norford, Mr. Beddow, Miss Garth, Miss Loving, Miss Ramsey, Mr. Hurt are only a few of those who left

87


quite an impact on my life.

The things I recall most about them are that they

continued to expect my best, while accepting me for what I was, and making me proud to be who I was.

They taught me so much more than what was between the

covers of the textbooks.

Honesty , Pride, Love, Faith, Perserverance and Trust

were only a few of the lessons learned from the examples and precepts of these models.

Equipment and v i sual aids were a "premium" even in what seemed to be

becoming an updated education in the early 1950s, but I did not need visual aids

for

the inscriptions made upon my formidable mind

by their words

and

deeds. In 1952,

(to the lovely tune of "This Is the End of a Perfect Day")

I

proudly accepted the marks I had earned, and graduated from what had become my school -- My Alma Mater! Life has been kind to me.

My Daddy went to live in Heaven in 1954 and my

precious Mother joined him there in 1981.

In 1954 I married Sonny and in 1957

we were blessed with a wonderful son, Tim, and in 1961 a beautiful daughter, Betsy Laurie blessed us.

In 1966 by way of serendipity,

school just to "help-out" for a little while.

I was back at my

Those seventeen years have been

wonderful years. As I reflect back over how quickly the years have passed , how orderly the grey has come to my dark curls,

and how slyly the pounds have

ability to enjoy the pleated skirts, some kindness Greenwood

I

have

School,

has

done

for

touched

the

I

only hope, with all sincerity, that

precious

even

changed my

one

little

life

and

children given

I've it

known

at

confidence,

encouragement and something to remember about his Greenwood School. The lovely Heavens declare it, the hills echo it, the grass, the trees, the flowers, all join in the refrain, "Greenwood School, I love you! Long may your days be bright!"

songs her i t


~y

May the sounds of children's laughter and footsteps be resounded by the '

ne

songs the birds sing--a testament to the faith and soundness of our Greenwood

ne

heritage!

st se be al

Lingering, precious memories, etched in delicate threads of bright, shining gold ••••••.• Memories shared with you, washed by my tears and joy of recall.

nd

I

my

my 157

!r'

my ~en

t he

my

Betty and her Prince

1at at

ce,

es,

may

89


her was but way

saw GREENWOOD SCHOOL

und

A VERY SPECIAL PLACE

not

By Charles F. Witt

wit As

When I was a first grader at Greenwood School in 1941-42 the Industrial Arts were considered to be an important part of the curriculum.. allotted

spe

or

how

It was one of these sessions that afforded me one of my most

sta

almost

varnishing.

Some time was

whe

every

week

to

sawing,

sanding ,

nailing,

and

painting

sch

vlvid recollections of my early schooling . We had been told and reminded many times that all sawing was to be done on the work table or on . the old apple boxes that were kept in the room for

rea

this purpose.

On this particular day, the work table was crowded and all of

Gre

the boxes were in use so I decided to saw my piece of wood in the seat of a

val

desk.

This worked out just fine except when the piece of wood that I had

mis

sawed off fell to the floor so did a small piece from the corner of the desk

pro

seat.

can

Before I had time to think of what I might do, Miss Durrer, my teacher,

happened by and there was no covering it up.

I can still hear her say "I'm

afraid we' 11 have to talk with the principal about this."

atm

All I knew about

wer

the principal at that time was that he was big and I kept my eye on the door

be,,

for the rest of the day, waiting for his appearance.

was

Finally the dismissal

bell sounded and after the other students had gone, Miss Durrer called me to

90


-

her side.

I figured that this was it and watched the door for Mr. Cale.

I

was never happier in my life than when, after talking with me very quietly, but sternly about following directions, she gave me a hug and sent me on my way. I managed to get through ten more years at Greenwood Scho?l without sawing on furniture again and Miss Durrer was to be the first of many kind and ~fuile

understanding teachers that I would be priviledged to encounter.

I did

not talk with Mr. Cale on this occasion, I had other opportunities to meet with him and with Mr. Hurt who followed him in the principalship at Greenwood. As a student, I had great respect for these two men, but it was years later ;trial

when I had the experience of working with them in the school system and

1e was

spending many

:tg

or

most

hour~

with them on fishing outings that I came to fully realize

how fortunate Greenwood was to have had their leadership for a few years.

The

standards that they established through direction and example made Greenwood a school that was known and respected.

done

As I have watched my children grow and progress through school, I have

m for

realized that they have had many advantages that were not afforded to me at

.11 of

Greenwood and yet

!

of a I

had desk

tcher, "I'm about door

tis sal

I

often wonder

if their school experience will be as

valuable to them as mine has been to me. missed out

on many of

provided for us.

Sometimes I feel that they have

the wonderful experiences

that

this

small

school

There are advantages of a small school that a larger school

cannot duplicate, but at Greenwood it was not just the smallness.

It was an

atmosphere and spirit created by the principal, teachers and community.

There

were high standards in academics and conduct, and yet it was a fun place to be, a place where you wanted to be.

It was more than just a good school, it

was and always will be, a very special place to me.

me to

91


Greenwood High School 1945-46. The following photographs are from the school's first yearbook, "The Spotlight" 1945-46. The following year the name was changed to "Echolite."

Is~

Gene Shirley's third grade class.

Addie McLaughlin's first grade class. M

Ruby M. Young's fourth grade class.

Anne Holsinger's second grade class.

Louise Burton's fifth grade class.

92


Isabelle Dunn's sixth grade class.

Deane Wade's ninth grade class.

Martha Clayton's seventh grade class.

Annie Mae Butler's tenth grade class.

Ben F. Hurt's eighth grade class.

Paul Cale's Senior class.

93


Within two decades the size of Greenwood's school bus tripled. Howard Toms, James Craig, and Frank Craig performed the daily duty of transporting the students to school in 1945-46.

te

c:l

tt

The faculty for 1945-46 consisted of Addie McLaughlin, Anne Holsinger, Gene Shirley, Ruby M. Young, Louise Burton, Isabelle Dunn, Martha Clayton, Ben F. Hurt, Deane Wade, Annie Mae Butler, Paul H. Cale, principal, Ruby Ramsey, home economics, William Oakes, agriculture, and Ruth Ramsey, librarian. Group of Greenwood students taken in 1946.

94


Nancy Virginia

s.

Bain

Class of 1949

This little verse is written in tribute, and appreciation f.or all the teachers, parents, including my own, Linden and Virginia Wiley Shroyer, and citizens of Greenwood, past and present, who put so much of themselves into the years. of Greenwood School. There's this neat little school in Greenwood VA (Vee Ay) ~~ere lessons for years were learned day by day Children, both small and la.rge, trudged through the halls Preparing for life, whatever the calls. The years they have come, the years they have gone To love such a place could never be wrong These walls rang with laughter, sometimes saw tears-We even learned things to help with our fears. Some say time has come to close up the doors There'll be no more trudging on all those floors. For'ere we'll treasure those days we spent there While some were quite bleak, but most were quite fair. Time marches on and events are allowed, Even some things that go against the crowd Of people who loved and cared for this place Who gathered their facts to present their case. Decisions were made in view of it all Now Greenwood School's doors won't open this fall. This little attempt by me has been made. To say that my "memories" will never fade. I am so grateful to have been a part Of what so many feel deep in their heart Were years spent in learning so much for life In my case it's been used as mother and wife. So--dear little school you're there in my heart I treasure those years of which you were part And I'm grateful God used you--with the rest Of what's made up my life--to meet His Test!

95


to an

di pu

MEMORIES

en

By

rna

Ben F. Hurt

Greenwood School is special to me.

ye

When I

came to Greenwood in 1940,

fresh out of college, I was so impressed with the teachers, the students, and the

people

considerate.

in

the

community.

Everyone

was

so

friendly,

helpful

and

After a year Uncle Sam called me into service and it almost

broke my heart.

I hated to leave this school and community.

After four years

in the army, I returned to Greenwood School in 1945 and remained there until 1953.

My nine years at Greenwood were happy years for which I have been most

grateful. Many times when I would walk down the hall, some first or second grader would approach me and put his/her arms around me. bring flowers and place them on my desk.

Frequently students would

These are just two examples of the

many acts of friendliness and kindnesses which students showered on me.

I

hesitate to mention specific people because there were so many and I would probably leave out some special people. There were special May Day programs which so many people worked so hard to bring to fruition.

On one particular May bay occasion when it was such a

warm day, the May Day court was lined up on the outside steps of the entrance

96


to the gymnasium.

During the program a number of the participants became sick

and had to drop out of the program.

There was an epidemic of measles.

I can recall a time when there was a deep snow and the Williams Store Bus did not have chains.

In my car we drove behind the bus and a number of us

pushed the bus up the hills so the students could get home. I

have so many happy memories of Greenwood and my life has been so

enriched because of my association with many fine people.

Greenwood School

may be closed in a physical sense but it ldll live on in our memories for many years.

)

.

td td

;t

:s

ll

>t ~ l路

\~

Fourth grade boys take some time ofT from stud~ ing in 19~5.

~r

ld

1e

Dancing around a May Pole in front of the school in 1945.

I

ld

rd a

ce

97


"Joseph's Hardships" written and produced by Isabelle Bing's class in 1949-50.

1 g

fa culty

Sisters Margaret Garwood Cutchins and Betty Garwood Clayton , July 1950.

MlS5 M:ARY GARTH

MRS. HUNTER BURTON Jo'ifthGrade

Conun~rcial

hUBS lSABELLE DONN Shttb Grade

MRS. WAt...T·ER 0.£NTRY Flr.$t Gr•de

MlSS ANN HOl..StNGER Second Grade

WlS. HUGH F AlN

Se•enth G1..de

MRS, Ll!:SL;lE WALTON HL!Jtor_y

MR. 1\0.BERT CHAM81JSS Agriculture

MISS RU8Y RAMSCY

MRS. GENE P IERSON

Hom• Et.:on::.m.ies M.athematics. IV

Rt!oll.di.ng

M ·R . i"l!ANK BEDDOW MlSS RUTH RAMSEY

Eneiish

Librarian· MISS !l..o\RY LOU REID lo'ourth

Greenwood High School class of 1952.

Qt"ad~

MR. PEN 1!'. llYRT Priocipal LAtin li AJaebr·a 1

Absent frotot. ;.ieture: MRS. STEVEN BERKO Mathem-atic& Sel~oee

Latin 1

1

I Is


Take note of Little Greenwood in the background in this 1953 photo.

GlAN'r STEPS FOR w1~rLt:: GIDUi

Plays were a common activity for all classes. This was one play produced in the late 1950's.

I

I'

1.!MM,. ViTAMINS!

Isabelle Bing's sixth grade class in 1955.

99


Square dancing in the gym.

May Day festivities in 1950 as photographed by Virginia Rogers.


Memories from 1953.

READl..'iG. 'RlTr'NG, AN'O â&#x20AC;˘RITKM.t;TtC

Robert Wood. principal, crowns the 1958 School Queen, Jeanie Fitzgerald.

1958 Greem\ ood School Queen and her court. {1-r) Dudley, Jeanie Fitzgerald, Patsy Fa r rish , and \Iary Lynn "IcCue.

Gar~

101


O's as

He.::

buj

Gre

fit

Clowns from First Grade Circus 1975. Chip Rea, Cheryl Brooks, Shelly Sin:ts, and David Branch. The Three Ring Circus was produced and directed by Linda Reaser, teacher.

tee:

anc

cor

Unj to pl.::

ret

Mn Students enjoying Sack Race games in 1968. Note trailer in background for additional classroom. A class trip to Monticello in 1968.

gr.:: of

anc

102


MEMORIES OF GREENWOOD By Harry W. Kent

My memories of Greenwood School date from December, 1935, when I enrolled as a scared second gr"ader.

Having transferred from a one room school at

Heards, Virginia, I was, to say the least, overwhelmed by the size of the building and by the size of the student body.

While most of my memories of

Greenwood are pleasant, I must admit that very few are to be found during my first day or two in this new environment. This was soon to change however, as Mr. Paul Cale, the principal, and the teachers provided a caring and supportive atmosphere.

I soon had many good

and lasting friends among my classmates. In remembering Greenwood, consider somewhat unique.

there are two

things in particular that

I

The first occurred when I served two years in the

United States Navy during my junior and senior years, being discharged in time

I~짜4~

Iwrn

M

to enter school in September, 1946.

During my senior year I had the honor of

playing on the undefeated baseball and basketball teams. The second incident that

I

consider somewhat unique occurred when I

returned to Greenwood in January of 1962 as the school principal.

II. r&

in di-

Greenwood

was now an Elementary School, and it was my prlvilege to have on the staff Mrs. Ruby Young and Mrs. Louise Burton who taught me in the third and fifth grades respectively.

Mrs. Young and Mrs. Burton, along with .the other members

of the staff and the community were supportive in every way, making my four and a half years as principal very enjoyable and productive. 103


Perhaps my most vivid and lasting memories of Greenwood have to do with Mr. Cale, who not only emphasized academic excellence and discipline, but also fair play and character building.

Through his example of Christian living,

Mr. Cale set the tone for the school, and profoundly influenced the lives of countless individuals.

This tradition of leadership was carried on at the

same high level by Mr. Ben Hurt who succeeded Mr. Cale as Principal in the Fall of 1946. It is with regret that I anticipate the closing of Greenwood School in June,

1984.

I

realize, however,

that Greenwood will last forever in the

hearts of those who have had the privilege of being associated with the school as a student, teacher, or parent.

GREENWOOD ElEMENTARY SCHOOL .

Prin<.ipai-Mr. Harry W. Kâ&#x20AC;˘nt

104


c:f

the the

,1 in

the ~hool

Seventh Grade Class 1962

Faculty of 1940; photo taken in 1961.

Clarence \tcCiure 1962

105


d l

II I

I I

I

Students go for a train ride from Greenwood to Charlottes,ille in 1968.

co

:.ii

OVI

.J ' op

Gr

路路;:

Ready to go home! 1967-68. '\ote Little Greenwood in background.

ev

di 106


d \

I Roland L. Zimmerman Memories of Greenwood 1966-1974

Having the opportunity to serve the Greenwood School as principal for eight years (1966-1974) was my pleasure,especially to follow in the foot steps of educators like Dr. Claude Graham, lfr. Paul H. Cale and Mr. Ben F. Hurt who served Greenwood as outstanding teachers and principals. The bronze plaque located in . the hall has been a constant reminder to me and other persons passing through this school of Randolph Ortman 1 s generous contribution to make this school possible for youth of the community to enjoy a fuller life.

Also, the addition in 1939 made it one of the first schools to

have a gymnasium in Albemarle County.

This was made possible by the Federal

Emergency Agency a part of the Federal Govenment Public Works project. opinion,

these

two

projects

have

been

very

important

to

the

In my

Greenwood

community.

My first year as principal at Greenwood was the beginning of many lasting memories as this school and community became a very important part of my life over

the

next

eight

years.

The

year

1966

was

the

beginning

of

total

integration in Albemarle County while much growth was being experienced in the opening of four new schools in the county to provide for overcrowding at Greenwood and other schools. One of the many memories of my eight years at Greenwood was that almost every year I would have to convince the stud.e nt body and parents that we didn't have a monster in the school.

The story of the monster would usually

~')) 107


be started by the older students and the younger students would be too scared to go to the bathroom located in the basement. that

their children couldn't

school.

sleep at night

Parents would report to me

or were fearful

of

coming to

It would usually take one to two weeks to eliminate these rumors.

It

was told to me that one possibility of the monster tale was that years ago a Greenwood citizen had made a request upon his death to have his body cremated and

and his remains spread over the school grounds.

monster story was started.

This may be the way the

It is my understanding the tale of the monster

still lives on in the hearts of the Greenwood students. Another memory was when I received a letter from a parent that her next baby would be named Charles Roland, after her brother and me. baby was a girl, she would name it Quintina Annette. ironically has been in my oldest son's class

However, if the

The baby was a girl and

in the same school for the past

three years. During my tenure at Greenwood, treat the school for termites.

the community employed the Orkin man to

On one of his monthly visits after he had

finished spraying for termites, he informed me he would not be caught working in this school.

When I asked him why, he replied that the termites had eaten

most of the wood structure and he expected the structure to collapse any

Approximately fourteen years

time.

students

passing

through

these

doors,

later with more the

structure

than two

of

the

at most thousand

school

still

stands providing a good education and many memories for the students. I

was

always

the

first

to

know of

inclement weather

approaching the

Greenwood area as one of the patrons of the school lived on the mountain known as

Scott Estate who would call me when she would see the first snowflake.

This would usually mean she was informing me that she was sending a vehicle to pick up her children and the others who lived on the mountain. beautiful sight to see the weather changes on the mountain!

108

Oh what a

The changes in


> me ~

to It

LgO a 11ated r the

nster

the sun and clouds that would make shadows and hues on the mountain with each changing season is a most unforgetable sight to behold. It was always a very enjoyable moment to have the retired teachers return annually to the school for the Thanksgiving dinner.

reminisce, a time to hear another's stories, experiences, and mem?ries.

.f the 路1 and ~

past

One

year we had teachers in attendance totalling over three hundred years teaching experience around the dinner table with many of these years being served at Greenwood and most of the others in Albemarle County.

next

This was a time to

This has been a very

rewarding tradition since 1969 even though I have not had the opportunity to attend all of these social events.

This is an outstanding social gathering,

one that will be remembered by the retired teachers and they do have some unbelievable experiences to share with one another. It was a pleasure to be a part of the Greenwood School and community as

rran to

principal for eight years and a visiting teacher for another eight years.

1e had

feel blessed to have had this opportunity.

orking

school are closing,

eaten

.I

Even though the doors of this

the memories of Greenwood will live on forever for many

many generations.

Lt most lOU Sand

still

Lng the

.n known

,wflake.

dele to what a

mges in

I

109


Jean Gianniny 1972

Gladys Leake 1972

John Armstead 1972

Janet Atwell 1972

Betty Clayton 1972

) Margaret Turner 1972 Happy birthday, Peggy Cocke! A party given by her students in 1978.

110


Kindergarten 1973-7 -l Mr!.. :vtiller and Roland Zimmerman

~

路~

;#

~~

Betty Rainey. Jonna Clarkson and Roland Zimmerman

Second-Third Combination 1973-7-l Janet Atwell and Roland Zimmerman

111


Evelny Barbour and Roland Zimmerman

112

Sixth Grade 1973-74 Linda Stubbs and Roland Zimmerman


."\:):~~

~"''

.

vt· .•

\ .1. "••

Ben Washington, 1972, drove the school bus at Greenwood for a number of years. At the death of Mr. Bill Mawyer, he became custodian, helper, and faithful friend of all at Greenwood School. ;»:;.~~

v:

;;i . i' ' (•

~·.·

1Tl\t',i:.

An annual visit from Santa taken in 1978.

Mary Strate's kindergarten in 1978.

113


Jam'"' 0. Sledd- Principal

HAPPY DAY

1979

114


1980's

"Would you like to swing on a star?" June 1981.

A group of fifth grade students serve Thanksgiving dinner to guests in November, 1983. (1-r): Edgar Green, Todd McAllister, Shawn Shifflet, Jason Baber, and Nathan Pannell.

115


"Thanksgiving Feast" Gathering of retired teachers and friends, November, 1983. It was a very enjoyable and memorable occasion to have retired Greenwood faculty return to their beloved Greenwood School for a feast and time of fellowship each year around Thanksgiving time. Photo courtesy Jim Crosby.

Teachers and former students: (1-r) Betty G. Rainey, Bertha Detamore, Betty G. Clayton, Sarah Dunn, Ann H. Dunn, Ruby M. Young, Margaret Washington, Belle Bing, Charles Witt, Carlos Gutierrez, James Sledd, and Virginia Rogers.

E

st

Retired teachers and friends: lst step (1-r) Virginia Rogers, Bernice Critzer, Addie Milton, Belle Bing, Margaret Washington, Ruby Young, Martha Clayton, Vada Foster, Sarah Dunn. Ann H. Dunn, Bertha D. Detamore, Charles Witt, Betty G. Rainey, Rice Green, Janice Layne, Mary Green. Carlos Gutierrez, (Superintendent, Albemarle County Schools), Col. William Washington, and James D. Sledd.

U1l

El pi bu

116


Excerpt From Ruth Rodes Culpepper's Letter

at-

to

ers er,

Albemarle County School Board Chairman

l>yca-

en-

Jessie Haden

te ir ool

April 5, 1983,

)W-

md oto

Greenwood

School

stands

as

a

monument

to

the

GREENl-lOOD

represents the collective effort of the whole community.

SPIRIT!

It

It was built before

the days when Big-Brother-Government dispensed its bounty at the drop of a hat.

The community earned its school.

Half of its cost was given by an able

citizen, Mr. Randolph Ortman, the remaining half was loaned by him, interest free!!

~fuen

a move was made to name the school in his honor, he refused the

suggestion, saying, "No, this is a community school."

The water rights from a

fine spring were give by Mr. Sam Purcell, of the community. was

surveyed

Rodes,

and

the

installation

who freely contributed his

supervised

by

another

time and expertise to

The water system citizen,

Mr.

the project.

Rodes also freely served as supervisor of construction of the building.

Tom Mr. , The

very impressive building itself, was designed at no cost to the county, by still another citizen, an emminent engineer and architect, Mr. Wills Johnson. The foregoing is ample testimony of the power of community spirit!

Let Us not

underestimate it! As

to

the

soundness

of this building:

It was constructed by Mr.

Ree

Ellis, whose name on a contract, was equivalent to the mark of "sterling" on a piece of silver.

His 2x4s were 2x4s after dressing.

built "Rose Hill".

He built Greenwood High School!

He built "Tiverton".

He

It had been said that

117


"Ree Ellis built, not for time, but for eternity."

The thought occurs, what

would be the cost to duplicate such a structure today? Let us economize on the multitude of less-essentials. Let us capitalize on the treasure we already have. Let us preserve our fine neighborhood school at Greenwood. Let us not underestimate the power of the Greenwood Spirit, which I'll wager is alive and well!

路 ''Bring on the Clowns.'' Mrs. Bridgeforth's kindergarten class did a unit on the circus. Sonya Crawford, Rodney Dunnivan, Crystal Belew, and David Tomlin demonstrate what fun it is to be a clown. Aprill980.

Charles Awkard and Angie Jeffries thought it was great fun to be clowns in a circus unit when they were in kindergarten in 1980.

118


Kindergarten Mrs. Ruth Bridgeforth's Class Janice Watson-substitute 1983-84

I WILL REMEMBER Tonia Johnson says,

11

Mrs. Wright is so nice ...

Barbara Campbell says, .. Mr. Sledd is kind and I love the whole school . 11 Robin Scott says,

11

Mrs Bridgeforth is sweet ...

Michael Snow and Melissa Simmons say, "Miss Watson is nice and kind. 11 Jeffery Campbell says, "Mrs. Reynolds is good to us. Mrs. Clayton does all the work for us. ! 1 11 never forget her 'cause she's so sweet." JoshuaManzano, "I like to color in school ... Jonathan Fortney says, "I like the whole school." Eric Salisbury says, "I love my classroom." Hannah Collins says, .. ! like my classmates." Obie Fenn says,

11

I like Math and Gym and that's all. 11

Alesha Eaves says, "I will remember all the teachers that are here. 11 Richmond Henry says, "I like flowers and grass at school and painting at school." We all will remember Aaron Bridgeforth and Andrew Cocke who were born to our teachers this year.

ll9


1st row: John Perry, April Fisher, Amika Salisbur~. Pittman. Brian Snow, and Jonathan Fortney. 3rd Scot \lichels, Christalle O'Brien, Jonathan King, row: \lichael Snow, Johann Reinicke, Joshua ManChris't opher Harlow, and Courtney Graves. 2nd row: zano. JeffeQ路 Campbell, K~路 te Rannigan, Ann ZamEric Salisbur~路 . Tonia Johnson, Obie Fenn, Barbara pini. Towanda Sims, Robin Scott, Hanna Collins. and Zampini. Barbara Campbell, Alisha Eaves, Megan \lelissa Simmons. Photo by Ste,路en G. Meeks.

120


Kindergarten Mrs. Cocke 1 s Class

(h

1983-84

Towanda said,

11

The play was fun. 11

11

I like the school

Brian said,

11

I like the puppet show, the one with the mouse. 11

Courtney said,

11

11

Johann said,

11

I like the decorations in the class. 11

Christopher said,

â&#x20AC;˘ ~~~~\\[~;

11

3rd antmmd

said'

Ann said,

I 1i ked it when Miss Hats on was here and the

we did. 11

thin~s

r~egan

Cocke came back. 11

I like this school because my sister went to it. 11

Christa 11 e said;

Kyle said,

1

Cause

~~rs.

April said,

1 like when

\'!e

qo out to recess. 11

I like the song after the Christmas play. 11 II

11

11

I 1ike the teachers. II

I 1ike the toys that I play with at school. 11

Jonathan said, Barbara said,

11

11

I like listeninq to records. 11

I like the pictures in the hall and the fishes.

I like the whole school. 11 Scott said,

11

I like to go to the hospital and McDonalds and to the

fire department. 11 John said, Amika said,

11

I like gym. 11 11

I like playing at school_. 1

121


First Grade Mrs. Janet Atwell •s Class 1983-84

Crystal said, Cindy said,

11

Andrew said,

11

I remember the calendar ...

I remember the spoon race on field day. 11 11

I liked the tug-o-war on field day

and racing around the field. 11 Shawanda said, Kevin said,

11

Merlin said,

11

I liked the dancing in the gym ...

I liked doing the math books ... 11

I liked when we went out to play

on the playground ... Billy said,

11

! 1iked the swings on the playground.••

Dedrick said,

11

I liked at the end of Kindergarten when

we got to take pictures down ... Bessie said,

11

I liked going to Chapter I class ...

David said,

11

I liked math best of all ...

Tonia said,

11

I liked when we qo outside to play. 11

Richard said,

11

I remember that Billy and David were

my two best friends. •• Macon said,

11

I 1 ll remember the dance contest ...

Butch said,

11

I 1 ll remember playinq with the blocks and all. 11

Emily said,

11

I 1 ll remember making a gingerbread boy in the kitchen. 11

n ~

B

122


11

D. J. said,

I •n remember a necklace with my name on

it from Mrs. Bridqeforth. 11 Sherman said,

11

I remember Taq Ba 11 in the qym. 11

Larry said,

11

I remember eating outside and field day. 11

H. A. said,

11

I 1 ll remember the playground and blocks. 11

Mikie said;

11

I liked to play qames and things. 11

Carl said,

11

I liked playino •slack Star• in the qym. 11

chen. 11

1st row: Mikie Pannell, Kevin Simmons, Bessie Durrette, Sherman Layne, Cindy Crowder, and Richard Wright. 2nd row: David King, Macon Salisbury, Billy McKean, Andrew Awkard, Larry Salisbury;

Carl Ober, and W. A. Johnson. 3rd row: Shawanda Crawford, D. j. Tomlin, Butch Belew, Dedrick Sims, Crystal Carr, Merlin Woodson, and Emily Gray. Photo by Steven G. Meeks.

123


Second Grade Mrs. Louise Hilker 1983-84

We will remember ... all the people at Greenwood School the mothers who helped us Easter egg hunts fun on the playground the love and friendships Christmas programs

1st row: Tabby Snow, Beth Fortney, Mark Campbell, quila Carr. 3rd row: Christy Dyer, David Woodson, Michael Campbell, Tina Jeffries, and Angela Scott. Travis Gibson, John Simmons, Michelle Tomlin, and 2nd row: Crystal Cunningham, Becky Fisher, April Grace JohnS. Photo by Steven G. Meeks Henry, Shannon Rannigan, Celie Fitzgerald, and Te-


Third Grade Mrs. Beth Hawkey ' s Class 1983-84

Greenwood School is very cool . Our principal really rules our school . l~e

have a very nice secretary

Mrs. Clayton is always very merry. The teachers are nice and wonderful, They're friendly and reliable. Mrs. Rea rules us at lunchtime where we sit . And she never throws a very big fit. Mr . Hudgins is high spirited. He makes us feel like we are dead. Mrs. Clarke and Mrs. Gray are very nice, Sometimes they make us be quiet as mice. We'll always remember Mrs. Hawkey ' s smile. You could hear her yelling for a mile. Mr. Washington cleans our school so well. He makes our school look so swell. Matt, Cheryl and Bill drive the bus And they never fuss at us . Mrs. Gianniny is our librarian dson, , and

We go to her and have some fun.

125

-~-~'


We all have very good friends All our friendships will never end. What a shame we have to go! We will never forget it, we all know!

1st row: Jesse McKean, Denise Campbell, Selena Fisher, Serina Goodwin, DeMarco White, Krystal Crawford, and David Tomlin. 2nd row: Sarai Fortney, Anthony Swingler, Dustin Kidd, Alisa Lowe, Dana Campbell, Sandra Hunt, and Lisa Durrette. 3rd

row: Crystal Belew, Lynn Mawyer, Lacy Graves, Michele Thompson, Jolen Harlow, 路Russell Woodson, Clint Dawson, and Veronica Goodwin. Photo by Steven G. Meeks

1st ro Carr, Chari \\ Y3I!

126

_ fel()(


Fourth Grade Mrs. Bonnie Fitzgerald's Class 1983-84

Fun Days of Greenwood enjoying old friends and making new knowing everyone learning in a special way cook.ing, learning in the loft in Kinderqarten gardening and show and tell in First Grade writing and makinq books

1st row: Rodney Dunnivan, Sonya Crawford, Dana Carr, Forestica Green, Buffy King, Tris Tiffany, Charles Sims, and. Timmy Hunt. 2nd row: Robby Wyant, Clay Johns, Felica Fisher, Benjy Whitlow, Melody Salisbury, Latanya Carr, and Angie Jeffries.

Jrd row: Demitri Benzinger, Jason Farish, Tonya Kidd, Christie Webber, Sarah Glime, Chris Shifflett, and Benjamin Sojka. 4th row: Chip O'Brien, Tim Reynolds, J. J, Sims, and Clayton Stearns. Photo by Steven G. Meeks

127


Mrs. Sarah G. Lewis' Fifth Grade 1983-84

I WILL REMEMBER ...... . the time at Greenwood when we sent off the balloons to send messages far away.

Tina Awkard

that I was a student in the last fifth qrade class to be qraduated from Greenwood School.

Jason Baber

Greenwood School as the most wonderful school of all.

Jimbo Barbour

when I came to Greenwood, the teachers I had, the Christmas olays, and when my sister started at this school. all of the nice teachers and students.

Linda Belew

We love you Greenwood.

Dan Cheatham the nice teachers who helped us to learn and how special Greenwood was to me.

Diane Crowder

always this happy place as one of the best schools where people were so nice . Stacy Diggs my nice teacher and this school as the best of all the rest.

Edqar Green

Greenwood as a good school where you learned a lot and everybody was nice.

Adrain Jefferson

the love and care everywhere.

Greenwood may have been old, but it

was as good as gold . Todd McAllister this school meQnt a lot to me.

I think other kids should have had

a chance to go to Greenwood School. the nice teachers and students. and beautiful. 128

Nathan Pannell

Adrina Miller

Greenwood was fun, wonderful,


every teacher was very smart and had a kind heart. Everyone treated each other as a sister or as a brother.

Bryan Rannigan

the welcome feeling that made me feel qood when I first started at Greenwood.

Jennifer Riley

Greenwood as a warm, nice, joyful place. and my friends were nice.

All of the teachers

Jason Robson

Greenwood as a nice school with very nice teachers and classmates. ·········~

Shawn Shifflett

Greenwood School, HE HILL ALWAYS REMEMBER YOU! ......... .

Green

1st row: Jimbo Barbour, Adrian Jefferson, Jason McAllister; Diane Crowder, Tina Awkard, and Stacy Baber, Jennifer Riley, Barry Hunt, and Bryan Ranni- Diggs. 3rd row: Nathan Pannell, Adrina Miller, and gan. 2nd row: Jason Robson, Linda Belew, Todd Dan Cheatham. Photo by Steven G. Meeks Edwin C. Hudgins, right, was the school's physical education instructor.

129


'

.....

'

Jeanie Rea, General Aide Devoted substitute teacher and friend "Up, Up and Away" Balloon Send-Off 1983. Students released helium filled balloons bearing their names and school address. Several Greenwood students found balloons from other states, but received no response from finders of their balloons.

"Haven't I seen that face before?" Angela, Celie, Erik, Melanie, and Grace. October, 1981.

How Does Your Garden Grow? Janet Atwell's 1983 First Grade Class shows how it is done.

130


Colonel William R. Washington speaks before the school board in 1983.

"Round and round on our Merry-go-round." Sarah Fortney, Lynn Glass, Robby Birckhead, April Henry, and Angie Jeffries end a happy year at school in June, 1981.

131


Addenda PRINCIPALS OF GREENWOOD Mrs. H. G. Coville 1918-1924 F. Robertson 1924-1925

~rchie

George Dunn 1925-1928 R. Claude Graham 1928-1935 Paul Cale 1935-1946 Ben F. Hurt 1946-1953 Richard M. Strafford 1953-1955 John W. Massie, Jr. 1955-1956 G. William Bullock, Jr. 1956-1957

132

Joyce A. Wright Principal 1984

Robert A. Wood . 1957-1958

Harry Kent 1962-1966

Charles Wallace 1958-1961

Roland Zimmerman 1966-1974

W. Harold Walker 1961

James Sledd 1974-1984


PRINCIPALS

OF GHEENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL

Mr. Ar c hi e F. Hob e rtson 1924 - 1925

-

~k.

l'vtr s. H. l'""i. C<'Vil:,.

George F. Dunn 1925 - 1928

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r

r ~·.- i'f rH r r ;· ·lr• ,.~

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~.

,.....

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E·.~. .r-r .I..' · ..

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:\1r . H. Clatl'if' Gr :tham I ~' 2 b - I ~~ 3 5

Mr. Pat> l H. Ca l e 1935 - 1946

l\1r. B en F. Hun 194 6- 1953


GREENWOOD HIGH SCHOOL GRAOUATES

1~

1921-22

1923-24 continued

1925-26 tontinued

William Davis Crabin Gill William Rodes Sadie Williams Drayton Mayers Bessie Critzer Rebie Critzer Virginia Ellinger Genevieve Forbes Nora Grinstead Martha Hopkins Aileen Hoodson

Vernon Rogers Hans Vandenberg John Veal Wyant Wharton Franklin Yancey Richard Yancey Charles Young Mary Bowen Mabel Brooks Lutie Burch Elizabeth Burton Edna Clayton Ann Cloud Dorothy Forbes Nellie Garwood Marie Lenington Edith Pugh Virginia Pugh Helen Rea Julia Shirley Lutie Williams

Mildred Rea Mary Betty Rhodes Mary Rogers Genie Shirley Keith Alexander Edison Gann Carson Shephard Vernon Snow Virgil TomUn Curtis Young

1922-23

Mary Black Mary Burch Martha Burnley Bessie Campbell Aylor Ellinger Winnie Ellinger Lilli an Foster Joy Gann Grace Hopkins Carrie Jones Maude Martin Dorothy Pugh Bessie Smith Russell Baber John Burch Hunter Burton Clifton Farrar John Farrar Russell Farrar Harold Marp William McAllister . Goodman Rea 1923-24

Reginald Alexander Jean Baber Harry Black John Burch John Clayton Gera 1d Covi 11 e Deane Foster Aubrey Ferguson Charles Haven 134

1924-25

Katherine Alexander Lutie Burch Mary Louise Yancey Lillian Gill Ruth Campbell Mildred Rea Mamie Revercomb Mary Winebarger Edith Young Marvin Baber Thomas Clayton Ashby Farrar Hamilton McCue Elmo Snow Clyde Wheeler David Wine 1925-26

l:.ouise Coleman Muriel Forbes Reba Hill Sophia Jarman Thelma Pugh Louise Rea

1926-27

Shield Critzer Eddie Ellinger George Gi 11 Raleigh Mann Caleb Mine Sam Pugh Cecil Wade Russel Wade John Yancey Mary Baber Elizabeth Burch Algy Ellinger . .Edna Pugh Margaret Pugh Dorothy Rodes Velina Rogers 1927-28

Robert Black Merriette Dollens Hunter Rogers Cecil Wade Ervin Wood Louise Black Natalie Foster Me 1i ssa Gill Florence Grinstead Ruth Rea Vree Smith . Louise Thurston Lillian Fox Agnes Bowling

r eC ssie te

rene hyll i nn ie Edith irgi n Bessie

IS

Conrad ridi Grant Butler Herman l ois F Ina Ma Myrtle Grace

1

Will ia Joe Ba Ell en Ella P Mary D Daisy Mary E Phylli Margie Sarah

Eve ret George Frankl Horace Mi 1dre, Paige , Martha Louise Sadre I Cl ara : Eiizab1 Charlo


1928-29

1932-33

Alfred Apperson Massie Clayton Walter Young Nancy Apperson Catherine Burch Lucille Burch Irene Claydon Phyllis Graves Annie Grinstead Edith Pugh Virginia Pugh Bessie Young

P.C. Fox Grant Grinstead John Key Marion McQueen Early Nay Filmer Schultz Lewis Tomlin Stuard Wood Lavonia Burch Mary Dell Cook Mabel Grasty Elizabeth Grose Mary Key Frances Shepherd A1rna Hhitl ock Mary Wilkins

1929-30

Conrad Fruit Meridith Gill Grant Rogers Butler Yowell Herman Wade Lois Foster Ina Mann Myrtle Rea Grace Schultz 1930-31

William Buchanan Joe Baber Ell en Apperson Ella Page Clayton Mary Doll ins Daisy Haven 路 Mary E. Pugh Phyllis Smith Margie Wheeler Sarah Young 1931-32

Everett Anderson George Ellinger Franklin Key Horace Rea Mildred Black Paige Burch Martha Dodd Louise Dowell Sadre Hensley Clara Shirley Elizabeth Skillman Charlotte Yowell

1935-36 continued

Marie Moore Alice Moyer Mabel Rea Helen Winn Ruby Lee Wyant 1936-37

Page Nay ~~a 11 ace

Shanks Phyllis Apperson Caroline Maphis Marie MeA ll i ster Irene Clayton Frances Timberlake Porrie Wheeler Dorothy ~Ji nn Julia Woodie

1933-34

Richard Burch Lavhoff Charles Maphis Kenneth Wood Genevieve Clayton Vi rg i ni a Do we 11 Ruth Harrison Edna Kirby Caroline Kirby Annie Layne Bertha Rea Dora Teufel Mary Young

1937-38

~Jilliam

-

1934-35

Donald Shroyer Joyce Dowell Mildred Gentry Pearle Rea Marian Wiley Luc i 11 e Woodson Jane Young 1935-36

George Maphis Purcell McCue, Jr. Massie Rea Cecil Robinson Lorene Burch Dorothy Collins Bess Mann

James Garwood Louis Toms, Jr. Harlett Wiley Tommy Hyant . Eleanor Anderson ~1arqaret Black Bessie Harper Bertha Kirby Edith Kirby Helen Mensing Frances Munn Charlotte Shephard Elizabeth Turner Virginia Wheeler 1938-39

Jerry T. Dollins Jack L. Fox Lucien W. Fox Cornelius H. Gentry William G. Shirley Mosby C. Toms Harrison Waite III Helen F. Bailes Sally B. Barksdale Juliette R. Belew Truman W. Grasty Margaret P. McCue Mary A. Page Mary v. Tomlin 135


1938-39 continued

1941-42 continued

1943-44 continued

Martha E. Quick Elizabeth L. Witt Margaret E. Woodson

Mae Baber Hallie Barksdale Mabel Davis Lucille Dollins Franc~ Fisher Kitty Harding Hattie Fox Margie Kent Virgie Kent Lilli an Layne Ruth Nay Nancy Page Frances Sullivan Margaret Teufel Polly Witt Margaret Heady

Elizabeth Mawyer Ann Mays Margaret Morris Ruth Quick Nancy Shephard

1939-40

Warren A. Burch Forrest M. Jones Claude Leftwich Sanmy ~1. Marvin, Jr. Oliver M. Parts Nelson C. Rea Leslie Robinson, Jr. Ben W. Wiley Lillian A. Grasty Thelma L. Grasty Stella E. Kent Mary J. Kirby Norma L. Lamb · Molly C. Marvin Dorotny L. McQueen Ann F. ~1unn Alice T. Sloan Margrettia J. Smith Hattie E. Tomlin Jane L. Tomlin Mary A. ~linn Phyllis A. Wyant Juliette R. Belew Bessie V. Harper Eva M. Quick 1940-41 Note: All Female

Katie Barksdale Phyllis Black Peggy Foster Ruby E. Fox Theresa McAll i ster Joyce Napier Jack Shirley Maxie Tomlin Althea Wyant 1941-42

Galley Gri tzer Philip Dollens James f r'etwe ll James Showers Orville Toms 136

1942-43

Alfred E. Dollins Preston F. Fox Early I. Kent ~~ Walter A. Layne, Jr. Warren F. Wade Ha ro l d Doll i ns Helen H. Baber Hattie R. Craig . Erdine E. deBalb) a ~ ~ Mary L. Kennedy lL: u: ~ Annie L. Pugh Theodisia G. Shirley Martha Tomlin Deane Wade Ann S. \~iley 194~-44

Johnny Booth Nathan Brown Maxwood Fitzgerald Richard Fox Alfred Layne John Page James Pugh Adam Teufel Charles Tomlin ~ Talmadge Toml in\""V~~~ Hilson Toms Mary F. Collons Mary E. Davis Virginia Gibson Louise Kennedy

1944-45

Lawrence Baber William H. Dollins Lloyd R. Napier Armstead Shirley, ·Jr. Magie G. Cook ~~) Lois Crowder Betty J. Fox Paula W. Grasty(~~ Phyllis V. Fox Ell a V. Harding f.r~.:J_b Clara Lamb Barbara Layman Sadie .F. Layne Florence Moyer Elizabeth Page (~~ Nancy Parr . Virginia Pugh r Mable L. Toml in\L~It~ Mary Fisher 1945-46 .

Wi 11 i am L. Cook James S. Fox Edward L. Graves Arthur E. Layne Dora M. Anderson Elizabeth B. Anderson~~~ Frances B. Kerley Lorene Morris Caroline A. Page Betty J. Patterson Marjorie A. Rea Carlene V. Shephard Florence E. Woodford Bessie B. Sernett 1946-47

Bobby Laster Harry Kent John Kent Herman Moyer · Jack Rainey

6- 7

rd T • C. Wa Ed'th Coo

rgaret ry J. G, Ma rgaret I El la Kent Virgi nia I Dor is Pug I Mary \~ell : Joanne Wi · 1947·

William F. Herbert C. James M. I James J. I Will iam W. Graven F. A1i ce P. E Doris J. E Mildred K. Virginia J Betty J. ( Mi 1dred I. Jean P. Ma Bessie D. Lucille M. Peggy A. F Helen V. ~ Ru th J. To Mary J. Wi Mary M. Wi

1948-

Aubrey Fo Andrew L; Thomas N. i 11 iam T. George £ John W. Ma Dewey F. P Ellis R. P Mi ckey M. Robert V. Edgar 0. W Betty A. B Naomi B. C Myrtle V. Audrey L. Thelma C. Fl orence L

:;U~


Jr.

n)

~~

J;;Jl)

tg ~tf~

1946-47 continued

1948-49 continued

Howard Toms R. C. Wade (~:t<e5) Edith Cook Margaret Fox Mary J. Garrison Margaret Garwood Ella Kent Virginia Mawyer Doris Pugh Mary Wells Joanne Witt

Joyce M. Hutchinson Lillian F. Lamb ~~ Dorothy M. Morris Nancy R. Moyer Verne 11 Mae Sandridge Nancy V. Shroyer Barbara L. Tomlin Mildred L. Wade Nora L. Wade <f~t:r~ ~ Mary K. Woodson~

1947-48

William F. Bailes Herbert C. Grinstead James M. Kennedy James J. Price William W. Wade Graven F. Winslow Alice P. Barber ~oJb~ Doris J. Belew Mi 1dred K. Fox Virginia A. Fox Betty J. Graves Mildred I. Kennedy Jean P. Maupin Bessie D. Pugh~ Lucille M. Pugh Peggy A. Pugh Helen V. Showers Ruth J. Tomlin 'JQ.~ Mary J. Wideman Mary M. Wiley 1948-49

d

rd

Aubrey Fox Andr.ew L; Graves (Le.si~_i) Thomas N. Kennedy . ~lliam T. Kennedy George F Marsha ll ~'j) John w. Mawyer&J~~~0 Dewey F. Pugh Ellis R. Pugh Mickey M. Pugh Robert V. Pugh Edgar 0. Woodson, Jr. Betty A. Bailes Naomi B. Clayton Myrtle V. Dudley Audrey L. Gray · .. Thelma C. Gray · Florence L. Hutchinson

f:.ruu~~

1950-51 continued

Catherine G. Hicks· Charlotte A. ~yer Lydia E. Pugh V!?t~~ Myrtle L. Shifflett Alice V. Thompson Barbara J. Wade ~arlott~V ~ Wpodson \f. ~l"' . w ~.e.. 1951-52

Vernon H. Anderson Robert R. Bailes Marvin W. Do 11 en Herbert H. Brown Godfrey T. Smith ~v~k-' ~ Calvin F. Canady r~s~:-6.,\) Malcalm \4. Wade Mitchell T. Clements Charles F. Witt, Jr. Raymond L. Garrison Meredith W. Woodson John S. Garwood Patricia A. Baber Andrew L. Graves ~~i) Mary E. Cook William H. Laster Betty J. Garwood Joseph A. Miller, Jr. Virginia B. Graves Pauline A. Atkinson Hazel Gibson Gracie E. Baber Susie M. Harris Mary L. Baber~ Genevieve M. Kirby Pearl L. Cash Winnie H. Louhoff Edna E. Cook Peggy M. Mawyer Edith 0. Craig Margorie J. Napier (:ric•. fVorothy L. Davis Grace Patterson 'Joyce L. Davis ~ Betty J. Pugh , ~ Anne L. Fox . Nancy M.. Tomlin (~~ Joyce L. Fox MildreCI L. Toml1n Alma B. McCue Betty J. Gray (H:.At~~*u~ [ Barbara A. Patterson <~~ Vi rgi ni a Sullivan \ :LdJ1 s e 'Dorothy J. Patterson Ruby M. Pugh 1952-53 Christine A. Shifflett Josie B. Sullivan William R. Barksdale ,(zot-p Barbara A. Wideman William E. Dick · Lillian L. Yancey John .W.... Gibson Bobby D. Graves . 1950-51 George A. Robinson ~~d u\ David L Sprouse · Y Calvin F. Canady Donald Thurston (<l~ th~t Calvin C. Kirby Randolph D. Wade William H. Layne Shirley M. Bailes Raymond G. Rainey Shirley A. Clements Dora E. Clements Shirley E. Fix Roxie A. Cook Barbara A. Gray Nellie P. Critzer Evelyn E. Gray Ruth E. Do 11 ens Margie A. Grinstead Annie M. Fox Marie F. Grinstead Cordelia A. Gentry Mildred L. Hicks · Ann M. Graves Daisy E. Hutchinson Betty J. Gray Doris G. Shiflett 137 1949-50

0

4


1952-53 continued Lois G. Thurston Charlotte Ann Wade Joyce A. Wood Mary A. Yancey

Last student body, faculty, and staff of Greenwood School - 1983-84. Photo by Steven G. Meeks

138


AT THE CROSSROADS

Photo by Matt Gentry

You to the left and I to th~ riqht For the ways of men must sever And it well may be for a day and a night, And it well may be forever. But whether we meet or whether we part (For our ways are past our knowing), A pledge from the heart to its fellow heart On the ways we all are qoing! Here's luck! For we know not where we are going. Richard Hovey 139


OH, GREENWOOD SCHOOL WE'LL SING TO YOU PRIDE OF OLD ALBEMARLE WE LOVE YOU, YES WE DO, DEAR GREENWOOD, LONG MAY WE CHERISH THEE, LOVE AND ADORE, SING PRAISE AND HONOR FOREVER MORE.

..

~路

.

"

,,

'

.

._

.. ~

Photo by Matt Gentry

140


Profile for Stan Maupin

Greenwood School Memories 1921-1984  

A privately published memory book with stories, hundreds of pictures and lots of history of Greenwood School in Greenwood, VA.

Greenwood School Memories 1921-1984  

A privately published memory book with stories, hundreds of pictures and lots of history of Greenwood School in Greenwood, VA.