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SPOTLIGHT

2017-18 Workshops Approaches to Capitalism

LINDA RANDALL MEIER RESEARCH WORKSHOP

Archaeology — Political Landscapes: Past and Present Asian Representations and Constructions of Space Cognition and Language Workshop Concerning Violence: A Decolonial Collaborative Research Group Critical Orientations to Race and Ethnicity HUMANITIES CENTER FELLOWS RESEARCH WORKSHOP

Data Scarcity of the Earth and Human Past BLOKKER RESEARCH WORKSHOP

Digital Aesthetics: Critical Approaches to Computational Culture Ethics and Politics Ancient and Modern MARTA SUTTON WEEKS RESEARCH WORKSHOP

Eurasian Empires Feminist/Queer Colloquium History of Political Thought

MARTA SUTTON WEEKS RESEARCH WORKSHOP

The Environmental Humanities Project

RESEARCH WORKSHOP IN HONOR OF JOHN BENDER

Workshop in Poetics

CLAIRE AND JOHN RADWAY RESEARCH WORKSHOP

Worlds of Work and the Work of Networks

Archaeology POLITICAL LANDSCAPES: PAST AND PRESENT Drawing together faculty and students from Archaeology, Anthropology, Museum Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures, History, Art & Art History, and Classics, this workshop discussed how archaeological landscapes and features have factored into political collectives, both in past civilizations and in the present, and broadened consideration of the ways in which political life influences societal facets such as health, environmental conservation, race, indigeneity, and class. Several winter quarter speakers discussed how archaeologists now work with artificial intelligence to furnish international health organizations with thousands of years of information about the relationship between mosquitoes and humans—research that has pressing implications for the future of malaria treatments in Europe, Africa, Asia, and South Africa. Another scholar examined how the recent Charlottesville protests  —i ncluding monuments to Confederate heroes—convene different publics in the present, to explosive political effect. These talks led to extensive Q&A sessions with Stanford faculty and students, and the dinners that followed provided even more opportunities for engagement.The rich discussions among Stanford students and faculty fostered new and expansive thinking about archaeology and its applications to human societies. STANFORD HUMANITIES CENTER

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Stanford Humanities Center 2017-18 Annual Report  
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