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2017–18 SEASON

SEASON GUIDE

Art is a nation’s most precious heritage. For it is in our works of art that we reveal to ourselves and to others the inner vision which guides us as a nation. And where there is no vision, the people perish. — LY N D O N B . J O H N S O N ON SIGNING INTO EXISTENCE T H E N AT I O N A L E N D OW M E N T FO R T H E A RT S

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CURATORIAL STATEMENT

C H R I S L O R WAY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Welcome to the 2017–18 edition of Stanford Live! As we unveil this year’s program, we want to

myself observing how my newfound home

take you behind the scenes of how this season

defines itself through its artistic voices.

came to be. Our planning process focused

Through a historical exploration of America’s

not just on the art, but also on the ideas and

cultural heritage—from Charles Ives and Duke

influences behind the work you will see on

Ellington to living national treasures Darlene

stage. Stanford Live’s curatorial team (Laura

Love and John Williams—the season looks at

Evans, Ryan Davis, and me) spent many

how tradition and collective memory shape

months talking through various themes we felt

national character. We also mark the centenary

resonated with artists and our community at

of Leonard Bernstein, who—as educator,

this particular moment in history. This curatorial

collaborator, activist, and musical populist—

process led to an exploration of the nature of

articulated so much of the “American Century”

identity—personal, artistic, and cultural—and

through music.

how we search for it. Through a considerable variety of performances and genres, we bring

The outlines of America’s national identity,

you a season that weaves together ideas

however, become more defined through

about nationhood, pluralism, and nostalgia.

a global perspective. I can’t help but wonder how our two countries’ melting pot vs.

The journey to our exploration of identity

multiculturalist attitudes to immigration

began with three separate ideas. First, as a

impact the way we make art and tell stories.

recent transplant from Canada, I’ve found

Our coming season features artists that tell 2


STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

the story of Canada alongside America, including

represent these ideas and provide additional

indigenous music icon Buffy Sainte-Marie, first-

context. The curatorial process was also

generation actor/director Ravi Jain (and his

informed by a review of the latest literature

mom, Asha), and one of today’s most important

and through discussions with Stanford faculty

social and political commentators, Samantha

and other leading academics, colleagues,

Bee. (Given that Canada is celebrating its 150th

and artists.

birthday in 2017, it seemed like an opportune time to shine a light on some of the country’s

This season would not be possible without

best.) Artists from beyond North America—such

the help of Helen and Peter Bing ‘55 for

as Bangladeshi-English choreographer Akram

funding a Distinguished Artists Fund to bring

Khan and the Stradivarius Ensemble of Russia’s

some of these artists to Stanford. Throughout

Mariinsky Orchestra—round out a sampling of

this guide you’ll find pop-up commentary

international counterpoints that suggest other

by the season’s curators sharing some of the

ways of establishing and questioning national

ideas behind selecting certain performances

identity through artistic expression.

and thoughts on how they contribute to the expansive themes that this season as a

Finally, throughout the season we look at the

whole will explore. These personal reflections,

recent role that nostalgia has played in shaping

we hope, represent windows into this

identity and influencing culture. The word

season’s design, as well as invitations into

“nostalgia” often conjures up positive memories

its creative conversations.

from the past and attaches to powerful moments in the stories of our selves. In many

The following brochure is organized not

cases, these moments are steeped in musical

by genre or chronology. Rather, it is inspired

interventions—the song that was playing when

by our season’s inquiry into the ways our

you had your first kiss or the first LP/tape/CD

identities take shape in the space between the

you owned. While some artists help us escape

retrospection of nostalgia and the speculative

back to that happy place, others like Taylor

imaginings of hope. It is divided into three

Mac and Penny Arcade will challenge the idea

sections that suggest an experience of time’s

of nostalgia as a positive force. Fierce creative

progress. The first includes performances

expressions, like the poetic conscience of

that masterfully reexamine classical

Claudia Rankine or a folk-punk reenactment of

and traditional repertoires as the foundations

the Ukrainian Revolution, will contest nostalgia’s

for nationalistic or nostalgic sentiments.

regressive tendencies head-on. But as nostalgia

The second offers performances that revisit

narratives shift over time, social commentators

the musical innovations and aspiring spirit

Chuck Klosterman and Simon Reynolds will

that gave the 20th century its voice. The

rethink the retrospective forces at work in pop

third section gathers performances and talks

culture and music and reexamine the supposedly

that encourage us to reconsider the tug of

seminal moments in our collective histories.

sentimental longings for golden ages lost and to envision new, more inclusive ways to

In addition to the artists highlighted above,

remember and to enact common identity.

we have selected additional events— Thank you for joining us on this journey.

performances, speakers, films, etc.—that

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STANFORD LIVE CURATORS

Meet the Curators

C H R I S L O R WAY

L A U R A E VA N S

R YA N D AV I S

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, S TA N FO R D L I V E A N D BING CONCERT HALL

DIRECTOR OF MUSIC P R O G R A M S , E N G A G E M E N T, A N D E D U C AT I O N

A S S O C I AT E D I R EC TO R OF ENGAGEMENT AND PUBLIC PROGRAMS

Hometown:

Hometown:

Hometown:

Sydney, Nova Scotia

Moraga, CA

New Orleans, LA

Life-Changing Performance:

Life-Changing Performance:

Life-Changing Performance:

Robert Falls’ production

Butoh company Dai Rakuda

Reza Abdoh’s play Quotations

of Death of a Salesman

Kan in Kyoto, Japan, 1991

from a Ruined City

Nostalgia Song:

Nostalgia Song:

Nostalgia Song:

Joni Mitchell’s “Case of You”

Rickie Lee Jones’ “On Saturday

Selena’s “I Could Fall in Love”

Afternoons in 1963” Most Excited for This Season:

Most Excited for this Season:

Introducing some of my

Most Excited for This Season:

Taylor Mac breaking down the

Canadian friends to Stanford

The studio series, especially

1990s in America through

audiences

Counting Sheep

pop songs

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SEASON SIX

2 0 1 7–1 8


PRESALES BEGIN APRIL 25 SINGLE TICKETS AVA I L A B L E J U N E 8

HOW TO ORDER

PHONE

650.724.BING (2464) T U E S DAY – F R I DAY, 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

IN PERSON BING CONCERT HALL TICKET OFFICE 327 LASUEN STREET STANFORD, CA 94305 T U E S DAY – F R I DAY, 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

ONLINE live.stanford.edu

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WELCOME TO

Stanford Live SEASON SIX

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CONTENTS

C U R ATO R I A L STAT E M E N T

SECTION—1

PAG E — 2

Past as Prologue

SUMMER PREVIEW PAG E — 5 0 H OW TO O R D E R PAG E — 5 2

S U P P O RT STA N FO R D L I V E PAG E — 5 4 P L A N YO U R

What is the difference between history

VISIT

and nostalgia?

PAG E — 5 5

F U L L C A L E N DA R

P A G E­­— 1 1

BACK COVER

SECTION—2

SECTION—3

Living Memory

Longing Forward

KEY:

What makes music American?

Does nostalgia hold us back?

P A G E­­— 2 3

P A G E ­­— 3 7

A M P L I F I C AT I O N

AU D I E N C E I N T E R AC T I O N

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

SECTION—1

Past as Prologue

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SECTION 1—PAST AS PROLOGUE

“I believe craft is essentially a commitment to learning the past, living in the present, and dreaming the culture forward.” — TAY LO R M AC , “I BELIEVE”

What about ourselves is encoded in the music of our past? How does tradition—or our subjective experience of it—make us who we are, as individuals and communities? How do our shared reminiscences enliven artistic expression today? Some of the world’s finest classical artists grace our stages this season as we explore the ways that musical traditions can lay the foundations for self-expression. We have invited a range of accomplished virtuosos to demonstrate expressive capacities and masterful techniques that are the legacy of generations of musical craft.

“All music becomes classical music in the end...The best kind of classical performance is never a retreat into the past but rather an intensification of the present.” — A L E X RO S S , T H E N E W YO R K E R

Together, we will share iconic works that we return to again and again and consider the ways that nostalgia both preserves and transforms cultural heritage. We will hear them in dialogue with the time-honored artistry of other cultures, and we will encounter examples of a new generation of performers embracing these artistic inheritances and reinvigorating classical forms to convey their own passions. Throughout this season we will look at music that has given birth to nations and continues to give voice to their evolution, all while paying attention to the shared retrospective affections for great art that can forge bonds across differences.

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Credit: Joel Simon Images


SECTION 1—PAST AS PROLOGUE

THEATER

A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged) Taylor Mac Taylor Mac is the American theater’s most beloved

If one show weaves

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, S E P T E M B E R 27, 2 01 7

maximalist. Creating extravagant performances with

together the ideas that

jester-like charm, Mac’s work reflects the vast

our season sets out to

mosaic of the American imagination.

explore—how national

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

With Mac as our puckish guide, join us for an abridged

and how popular culture

version of his epic 24-hour performance art concert, which

and nostalgia shape

decodes the social history of the United States—all

who we are for better or

240 years and counting—through popular songs ranging

worse—Taylor Mac’s

from “Yankee Doodle Dandy” to disco. The show is a dazzling,

American historical pop

community-building experience that reflects our nation’s

odyssey does it all with

diverse and sometimes dysfunctional story in order to

an epic amount of heart,

reinvigorate a distinctively American sense of possibility.

laughs, and glitter.

identity merges with art,

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

A 24-Decade History of Popular Music is the winner of the

— RYA N DAV I S

2017 Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History and a finalist for the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

In partnership with Stanford Live, the entirety of A 24-Decade History will be performed in four parts at the Curran Theatre in San Francisco on September 15, 17, 22, and 24. For information, visit sfcurran.com.

R EC O M M E N D E D FO R M AT U R E AU D I E N C E S


CLASSICAL

The Stradivarius Ensemble of the Mariinsky Orchestra Valery Gergiev: Conductor and Music Director Behzod Abduraimov: Piano The Mariinsky Orchestra’s Stradivarius WHEN: S U N DAY, O C TO B E R 2 9, 2 01 7

Ensemble, an elite group of string musicians led by conductor extraordinaire Valery Gergiev, plays on priceless period instruments (like

CLASSICAL

American Brass Quintet

SHOW TIME: 2:30 P M

the one played by the famous cellist Pablo Casals). Young virtuoso Behzod Abduraimov, acclaimed for the

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

precision, tenderness, and fire of his interpretations, will play Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 1. Also on the

Created in 1970, the venerable WHEN: S U N DAY, O C TO B E R 15, 2 01 7

quintet hailed by Newsweek as “the high priests of brass” pays its first visit to the Bing with a program devoted to the early days of the

SHOW TIME: 2:30 P M

American republic. The quintet has dedicated itself to music originally written for brass, also commissioning

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

new chamber works. American Brass is in residence at the Juilliard School and the Aspen Music Festival.

bill: Grieg’s Holberg Suite, Richard Strauss’ Metamorphosen, and Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings.


CLASSICAL

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Chorale Three Performances at Bing Concert Hall, 7:30 PM

PERFORMANCE NO.1

PERFORMANCE NO.2

PERFORMANCE NO.3

The Judas Passion

Corelli the Godfather

Beethoven Unleashed

Nicholas McGegan: Conductor

Richard Egarr: Conductor

Nicholas McGegan: Conductor Eric Zivian: Fortepiano

and Harpsichord

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 4 2017

WHEN: F R I DAY, M A RC H 9 2 01 8

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, A P R I L 25 2 01 8

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and

The orchestra pays tribute to perhaps

Nicholas McGegan, PBO’s founder,

Chorale reveals a groundbreaking

the best known of the Baroque

takes the podium for Cherubini’s

new work by Scottish composer

composers, Arcangelo Corelli, who

Chant sur la mort de Joseph Haydn

Sally Beamish with libretto by David

influenced not only his generation

and early Beethoven works including

Harsent. The Passion According

of composers but the next. Organist

the Mass in C Major, op. 86, and

to Judas, loosely based on the

Richard Egarr conducts and also

the Fantasia in C Minor, op. 80,

Gnostic texts, offers a different

solos in the Handel Organ Concerto

Choral Fantasy. Bruce Lamott directs

perspective on the Last Supper and

No. 15 in D Minor, HWV 304. Also

the Philharmonia Chorale, with Eric

Jesus’ betrayer: from Judas’ sin to

benefiting from PBO’s expert

Zivian on the fortepiano.

forgiveness and redemption.

musicianship and period instruments are concerti grossi by Corelli and Handel and a Georg Muffat sonata.

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

CLASSICAL

A Chanticleer Christmas It wouldn’t be December at Stanford WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, D EC E M B E R 13, 2 01 7

without the annual concert of this beloved a cappella male choir, filling Memorial Church with sound and hearts with joy. Since its 1978

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

founding in San Francisco by Louis Botto, Chanticleer has toured the world, winning bravos from the

VENUE: MEMORIAL C H U RC H

capitals of Europe to the greenways of Central Park, where the group has sung alongside the New York Philharmonic. Who knows? Your first

WORLD

Daniel Pearl World Music Days Concert

visit may launch a family tradition.

Harmony for Humanity (Free Event) Stanford musicians, including WHEN: T H U R S DAY, O C TO B E R 26, 2 01 7

members of the St. Lawrence String Quartet, curate this annual free concert honoring the life and memory of alumnus Daniel

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Pearl, the violin-playing Wall Street Journal reporter who was murdered in 2002 in Pakistan. The

VENUE: MEMORIAL C H U RC H

event is presented in partnership with the Office for Religious Life and Music at Stanford.

This Stanford tradition of remembering Daniel Pearl through music reflects the open spirit, inclusiveness, and ecumenical tastes of its honoree. This year’s program features music of all seven Muslim-majority countries affected by the travel ban of early 2017. Addressing questions of migration, cultural identity, and global harmony seems a fitting way to pay tribute. — L AU R A E VA N S

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CLASSICAL

Sundays with the St. Lawrence ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET

Three Performances at Bing Concert Hall, 2:30 PM

The acclaimed St. Lawrence String Quartet, continuing its multifaceted residency at Stanford University, demonstrates its diverse musicality with three Sunday concerts at the Bing.

Performance No.1 WHEN: S U N DAY, N OV E M B E R 5 2017

Performance No.2 WHEN: S U N DAY, F E B RUA RY 1 1 2 01 8

Performance No.3 WHEN: S U N DAY, APRIL 29 2 01 8

The quartet, which has in the past

Joining forces with guest viola

Returning to its roots, the St.

featured immersive encounters with

player Masumi Per Rostad, the

Lawrence performs music by

the music of Franz Joseph Haydn,

St. Lawrence performs a new

Canadian composer R. Murray

holds an all-Haydn “Bing-fest”

work by Stanford composer Mark

Schafer, in addition to Haydn’s

with all six of his Opus 20 string

Applebaum, alongside works

String Quartet in C Major,

quartets—quite a feat.

by Mozart and Tchaikovsky’s

op. 33, no. 3, and Erich Wolfgang

String Quartet No. 3 in E-flat

Korngold’s Opus 15 Piano

Minor, op. 30.

Quintet with longtime collaborator Stephen Prutsman.

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

CLASSICAL

St. Louis Symphony David Robertson: Music Director Augustin Hadelich: Violin The St. Louis Symphony—second WHEN: F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 19, 2 01 8

oldest in the nation—is both venerable and forward-looking, with a broad musical range and diverse repertory. The Bing program includes

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Thomas Adès’ Dances from the opera Powder Her Face, Benjamin Britten’s Violin Concerto with Grammy-

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

winning violinist Augustin Hadelich, and Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 1. Under David Robertson, now

CLASSICAL

in his 12th and final year as maestro,

Rolston String Quartet

the orchestra has toured extensively in the United States and across the globe.

Rising Canadian stars the Rolston WHEN: S U N DAY, D EC E M B E R 3, 2 01 7

Quartet (Luri Lee, violin; Jeffrey Dyrda, violin; Hezekiah Leung, viola; and Jonathan Lo, cello) came together in Banff in 2013, eventually

SHOW TIME: 2:30 P M

winning first prize at the prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition in 2016. That same year,

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

the ensemble won the John Lad Prize, which brings it to the Stanford Live stage. On the program: works by Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and Canadian composer and educator R. Murray Schafer.

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CLASSICAL

Cameron Carpenter “My place...is to do things with the WHEN: SAT U R DAY, F E B RUA RY 3, 2 01 8

organ that it never would want to do... and for people that didn’t know that they wanted to hear it. Which is exactly what’s happening,” says iconoclastic

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

organist Cameron Carpenter. In a Bing concert that promises to be one of a kind, Carpenter—who will be in

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

residence on campus—will be playing his revolutionary digital International Touring Organ. Known for his fearless reinterpretations of the classics, Carpenter has won international acclaim for his brilliance, not to mention his sartorial style.

CLASSICAL

Renée Fleming Renée Fleming is one of the most WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, JA N UA RY 3 1, 2 01 8

beloved and acclaimed sopranos of all time, captivating audiences with her magnificent voice and indelible artistry. In 2013, President Obama

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

awarded her the National Medal of Arts, America’s highest honor for an individual artist. For years, Fleming

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

has graced the world’s greatest opera stages and concert halls—now extending her reach to jazz clubs, Broadway, and even the Super Bowl (the first classical artist to do so). Expect her debut recital at the Bing to be a showstopper!

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

CLASSICAL

Zurich Chamber Orchestra Daniel Hope: Music Director and Violin Since its founding in 1945, the Zurich WHEN: S U N DAY, M A RC H 1 8, 2 01 8

Chamber Orchestra has covered a lot of ground, performing on Baroquestyle bows and traditional gut strings in recent years while also looking to

SHOW TIME: 2:30 P M

the new in its performance of jazz and folk repertoire. Conducting from the violin, Daniel Hope, succeeding

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

his countryman Sir Roger Norrington, leads the ensemble in an unusual pairing of The Four Seasons with minimalist composer Max Richter’s Recomposed, an exciting reimagining

CLASSICAL

of Antonio Vivaldi’s Baroque classic.

Takács Quartet With Marc-André Hamelin Blessed with a nigh-otherworldly WHEN: F R I DAY, F E B RUA RY 23, 2 01 8

gift for chamber artistry, the Takács Quartet, in the latest of its highly anticipated visits to the Bing, partners with Canadian piano

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

virtuoso Marc-André Hamelin for the Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 2. Beethoven’s Opus 131 Quartet and

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Schubert’s Quartettsatz are also on the program for this Boulder, Colorado–based quartet.

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

SECTION—3

Longing Forward

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SECTION 3—LONGING FORWARD

“Remember a future from another dream and hold on.” —C L A U D I A R A N K I N E , “OV E RV I E W I S A P L AC E ”

Does nostalgia hold us back? How might fond memories of the “good ol’ days” only tell a partial or skewed story of our shared past? Or can retrospective attitudes inspire new ways of looking at ourselves and imagining what we might be? What can we learn from returning to a moment when we thought the future would be different? How do we preserve the lessons of history from cultural amnesia without giving in to more regressive kinds of thinking? This section presents an eclectic survey of musical acts, theatrical performances, dance pieces, and conversations that take a critical eye to our urge to look backwards for answers about who we are. Some of the artists you see here engage in selfconscious retrospectives of their storied careers in order to propel forward. Others reframe beloved

“What about ideas that are so accepted and internalized that we’re not even in a position to question their fallibility? These are ideas so ingrained in the collective consciousness that it seems foolhardy to even wonder if they’re potentially untrue.” — C H U C K K LO S T E R M A N , B U T W H AT I F W E ’ R E W RO N G ? :

cultural legacies in order to innovate and forge

T H I N K I N G A BO U T T H E P R E S E N T A S

new bonds. Many highlight alternative acts of

I F I T W E R E T H E PA ST

reminiscing that complicate the stories by which we define ourselves, particularly in our increasingly diverse societies. Together, these artists and thinkers question our yearning to retreat into the past to make sense of ourselves and unmask the effect nostalgia has on our creative and social imaginations. In doing so, they paint a picture of how the past participates in progress with richer dimensions than rose tint alone. 38


As a part of our exploration of the ways national identity finds expression through music, who better to invite than Rob Kapilow to share his irresistible insights? His seasonCLASSICAL

What Makes It Great?

long retrospective of iconic composers who tried to define the essence of American sound from its cultural fusions—

Rob Kapilow Three Performances at Bing Concert Hall

Antonín Dvořák, Leonard Bernstein, and Duke Ellington— follows the footsteps of Bernstein himself. — RYA N DAV I S

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

CLASSICAL

The American Quartet Featuring the St. Lawrence String Quartet The revered and longtime Stanford WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 11, 2 01 7

University-resident St. Lawrence String Quartet joins Kapilow to explore and appreciate Antonín Dvořák’s American Quartet, perhaps

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

his most popular work. Formally titled Quartet No. 12 in F, it was written in 1893, when the composer was summering in Spillville, Iowa, an emigrant Czech community. It was the second piece he wrote in America; his first was the New World Symphony.

AMERICAN SONGBOOK

JAZZ

Theater Songs of Leonard Bernstein

The Music of Duke Ellington Featuring the Marcus Shelby Orchestra Joined by Marcus Shelby’s 10-piece

Kapilow looks at the story behind WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUA RY 7, 2 01 8

Leonard Bernstein’s songs from West Side Story. Bernstein in the 1960s was himself a popular advocate

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, A P R I L 1 1, 2 01 8

narrating the New York Philharmonic Young People’s Concerts live on

explorations of American identity in music, this time focusing on Duke Ellington. Shelby, a preeminent figure

of classical music, conducting and SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

jazz orchestra, Kapilow continues his

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

on the Bay Area jazz scene, is a bassist, arranger, composer, educator,

television for a national audience.

and activist focused on sharing the

As an American composer and

past, present, and future of African

conductor, Bernstein crossed genres,

American music.

lending his gifts to Broadway, the opera house, and the concert hall. Two vocalists will join Kapilow at the piano. Generously supported by Bonnie and Marty Tenenbaum 27


After seeing the brilliant documentary, I was struck by two things that are important to consider at this moment: how soft power— like the State Department’s Jazz Ambassadors program— was used in the late 1960s to mitigate international perceptions of racial division and inequality. And how the Lahore musicians’ sometimes frustrating rehearsals with Jazz at Lincoln Center can be seen as metaphor for the immigrant experience, an often challenging transition into the melting pot. — C H R I S LO RWAY

WORLD

Song of Lahore Sachal Ensemble The Golden Era of “Lollywood” in Lahore, Pakistan, peaked WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, N OV E M B E R 15, 2 01 7

in the 1960s and ‘70s, until the enforcement of Islamic Sharia law in 1977 led to a steep decline in the arts. As work dried up for studio musicians, producer Izzat Majeed secretly gathered these intrepid players at his Sachal

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Studios, where they recorded a hit version of Dave Brubeck’s iconic “Take Five”—with a South Asian twist. Wynton Marsalis invited the Sachal Ensemble to perform

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

with his Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, leading to an album, an acclaimed documentary (directed by Stanford alums Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and Andy Shroeder), and invitations to perform around the world. In conjunction with the performance, we will be screening the documentary Song of Lahore. Date and time will be announced in the fall.

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JAZZ

Jason Moran In My Mind: Thelonious Monk at Town Hall 1959 Jazz virtuoso Jason Moran, winner of WHEN: SAT U R DAY, N OV E M B E R 1 1 , 2 01 7

a MacArthur “Genius” award and currently the Kennedy Center’s artistic director for jazz, took up piano because of Thelonious Monk. Moran, who is

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

reimagining Monk’s historic 1959 Town Hall concert at the Bing, says Monk is “the most important musician, period.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

In all the world, period.” In this centenary year of Monk’s birth, Moran evokes the concert’s breakaway excitement via an in-depth media show, and with his 10-piece Big Bandwagon he explores Monk’s roots and impact.

JAZZ/BLUES

Generously supported by the National

SFJAZZ Collective The Music of Miles Davis Founded in 2004 in San Francisco, WHEN: SAT U R DAY, O C TO B E R 21, 2 01 7

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

this award-winning octet celebrates legendary jazz artists by performing their masterworks

Endowment for the Arts I was at SFJAZZ in 2007 when that organization commissioned and premiered In My Mind. It was an inspiring experience to be behind the scenes as Jason came to grips with his musical hero Thelonious Monk in two concerts, first recreating and then reimagining the famed 1959 Town Hall concert. The final result was a thrilling synthesis of image and music. Starting as

and by creating new music

homage, In My Mind takes that giant specter of influence and

expanding on those influences.

transforms it into Moran’s own multi-layered story of musical

This year it’s Miles Davis’ turn.

innovation and social critique.

The octet—Miguel Zenón, alto sax; David Sánchez, tenor sax; Warren Wolf, vibraphone; Sean Jones, trumpet; Robin Eubanks, trombone; Edward Simon, piano; Matt Penman, bass; and Obed Calvaire, drums—explores the Miles of myth and reality and his blues/jazz connections.

— L AU R A E VA N S


SECTION 2—LIVING MEMORY

JAZZ

The Hot Sardines’ Holiday Stomp Dance ‘til you drop to a yuletide WHEN: SAT U R DAY, D EC E M B E R 9, 2 01 7

blend of hot jazz, including swinging renditions of classics like The Nutcracker Suite and “White Christmas” and less traditional

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

tunes like Ella Fitzgerald’s “Santa Claus Got Stuck in My Chimney.” All this and the Hot Sardines, too,

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

full of the brass and dazzle of their New York home and a year of sold-out engagements. Join us on

SCREENING WITH LIVE SCORE

The Red Violin François Girard: Film Director Lara St. John: Violin Canadian violinist Lara St. John, WHEN: F R I DAY, D EC E M B E R 8, 2 01 7

with the help of a live orchestra, performs the score at a screening of The Red Violin, an engaging film about an antique instrument

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

made in Cremona, Italy. The story follows this violin’s odyssey from Europe to modern Montreal,

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M

tracing its path through four centuries and five countries and bringing ill fortune to all who play it. Can the curse be broken?

T H I S F I L M I S R AT E D R

30

the dance floor and shimmy your way to the holidays in style.


WORLD

The Klezmatics Happy, Joyous Hanukkah Woody Guthrie and Hanukkah? Who WHEN: T H U R S DAY, D EC E M B E R 14, 2 01 7

knew? Almost nobody. But in 1998 his daughter Nora discovered a trove of songs that the celebrated folksinger wrote in the 1940s. The

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Grammy-winning Klezmatics riff off Guthrie’s original melodies and create new tunes in this unremittingly

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

SPOKEN WORD

Selected Shorts Holiday Nostalgia A public radio watchword for years, WHEN: S U N DAY, D EC E M B E R 10, 2 01 7

Selected Shorts broadcasts weekly on 150 stations to some 300,000 listeners across the country—not to mention its devoted podcast

SHOW TIME: 2:30 P M

audience. On tour from its home at Symphony Space in New York City, each show follows a single

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

theme through short stories from both established and emerging writers, performed by an engaging cast of actors from stage and screen. At the Bing, the nostalgia of the holidays takes center stage.

cheerful fusion of Klezmer music and American sounds.


SECTION 2—LIVING MEMORY

CLASSICAL

Jeremy Denk with Stefan Jackiw Jeremy Denk, American piano WHEN: S U N DAY, JA N UA RY 28, 2 01 8

virtuoso and a MacArthur “Genius” award winner, visits the Bing with noted violinist Stefan Jackiw—and members of the Stanford Chamber

SHOW TIME: 2:30 P M

Chorale—for a performance of all the sonatas of the American modernist composer Charles Ives.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Ives drew upon contemporary hymns, songs, and marches to eloquently convey the nuances of the American experience. Nobody is better equipped than Denk to demonstrate Ives’ influences and his continuing impact on American music. Generously supported by Trine Sorensen and Michael Jacobson

WORLD

Çudamani: Gamelan and Dance of Bali Among the more surprising WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUA RY 2 8, 2 01 8

influences on American composers is the traditional Balinese art of gamelan. The gigantic ensemble of instruments’ resonating tones

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

and rich sound have captivated composers like Canadian Colin McPhee and American composers Lou Harrison, Charles Ives, John Cage, and Steve Reich. Experience the inspirational source of these composers in this special performance by the musicians and dancers of Gamelan Çudamani.


STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

JAZZ

Bill Charlap Trio Uptown/Downtown: From Broadway to Harlem Mary Stallings and Freddy Cole: Special Guests Son of Broadway composer Moose WHEN: SAT U R DAY, F E B RUA RY 10, 2 01 8

Charlap and TV singer Sandy Stewart, Bill Charlap has American song in his DNA. In this program, Charlap brings us on a guided tour

SHOW TIME: 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

of American Popular Song—from Berlin and Bernstein’s Broadway to the Harlem stride of Eubie Blake and Fats Waller, to the singular songbook of Duke Ellington—with other exciting stops along the way. Special guests and legendary vocalists Mary Stallings and Freddy Cole join the Bill Charlap Trio on stage.

CLASSICAL

The American Sound Curtis on Tour The prestigious Curtis Institute of WHEN: S U N DAY, M A RC H 4, 2 01 8

Music in Philadelphia sends its most promising young students on tour to play alongside faculty and noted alumni. This program pays tribute

SHOW TIME: 4:00 P M

to Leonard Bernstein (himself a Curtis alum), in celebration of his centenary, with Bernstein’s Clarinet

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Sonata (with alum, David Shifrin) and songs from West Side Story, alongside pieces by two of his contemporary influences, Aaron Copland and George Gershwin. Generously supported by Mary and Clinton Gilliland 33


POP

Disco Manila Featuring Spanky Rigor and Roger Rigor of VST and Co. and the Union Take a trip down Memory Lane WHEN: SAT U R DAY, A P R I L 7, 2 01 8

to the Filipino disco songs of the Manila Sound, which began in Quezon City in the late 1970s, continuing into the early ‘80s.

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

ABBA, Donna Summer, and the Bee Gees influenced the Sound, recreated at the Bing by alums

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

from some of the era’s major disco groups, VST, the Union, and a funky five-piece band.

POP

Darlene Love For more than 50 years, backup WHEN: F R I DAY, F E B RUA RY 9, 2 01 8

singer Darlene Love has been making rock and roll’s world go ‘round. In the early 1960s, she was part of Phil Spector’s Wall of

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Sound for “He’s a Rebel,” doing backing (as well as uncredited lead) vocals for “Da Doo Ron Ron,”

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

“Be My Baby,” and scores of other hits. With the 2013 documentary Twenty Feet from Stardom, she became the best-known unknown in rock history. Joined for part of the program by the Stanford Symphony Orchestra, Love will fill the house with nostalgia and her timeless, soaring voice.

34


JAZZ/BLUES

Songs of Freedom Songs of Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln, and Nina Simone Theo Bleckmann, Alicia Olatuja, and Joanna Majoko: Vocalists Ulysses Owens Jr: Musical Director In a program first presented under WHEN: T H U R S DAY, A P R I L 1 9, 2 01 8

the auspices of Jazz at Lincoln Center, the 1960s are explored through the work of three prolific artists: Joni Mitchell, Abbey Lincoln, and Nina

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

indelible mark in music with their unique expressions of freedom. Mitchell

SCREENING WITH LIVE SCORE

The Triplets of Belleville

Simone—all of whom have made an

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

composed and sang about the freedom of love, Lincoln expressed freedom of her individuality and race through her lyricism, and Simone demanded freedom politically through song.

Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville Benoît Charest: Composer When her grandson is kidnapped WHEN: SAT U R DAY, A P R I L 14, 2 01 8 7 : 30 P M

during the Tour de France, Madame Souza and her beloved pooch Bruno team up with the Belleville Sisters—an aging song and dance

S U N DAY, A P R I L 15, 2 01 8 2 : 30 P M

group—to rescue him. This much beloved animated film is screened as composer Benoît Charest leads Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville in a

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

live performance of his original score for the film, including his Academy Award–winning best song. In the spirit of the film, Le Terrible Orchestre de Belleville transports audiences to the exciting streets of 1920s Paris and Le Jazz Hot. T H I S F I L M I S R AT E D P G -13

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

SECTION—2

Living Memory

Credit: Paul de Hueck, courtesy the Leonard Bernstein Office, Inc. 23


SECTION 2—LIVING MEMORY

“…there are as many sides to American music as there are to the American people—our great, varied, many-sided democracy... Think of all the races and personalities from all over the globe that make up our country; and when we think of that we can understand why our own folk music is so complicated.” — L EO N A R D B E R N S T E I N , “ W H AT M A K E S M U S I C A M E R I C A N ?”

For many today, our identity is refracted through

make up the soundtracks of our lives and

nostalgia for a Golden Age of music in the

influence the wider culture. Through unforgettable

20th century. Our personal histories mingle with

concerts, heart-touching screenings with live

landmark moments in the evolution of jazz,

scores, dynamic hybrid lecture-performances,

memorable refrains from the Great American

literary events, and more, we take a look at the

Songbook, infectious rhythms of the 1960s—from

ways that we piece together personal and

its girl groups to its rock protest anthems—and

national narratives out of the last century’s myriad

the pulse of the disco dance floor.

experiences and cherished living memories.

This season we will explore how the “American Century” found its sound and how that sound was transmitted across the globe. Performances will pay homage to its pivotal voices, who continue to

24


SECTION 3—LONGING FORWARD

Since her folksinging debut in 1964, singer-songwriter WHEN: F R I DAY, S E P T E M B E R 22, 2 01 7

from her early days as a

been an avatar of the international protest movement and

musician and activist in the

a performer of the first order. She wrote “Til It’s Time for

1960s. Or maybe you

You to Go” and “The Universal Soldier” in 1973, sang with SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Some of you may know Buffy

Buffy Sainte-Marie, a Cree Indian born in Canada, has

Pete Seeger, Johnny Cash, and the Muppets, and aided Native Americans through her foundation. Fifty years on, her voice has lost none of its presence and power.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

remember her from her time on Sesame Street in the late 1970s or know her Oscarwinning song from An Officer and a Gentleman. What you may not know is her recent history as both a critical voice for indigenous issues and the

POP

Buffy Sainte-Marie

recipient of the Polaris Prize, Canada’s top musical honor. — C H R I S LO RWAY


THEATER

A Brimful of Asha Why Not Theatre Culture clash, Canadian-style, comes

DISCUSSION

In Conversation with Samantha Bee Meet America’s Canadian sweetheart, WHEN: F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 6, 2 01 7

the only female comic to host her

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

with Jon Stewart, has become

own network late-night show. Bee, who learned her craft as a

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 1 8, 2 01 7 7 : 30 P M

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M

a ribald voice that never loses its

F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 2 0, 2 01 7 7 : 30 P M SAT U R DAY, O C TO B E R 2 1 , 2 01 7 7 : 30 P M

Bee emerged as the clarion voice of American political satire. Her full-throated feminist take on the news and jokes-per-minute blitzkrieg style almost betray her polite Canadian roots. But as we look at exemplary artists among our neighbors to the north this season, she stands out to us as someone to offer some perspective about what makes America great. — RYA N DAV I S

S U N DAY, O C TO B E R 2 2 , 2 01 7 2 : 30 P M

charm or its funny.

In the throes of the 2016 presidential election, Samantha

person play written by and starring mother and son Asha and Ravi Jain. The story is about a first-generation

T H U R S DAY, O C TO B E R 1 9, 2 01 7 7 : 30 P M

correspondent on The Daily Show a sharp political commentator with

to life in A Brimful of Asha, a two-

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

twenty-something who wants to connect with his Indian heritage—but not necessarily all of it. How will his family handle the conflict? A Brimful of Asha’s warm and complex story has captivated audiences throughout North America.


SECTION 3—LONGING FORWARD

WHEN: F R I DAY, O C TO B E R 27, 2 01 7

SAT U R DAY, O C TO B E R 28, 2 01 7

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Acclaimed choreographer Akram Khan brings the full

One of the most important

range of his artistry to bear in his newest work, Until the

arts events of the last

Lions, based on the ancient epic Mahabharata, using

century was Peter Brook’s

both Indian Kathak and modern dance in a tale of

production of the

transformation and justice exacted by a bride wronged

Mahabharata, a nine-hour

on her wedding day. Rianto, a dancer personally selected

epic that toured the world

by Akram Khan to take on the lead role, performs with

in the late 1980s. A 13-year-

two female dancers and four musicians to tell the bride’s

old Akram Khan was

story in a powerful departure from the normally

part of that company and

male-centered ancient epic.

went on to be one of the world’s top dancers and choreographers. Until the

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M

Lions takes Khan back to this source material, DANCE

Until the Lions Akram Khan

more than 30 years after his debut. — C H R I S LO RWAY


DISCUSSION

Chuck Klosterman and Simon Reynolds A Conversation on Nostalgia and Pop-Culture Throwbacks

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, N OV E M B E R 1, 2 01 7

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Best-selling writer Chuck Klosterman (But What If We’re Wrong:

Chuck and Simon are two

Thinking about the Present as If It Were the Past) and Pitchfork

of today’s sharpest wits

music critic Simon Reynolds (Retromania: Pop Culture’s Addiction

breaking down what makes

to Its Own Past) discuss how nostalgia drives pop culture and

pop culture tick. They have

the music industry and what that means for the way that we

written brilliantly about the

look at ourselves. Can indulging “retro” pleasures be productive,

ways that music, television,

or are we stuck in a groove?

and other media employ nostalgia—from Amy

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Winehouse’s retro sound and hip-hop sampling to the throwback appeal of VH1 Classic and Hollywood reboots. We’ve asked them to wage a friendly debate about the merits and dangers of looking to the past for inspiration. — RYA N DAV I S

43


SECTION 3—LONGING FORWARD

THEATER

Longing Lasts Longer Penny Arcade Penny Arcade’s hilariously WHEN: F R I DAY, N OV E M B E R 3, 2 01 7

iconoclastic monologue, created by

SAT U R DAY, N OV E M B E R 4 2 01 7

political issues of class and

one of Andy Warhol’s underground THEATER

superstars, addresses perennially

The Fever

gender and everyday woes like gentrification. To Arcade (née

SHOW TIME: 8:00 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

600 HIGHWAYMEN

Susana Ventura), the Big Apple has become the Big Cupcake: a New York City of fluff, with no affordable places for artists and no place to buy a broom or get your shoes repaired or your clothes washed. Sound close to home?

Nostalgia can be a seductive feeling, even for those who don’t yearn for an old-fashioned America. But, at a moment when we’re “conditioned to hate history and love vintage,” Penny Arcade is a colorful counter-culture stalwart who shakes up our gentrified sentimentality to resuscitate a clear-eyed spirit of American activism and creativity.

Young and innovative theater WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUA RY 14, 2 01 8 8:00 PM T H U R S DAY, F E B RUA RY 1 5, 2 01 8 8:00 PM F R I DAY, F E B RUA RY 1 6, 2 01 8 7:00 & 9:00 PM

artists Abigail Browde and Michael Silverstone, together known as 600 HIGHWAYMEN, present a story about a party, just an ordinary party, and request your participation. It is an invitation to be together, to have faith in each other, and to show each other how warm and healing trust among strangers can be.

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

— RYA N DAV I S R EC O M M E N D E D FO R M AT U R E AU D I E N C E S

I saw The Fever in New York and was fascinated by the way it probes American feelings toward collective action and identity. It draws us in to experience, in an embodied way, the lines between our individual wills, our instincts to play and participate, and the ways we form groups or resist. At a time when we feel most divided as a nation, this performance brings us back to the basics of finding common purpose and acting together. — RYA N DAV I S


THEATER

The Daisy Theatre Ronnie Burkett, Theatre of Marionettes

WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, N OV E M B E R 15 2 01 7 T H U R S DAY, N OV E M B E R 16 2 01 7 F R I DAY, N OV E M B E R 17 2 01 7 SAT U R DAY, N OV E M B E R 18 2 01 7

SHOW TIME: 8:00 P M

Don’t bring the kiddies to puppeteer Ronnie Burkett’s

I first saw Ronnie’s work

rather ribald, thoroughly entertaining Daisy Theatre.

performed as part of the

Burkett, who hails from Alberta, Canada, became

Henson Puppetry Festival

interested in puppets as a child, when he picked up

in New York City. His use

Volume P of the World Book and it fell open at “puppets.”

of marionettes was unlike

Burkett is a one-man show, improvising on the spot. His

anything I had seen before,

marionettes—a rotating cast of 40 characters—include

a village of extreme

ventriloquist Meyer Lemon, actress Lillian Lunkhead, and

personalities brought to life

Edna Rural. Advisory: chance of puppet nudity.

through Ronnie’s quick and witty dialogue. The Daisy Theatre gives you a chance to see Ronnie at his improvisational best, as each night a new cast of characters takes to the

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

small stage. — C H R I S LO RWAY

R EC O M M E N D E D FO R M AT U R E AU D I E N C E S

45


SECTION 3—LONGING FORWARD

FAMILY

Machine de Cirque Even as big circuses are folding WHEN: F R I DAY, M A RC H 16, 2 01 8 7 : 30 P M SAT U R DAY, M A RC H 17, 2 01 8 2 : 30 P M

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M

their tents, intimate circuses are on the rise. The Quebec City–based Machine de Cirque is a prime example: just five guys existing in a post-apocalyptic world without women or computers. How will they survive? Watch and see. Machine de Cirque was founded in 2013 with the aim of engaging imaginations in their community. It adroitly blends acrobatics, juggling, music, dance, clowning, and derring-do.

THEATER

Counting Sheep: A Guerrilla Folk Opera Lemon Bucket Orkestra A sensation at the 2014 Edinburgh WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, F E B RUA RY 7, 2 01 8

Festival, Counting Sheep, a Ukrainian

T H U R S DAY, F E B RUA RY 8, 2 01 8

Lemon Bucket Orkestra, a guerrilla-

F R I DAY, F E B RUA RY 9, 2 01 8 SAT U R DAY, F E B RUA RY 1 0, 2 01 8

folk opera created by Mark and Marichka Marczyk (featuring Toronto’s folk party-punk band), recounts the 2013 outbursts, violence, and sniper fire of Ukraine’s Maidan Revolution witnessed by the Marczyks themselves, who emigrated to Canada soon after. Through traditional choral songs, it explores the human condition in times

SHOW TIME: 8:00 P M

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L ST U D I O

of violent upheaval, evoking the yearning for a better tomorrow. Presented in association with the Lemon Bucket Orkestra, Hot Feat Canada Ltd., and Selfconscious Productions

R EC O M M E N D E D FO R M AT U R E AU D I E N C E S


NEW MUSIC

Kronos Quartet With Special Guest Tanya Tagaq

Stanford Live is proud to be a commissioning partner in WHEN: F R I DAY, A P R I L 6, 2 01 8

Fifty for the Future: The Kronos Learning Repertoire, an initiative by the Kronos Quartet to commission new works for string quartet and distribute them online for free. The program features two of these new works by

SHOW TIME: 7 : 30 P M

Canadian composers and artists including throat singer Tanya Tagaq as well as The Green Fog, a new work for Kronos by filmmaker Guy Maddin, who set himself the

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

challenge of remaking Vertigo without using footage from Hitchcock’s classic. Composer Jacob Garchik fashions a score that canvasses Maddin’s footage to create a distinctive musical extravaganza. The Green Fog—A San Francisco Fantasia was commissioned by SFFILM and Stanford Live with support from Nion McEvoy.


DANCE

L.A. Dance Project Benjamin Millepied: Artistic Director

WHEN: F R I DAY, JA N UA RY 26, 2 01 8

SAT U R DAY, JA N UA RY 27, 2 01 8

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

Former Paris Opera Ballet Artistic Director

Millepied’s full-time return to Los

Benjamin Millepied, who choreographed the

Angeles has injected a new energy

movie Black Swan, founded the L.A. Dance

into this Downtown L.A. ensemble.

Project, an artist collective, in 2012 with

The company’s approach to

composers Nico Muhly and Nicholas Britell,

collaborative creation—integrating

art consultant Matthieu Humery, and producer

composers, musicians, and visual

Charles Fabius. The Project aims to make

artists into the process—harkens back

new work for a small group of dancers in

to the days of the Ballets Russes.

collaboration with visual artists, musicians, and composers to perform in both traditional and unconventional spaces.

VENUE: MEMORIAL AU D I TO R I U M

48

— C H R I S LO RWAY


STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

S P EC I A L B I N G C O N C E RT H A L L E V E N T S

Bing Fling 2018: Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra F R I D AY, A P R I L 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 8:00 PM Under the baton of conductor Keith Lockhart, the world-renowned orchestra brings the music of celebrated American film composer John Williams—the man behind the soundtracks for E.T., Star Wars, Harry Potter, and more—to the Bing. For our Bing members, this unforgettable evening also includes a reception and seated dinner. A limited amount of tickets will go on sale in the winter.

Join or renew your Bing membership to

See website for more details.

receive complimentary tickets to this event.

Generously supported by Marcia and John Goldman

For more info, visit live.stanford.edu/give.

Emanuel Ax, Leonidas Kavakos, and Yo-Yo Ma T H U R S D AY, M A R C H 1 , 2 0 1 8 7:30 PM For the love of Brahms, pianist Emanuel Ax, violinist Leonidas Kavakos, and cellist Yo-Yo Ma join forces on the Bing stage for an unforgettable performance. Generously supported by Marcia and John Goldman

N OT E : T H E S E S P EC I A L E V E N T S A R E O N LY AVA I L A B L E A S S I N G L E-T I C K E T A D D - O N S A N D D O N OT C O U N T TOWA R D S A S U B S C R I P T I O N PAC K AG E .

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SAV E T H E DAT E

Summer at Stanford Live Join us for a celebratory summer at Bing Concert Hall. Mark your calendars for the following events: Hiromi Duet featuring

Shai Maestro Trio

Edmar Castañeda

S U N DAY, J U LY 9, 7 : 30 P M

SAT U R DAY, J U N E 24, 8 :00 P M

Classic Albums Live: Music of Woodstock Canada Day Celebration:

F R I DAY, J U LY 14, 6: 0 0 P M

150th Birthday! Betsayda Machado and Parranda El Clavo

SAT U R DAY, J U LY 1, 4 :30-10:00 P M

SAT U R DAY, J U LY 1 5, 7 : 30 P M

Federspiel (“Austriafest”) Lisa Fischer and Grand Baton

SAT U R DAY, J U LY 8, 7:30 P M

SAT U R DAY, AU G U ST 5, 8 : 0 0 P M

Merola Opera Showcase: Schwabacher Summer Concert

Youssou N’Dour

S U N DAY, J U LY 9, 2:30 P M

W E D N E S DAY, AU G U ST 9, 7 : 30 P M

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFO: LIVE.STANFORD.EDU

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STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

JAZZ/BLUES

Arturo O’Farrill Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra Cornel West Concerto SPOKEN WORD

The Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra of WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, M AY 9, 2 01 8

pianist Arturo O’Farrill, a two-time Grammy winner, reaches beyond his trumpeter father Chico O’Farrill’s Afro-Cuban jazz to embrace many

SHOW TIME: 7 : 30 P M

Latin American music traditions. This Bing program features the

In Conversation with Claudia Rankine

Cornel West Concerto—which sets VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

Whiteness and the Aesthetics of Nostalgia

text by virtuosic speaker, scholar, and activist Dr. Cornel West to AfroLatin jazz orchestration.

African American poet Claudia WHEN: W E D N E S DAY, M AY 1 6, 2 01 8

Rankine, a professor at Yale University, speaks to the human condition in all its many manifestations. A winner of the 2016 MacArthur Fellowship

SHOW TIME: 7:30 P M

and author of five poetry collections, including Citizen—An American Lyric and Don’t Let Me Be Lonely, Rankine

VENUE: B I N G C O N C E RT HALL

candidly and critcally uses poetry and prose to explore how race and memory shape what it means to be an American citizen.

When thinking about how the foundational myths of cultural national identity coalesce, many of the artists in our season look at who and what nostalgia erases from the story. But we asked celebrated poet Claudia Rankine—who has devoted her MacArthur grant to creating the Racial Imaginary Institute—to share her thoughts on how ideas about whiteness are sustained by a culture of nostalgia in America. — RYA N DAV I S

51


Ticket Information For complete pricing, availability, and added shows throughout the season, visit live.stanford.edu HOW TO ORDER

Phone

S A L E DAT E S

650.724.BING (2464) Tuesday – Friday, 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

In Person

Bing Concert Hall Ticket Office 327 Lasuen Street Stanford, CA 94305

Bing members

Tuesday, April 25

$500+ donors

Wednesday, May 3

Renewing subscribers and donors of $150+

Saturday, May 20

Stanford community

Tuesday, May 30

Public onsale for subscriptions

Thursday, June 1

Public onsale for single tickets

Thursday, June 8

Tuesday – Friday, 12:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Online

52

live.stanford.edu


STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

DISCOUNTS

Discounts are available for the following categories (valid university ID or Courtesy Card may be required): Stanford employees (faculty, staff, visiting professors, and Stanford hospital employees): 20% off full-priced tickets,

B E S T S E AT FO R T H E P R I C E DONORS AND SUBSCRIBERS RECEIVE ADVANCED ACCESS TO TICKETS FOR THE UPCOMING SEASON, LOWER TICKET PRICES, AND MORE.

New for 2017: a simplified subscription

limit 2 per ID.

We’re streamlining our subscription process by offering a

Stanford students (matriculated undergraduate and

performances, and you’re locked into subscriber

single, customizable option: select five or more

graduate students): Tickets start at $15 for all main-stage events (special events and other restrictions apply). Deep discounts and rush tickets are also available for premium seats, pending inventory. Limit 2 per ID. Non-Stanford students: 20% off full-priced tickets,

benefits all season long. Alongside early access to season tickets ahead of the public, enjoy these subscriber perks: •Early ticketing access to our most popular events this season

limit 1 per ID.

•Advance notice and purchasing options for special

Youth (under age 18): 50% off full-priced tickets.

•Free ticket exchanges if your plans change

events and added programs

Groups (10 or more): 10% off full-priced tickets; processing fees may apply.

•A subscription to the newly redesigned Stanford Live magazine, with artist interviews, extended content, and more

Note: Regardless of age, everyone must have a ticket. Discounts cannot be combined.

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fees are reduced to $2 per ticket for Stanford students and are waived for Bing members. Subscription orders incur a $10 handling fee.

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All programs and prices are subject to change. Tickets are

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nonrefundable, except in the case of a canceled event.

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Some performances may be amplified at the request of the artist. Ear protection is available from ushers or at the

Be sure to inform the ticket office staff of any accessibility

Patron Services desk for all performances.

needs or seating requests when you order.

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Your donation directly contributes to:

· Complimentary ticket exchanges, and more!

· Matinee performances for more than a thousand K–12 students from across the Peninsula and South Bay

E N H A N C E YO U R E X P E R I E N C E —

· Free arts education workshops for K–12 teachers

B EC O M E A B I N G M E M B E R

· Discounted youth and student tickets

Become a leader in supporting Stanford Live’s mission

· Residency programs for visiting artists to work

and activities when you join as a Bing member!

and perform alongside Stanford students · Artist visits to local schools and community centers

Your annual Bing member contribution of $7,500 or more will provide a vital investment in Stanford Live’s

M A K E A D I F F E R E N C E W I T H E V E RY G I F T

programming and activities. In return, you can enjoy

Ticket sales cover less than one quarter of Stanford Live’s

exclusive benefits including our dedicated Bing member

operating costs. Your donation of any size allows Stanford

ticket concierge service, reserved parking for all Stanford

Live to offer a broad range of programming while keeping

Live ticketed performances, and tickets to Bing Fling,

ticket prices affordable and accessible for all.

our Bing member annual recognition event.

To l e a r n m o re o r to m ake a g i ft , v i s it l i ve.s ta n fo rd .ed u /g i ve, c o n ta c t u s a t s u ppo r ts ta n ford l i ve@s ta n fo rd .ed u , o r c a l l 650.72 5.8 78 2 . Gifts to Stanford Live are tax-deductible as a charitable contribution to Stanford University, but the tax deduction for Bing members will be reduced by $500 for each ticket to Bing Fling, as noted in the goods and services values as listed on our website. You may choose to decline the tickets to Bing Fling and receive the full taxdeduction for your gift. We are advised that federal law prohibits Bing member gifts to be made through a donor advised fund, a private foundation, or a qualified charitable distribution from an individual retirement account (IRA) if benefits such as tickets to Bing Fling are provided in return for such contributions. Please consult your tax advisor with any questions.

54


STANFORD LIVE 2017–18 SEASON

Plan Your Visit

BING CONCERT HALL

TERRACE 2

VENUES

CENTER 3

TERRACE 1

CENTER 2

Bing Concert Hall Seating is by pricing zone and varies by performance. Seating map shown at right.

TERRACE 3

CENTER 1

TERRACE 8

Bing Concert Hall Studio Seating in the Bing Studio is by general admission. Memorial Auditorium Seating is by pricing zone. Seating map shown at right.

STAGE

TERRACE 7

TERRACE 4

Memorial Church Seating at Memorial Church is by general admission. Access to the reserved-seating section is available for Stanford Live donors of $500 or more.

CHORAL TERRACE TERRACE 5

TERRACE 6

All prices and programs subject to change. Visit our website for up-to-date pricing information. MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM DINING

Enjoy pre-concert and intermission snacks and drinks at

BALCONY

Interlude Café in Bing Concert Hall’s expansive lobby. Pre-performance dining is also available at the café at the Arrillaga Alumni Center, just a five-minute walk to

BALCONY CIRCLE

Bing Concert Hall. Visit live.stanford.edu/dining for your dining options.

REAR ORCHESTRA

PA R K I N G & D I R EC T I O N S

For up-to-date information on parking and directions to our events and ticket office, visit live.stanford.edu/directions.

FRONT ORCHESTRA S TAG E

55


SEASON SIX

MEDIA SPONSORS:

F O U N D AT I O N S A N D I N - K I N D S P O N S O R S :

L I V E . S TA N F O R D. E D U


MARCH 1

Thu

Kronos Quartet featuring Tanya Tagaq

APRIL 6

Fri

APRIL

Emanuel Ax, Leonidas Kavakos, Yo-Yo Ma

APRIL 7

Sat

MARCH

Sun

Corelli the Godfather Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra

A P R I L 1 4 -1 5

Sat-Sun

The Music of Duke Ellington Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?

Disco Manila

MARCH 4

Fri-Sat

The Triplets of Belleville

Curtis on Tour

M A R C H 1 6 -1 7

APRIL 11

Machine de Cirque

Thu

Wed

Sun

APRIL 19

MARCH 9

MARCH 18

Songs of Freedom: Mitchell, Lincoln, and Simone

Fri

Zurich Chamber Orchestra

APRIL 20

Fri Bing Fling Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra

APRIL 25

Wed

Beethoven Unleashed Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra

APRIL 29

Sun

M AY

Sundays with the St. Lawrence St. Lawrence String Quartet

M AY 9

Wed

The Cornel West Concerto Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra

M AY 1 6

Wed

Claudia Rankine


OC TOBER 15

Sun American Brass Quintet Wed-Sun O C T O B E R 1 8 -2 2

A Brimful of Asha Why Not Theatre Sat

Sun

DECEMBER

DECEMBER 3

Rolston String Quartet

DECEMBER 8

Fri The Red Violin Live score featuring Lara St. John Sat

OC TOBER 21

The Music of Miles Davis SFJAZZ Collective

The Hot Sardines’ Holiday Stomp

F E B R U A R Y 7 -1 0

Wed-Sat

Counting Sheep Lemon Bucket Orkestra

Fri

FEB RUARY 9

Darlene Love with the Stanford Symphony Orchestra

FEB RUARY 10

Sat

Bill Charlap Trio with Freddie Cole and Mary Stallings

Selected Shorts

F E B R U A R Y 1 4 -1 6

Wed-Fri

Sundays with the St. Lawrence St. Lawrence String Quartet

FEB RUARY 11

Sun

DECEMBER 13

Wed

Sun

DECEMBER 9

Thu OC TOBER 26

OC TOBER 27 & 28

A Chanticleer Christmas

DECEMBER 10

Until the Lions Akram Khan

Thu

Harmony for Humanity Daniel Pearl World Music Days Concert

Sun

DECEMBER 14

Fri–Sat

OC TOBER 29

Happy, Joyous Hanukkah The Klezmatics

Takács String Quartet with Marc-André Hamelin

FEB RUARY 2 3

Fri

The Fever 600 HIGHWAYMEN

The Stradivarius Ensemble of the Mariinsky Orchestra

FEB RUARY 28

Wed

Gamelan Çudamani


Fri

Chuck Klosterman and Simon Reynolds

N OV E M B E R 1

Wed

St. Louis Symphony

JAN UARY 19

Fri

JA N UA RY

SEPTEMBER 22

Fri-Sat

N OV E M B E R

Buffy Sainte-Marie Fri-Sat

J A N U A R Y 2 6 -2 7

SEPTEMBER

Wed

L.A. Dance Project

N OV E M B E R 3 - 4

Jeremy Denk with Stefan Jackiw

JAN UARY 28

Sun

N OV E M B E R 5

Wed

JAN UARY 31

Renée Fleming

F E B R UA RY

Cameron Carpenter

Songs of Leonard Bernstein Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?

FEB RUARY 3

Song of Lahore Sachal Ensemble

Sat

Wed-Sat

FEB RUARY 7

Wed The Daisy Theatre Ronnie Burkett, Theatre of Marionettes

N OV E M B E R 1 5 -1 8

N OV E M B E R 1 5

Wed

In My Mind: Thelonious Monk Jason Moran and the Big Bandwagon

N OV E M B E R 1 1

Sat

Sundays with the St. Lawrence St. Lawrence String Quartet

Sun

Longing Lasts Longer Penny Arcade

SEPTEMBER 27

A 24-Decade History of Popular Music (Abridged) Taylor Mac

O C TO B E R

OC TOBER 4

Wed The Judas Passion Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra Fri OC TOBER 6

Samantha Bee Wed OC TOBER 11

St. Lawrence String Quartet Rob Kapilow’s What Makes It Great?


2017–18 SEASON

Schedule of Events

60

2017-18 Season Guide  
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