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November 2, 2011 Dear Colleagues: I am excited and proud to share with you our three-year Human Resources Strategic Plan. Stanford University is a remarkable institution. We have outstanding facilities, a stunning campus, and a strong endowment. But we would be a hollow vessel without the animating energy of our people. It is the faculty, students, and staff that the rest of the world recognizes when acknowledging Stanford’s preeminent status. All of us in Human Resources believe we have an essential contribution to make to Stanford and the people who make up this special community. We are committed to advancing Stanford’s position as the best led, best managed university in the world. “Best led, best managed” is an impressive tag, and we want our decisions and actions to give it rich meaning. For Human Resources, that means developing and delivering programs, policies, and plans that add value and unleash the possibilities of our people. We know and believe that excellence in human resources clears the way for our people to focus on their purpose—on the ideas, the research, the leadership, the teaching—the reasons why you and other members of the Stanford community are here. We hope you will recognize the energy and possibilities this plan represents. It’s an important roadmap for our function, for the contribution we intend to make, and for the standards and accomplishments by which we should be measured. We expect to demonstrate renewed leadership on the most pressing human resource challenges Stanford faces. We want you to be able to see what we’re up to, to share your ideas and insights, and to let us know how we’re doing. We look forward to working with you to bring this strategy to life. Best regards,

David A. Jones Vice President, Human Resources Stanford University


S T R AT E G I C P L A N FOR HUMAN RESOURCES

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S T R A T E G I C P L A N : F Y 2 0 1 2 - FY2014

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S BACKGROUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 About the Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

STRATEGIC FOUNDATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Who We Are . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Why We’re Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 How We Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

HR STRATEGIC ROADMAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

SUMMARY OF FY12 INITIATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

SUMMARY OF FY13 – FY14 INITIATIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

MOVING FORWARD/WHAT TO EXPECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

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BAC KG RO U N D This strategy has evolved over several years of work, of successes and failures, and, especially in the past year, of extensive feedback, critical insights, and thoughtful analysis from leadership, faculty, staff, and HR team members.

The president and I do not think it is reasonable to expect fewer people supported by fewer resources to work twice as hard to accomplish the work of the university. We need to find ways to enhance our efficiency. — John Etchemendy Professor of Philosophy and Stanford Provost

In 2009, the Provost appointed several university-wide task forces to pursue efficiency and effectiveness. The HR Task Force was one of four task forces charged to examine ways to improve operations across the university. Additional efforts in 2010 included an external HR Peer Review and an HR Community survey. Among the high level findings was a recommendation to create “centers of expertise� that would provide a service center approach to key services and transactions that were burdensome (e.g., processes that were redundant, labor-intensive, ineffective, or inconsistent) to schools and business units. Several initiatives in FY12 are focused on creating these service centers. Earlier this year, we held a number of discussions with senior leaders to identify the desired alignment of services with school and business unit needs. Additionally, University HR leaders and human resources managers worked in partnership on a client outreach effort to obtain input from school and business unit leaders on the priorities they see for HR. A two-day strategic planning session was held in late July for the broader HR community at Stanford to consider client input and provide additional insights and suggestions about the proposed initiatives. Information shared included a review of the client input received from April through July, with brainstorming sessions to gather input on specific actions that could be taken. Overall, the feedback and learning from recent examinations have greatly informed our ongoing strategic planning efforts, and have enabled us to build client relationships and gain momentum on changing the culture related to human resources at Stanford. The strategy summarized on the following pages is the product of all these efforts.

Pa s t P l a n n i n g E f fo r t s Includes HR for HR, HR @ Stanford, People Management at Stanford, HR Task Force

Th e mes E m e rged More support for managers and leaders Need for more benchmarking More strategic, less transactional HR

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Work Has Pro g ressed Business Intelligence

Cur rent Strate gies

Employee Survey

Leadership and Management Development

Leadership Development

HR Operations and Development Employee Engagement

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About the Strategy The three-year strategy for University Human Resources is an organizational roadmap for carrying out HR’s mission to support the University through FY14. The strategy has: • A strategic foundation, with elements that are long-lasting and tied to the overall mission of Stanford. The foundation includes HR’s mission, vision, and guiding principles. • Strategic plans that include current and future actions through FY14. While the strategic foundation is relatively fixed, strategic plans will be more dynamic to reflect the changing environment, evolving University priorities, and available resources. Over the next three years, strategic plans will focus on three main areas: n Further improve the quality of leadership and management n Enhance HR capability, efficiency, and service excellence n Foster an environment for optimal employee engagement and efficiency In addition, HR is committed to a different approach in carrying out this strategy, creating greater: • • • •

Collaboration with key stakeholders to identify priorities and the best actions to address them Transparency about process and decisions Measurement that others can see and evaluate Communication on actions and results

We will continue to seek input to our priorities and revise this plan based on client feedback, changing or emerging client needs, and new priorities or requirements from university leaders.

… the ability to work effectively with and through people is one of the most important determinants of success in any organization. — Garth Saloner Philip H. Knight Professor and Dean, Graduate School of Business

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S T R AT E G I C F O U N DAT I ONS Who W e Are Human Resources at Stanford is comprised of professionals who work in University HR as well as in school and business unit HR groups. Services are provided to the broad university community, including deans, vice presidents, vice provosts, directors, managers, faculty, staff, and bargaining unit staff. Additional client groups include emeriti, retirees, postdoctoral fellows, and those seeking employment. As of September 1, 2011, the HR organization is structured as shown below:

Associate Dean HR School of Medicine

PRESIDENT HR Director SLAC

Associate VP Learning and Organizational Effectiveness

Associate VP Benefits

vice PRESIDENT of human resources*

Associate VP Employee and Labor Relations

Associate VP HR Generalist Service Delivery School/Unit HRDs, HRMs & HRAs

Associate VP HR Initiatives and Exec. Compensation

Associate VP HR Operations and Systems

Associate VP Staff Compensation

Associate VP Staff Employment

*Reports jointly to President and Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer.

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Wh y W e’ re Here HR Mission Stanford Human Resources supports the University’s mission of excellence in teaching, research, and patient care. We are committed to provide strategic, innovative, and flexible policies, practices, programs, and services that: • • • • •

Attract, develop, reward, and retain a diverse and talented workforce Foster a productive work environment where people feel valued Respond to the changing nature of work and the workplace environment Add value, and reflect good stewardship of resources Are fair, ethical, and legally compliant

HR Vision We are committed to advancing Stanford’s position as the best led, best managed university in the world. We provide outstanding benefits, career development, and work/life balance resources. Guiding Principles Our guiding principles help keep us focused on being client-centric and on bringing the varied talents of the HR team to bear. We are here:

It is my expectation that administrative services at Stanford be performed in a manner commensurate with the university’s academic standing. — Richard Saller Vernon R. & Lysbeth Warren Anderson Dean, School of Humanities and Sciences, and Kleinheinz Family Professor of European Studies

• To serve our clients n Providing HR’s best thinking and practices, advice, and counsel n Collaborating with one another as we scope the work n Delivering timely service n Enabling them to make sound decisions • To serve and support one another n Providing advice, counsel, and information n Leveraging and sharing resources, ideas, and talents n Valuing continuous improvement n Communicating respectfully, openly, and collaboratively • To provide service and support that is n Respectful, responsive, timely, and accountable n Solutions-oriented, flexible, creative, and resourceful n Highly knowledgeable, informative, and accurate n Truthful and ethical

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How W e Work We commit to following a consistent, disciplined approach when determining our strategic priorities and actions. Our Strategy Model and Process Our strategic planning effort follows a well-established three-phase approach: • Identify the vision • Determine the overarching strategy • Create the “roadmap” for execution

1. VISION Aspirations & Dreams Purpose & Values

2. STRATEG Y Positioning for Greatest Value

3. EXECUTION Delivery of Services

Setting Priorities

Accountability & Performance

As we work through each phase, we follow an iterative process that includes these steps:

1 . L I S TENING Customer Needs, Priorities

3. SETTING PRIORITIES Identify Resources, Alignment with Vision

2. VALIDATING Refine & Shape Priorities

4. ROAD M AP & RESOURCES Develop Detailed Plans

5. EXECUTION Implement & Assess

Challenge the status quo; be creative, be part of the solution, be strategic with us. — Sara Bible Associate Vice Provost for Research, Office of the Vice Provost and Dean of Research

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H R S T R AT E G I C ROA D MAP The HR Strategic Roadmap that follows is the initial product of the process and approach described on the previous pages. The roadmap charts our direction in three key strategy areas: • Leadership and Management Development • HR Operations and Development • Employee Engagement We identified high-impact initiatives for each of these areas, set priorities, and assessed feasibility for these initiatives over the next three fiscal years. The chart below summarizes the results. KEY STRATEGIES

FY12

FY13

Leadership & Management Development Improve the Quality of Management & Leadership

Performance Management @ Stanford Pilot

Stanford Manager Academy • HR Academy

FY14

Staffing Services

HR Transaction Services HR Operations & Development Enhance HR Capability, Efficiency, and Service Excellence

Job Classification

Global HR Standards, Policies, and Practices

New Employee Intake Center

Cross-Campus Career Paths

University-wide Employee Survey

HR Dashboard — Business Intelligence STARS Revitalization

Employee Engagement Foster an Environment in which Employee Engagement & Efficiency is Optimized

Health Care Consumer Education

Note that while the initiatives above are shown in one fiscal year, most are being implemented in phases that will span all three fiscal years. For example, although the university-wide Employee Survey is targeted for FY14, planning must start in FY12 to research best practices, frame a budget, and prepare a comprehensive Request for Proposal for bids.

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S UMM A RY O F F Y1 2 I N ITIATI V ES Performance Management @ Stanford Pilot Close to 800 employees are participating in a year-long performance management pilot. The pilot will test a transformation in the employee/manager relationship and a redefinition of the quest for excellence with Stanford’s workforce. Six schools and business units are taking part in the training. The pilot will include a new definition of university-wide competencies, a consistent rating scale and form, and an approach for employee development that combines experiences, exposure to others, and education. After an assessment to identify best practices during the pilot, the plan is to launch the Performance Management @ Stanford program to the entire university during FY13 and FY14. Staffing Services Staff Employment (SE) will offer a suite of HR should strive toward continuous improvement, services to enhance the quality of staff hiring fueled by the gift of feedback. at Stanford and, in particular, to assist hiring — Sam Steinhardt managers throughout the hiring process. The Executive Director, Business Services, current economic turbulence has resulted in Information Technology Services job seekers applying for positions at Stanford more than ever (over 125,000 employment applications were received last year—an alltime high). SE will help hiring managers find the right talent by providing targeted recruitment and advertising services, resume screening, and preliminary telephone interviews. At the end of the process, SE will provide timely candidate notifications and ensure accurate reporting of mandated data. The goal is to improve the quality and efficiency of the overall hiring process and help hiring managers to make the best use of their time – resulting in successful hires of great talent. HR Transaction Services A central service center is being established in the HR Operations and Systems group to consolidate the processing of HR-related transactions. The consolidated center will handle tasks such as background checks, hiring, job and position changes, terminations, and salary changes. The efficiency gains will be significant, as a small group of highly trained experts manage transactions for all schools and business units (instead of the current large number of departmental users who may not need to complete various transactions on a regular basis). Additionally, the central service center is expected to improve the accuracy of data used in university-wide workforce planning (see HR Dashboard—Business Intelligence). Services will initially be launched with requesting schools and business units. Further expansion is planned in FY13. Job Classifications This is a multi-year project to replace Stanford’s current job classification system with a new market-based system. The job classification process will be streamlined for easier understanding, consistent and fair job assignments, and market-based salary grades/ranges. Job descriptions will be standardized and career path descriptions developed. As a result, employees and managers will have a better understanding of career paths and career opportunities at Stanford.

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HR Dashboard — Business Intelligence Stanford’s leaders need and use a wide range of data for analysis, planning, decision making, and resource allocation for a workforce that exceeds 12,000 people. In FY12, those leaders will be able to see the data online using the Oracle Business Intelligence tool. Viewing information displayed in dynamic charts and graphs to make use of comparative data (instead of relying on data-dense spreadsheets) will facilitate the effectiveness of workforce planning by senior managers and leaders. STARS Revitalization Stanford’s learning management system is a PeopleSoft system component named STARS (Stanford Training and Registration System). STARS will join the rest of the Human Resources systems as Audit and Institutional Compliance transitions business ownership in FY12. Currently, STARS tracks a diverse array of compliance and competency-based learning. The goal is to increase the capability within STARS to track equally important informal learning activities such as job shadowing, cross training, mentoring, project team work, and other on-the-job experiences. The vision for STARS is a flexible, easy-to-use system that engages employees with their own learning and growth and enhances the overall excellence of Stanford’s workforce. Health Care Consumer Education Stanford is embarking on an educational campaign to provide information and tools so employees can make informed decisions about their health care. The multi-year campaign should demonstrate that employees who make thoughtful choices about their care can help to contain their costs. Likewise, the university should be able to manage costs more effectively as employees better understand the connection between healthy living choices, prevention of illness or disease, and taking a proactive approach when working with their health care providers. An overview of objectives and success indicators for each of these initiatives can be found in the foldout page accompanying this report.

Establishing success measurements and constantly assessing yourselves is critical for departmental effectiveness. — Megan Davis Associate Vice President, Finance and Administration, Land, Buildings and Real Estate

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S UMM A RY O F F Y1 3 - F Y 14 INITIATI V ES Note that plans for FY13 and FY14 do not include the FY12 initiatives that will either expand in scope or were planned as multi-year initiatives. As we plan future work, we need to ensure organizational readiness to support new needs that may emerge. As that occurs, we’ll gather client input, analyze and scope the work, identify viable funding options, and gain the support needed to move forward on those new initiatives.

F Y13 Stanford Manager Academy Investing in our leaders and managers not only (includes HR Academy) makes sense from an economic standpoint, but The Stanford Manager Academy seeks to support will be a critical enabler of the University’s success managers with specialized training to hone moving forward. skills related to managing people. This includes — Randy Livingston hiring, onboarding, managing performance, Vice President for Business Affairs setting goals that align with institutional and Chief Financial Officer priorities, communicating with staff/peers/upper management, giving rewards and recognition, and building effective teams. The result should be an increase in the productivity of teams and the quality of the employee experience. The Academy will give managers a full set of “tools” to manage people effectively, meet or exceed goals, and enhance their overall capability. • The HR Academy seeks to provide similar high quality learning experiences to those in human resources manager positions, supporting their growth by developing their ability to be highly skilled and effective business partners. Global HR Standards, Policies, and Practices Stanford seeks solutions to some of the world’s most complex issues through its academic and research programs. As Stanford expands its workforce presence throughout the world, HR must expand its capability to support employees hired outside of the United States, including the development of consistent standards. In particular, a set of policies, processes, and procedures for hiring non-academic staff within the framework of the local country and to adhere to local employmentrelated practices will occur. We must also assist in the relocation of current U.S. employees. Cross-Campus Career Paths Employees want to work in a place where they have opportunities for career advancement. This initiative will build upon the changes to the new job classification system by developing such tools as career maps, a competency assessment mechanism, career building guidance, mentoring and networking opportunities, and other tools for employees to identify their career goals. Support and guidance related to career advancement, along with a redesigned performance management process that introduces more consistency, should result in an increase in staff opportunities in positions outside of their current department. These opportunities are expected to lead to an increase in career satisfaction on the university-wide employee survey.

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F Y14 I nitiativ e D escriptions New Employee Intake Center With close to 1,700 new staff members hired My vision is to create a culture of excellence ... that each year, the amount of hours spent by new would allow us to be better today than yesterday employees, their hiring managers, and their and ... better tomorrow than we are today. school/unit HR staff to oversee their onboarding — Shirley J. Everett is immense. Establishing a New Employee Intake Senior Associate Vice Provost, Center will provide a more efficient “one-stop Residential & Dining Enterprises shop” approach to onboarding, including completion of in-hire payroll requirements (e.g., I-9, direct payroll deposit), benefits enrollment, ID card issuance, commute counseling and commute program enrollments, the Patent and Copyright Agreement and Conflict of Interest form, SUNet ID selection, and more. The Center will help reduce the amount of time spent by the employees, their managers, and their HR representatives, and increase the attachment felt to the university by new employees as they experience a seamless introduction to working at Stanford. University-wide Employee Survey Employees want to provide opinions and feedback and to see their suggestions are being taken seriously. Human Resources implemented an online survey in 2010 with 12 schools and business units. Moving forward, the intent is to implement the survey throughout the university. Survey results will help guide decisions made by managers and leaders, will be used as a baseline to track progress over time in how employees view their experience at Stanford, and help define how that experience can become more engaging and productive. An overview of objectives and success indicators for each of these initiatives can be found in the foldout page accompanying this report.

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MOVI N G F O R W A R D / W HAT TO EXPECT As the different initiatives in this strategic plan begin to take shape, you can expect to get progress reports and have opportunities to provide feedback. We are committed to keeping stakeholders informed through these ongoing steps:

Detailed project plans and deliverables will be submitted with the funding requests for each initiative.

Business owners will manage tasks and budget for each initiative and will provide regular updates to HR and the broader management community.

A comprehensive communication plan will be completed for each initiative to clearly identify affected groups, information needs, and communication channels.

Monthly operations reviews will be held to ensure projects are on track and issues are addressed proactively to keep all projects on time and within budget.

Client feedback will be actively sought and analyzed, with changes made where feasible, on a regular basis during and after implementation.

Periodic articles will be posted on the newly revised HR website: http://hrweb.stanford.edu.

We like to think we’re a great university, but to be honest, one never moves forward by standing still. — James D. Plummer John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering; Professor by Courtesy, Materials Science and Engineering; Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering

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UHR Strategic Plan FY12-FY14