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Albannaich

“Shoulder to Shoulder”

A Quarterly Newsletter of The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited"

www.standrewsociety.com

Cairn and “Robert Burns Walk” unveiled in Toowoomba A joint project involving the Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited, Darling Downs Branch, the Toowoomba Caledonian Society and Burns Club Incorporated, and the Toowoomba Regional Council saw its culmination on Saturday, 22 August, 2009. It had been suggested that a cairn be built in Dr Alex Horn Park to recognize the 250th anniversary of the birth of Scotland’s National Poet, Robert Burns, and both Darling Downs Branch and the Caledonian Society had agreed to participate. When the suggestion was put to the Toowoomba Regional Council, it was decided that the cairn should primarily recognize the contribution of parkland to the city by Dr Alex Horn, after whom the park was named. Both societies agreed with this suggestion, and contributed to the cost, and the cairn was then built by Council staff at the eastern, Stuart Street, end of the park. Two bronze plaques were mounted on the cairn. One commemorates Dr Horn and his contribution, the other recognizes the importance of the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns, and names the path running through the park as “Robert Burns Walk”. Both of these events are of great significance to the Scottish community of Toowoomba. The unveiling ceremony took place on Saturday, 22nd August 2009. At the ceremony, Mr Alex Horn, grandson of Dr Alex spoke about the involvement of the Horn Family with the Toowoomba community, and the pride they had in the recognition being given to his grandfather. The Mayor, Cr Peter Taylor then unveiled the plaque dedicated to Dr Alex Horn and he praised the fact that the plaque outlined the history of the park. Then the “Robert Burns Walk” plaque was unveiled by Mr Kym Flehr, who is currently Chieftain of the Caledonian Society, and President of both the Darling Downs Branch and Governing Body of the St Andrew Society.

Cairn built in Dr Alex Horn Park, Toowoomba to recognize the 250th anniversary of the birth of Robert Burns

... continued page 2 ... Also in this issue ... Queenslander recognised with World piping award

Prominent Queensland Scot, Walter Hill

At the recent Glenfiddich Championships, Malcolm McRae was awarded the Balvenie Medal.

Walter Hill was the Foundation Director of the Brisbane Botanic Gardens.

Read more on page 11.

Ross McKinnon tells us more about Hill’s life on page 8.

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

The MacKenzie Clan The A.H. MacKenzie Memorial Bursary is awarded to a student annually, but who are the MacKenzies? Read the full extract on page 4.

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Society Structure Patron McPherson, Hon. B. H., CBE. Chieftain Porteous, R. D. Chaplain MacNicol, Rev. Archie President Flehr, K. G., FSA Scot. Chairman, Council Gill, Professor S. Members of the Council Bolton D. G. F. Bursary Convenor Campbell T. C. D.Ua. FSA Scot. De Hayr M. W. D.Ua. Galloway D. W. H. Gunn G. N. Chairman, Dinner Committee Malcolmson S. D. McCabe A. H. McConnell A. J. Treasurer McDonald D. F. QPM. McNee, A.J.K. Nicol P. R. D.Urr. FSA Scot. Porteous, R.D. Scott R. D.Urr Vaudin J. B. Secretary Wilson A. N. Chair of Ladies Night Committee Worrell J. P. M. Editor, Soc. Publications Worrell J. R. I. Asst. Editor, Web Master

Albannaich Queensland Editor Web Site Postal Address

Jim Worrell j.worrell@bfsurveys.com.au www.standrewsociety.com PO Box 674 Toowong Business Centre Queensland 4066

From the Editor Welcome to the Spring Edition! In the Winter edition that was published last quarter we were extremely fortunate to have been able to bring you the article on “Queensland’s Forgotten Founding Father”, the Rev Dr John Lang, researched and written by Society member Angus Edmonds, which received favourable feedback from readers. In this edition we have contributions from another two members. Ross McKinnon describes in “An Extraordinary Life” the story of Walter Hill, the Foundation Director of the Brisbane Botanical Gardens, whilst Bruce MacKenzie outlines the history of the MacKenzie’s of the Society. Please keep these articles coming as the success of the Albannaich is dependent on quality content. A challenge to members, especially senior members, is to put pen to paper and tell our Society about matters that will be of interest to other members and historians. Copies of the Albannaich are deposited in the National Library in Canberra, the State Library of Queensland and the Queensland Parliamentary Library, so contributions are preserved for posterity. Feedback is welcomed, be it criticism or praise. It is our aim to produce a journal that members of the Society can be justifiably proud. Ed. 2

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... from page 1 ...

In his speech, he spoke highly about the cooperation between our two societies, and with Toowoomba Regional Council, and expressed a wish that this will continue. The Cairn and plaques were then dedicated by Reverend Graeme McKay, Minister of St John’s Presbyterian Church, Toowoomba. Entertainment for the afternoon was Kym Flehr, David Kemp and Alex Horn provided by the with a prescription pad owned by Dr Alex Horn Toowoomba Caledonian Pipe Band, Bernadette Spies’ Highland Dancers and Kirby Douglas (a Horn Family member and piper from Warwick. Afternoon tea was supplied by Caledancers, the local Scottish Country Dance group. Several descendants of Dr Alex Horn and his brother, Dr David Horn, were in attendance, some coming from as far as Sydney. Drum Major David Kemp of the Toowoomba Caledonian Pipe Band had found a prescription pad from Dr Alex Horn’s practice, which he presented to Mr Alex Horn. The park has long been recognized as having significance to the Scottish community, with Oak trees being planted by the Caledonian Society in 1992 and 1994, including one planted by Dr Craig Horn (Dr Alex’s son) and Mrs Evelyn Propsting, daughter of Dr David Horn. This tree is adjacent to the cairn. The following is an extract of an obituary which appeared in the Toowoomba Chronicle on 1 September 1973: “A Toowoomba doctor who set a record 62 years practicing medicine died on his 92nd birthday. He was Dr. Alexander Horn of “Glenairdrie”, Cabarlah who retired from active medical practice only three years ago. Dr. Horn treated three generations of some families and was held in high regard as the true family doctor, adviser and friend. Two of his brothers, David and William, were also doctors (now deceased), and his son, Dr. Craig Horn, is a Macquarie Street specialist in Sydney. Dr. Horn died at his Cabarlah residence last Sunday and was buried at the Garden of Remembrance. Dr. Alex Horn was born at Airdrie, Scotland, on 27th August, 1881. He migrated to Australia with his father and mother Mr and Mrs David Horn, during the first year of his life. After leaving Toowoomba Grammar School with matriculation in 1897, he and his brother David established Carlton High School in Christmas Street, Toowoomba. David Horn was then a Bachelor of Arts. In 1901 the brothers decided that they would like to become doctors. They went to Scotland where they graduated as medical practitioners at the Aberdeen University. They both returned to Toowoomba to practice medicine. Dr. Alex Horn practiced for 62 years. His surgery was situated at 137 Herries Street until 1959 when he moved to 206 West Street. He retired in 1969, and continued to live at ''Glenairdrie'', formerly the Church of England Bush Brotherhood training school. During his residence in

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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Toowoomba he owned the present Downlands College property before it was sold to the Roman Catholic Church in 1930. In 1928 he donated to the Toowoomba City Council 30 acres of land solely for use as parkland. The parkland runs from Messines Street to Stuart Street at the rear of the college.

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From the Archives ... Shoulder to Shoulder Vol 1, No. 3, April 1949 A series of interesting and historical extracts from your Society’s past.

He also owned ''Redlands'' which is now the administration building of Concordia College. Dr. Horn was a member of the 11th Light Horse before the start of the World War I and early in 1915 he joined Dr Alex Horn the Expeditionary Forces and served in both Egypt where he was commanding Officer of the 11th Light Horse Field Ambulance, and in France as Lieutenant Colonel and C.O. of the 5th Field Ambulance. He was mentioned in dispatches for conspicuous bravery in the field. The dispatch was signed by Sir Winston Churchill.” 4GR runs a project each year, called “Give Me 5 For Kids”, to raise funds in support of the Children’s Ward at the Toowoomba Base Hospital, and it was with pleasure that our branch presented Kim with a cheque for $200 towards this worthy cause.

Welcome New Members Jul

Darbishire, William A.P. McPhee, Roger S. McWade, Donald Macdonald-Buchanan, James I.H. Goddard, Justin Finlayson, Bruce M.

Aug

Cullen, John

Society Notice Board Important Dates and Upcoming Events Annual Mens Dinner

November 27th

St Andrew’s Day Service

November 29th

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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The MacKenzies of The Society of St Andrew of Scotland Queensland By Bruce MacKenzie Bruce MacKenzie is the eldest grandson of the late Alexander Harper Mackenzie. The A.H Mackenzie Memorial bursary is donated by our Society annually to a student at Brisbane Boys College. Current St Andrews Members

Harry Hinkler Mackenzie, life member, born 24 February 1928, son of Alec MacKenzie (deceased). Bruce Alfred Mackenzie, born 16 July 1945, nephew of Harry.

were crossing the Story Bridge on its opening day and playing his pipes behind the official party; playing his pipes at Brisbane Airport as a lone piper welcoming Queen Elizabeth, Jimmy Shand, Andy Stewart, Kenneth Mackellar and other luminary visiting Scots.

Alexander Harper MacKenzie

Robert James MacKenzie, born 13 June 1981, son of Bruce.

18 June 1892 - 3 September 1970

Anthony Charles MacKenzie, born 7 March 1984, son of Bruce.

Alec was born at Birsay in the mythical Orkney Isles off the north coast of Scotland. Alec’s parents were Malcolm Alexander MacKenzie of Stromness in Orkney and Mary Helen Harper of Birsay in Orkney. The Mackenzie family prior to this goes back to the Island of Lewis in Stornoway in the outer Hebrides.

David John MacKenzie, born 16 November 1985, son of Bruce. Cameron Douglas Bruce Mackenzie, born 16 December 1987, son of Bruce. My Grandfather Alexander (Alec) Harper MacKenzie was the most strongly minded individualistic person that I have ever known, and he has left a lasting impression on me forever. He was a member of St. Andrews, and he was the A.H. MacKenzie named in the above St. Andrews perpetual annual bursary to Brisbane Boys College. My first childhood recollection of Alec was a family picnic to the Glasshouse Mountain area whereupon Alec climbed Mt. Tibrogargan with his bagpipes in a pack. While our family enjoyed our picnic goodies, Alec stood atop Mt. Tibrogargan and played his pipes which we could hear in the distance. Alec was a fine example of a determined and persistent Scot who did the things that he wanted to achieve with scant regard for the opinion of others. Some examples 4

The Early Years

In 1912 at the age of 20 Alec arrived in Brisbane. During his voyage to Brisbane his ship passed the British Steamer “Titanic” which sank in April of that year. Alec joined the Brisbane Fire Brigade situated on the corner of Ann and Wharf streets in the City. Soon afterwards Alec met a young English woman Florence Sarah Brand (know as “Flo”) who was born in June 1896 at Wimbledon in Surrey, England. Flo had come to Australia with her family in 1909 and she was working at that time for T.C. Beirne in Brunswick Street, Fortitude Valley. Family Development

Some time later following Flo’s 18th birthday a courtship blossomed between Alec and Flo. On 27 September 1917 they were married at St Johns cathedral. The wedding breakfast that followed consisted of a

small gathering at a cottage in Alfred St. Hamilton. This was to be the home of Alec and Flo and their first born son Arthur Alexander MacKenzie (my father) arrived on 30 June 1918. In January 1922 Alec received a promotion at the Brisbane Fire Brigade and the family moved into living accommodation at the Fire Station Head quarters in Ann Street. During their stay, 3 more MacKenzie children entered the world: Florence Madeline MacKenzie 7 August 1922 Neil Campbell MacKenzie 13 August 1926 Harry Hinkler MacKenzie 24 February 1928 In March 1928 Alec was promoted to Officer in Charge of Wynnum Fire Station. At this time baby Harry was a month old. The following 10 years rolled on with many special family events occurring at home, and on outings in their 1926 Essex vehicle. Due to Alec’s interest in music and culture, the MacKenzie children’s interest and abilities were nurtured at Wynnum. Arthur learned the violin, and Neil Harry and Madeline learned Highland dancing from a local teacher. At this time, the Brisbane Caledonian Society and Burns Club

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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did a good job of keeping alive the national music of Scotland through their pipe band of which Alec was a member, as well as Neil at age 11 and Harry just 9 years old. Their piping lessons were given by Alec as well as a qualified Teacher from the Society. An important date on the Mackenzie calender was the annual calling from the Warwick Caledonian Society through whom highland competitors of various avenues gathered on Boxing Day to compete at Warwick on the Darling Downs. I particularly recall how my grandfather Alec marvelled at The Red Hackle Pipe band , and their synchronism in playing and precision in marching. One year before the announcement of the Second World War in 1939 Alec received another transfer to the suburb of Ithaca hence providing accommodation in a 1918 standard double story Fire Station with a panoramic view of the City. The Story Bridge was opened on 6 July 1940 and after the opening Scottish Country dancing was held in the centre of the bridge involving members of the MacKenzie. In 1942 Alec received another promotion and was transferred to Ann St Headquarters to the Chiefs living quarters. The 27th September 1942 gave close friends and the family the opportunity to tuck wartime affairs away to an evening of celebration for Alec’s and Flo’s Silver Wedding Anniversary which included a moving display of Neil and Harry piping their parents to the main table. This close knit family had reached a stage of their lives of parting ways through career involvements and life in general. Arthur had enlisted in the R.A.A.F., Madeline had moved to Proserpine, Neil stayed in Brisbane and became an apprentice engineer, whilst Harry ventured out to sea as a crewman on a Merchant Navy Oil Tanker. In 1945 after the end of World War Two Alec resigned from the Fire Brigade and purchased the Bulimba

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Newsagency which he and Flo owned until their retirement in 1952. Neil and Harry’s piping skills were continually encouraged by Alec culminating into their selection into St. Andrews pipe band. In 1949 St. Andrews Pipe Band of Brisbane won the Australian Championship at Tenterfield. Alec Retires and Clan MacKenzie is Formed

Between 1952 and 1970 was a period of new horizons for Alec and Flo. After Alec retired in 1952, he set about pursuing his dream of seeing his entire family involved in forming a Scottish Band. In 1953 the Clan MacKenzie Pipe Band was founded and subsequently the idea was put forward to hold a Highland Ball. In August 1955 the Clan MacKenzie First Annual Charity Highland Ball was held at Cloudland Ballroom with all proceeds being donated to children’s charities. Alec with the assistance of the family and others made and decorated the original shields for all of the other clans who attended the ball. These shields decked the walls towering above the beautiful polished sprung floor boards of Cloudland Ballroom adding an extra touch of Scots flair to this gala evening. The atmosphere of this glorious old ballroom mingled with the traditional Scottish, old time and some modern dance along with the pageantry ceremony of Debutantes stirred the soul of any persons being of Celtic origin or otherwise. I was 8 years old at the time and I remember watching the spectacle of the early part of the night in awe and splendour from the upstairs seating area at Cloudland after which I was quickly taken home to Newmarket. We returned the following day to assist in dismantling. Who would ever have dreamt that all the MacKenzie family and I would have been participants at many of these subsequent Clan MacKenzie Annual Charity Highland Balls which were held every year at Cloudland on the third Friday every August. The 25th

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Silver Jubilee Ball was held on 22 August 1980 albeit had to be shifted to the Greek Community Centre at West End due to regulation adjustments at Cloudland throughout 1980 - Alec was done proud although he had passed on 10 years earlier in 1970. On 7 November 1982 Cloudland was demolished and the location of future balls continued to be at the Greek Community Centre. Shortly after the introduction of annual balls came plans to commence Scottish Country dance lessons and the Clan MacKenzie Scottish Country Dancers were formed. This group not only taught lessons to the many who attended the annual balls but also performed dance demonstrations at many social events including church and school fetes, City hall concerts, Warana Festivals, Masonic lodge functions, Caledonian Society etc.. A.H.MacKenzie Memorial Bursary donated annually by St. Andrews to Brisbane Boys College

When forming the Clan MacKenzie Pipe Band Alec sought out to find and gain the support of as many “MacKenzies” as possible living in the greater Brisbane area. This search lead Alec to meet Dr. T “Ross” Mackenzie who was the headmaster of Brisbane Boys college (BBC) between 1947-1955. It was from this meeting, association and involvement that Alec began teaching students at BBC to play the pipes. St. Andrews subsequently established the A.H. MacKenzie perpetual bursary and it continues today. “Son of The Isles” Twilight Years

As the hands of time moved on, the Mackenzie family tree rapidly grew through marriages and grandchildren into Alec and Flo’s life. On 27 September 1967 a family gathering was held to celebrate Alec and Flo’s Golden Wedding Anniversary. Unfortunately almost 3 years later just prior to the Clan MacKenzie Ball in August 1970,

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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Alec’s health failed miserably resulting in the need for hospitalization at St. Andrews Private Hospital. Alec was unable to attend the Ball but he did receive reports on its success. Sadly Alec’s well trodden path of life came to its end on 3 September 1970 aged 78. Many people came to pay their final respects to this proud, traditionalist, Orcadian Gentleman (from the Orkney Isles). “Sons of the Isles” By Duncan John Robertson The first stanza is appropriate. There is a spell woven by restless seas, A secret charm that haunts our Island air, Holding our hearts and following everywhere The wandering children of the Orcades.

MacKenzie Family – The tradition of the Stags Head

My earliest recognition of seeing the Mackenzie family stags head was when as a small boy attending Clan MacKenzie Balls held annually at Cloudland. It is a magnificent 12 pointer stuffed and mounted by a professional taxidermist, and it requires regular care of the head, fur and skin. It currently takes pride of place high on the lounge room wall of my house. My Grandfather Alec decreed that this Stags Head pass from the eldest son to the eldest son – so from my Grandfather to my father Arthur, then from my father to me, and then to my eldest son Robert and so on. I never knew how or why this decree came about although my father told me that this stag was captured not far from Esk in the Brisbane Valley. The MacKenzie coat of arms has the motto “Cuidich ‘N’ Righ” and has a stags head as the emblem. At the Mackenzie Highland Balls, other family clan shields were displayed above each of the alcoves that surrounded the dance floor however the MacKenzie shield and the 12 pointer Stags Head held pride of place at the MacKenzie alcove.

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My subsequent research with historians in Scotland showed that the motto and the stags head come from the heroic rescue of King Alexander 3 by a MacKenzie (Colin MacCoinneach – gaelic derivation for MacKenzie) who in 1263 saved the King from a charging stag by shooting it dead with an arrow. “Cuidich ‘N’ Righ” means “help the King”. For his deed, and for his victory against the Danes at the Battle of Largs in 1263, MacKenzie was awarded the lands of Kintail, and the arms of a golden Stags Head, and the right to the be the hereditary Royal body guard (a tradition that was upheld until the battle of Pinkie in 1547). Harry Hinkler MacKenzie Life member of Society of St Andrew of Scotland

Harry Hinkler MacKenzie was a Life Member of The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited and Son of the late Alexander Harper MacKenzie. Although my mother was English, we were all brought up in a very Scottish oriented household. My first recollections were of Alex’s New Years Eve parties in the yard of the house behind the fire station in Wynnum where I spent the first years of my life and then the first footing around the neighbours with pipes and of course a bottle whisky. Our father used to march up and down the hall outside our bedroom and pipe us to sleep. My piping career started at 6 years of age. I used to play with Dad’s practice chanter every day and Dad said when your fingers can cover the holes I will teach you. I won my first under 16 contest at Warwick when I was 9 and also at that age joined the Brisbane Caledonian Society & Burns Club Pipe Band with my father who was Pipe Corporal under the late Peter McCorkindale. I stayed with this band until I joined the Merchant Navy. My solo playing continued to improve and my father at one stage said he could not take me any

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further and I then went to the late Angus McPherson who really brought me on. I used to go to Ipswich and live with the McPhersons every chance I got. After leaving the Merchant Service I joined the St Andrew’s (exservicemen’s) Pipe Band not long after it was formed, but unfortunately I cannot claim to be a foundation member. I stayed with the band until pressure of business and married life forced me to have to leave the pipe band scene. I was Pipe Corporal under the late Pipe Major Archie Galloway and the late George Marshall was Pipe Sergeant. I enjoyed very much my time with this band and was sorry to leave as they were a wonderful bunch of mates and a top band. I never stopped practice or playing. I was so keen and interested in piping. Over the years I owned a Newsagency and after selling that took up a career in Real Estate. After 5 years of study I became a Valuer. My first position was with the late Alex Meldrum and I was employed by him for quite a while before starting my own business as a Real Estate Agent, Auctioneer and Valuer. After my retirement and going to live in the Redlands I was asked by the late Eddie Santagiuliana, Mayor of Redland Shire, to get the Redland Pipe Band up and running again. So my piping and pipe band work started in earnest again. Over the past 18 years I have taught bagpipes to many students of all ages at no cost to pupils. I was Pipe Major of the band until late 2008. I am still very interested in the band and still do all the teaching. My idea was that the future of the band was in the young people and I was determined not to take players from other bands. It has been a long hard road with lots of ups and downs, but with a nature evidently inherited from my father, I have come through and am very proud of the legacy I will leave

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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behind. The Band has now been granted the right, by Mayor Melva E Hobson PSM, to call ourselves the Redland City Pipe Band. The band is a part of the Redland Scottish & Celtic Society Inc. This Society was a joint vision of myself and Mayor Eddie Santagiuliana and was formed in September 1996. We do a lot of community work and our main annual event is the Redland Highland Gathering. Now in it’s 8th year, it is a premier event in South East Queensland that showcases the culture, traditions, music and dance of Scottish Heritage. Arthur Alexander MacKenzie Deceased 13 September 2001 (Eldest son of Alec, Harry’s brother)

My father Arthur left school at 14 and worked in western NSW for 5 years. It was there that he gained bush ingenuity of solving practical problems. At age 19 he began an electrical apprenticeship and after qualifying he joined the RAAF but did not see combat. Arthur married Freda Pack in 1943 and they had two sons – myself (Bruce) and my younger brother Ross Arthur Mackenzie who lives permanently in Singapore. Arthur became a teacher of electrical apprentices and ultimately rose to the position of Deputy Director of Technical Education in Qld until his retirement in 1980. Arthur was also president of the Clan MacKenzie Association for quite a number of years and he was very involved in the Administration of the Association. Arthur gave many years of service to Rotary, The Masonic Lodge, the church and the Redland Bay community. Epilogue

The writer Bruce MacKenzie although not a piper or prominent person in the Scottish community was driven by desire to enquire as to a number of things including the A.H. MacKenzie Memorial Bursary donated by St. Andrews, the Life membership of his Uncle Harry Mackenzie in St. Andrews, and the Tradition of the Mackenzie Stags Head, and also driven to record this and other such things in the knowledge that it was correctly recorded for coming generations. Input was sought from a number of people to ensure that this article contains information, facts and opinions that reflect the accuracy of research as far as possible but any input from St. Andrews members is most welcome. Finally I would like to say that I am fiercely proud to be a Mackenzie, and that the determination and persistence which are in our blood as Scots are indeed omnipotent.

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Scottish Humour An 80-year-old Scotsman pops into his local pharmacy to purchase his multi-vitamins. The pharmacist is amazed at what good shape the guy is in and asks, ‘How do you stay in such great physical condition?’ ‘I'm Scottish and I am a golfer,’ says the old guy, ‘and that's why I'm in such good shape. I'm up well before daylight and out golfing up and down the fairways. I have a wee glass of whiskey, and all is well.’ ‘Well,’ says the pharmacist, ‘I'm sure that helps, but there's got to be more to it? How old was your Dad when he died?' 'Who said my Dad's dead?' The pharmacist is amazed. 'You mean you're 80 years old and your Dad's still alive. How old is he?' 'He's 100 years old,' says the old Scottish golfer. 'In fact he golfed wid me this morning, and then we went to the topless beach for a walk and had anither wee dram and that's why he's still alive. He's Scottish and he's a golfer, too.' 'Well,' the pharmacist says, 'that's great, but I'm sure there's more to it than that. How about your Dad's dad? How old was he when he died?' 'Who said my Granddad's dead?' Stunned, the pharmacist asks, 'You mean you're 80 years old and your grandfather's still living! Incredible, how old is he?' 'He's 118 years old,' says the old Scottish golfer. The pharmacist is getting frustrated at this point, 'So, I guess he went golfing with you this morning too?' 'No. Granddad couldnae go this mornin' because he's getting married today.' At this point the pharmacist is close to losing it. 'Getting married?? Why would a 118 year- old guy want to get married?' ‘Who said he wanted to?’

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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While not yet sixteen years of age he was apprenticed to his father (Mr. David Hill), Head Gardener of Balloch Castle, Dumbarton. From this place he went to Dicksons’s Nursery, Edinburgh, then as foreman to Minto House, Roxburghshire. After two years he returned to Edinburgh and accepted a position in the Royal Botanic Garden under Mr. Wm. McNab. In 1843, on the recommendation of Mr. McNab, Walter Hill came to the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew where he subsequently became foreman of the propagation and new plant departments. Hill left the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in October 1851 and landed at Sydney the following February (1852). He carried a letter of introduction to gentleman and botanist, William Sharp Macleay, but initially, Hill, sought his fortune in the Victorian gold fields at a time when the gold rush was at its height. The fever did not pass him by and he worked for 6 months on the Turon gold field (with indifferent success), and subsequently visited the gold fields at Beechworth, Bendigo and other places. In 1854 Hill returned to Sydney and in the company of a Mr. Frederick Strange and four others set out as an exploratory party to Percy Island off Mackay (Qld), which ended in a fatal altercation with local Aboriginals.

Walter Hill (1820 - 1904) Foundation Director of Brisbane Botanic Gardens

An Extraordinary Life By Ross McKinnon AM Curator-in-Charge Brisbane Botanic Gardens Walter Hill was born in the small Scottish village of Scotsdyke near the Scottish/English border in the Parish of Canonbie, Dumfrieshire, on New Year’s

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Eve, December 31, 1820: the eldest son of David Hill and his wife Elizabeth (nee Beattie). He had a twin brother James and four older sisters: Grace, Elizabeth, Mary and Georgina. He later had a younger brother William and two younger sisters, Alice Ann and Thomasina.

All the members of the party now, about seven in number, landed on Percy Island and separated to collect specimens. Hill went up the mountains and others going along the shore after shells etc. When Hill was returning to the boat he came across the body of the mate stripped naked and with his throat cut and he soon found that the natives had killed all the rest of the crew except an Aboriginal who had been employed by Hill’s party. The two managed to reach the vessel and sailed next day for Brisbane.

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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About this time the Government of New South Wales, to which colony of Brisbane then belonged, decided to establish a Botanic Garden and Hill was appointed its first Superintendent on 21 February, 1855. Hill was allotted nine acres and a sum of 500 pounds to purchase rare plants. When Queensland became a separate colony in 1859 he was appointed Colonial Botanist. Hill was allotted a house and garden within the reserve and lived there until his retirement as Director of the Gardens and Colonial Botanist on 1 March 1881. The original Garden reserve was soon expanded to twenty-eight acres (11.5ha). Hill made his first annual report to Parliament in 1861; he listed forty-eight recently introduced species of plants and twenty-seven varieties of vines, twelve pineapples, eight of banana’s, and ten types of oranges. Three years later he reported successful results of the experiments made with tea, coffee, sugar, cinnamon, allspice, ginger, indigo and tobacco. Hill established an oak plantation between the original lagoon and the Brisbane River in which eighteen species of European, Asian, and American oaks were planted to investigate for tanning purposes. He had also managed to obtain one specimen of Cinchona calisaya (Peruvian Fever Tree) for the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, and hoped for more from his contacts with Sir William Hooker at Kew and the Governor of Madras, India. There had been a concerted effort to establish this valuable medicinal tree (which yields quinine) throughout tropical areas of the British Empire, and Hill responded enthusiastically. Though the plants acclimatised adequately, the project was not a success, as he was unable to interest farmers in plantation forestry of the tree. Hill was also placed in charge of Forest Reserves in Queensland and to him is due the credit for the

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introduction and acclimatisation of numerous valuable trees and plants of economic importance from all over the world. He is credited with the introduction of the first: Mango, Pawpaw, Ginger, Poinciana and Jacaranda (planted 1864 – died 1979), this Jacaranda is depicted in perhaps Queensland’s most recognised painting: “Under the Jacaranda” by Godfrey Rivers. Hill planted the first commercially grown Macadamia, brought from the Queensland bush and planted in the Brisbane Botanic Gardens in 1858 and in the same year the first Litchi, Tamarind and Mahogany of commerce. Perhaps Hill’s greatest economic achievement was performed on 25 April 1862 when with a planter from Barbados, John Buchot (1831-1881) they together granulated the first sugar in Queensland and Australia: ‘crushing the canes with a lever and boiling the juice in a saucepan. No one was allowed to witness the tremendous experiment (carried out in the dead of night) which was to settle the problem of whether the juice of Queensland sugar cane would granulate’. From this simple experiment has grown the mighty sugar cane industry. A cairn marking the spot of the first sugar cane grown in Queensland is still to be found in the centre of the City Gardens. Walter Hill also planted the fine Bunya Pine Avenue (1858-1867) Araucaria bidwillii named and planted in honour of John Carne Bidwill – Colonial Botanist and Commissioner of Lands at Wide Bay. By 1870, Hill distributed more than 50,000 sugar cane cuttings of thirtysix varieties from the Brisbane Botanic Gardens to coastal Qld; by 1876 more than 75,000 cuttings of fifty varieties were dispersed. Hill is also credited with the introduction and acclimatisation of many economic plants. He sought grasses to rejuvenate the near disaster that had occurred on the

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Darling Downs through overgrazing by the introduction of exotic grasses and fibre crop, dye plants, mulberries, and all the stone and cool temperate fruits of the Stanthorpe region. Hill is credited with having started the wine industry through the importation of grape vine cuttings and the pineapple industry, and recommended the planting of tea on the Atherton tablelands 100 years before commercial plantations were established. Hill imported all manner of tropical fruits – including important horticultural species of mangoes, paw paw, and ginger – from around the world to acclimatise and distribute throughout the colony. He supplied trees and shrubs to many Government institutions for the beautification of their grounds and for shade purposes. With his overt support, branch BOTANIC GARDENS – often known as Queen’s Parks – were gazetted in ROCKHAMPTON, TOOWOOMBA, MARYBOROUGH, and IPSWICH, during the 1870’s. Hill desired experimentation with plants in various climatic zones of the colony; though over time, these regional gardens reverted mainly to recreational PUBLIC PARKS. Hill had a fine stone drinking fountain erected in 1867 (restored and rededicated 2nd June 2005). Hill established a HERBARIUM, and in 1875 completed a catalogue of the plants in the Gardens. In 1862 he established a LIBRARY of botanical titles, open to his gardeners from 8 o’clock in the morning; the public waited until 9 o’clock for entry. Unfortunately the building in which the books were housed deteriorated and by 1875 Hill was forced to package the books until renovations were complete. His own residence in the Gardens suffered a similar lack of maintenance, as did the greenhouse.

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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Walter Hill acted as a botanist on a number of voyages of exploration up the Queensland coast and into it’s interior. The North-East Coast Exhibition of 1873 under the leadership of George Elphinstone Dalrymple led Hill to report: ‘Half-a-million acres of good land, 300,000 of that fit for sugar.’ Hill thought it ‘the most valuable discovery in Australia’ (the area they explored around the Johnstone River south of Cairns).

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So what is a wee “Deoch an Doruis”? In this extract from “A Book of Scotland”, Sir Walter Scott tells the story of a drunk cow up in front of the local Magistrate.

During his time at the Gardens, Hill arranged for Queensland’s flora and fauna to be exhibited at Expositions throughout the world and in return received numerous rare specimens for Queensland’s benefit. He published several impressive reports and catalogues which are now prized by botanists and many species of plants have been named to commemorate him. ‘Walter Hill was retired as Director of the Brisbane Botanic Gardens on 1 March 1881 on a pension at the age of 60. It was unfortunate that his association with the Botanic Gardens ended on a sour note. It was mentioned in Parliament that the Lands Department was not satisfied with his upkeep of the Gardens and it was decided to ask for his retirement on a full pension at 60. Hill, described by some as stubborn and impracticable to deal with, was most incensed. He immediately claimed full paid leave of absence for twelve months having not had any annual leave for twenty-six years plus a gratuity for the upkeep of five horses. Walter Hill lived to 83 years of age and died at his home – Canonbie Lea, at Eight Mile Plains south of Brisbane on 4 February 1904 and was carried from his home “on a chookhouse door” (one presumes to a waiting hearse… an account given by David Lindasy, Walter Hill’s great nephew, his grandfather’s brother). Hill’s wife Jane Hill died on 25 June 1888 aged 70 years and only daughter Ann Hill at the age of 21 years (25/04/1850 – 01/11/1871). In 1992 newspaper poll (Saturday 26 June Courier Mail) saluting our ‘Top 100’ Walter Hill was finally acknowledged among the great builders who have helped to shape Queensland. To find out more, or visit the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, visit them at Mt Coot-tha Road, Toowong or visit their web site at: www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/botanicgardens

“Shoulder to Shoulder”

A N I N V I TAT I O N T O M E M B E R S

S T A N D R E W ’ S D AY S E RV I C E F R I D AY , N O V E M B E R 2 9 T H , 2 0 0 9 1 0 : 0 0 A M

The service is to commemorate Scotland’s National Day and Scotland’s Patron Saint, St Andrew. Pipers from 9:30am. The service will be conducted by The Society’s Chaplain, The Reverend Archie MacNicol, in the Ann Street Presbyterian Church, 145 Ann Street, Brisbane. Dress: Kilt/Plaid/ Highland Dress or Other. Family and friends all welcome. For further details, see the flyer on The Society Web Site

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© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


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Queenslander, Malcolm McRae, awarded the 2009 Balvenie Medal A reprint of the citation address given by Alan Forbes The Balvenie Medal is presented each year for outstanding service to Piping. This year’s presentation will be the twentyfifth, and the list of recipients contains the names of many legends of the piping world, quite a few of them, I’m delighted to say, here today. It is traditional at these presentations to keep the audience guessing by withholding the name of the nominee until the last moment and I’ll try to follow that approach as best I can. However, I fear that many of you will guess who it is before I have finished my first sentence and its just possible that he himself will also figure it out me pretty quickly. This year’s nominee for the Balvenie Medal is an Australian, albeit one with a Scottish name and very Scottish ancestry, whose contribution to piping covers the fields of professional competition at the highest level, judging, teaching, serving on committees and boards, intellectual input to debate and unstinting kindness and hospitality to pipers visiting his home over many years.

playing tunes and is a great believer in the oral tradition in teaching piobaireachd. Back in Australia, he couldn’t resist the lure of Scotland and returned to compete in 1973. He married in Australia in May 1974, came to Scotland on honeymoon, and stayed here for 30 years! By this time Bob Brown, his old teacher, had sadly died so he went to Robert Nicol for tuition, until his death four years later. He is therefore steeped in the Brown and Nicol approach to piobaireachd, which came in turn from John Macdonald, Inverness. He collaborated with Robert Wallace and Norman Matheson in the production of their highly acclaimed ‘Masters of Piobaireachd’ series of CDs of the music and teaching of Bob Brown and Bob Nicol. His serious interest in the traditional ways of playing piobaireachd led to many interesting and productive friendships, not least with James Campbell, son of Archibald Campbell, Kilberry, who, when he died, entrusted him with his whole archive of recordings and documents which, I think, he is still ploughing his way

As a boy in Australia in the fifties he was smitten by the desire to play bagpipes, and he went for lessons to through to this day. Peter Davidson, from Dunedin, who Malcolm McRae with the Balvenie Medal As a competitor he met with (courtesy D. Maxwell of WM Grant & Sons) had previously competed with some considerable success during the 70's success in Scotland. Peter Davidson and 80's, winning many major prizes had been a pupil of Robert Reid and including the Gold Medal and Open Piobaireachd at Oban, had also had lessons from Bob Brown, so his piping the Braemar and Dunvegan Medals, the Open pedigree was good and his pupil progressed quickly to Piobaireachd and the Bratach Gorm at London and many become an excellent player. prizes for light music. He was also a regular competitor He came to Scotland in 1967 to work in Glasgow where he here at The Glenfiddich Championship during these years. teamed up with Donald Bain, a well know New Zealand His pipe was always immaculate, and still is! piper. To further his piping he went for lessons in On retiring from competitive piping he turned to teaching piobaireachd to Bob Brown at Balmoral, traveling regularly and judging. He has taught piping at the College of and in all weathers with Jim Mackintosh in a tiny car, Piping and the National Piping Centre and is a qualified which came with his job. These lessons continued for two examiner for the Piping and Drumming Qualifications years until he returned to Sydney at the end of 1968. Board. He is also much sought after for individual During that time he established a strong bond of piobaireachd tuition by pipers from all over the world. friendship and mutual respect with Bob Brown, who He was an excellent and influential president of the considered him one of the best of all his pupils. He Piobaireachd Society from 1988 until 1997 and, not content admired Brown not only as an outstanding musician, but with that, followed up as Chairman and Secretary of the also as someone able to analyse the music and Music Committee for several years. communicate the subtleties of it in an infectious and inspiring way. He is still a devotee of Brown’s ways of ... continued on page 12 ... © 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066

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... Queenslander wins Balvenie Medal, continued from page 11 ...

He still makes a valuable contribution as an ordinary member of the Music Committee. During his time in these positions he took his responsibilities seriously, and was particularly influential in promoting the development of judging skills, and broadening the knowledge of styles and settings of tunes, through the discussion seminars run by the Piobaireachd Society.

does, however, return to Scotland each summer to judge and enjoy the piping season here. He is in considerable demand as a judge, and it is greatly to his credit that he is just as happy judging half a dozen pipers at a small, wet, traditional highland games in the back of beyond, as judging the very top players at Oban, Inverness, London, Dunvegan and here at the Glenfiddich.

He was a founder director of The National Piping Centre in Glasgow and is a former President of the Competing Pipers’ Association. He also served for many years on the BBC piping advisory committee and on the piping committee of The Northern Meeting. Much of this work was done during fairly turbulent times for these organizations, some of which had just started up and others of which were going through times of change. His calming influence and diplomatic skills were invaluable. He is a lawyer by profession and his day job was, latterly, with the Highland Council in Inverness as Head of Legal Services until his retirement in 2004, when he and his wife moved to Queensland, Australia, for some sunshine. He

Despite all this piping activity, his wife of 35 years and four children are still on good terms with him! He is perhaps fortunate that his wife was also a piper, so she knows a bit about it, and her kindness and hospitality at their home to a large number of pipers from all over the world in different states of sobriety, elation and depression is legendary. She still has vivid memories, or possibly nightmares, of her Aga cooker covered in soaking wet sheepskin pipe bags drying out after competitions! Ladies and gentlemen, I’m sure you will agree this has been an outstanding contribution to piping in the best traditions of the Balvenie Medal and I am delighted to present it now to a worthy winner and good friend:

... Malcolm McRae

From the Branches Gold Coast Branch

The committee of President – Ian Pert, Treasurer – Brian Pert, Secretary – Ian Forrester together with Charles Hamilton were all re-appointed in October 2008 That aside, our Race Day at the Turf Club in November was extremely popular and we are considering taking a bigger function room to cope with the numbers. The ‘lucky key’ jewellry prize was a huge hit with Letitia Maxwell the lucky winner. The Race Day was certainly enjoyed by the ladies with prizes of handbags, beauty treatments and jewellry. Also I would like to extend a big thank you to all our table sponsors. We donated $1,000 to the Gold Coast Pipe Band who also managed to raise $1,500 for the Surf Lifesavers on the same day by playing to the ‘punters in the dome’ We are glad to see that our ‘investment’ in our local Pipe Band has paid dividends with the Band winning a number of competitions. 12

Gold Coast Branch, Bannockburn Dinner in June is starting to achieve legend status on the Gold Coast as “a must” to attend event!

Our next big event was the Bannockburn Dinner in June. This function is starting to achieve legend status on the Gold Coast as “a must” to attend. With about 120 attendees, it was a big night with the usual haggis, whiskey and singing! The ‘trainee waiter ‘ caused havoc with the guests until he turned out to be local comedian, Steve Davis.

I am also happy to report that we have been promoting bagpiping with the local schools and have bought chanters and music books for the students. This is progressing well with one of the students already on the pipes. He is to play Amazing Grace to the school Assembly at the end of the year. Ian Pert President, GC Branch

© 2009. All rights reserved. The Society of St Andrew of Scotland (Queensland) Limited. PO Box 674, Toowong Business Centre QLD 4066


Albannaich Queensland Spring 2009