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Albannaich

“Shoulder to Shoulder”

A Quarterly Newsletter of The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited

www.standrewsociety.com

Crawford Bursary to be recipient of 2010 Mens’ Dinner proceeds The Council recently reviewed the Societies philanthropic donations, which include a number of bursaries, donations to like minded organisations and the Saint Andrew’s War Memorial Hospital. Overwhelmingly Council agreed that the quantum of existing bursaries should be increased over the next few years. Council also agreed that proceeds of the 2010 Men’s Dinner to be held at the Sebel City Gate on Friday 26th November 2010 should benefit the Dr. W.M.J Crawford Memorial Bursary. William John Crawford (Bill), a distinguished and well loved member of the Society, was born in Brisbane to Dr. Harold Crawford and wife Edith and was educated at Eagle Junction State School and Scots College, Warwick, later studying medicine at the University of Queensland graduating in 1957. In 1963 Bill was admitted to the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh and later spent two years as orthopaedic Registrar at Reading then at Oxford’s Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre. During his time at Nuffield Bill was appointed by Professor Sir John Charnley as his senior registrar at the world famous Centre for Hip Surgery at Wrighington where he contributed to Sir John’s development of hip prosthesis. Bill and family returned to Brisbane in 1968 and Bill performed the first total joint replacement in Queensland, ultimately going on to perform more that 5500 total hip replacements and about 1600 knee cap replacements in his career. In 1974 Bill followed in his fathers footsteps and was appointed to the Board of Governors of the St Andrew’s War Memorial Hospital Board and in 1983 was elected chairman.

Also in this issue ... Ross McKinnon AM An interesting article about Society member Ross McKinnon AM, following on from Ross’s biography on Walter Hill.

Scotland’s Day of Rugby Glory

2009 Mens’ Dinner

For rugby fans, an insight into the opening of Murrayfield Park in 1925.

Society Chaplain, The Reverend Archie MacNicol’s address to the 2009 Mens’ Dinner guests.

Article on page 6.

Archie’s speech, page 9.

Read more on page 4.

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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Society Structure Patron McPherson, Hon. B. H., CBE. Chieftain Porteous, R. D. Chaplain MacNicol, Rev. Archie President Flehr, K. G., FSA Scot. Chairman, Council Gill, Professor S. Members of the Council Bolton D. G. F. Bursary Convenor Campbell T. C. D.Ua. FSA Scot. De Hayr M. W. D.Ua. Galloway D. W. H. Chair, Ladies Night Committee Gunn G. N. Chair, Dinner Committee Malcolmson S. D. McCabe A. H. McConnell A. J. Treasurer McDonald D. F. QPM. McNee, A.J.K. Nicol P. R. D.Urr. FSA Scot. Porteous, R.D. Scott R. D.Urr Vaudin J. B. Secretary Wilson A. N. Worrell J. P. M. Editor, Soc. Publications Worrell J. R. I. Asst. Editor, Web Master

Albannaich Queensland Editor Web Site Postal Address

Jim Worrell j.worrell@bfsurveys.com.au www.standrewsociety.com PO Box 674 Toowong Business Centre Queensland 4066

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F R I D AY , N O V E M B E R 2 6 T H , 2 0 1 0

“Shoulder to Shoulder”

S AV E T H E D AT E

WHISKY TASTING T U E S D AY , J A N U A R Y 2 5 T H , 2 0 11 We are still in the planning and negotiation phase, but we are hoping to have our inaugural whiskey tasting and information evening in 2011. This is also Robbie Burns Day in Scotland, so expect some poetry! You even have a public holiday to recover. Watch this space!

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raising the standard of the Bursary named in his honour.

Acknowledgement to Leanne Edmistone - Courier Mail 13 February 2004.

Those who attended last year’s dinner will remember the stirring speech from our Chaplain Archie MacNicol. For those who were unable to attend a transcript of Archie’s speech is printed in this issue for your enjoyment. (page 9.)

The Men’s Dinner. It is therefore fitting that Council has seen fit to honour Bill Crawford by

The 2010 Men’s dinner is always an enjoyable evening and this year will be an opportunity for members and guests, as well as the Society, to contribute to the memory of such a distinguished Queenslander and member.

Bursaries Presented to Students in 2009

As part of the Society’s annual philanthropic activities, we present a number of bursaries to worthy student r pursuits.

In the early 1960’s a Bursary Award Scheme was established by the Society. Monies were set aside to establish educational Bursaries to be awarded to students enrolled at and attending nominated school and colleges in Queensland. The purpose of the Bursaries is:

ANNUAL MENS DINNER

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During his stewardship of the St Andrew’s Board he oversaw the first nuclear medicine department in a Queensland Private Hospital, the states first CT scanner, the first intensive care unit in a private hospital, the establishment of a radiology service and the first private cardiology and cardiac surgery service.

“Shoulder to Shoulder”

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• To encourage, maintain and foster Scottish traditions in Queensland through future leaders of the community; • To promote interest in the Society; • To encourage and assist qualifying students to attain higher educational levels; • To honour the memory of deceased members of the Society who have given outstanding service to the community.

Funds for the Bursary scheme came out of Society General funds. However, on October 19th, 1990, a separate Society fund was established for ‘public educational purposes’, complying with a Deed in Trust, approved by the Australian Tax Office, exempting the fund from income tax. In respect of candidates for Bursaries, it is stipulated that the candidate should be a student attending a recognised school or college in Queensland and be returning to such school for at least a further year of study.

Over the years, the bank interest from the Bursary Fund has financed the scheme. 2009 Recipients The D.M. Fraser Memorial Bursary Paul Andrews, Emmanuel College The A.H. MacKenzie Memorial Bursary Hamish Thorburn, Brisbane Boys College The George C. Reid Memorial Bursary Suzanna Lindley, Clayfield College The Professor W.M. Kyle Memorial Bursary Kaiya Ferguson, Fairholme College The A.D. McGill Memorial Bursary Sallyanne Elder, The Scots PGC College The Robert Steele Memorial Bursary Brent Peel, The Scots PGC College The W.M.J. Crawford Memorial Bursary David McMahon and Patrick Slatter both from The Scots PGC College The Rupert Newman Memorial Bursary Grace Scholl, Somerville House The Sir Bruce Shearer Memorial Bursary Alison McKay, Somerville House The Dr. A. Gordon Grant Memorial Bursary Stuart Neil McKelvile, Toowoomba Grammar The Dr A.D.A. Mayes CBE Memorial Bursary Gordon Connor McBain, Toowooma Grammar The Dr H.S. Paterson AM OStJ Memorial Bursary Alan and Gregory Carlow, Ipswich Grammar

Donations to the Bursary Fund are still invited by the Society.

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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From the Archives ... Shoulder to Shoulder Vol 2, No. 2, January 1950 A series of interesting and historical extracts from your Society’s past.

Welcome New Members Oct

Daley, John G. Ryan, Adrian J. Barry, Thomas A.

Elborne, Gareath Bridgewater, Donald Edmiston, Malcolm J.M.

Nov

Eagle, Terrence E. King, Graeme W. McCord, William F. Pullar, David M. Charlton, Peter B.

Mar

Paul, Anthony

April

Galer, Bill

May

Stewart-Gray, Kenneth C.

Dec

Foote, Ian M. Robinson, Cameron J.K. Short, Bruce R.

Feb

Menke, Brian McHardy, Craig R. Hamill, Mark Fitzpatrick, Thomas S.

Jun

Taylor, Roger E. Macdonald, Shane W. Lancaster-Smith, Julian B. Cochrane, Malcolm R. French, Gordon C.

Jul

McPhail, Ian R.

“Shoulder to Shoulder”

I N V I TAT I O N T O T H E S O C I E T Y ’ S

ANNUAL LADIES DINNER F R I D AY , S E P T E M B E R 3 R D , 2 0 1 0

Members and guests are invited to the Annual Ladies Dinner to be held on Friday 3 September 2010, 7.00pm for 7.30pm at the Gaythorne RSL Club, 534 Samford Road, Mitchelton, Brisbane.  The night will be hosted by Mrs Jackie McPherson, wife of our Patron, is for our Ladies, Members with their wives, partners and guests, will include piping, singing, dancing and guest artists. See the Society web site, www.standrewsociety.com for further details and forms. Price $75.00 per person RSVP August 27th, 2010

Society Notice Board Important Dates and Upcoming Events Annual Ladies Dinner

September 3rd

Annual Mens Dinner

November 26th

Whisky Tasting Evening

January 25th (TBC)

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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Curator, Record Tenure Ross McKinnon AM The Curator-in-Charge of the Brisbane Botanic Gardens – Ross McKinnon AM, has just reached a personal milestone, with a record tenure in the position of over twenty-six years. Actually Ross has been working in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens now for a record thirty-seven years, the first ten years as second-in-command to the previous Curator. Walter Hill was the Brisbane Botanic Gardens’ first Curator – from 1855-1881 (26 years, 8 days) and Harold Caulfield was Curator from 1956-1982 (26 years, 13 days). Ross passed both of these records on the 15th of June 2009. Quarterly visitor surveys show that the Brisbane Botanic Gardens at suburban Mt Coot-tha are now that city’s second largest tourist attraction after only the combined attractions of South Bank. Reflecting on the growth of the new Brisbane Botanic Gardens during his Curatorship, Mr McKinnon said that he was most proud of the doubling in size of the Botanic Gardens from approximately 25 to 52 hectares, with the addition of the 25 hectare Australian Native Plants Gardens, which now contains the worlds largest collection of Australian Native rainforest trees, numbering more than 2,500 labelled species. The Brisbane Botanic Gardens also have reputable and internationally significant collections of Palms, Bromeliads, Cacti and Succulents, Ferns, Exotic Tropical Plants, the largest public display of Bonsai in Australia, Conifers, Cool Temperate and Tropical Display Dome collections and a significant collection of subtropical fruiting trees.

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Ross McKinnon

“So equitable is Brisbane’s climate that we believe we have the ability to grow more species of plants in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens than any other Capital City Botanic Gardens in Australia”, Mr McKinnon said.

As well, the Brisbane Botanic Gardens now have one of the world’s largest public education programs called “Lessons in the Gardens”, some years over 14,000 students a year access these fully self-funding education programs. Six school teachers are now engaged in teaching these lessons in the Gardens

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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programs for preschoolers, right through to university students – with a heavy emphasis on the environment and sustainable living. Each weekend, some of Australia’s largest horticultural exhibitions are conducted in the Auditorium in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, spawning a whole cottage industry supplying plants not generally available in the nursery trade to eager plant hunters. Brisbane Botanic Gardens now host national and international plant species conferences in conjunction with these weekend horticultural exhibitions, attracting national and international speakers. Two-hundred Botanic Artists now meet and receive instruction and conduct exhibitions each year in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens with a number of their members’ paintings to be found in national and international art collections. An outstanding and annual “Aristin-Residence” program – now in it’s fifteenth year, has contributed hugely to the cultural life of the Gardens, along with the annual Queensland Sculptors’ Societies annual exhibition “Sculptures in the Gardens”. The Brisbane Botanic Gardens have one of Australia’s most successful Volunteer Guides’ Programs, with 87 trained Guides providing daily general and specialist walks in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens at suburban Mt Coot-tha and the old Heritage-listed City Botanic Gardens. DESIGN CONSULTANCIES Ross has also been engaged through Brisbane City Enterprises in the design of Botanic Gardens and has lived in Shen-Zhen in South East China, a Botanic Gardens in Rodrigues – east of Mauritius, and other Botanic Gardens and resort developments in Fiji, Western

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Samoa, Thailand, the Marshall Islands, and Papua New Guinea. Ross and his team have been responsible for the steering and gazetting of over thirty regional Queensland Botanic Gardens, and Ross has now been Chairman of the Council Heads of Australian Botanic Gardens Group – an umbrella group representing all Australian Botanic Gardens on five occasions. Botanic Gardens technical staff under Ross’s direction have edited a number of regional Botanic Gardens, scientific papers and anthologies. Ross counts as a coup the procuring of the Japanese Gardens for the Brisbane Botanic Gardens from the World Expo ’88 – site at South Bank following a chance meeting with the then Lord Mayor, Sallyanne Atkinson. “I had just introduced Sallyanne to my extended family and we were all standing in front of the Japan pavilion admiring the beautifully landscaped grounds”, Ross says, “When the Lord Mayor said ‘What a pity, Ross, that in two weeks time all of this will be pulled down and dismantled, and disappear forever’. We both then had the brilliant idea of relocating the Japanese Garden to the Brisbane Botanic Gardens and Sallyanne added: ‘I’m just going to have lunch with the Japanese Ambassador to Australia – Why don’t I put the hard word on him for us to recreate this Japan Garden? Ross, how much would you estimate it would cost to relocate the garden?’

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demonstrations and has just celebrated it’s twentieth anniversary since relocation to the Gardens. The Queensland Council of Garden Clubs count over 100,000 members throughout Queensland among their members, and this huge horticultural organisation have contributed many hundreds of thousands of dollars to the advancement of the Brisbane Botanic Gardens over more than twenty years, with items ranging from arbours, shelters, seats, library books, a mini-bus, a bus shelter and contributions to the Gardens’ Cacti and Succulent and Fern houses. Ross has judged national and international Garden competitions and at London’s Chelsea Flower Show and Belgium’s Floralies – horticultural exhibition. In June 2009 Ross was chosen as one of 150 Queenslanders to appear in a book entitled “QUEENSLANDERS ALL OVER”, launched by the Premier of Queensland, the Hon. Anna Bligh at Parliament House on Wednesday the 24th of June 2009 to celebrate our States’ Sesquicentenary (150 years). “For services to horticulture”, Ross was awarded the Order of Australia (AM) in 1999, along with the inaugural Brisbane City Council Employee of the Year – Award.

Editor’s note ...

“I blustered ‘Probably around half a million dollars’, Sallyanne suggested that the Japanese Government might go halves in the deal – and as they say, the rest is history”, Ross said!

This is a follow up to our last edition, Spring 2009, where we took a look at Walter Hill’s contribution to the Botanical Gardens

The Japanese Garden is now the most popular garden within the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, and the site for many important cultural exchanges, exhibitions and

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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Scotland’s Day of Rugby Glory A step back in time. No Hollywood premiere could have been more colourful – or sensational – that when Scotland’s famous Rugby headquarters, Murrayfield, staged its first match on March 21, 1925. Even today, years and hundreds of Internationals later, it still ranks as one of the most memorable days in Rugby history. A huge crowd, riotous demonstrations by those locked out and in, and a spine-tingling match …. Murrayfield had the lot. The occasion was the England international.

Scotland-

At stake was the championship, the triple crown and the Calcutta cup. And on hand were 70,000 Rugby fans – all but a few of them bent on seeing the home side thrash England, and end her long run of success in the International Championship. Certainly the Scots had good cause to be optimistic.

Now only England stood between them and a clean sweep for the season. And, to add spice to the occasion, they were playing at home in the very first game on the new ground at Murrayfield. The opening of the new stadium created tremendous enthusiasm amongst the Scottish supporters, and on the morning of the match, buses and cars began pouring into Edinburgh from all parts of the country. Some had come from as far south as Swansea, but the English players knew it would be a predominantly home-town crowd they would face when they ran out on to the ground that afternoon. At noon the scene at Murrayfield was chaos. Already about 40,000 were inside the ground with the same number outside trying to join them.

Fielding a young, virile team, Scotland had swept all before them that season.

By 1.30 p.m. more than 70,000 had jammed into the ground, and police ordered the gates closed.

In the opening match they had swamped France 25-3, scoring seven tries to nil, and giving a thrilling display of three-quarter play.

The thousands still milling outside began demonstrating angrily but by that time there was no way the gates could have been re-opened anyway.

In the next match against Wales at Swansea, they repeated the treatment.

Inside the ground conditions were even more frightening. Stewards were virtually helpless trying to cope with the numbers.

They ran up 18 points in the first 25 minutes and had the fiercely patriotic Welsh crowd cheering madly every time the Scottish backline handled the ball.

Half an hour before the match another angry demonstration started behind the main grandstand, when spectators who couldn’t reach their seats began demanding their money back. Police and officials, who were called to break up the demonstration, finally reached a compromise by allowing thousands of fans on the ground to sit around the touchline. Crush still Great That way everyone had some sort of view, but the crush was still great, when the two teams filed out for the match. Spurred on by the crowd’s non stop roar, Scotland began at breakneck pace. The quick-breaking, smothering tackling of their forwards soon had the English backs worried. Then Scotland gained possession, and twice in five minutes Macpherson, their brilliant centre and captain, slipped around his opponent, Corbett. But the Englishman brought him down each time with a desperate dive. Scotland maintained the pressure, but the English backs and loose forwards were tackling determinedly, and managing, so far, to stifle the home side’s brilliant three-quarters.

Although Wales rallied in the second half, Scotland ran out comfortable winners by 24-14, winger Ian smith scoring another four tries, to give him eight from two matches. Ireland, on their home ground in Dublin, were tougher, but again the Scots triumphed by 14 points to 8.

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Murrayfield today ...

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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A few minutes later England shocked the crowd when their burly prop forward Luddington kicked a great penalty goal from a wide angle. England were in a 3-0 lead! Stung by Reverse Stung by this reverse, Scotland launched an all-out attack that took them deep into England’s half. From a scrum on the 25 they heeled quickly, and the ball swung out along the back-line. With more room to move, Macpherson this time beat Corbett and switched play back inside. Waddell, the stand-off, took the return pass and sent it on to half-back Holliday, who fended off England’s fullback as he went over between the posts for a try. An easy conversion and Scotland led 5-3. The crowd was still settling down when Ian Smith, Scotland’s try-scoring hero, misfielded a ball out on the wing and let England in for an opportunity try and five more points.

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Taking heart from the let-off, Scotland stormed back. A copy book backline movement saw winger Wallace streak across in the corner. Gilles converted brilliantly with a difficult kick, and now only one point separated the teams. For the next 15 minutes, seesawed dramatically.

play

First Scotland’s other centre, Aitken, took the ball through on his toe, only for it to bounce back of an upright and allow England to scramble clear. Then Corbett got away for England. But as he went around the Scottish full-back Drysdale, with the line open, he fell down with shear exhaustion. Scotland’s forwards then menaced England’s line, but a gallant save by full-back Holliday took the ball from their feet, and averted a certain try. Almost immediately, England’s flyhalf Myers raced clear with no one to beat. It looked a certain five points – and the match-to England.

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Scottish Humour A Scottish couple decided to go to Spain to thaw out during a particularly icy winter. They planned to stay at the same hotel where they spent their honeymoon 20 years earlier. Because of hectic schedules, it was difficult to coordinate their travel schedules. So, the husband left Glasgow and flew to Barcelona on Thursday, with his wife flying down the following day. The husband checked into the hotel. There was a computer in his room, so he decided to send an email to his wife. However, he accidentally left out one letter in her email address, and without realizing his error, sent the email. Meanwhile, somewhere in Blackpool , a widow had just returned home from her husband's funeral. He was a minister who died following a heart attack. The widow decided to check her email expecting messages from relatives and friends. After reading the first message, she screamed and fainted. The widow's son rushed into the room, found his mother on the floor, and saw the computer screen which read:

To: My Loving Wife Subject: I've Arrived Date: October 16, 2008

The score remained unchanged at half-time and with England leading 8-5, the undefeated record of the home side was in danger.

But Aitken swopped across the field to bury Myers, ball and all, only a few yards from Scotland’s line.

Scotland resumed at the same scorching pace, but it was England who scored again.

This fantastic, action packed spell had left the crowd almost out of voice and the payers almost out of breath.

I know you're surprised to hear from me. They have computers here now and you are allowed to send emails to your loved ones.

From a centre-kick by Corbett, the English forwards toed the ball across the line, where their captain, Wakefield, dived on it close to the posts.

Waddell was quick to sum up the situation, and immediately began potting for field goals.

I've just arrived and have been checked in. I see that everything has been prepared for your arrival tomorrow.

His second attempt sailed straight between the uprights to give Scotland the lead 14-11, with only a few minutes to play.

Looking forward to seeing you then! Hope your journey is as uneventful as mine was.

It put England ahead 11 points to 5, but the conversion which would have almost settled the result, was missed after a bad mix-up between the kicker, Luddington, and his placer.

P.S............ Bloody hot down here!

Right on full time the ball went loose, for England full-back Holliday to

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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swoop on it and set himself for a field goal.

particularly when Scotland played Wales.

Hearts beating wildly the Scottish players and 70,000 spectators watched as the ball sailed closer and closer, then swing just outside the left hand upright.

Welsh and Scottish supporters would walk the full length of Princes Street and the three or four miles beyond to Murryfield. The Welshmen were renowned for raiding the Woolworths store on the eastern end of Princes Street and purchasing all of the cheap saucepans which they would bag together at every chance whilst singing Sosban Fach (see note on history of song from Wikipedia below)

The whistle blew immediately, and Murrayfield heard the famous roar that ever since has been part of the ground’s heritage. Author unknown From the opening of Ballymore souvenir programme April 20-21 1968. Editors Note As young schoolboy your Editor spent many an afternoon at Murrayfield – even played in a schoolboy sevens final on the hallowed ground. In the early 1960’s it was almost impossible to get to Murrayfield by bus or car on match day,

For our younger readers who are wondering about the reference to the 25 – this was the 25 yard line which today has been superseded by the 22 metre line. And for the budding junior mathematicians, the scoring is right; it was 3 points for a try at the time. Even as late the early 1970’s one could hear a pin drop when a kick at goal was being taken – such were

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the manners of the Rugby fraternity – far cry from hissing and booing that one hears today. Sosban Fach: Welsh "Little Saucepan") is a traditional Welsh folk song. It is one of the bestknown and most often sung songs in the Welsh language. The song catalogues the troubles of a harassed housewife. The song is mostly associated with the Llanelli RFC and, more recently, the Scarlets regional rugby side. The association derives from Llanelli’s tin-plating industry, which used to tin-plate steel saucepans and other kitchen utensils as a cheap supply to the British public. During the final years of Stradey Park, the former ground of Llanelli RFC and the Scarlets, the goalposts were adorned with Scarlet saucepans as a tribute to the town's history; the utensils have been transferred to the clubs' new ground, “Parc y Scarlets”. Also, the Scarlets' official magazine is titled Sosban.

Auld Lang Syne In this extract from “A Book of Scotland”, we take a look at the iconic poem collected by Robert Byrns, “Auld Land Syne”. The poem was penned in 1788 and is often sung to celebrate the start of a new year. Its use has also become common at funerals and as a farewell or ending to other occasions, including our own dinners! The literal translation of the poem’s title is “old long since”, or more idiomatically, “long long ago”, consequently “For auld lang syne” as it appears in the first line of the chorus is loosely translated as “for (the sake of) old times”. It seems Burns did not write the poem himself, rather “collected” it. When Burns sent a copy of the song to the Scots Musical Museum, he did so with the remarks, “The following song, an old song, of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manuscript until I took it down from an old man”. Indeed the ballad “Old Long Syne” printed in 1711 by James Watson shows considerable similarity in the first verse and the chorus to Burns’ later poem. It is a fair supposition to attribute the rest of the poem to Burns himself. Singing the song on Hogmanay quickly became a Scots custom that soon spread to other parts of the British Isles. As Scots emigrated, they took the song with them around the world.

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© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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2009 Mens’ Dinner Guest Speaker’s Address The Reverend Archie MacNicol Those who attended last year’s dinner will remember the stirring speech from our Chaplain Archie MacNicol. For those who were unable to attend a transcript of Archie’s speech is printed in this issue for your enjoyment. Mr Chairman, Patron Honourable Bruce McPherson, President Mr Kym Flehr, Mr Doug Porteaus, members of the Society of St Andrew of Scotland, distinguished guests, gentlemen. Thank you for your very warm welcome and kind invitation to be present tonight and for the honour and privilege of being your Chaplain and Guest Speaker to propose the toast to “Scotland and the Society”. Gentlemen, of all the terrible news of the smart generation, doom, gloom, recession, nothing shocked me as much as an article in a newspaper that said in referring to a school of testing and grading of bag-piping to be held: “How anybody can derive pleasure from tucking a poor cat under one’s sweaty armpit, toss its legs over one’s shoulder, run the fingers up and down its tail, stick a hollow tube in one’s mouth and the other end in an unmentionable place, then blow large volumes of air into the poor creature’s belly, then squeeze the belly with the elbow, is beyond a musicians comprehension - and sound produced beyond belief.” A friend of mine asked me a question, “What’s the difference between a chainsaw and the bagpipes? You can tune a chainsaw.” I received an envelope from the Presbyterian Church Offices and inside there was a printed sheet headed Bagpipe and attached to it a wee note which said, “Archie, from a Friend?”. Let me read to you some of the statements in this printed sheet from a friend. “What’s the difference between a bagpipe and an onion? No one cries when you chop up a bagpipe.”

“What’s the definition of a gentleman? Someone who knows how to play the bagpipe and doesn’t.” “How can you tell a bagpipe is out of tune? Someone is blowing into it.” “If you were lost in the woods, who would you trust for directions, an in-tune bagpipe player, an out-of-tune bagpipe player, or Santa Clause? The out-of-tune bagpipe player, the other two indicate you have been hallucinating.” There’s a good wee poem about the value of the pipes. T’was in an English hospital, A Scottish soldier lay, He says, “I’ll not get better Till I hear the bagpipes play.” They searched the country High and wide, They searched by night and day, Until at last a man was found Who came his pipes to play, The soldier leaper up from his bed, “I’m saved, I’m saved,” he cried, The Scottish pipes had saved his life, But the rest of the patients died. A Scotsman living in London was always boasting about his native land to his English friends. “Why didn’t you stay in Scotland,” one of them asked him, “it it’s such a wonderful place?” “Well,” he explained, “they were much too clever for me there, but I get on quite well here.” I want tonight to speak for a wee while about the story of Scotland’s Flag, The Saltire, the St Andrew’s Flag. Over the centuries the Scots have placed St Andrew’s Cross on

their flag and on the uniforms of their armies. The great disciple St Andrew is closely associated with Scotland in everything from the game of Golf, to the name of Churches, to the Scottish national flag, that many people are actually quite surprised to discover that St Andrew was not a Scotsman. Indeed he never set foot in Scotland, at least while he was alive. He never wore tartan. He never heard a bagpipe. He never enjoyed haggis. Mind you some folk would say “Who does?!” How then did such a man become the patron saint of Scotland who’s example has driven the Scottish people to the far corners of the world with passion and

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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purpose? Well that is the story I’d like to tell you tonight.

instead, which is called the Saltire. He was buried in Patras, Greece.

Andrew was born more than 2,000 years ago into a Jewish family in a village in Israel called Bethsaida and was a fisherman by trade. It was while mending his nets that Jesus called him to be a fisher of men.

When Christianity finally became the religion of the Roman Empire, Emperor Constantine had the bones of Andrew moved from Greece to the capital city Constantinople.

He was the first of all the 12 apostles to join Jesus. Andrew was absolutely convinced that Jesus was indeed the Messiah, the Lamb of God of whom the Old Testament had foretold. Andrew knew that finding the Saviour meant the hope of eternal life for the whole world and so the very first thing Andrew did was run off and tell his brother Simon, who was later named Peter, what he had found. Peter told others about Jesus and those others told others and down through the generations the Christian church spread all over the world. But it all started with Andrew! After Jesus died and rose again, each of His disciples went out into a different part of the world to preach the good news of the new life of Christ. The Roman authorities became suspicious of this new religion so they tried to suppress it. While Andrew was preaching in the town of Patras in Greece, the Roman authorities sentenced him to death on November 30th, 60 AD by crucifixion. Andrew pleaded that he was not worthy to be crucified on a cross like the one which had borne his Lord, a Latin Cross, and convinced his captors to alter the shape of his cross into an X

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In 832 AD, a Pictish army under King Angus MacFergus, along with a force of Scots, was battling an English army in Lothian for control of that whole region. The Scots and the Picts were out numbered, nearly surrounded and very desperate. The next day’s battle promised certain defeat and death for them all. The King sought God’s help. Popular legend reported by several authoritative historians has it that during that night, St Andrew appeared in a vision to King Angus and promised that his army would win the victory. In the early morning over the battlefield, the army of Scots and Picts looked up and saw that the clouds in the sky had miraculously been arranged into the shape of the Saltire, or Xshaped cross, similar to the one St Andrew had been crucified on 800 years before. At the sight of the St Andrew’s cross overhead, the Scots and Picts rallied their strength and courage and chased the English from the battlefield, of course slaughtering as many as they could along the way. Even the English commander was cut down in the fighting and the battlefield carries his name to this day, Atheistane or Atheistaneford.

In the eight century some of his remains are said to be have been taken by St Regulus, or Rule, by ship going west. Legend has it that his ship began to sink off the north eastern coast of Scotland and so he came ashore and buried the bones of St Andrew where he landed. There he built a chapel and founded a settlement we know today as the city of St Andrew’s.

And so St Andrew earned the title of Patron Saint of Scotland on the battlefield. After that grand victory, the cloudy white St Andrew’s cross on a sky blue background more and more came to be used by Scottish kings as a national symbol of Gods promise of victory. It is perhaps the oldest national flag in the world, and it proudly flies wherever Scots go.

© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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Scotland. The national flag became so closely associated with the Covenanting movement that for many years it was known as the Blue Banner of the Covenant. It calls to our remembrance the faith of our fathers who faced persecution and death rather than lower their standards of truths and righteousness and surrendered their freedom. That’s what our Scottish National Flag stands for. May each of us follow and serve Jesus Christ as Scotland Patron Did. We have been handed down a great heritage of faith, freedom and courage, let us hold fast to it. Gentlemen we are here tonight because our forefathers upheld the Declaration of Arbroath, and I trust and pray that we will not fail them in doing the same. Gentlemen, I bid ye all be upstanding with me, and raise your glasses to the prosperity of “Scotland and the Society’. The St Andrew’s Cross is the national flag of Scotland, and tonight I want you to remember the history of that flag and what it stands for. Oh yes, it stands for victory and freedom, but at its very core it stands for faith shared

boldly. Andrew shared his faith boldly and he died because of it. During the reigns of Charles II and James VII the Covenanters of Scotland rose up to defend their liberties and took as their banner the old blue and white flag of

“Here’s to Scotland ance again, Land o’ lands, our loved, our ain; Cradle o’ the leal and brave, Hero’s hame and martyr’s grave” Gentlemen, the prosperity of Scotland and the Society.

From the Branches Darling Downs Branch - Extract from the President’s Report 2010

At the conclusion of my second period of President of the Darling Downs Branch of the Society, I am pleased to report on yet another very eventful year for the Branch and to confirm to anticipated incoming President Rob Craig and the new committee of the Branch that I believe the Branch is in “great shape”. Following election of the current board on 4 August 2009 we were immediately into arrangements for the unveiling of the memorial plaque to Dr Alex Horne and the designation of the Robert Burns Walk through Horne Park. This project was of course the “brainchild” of our much loved Secretary/Treasurer Mal Leslie and Mal bore the major bulk of the arrangements in conjunction with the Toowoomba Regional Council and the Toowoomba Caledonian Society. The two parts of the memorial were unveiled by Toowoomba Regional Council Mayor Mr Peter Taylor and by myself on 22 August 2009. We had a terrific

attendance of members at the opening, a large number of members of the public and of the Horne family and great participation from the Toowoomba Caledonian Society pipe band. The event received major recognition in the Toowoomba Chronicle and was the “front page” story for Albanaich, the Society State magazine. Our second major project was to again act in co-operation with the Toowoomba Caledonian Society to enter a major float in the Toowoomba Carnival of Flowers which was held on 20 September 2009. I want to thank all members for the tremendous turn up we had at the “working bees” to build the float which consisted of an eight tonne body truck with effectively a “castle” built onto the back of it and then the whole thing decorated with flags, tartan and flowers. We received tremendous co-operation from the Toowoomba Show Society that produced the major component of the “castle” props and I acknowledge the very generous support of Land Transport which donated

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From the Branches continued ... the truck and Readiquip Hire Toowoomba which provided the scaffolding to constitute the base of the castle on the back of the truck. For the major construction of the float we had John Doig, Gordon Graham, Rob Craig, Graham Docherty, Jeff Young, Mike Moffatt, David Henderson and myself all present (apologies if I missed anyone). On the actual day of the parade myself, John Doig, Gordon Graham, Rob Craig and Graham Docherty marched with or attended on the float. It was overall a great promotion for the Scots community in Toowoomba. Our next major event was our Men’s Night held on 7 November. We received a tremendous address from Peter Cullen, President of the Toowoomba Historical Society and were entertained by the wonderful voice of Scot Malcomson. It was at this stage of the year that Mal Leslie completed another of his initiatives being the organisation of an appropriate perspex display case for our Branch silverware. This consisted of the very lovely beer mugs listing the Branch Urrumach Buill and the Branch Patrons as well as a large Quaich listing our Branch Presidents. This entire display was then able to be presented at each of our subsequent events during the year. I subsequently represented the Branch at the Caledonian Society St Andrews Day Dinner, at the Royal Society of St George dinner and at the Robert Burns Masonic Lodge Annual Dinner as well as at the Society of the Knights of St John luncheon function and the Caledonian Society Burns Supper. On 14 May we conducted our Branch formal dinner dance which this year was a huge success due primarily to the initiative of committee member Mike McKenna. At Mike’s suggestion we went “up market” to a degree increasing the dinner price and bringing Celtic Crossover to provide the music. Mike obtained a major sponsor from Toowoomba Childcare Centre and in addition we received major sponsorships from Concordia College (courtesy of Rob Craig) and from Toowoomba Party Hire. I would like to make a special mention of the generosity of Wes Hick of Toowoomba Party Hire who contributed “above and beyond” for purposes of provision of the dance floor for the evening. It was a fantastic night and it was my great pleasure at the dinner to be able to induct five new members, being Mal Cochrane, Roger Taylor, Ken Stewart-Gray, Julian Lancaster-Smith and Shane Macdonald. We had a full table of attendees from McClymonts Holdings which company has indicated it would next year like to be a major sponsor for the dinner.

School, a wreath laying on Anzac Day and presentation of the Ron Douglas Memorial Bursary to the plumbing apprentice of the year at Toowoomba TAFE. We have our Men’s Annual Dinner largely planned awaiting the “final touches” from the new committee. I have been very heavily involved in the planning of the Australian Heritage Festival to be conducted at Jondaryan Woolshed commencing on Saturday 21 August. The festival this year will feature the contribution of people of Scots origin to the development of Australia and particularly the Darling Downs. We have a number of Clan Societies and Armigers intending to be present to parade their banners at the official opening at 10.30am on Saturday 21st. The British Consulate Head of Post Rob Zaccarin will take part in the official opening which will be completed by the Federal Member for Groom Mr Ian MacFarlane. Notwithstanding the election we are extremely grateful for Ian MacFarlane still holding to the appointment. Following the opening we will have pipe band displays by six major pipe bands and there will be a highland/bush dinner dance conducted in the woolshed on the Saturday night. The formal brochures and a dinner dance flyer have been produced by the woolshed committee and will be distributed next week. I urge all members to support this initiative to the greatest extent possible. As part of our ongoing relationship with St Andrews Hospital Toowoomba I have held discussions with hospital CEO Ray Fairweather and ascertained that the hospital is in great need of an ECG machine to be installed into the West Ward. This will involve the sum of approximately $2,000.00 so it is a project that I commend to the incoming committee. In conclusion I thank all members of the committee for their participation during the year but I give a very special thanks to our Secretary/Treasurer Mal Leslie who is the best Secretary/Treasurer that I have ever worked with in a community service organization. I also acknowledge my wife Katrina who managers in conjunction with Mal to undertake all of our Branch mail outs, trying to keep the membership list updated and as usual supporting me in every aspect. It has been a privilege to serve and I wish the incoming committee every success. Yours aye Kym Flehr President

Throughout the year we undertook a number of our usual projects being school bursaries presented to Toowoomba State High School and Centenary Heights State High

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© 2010. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


Albannaich Winter 2010