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A DAY IN THE LIFE OF...

A Physics Teacher

Hamish MacLeod Y9

Bryn Rumble Y11

B R Y N PA R I S H ( Y 1 3 )

MR CAMERON PICKERING G E O G R A P H Y , H I S TO R Y A N D S O C I A L S T U D I E S T E A C H E R

BRYN RUMBLE (Y11)

Jumping out of primary school straight into high school in Year 9 can be quite a big leap. However, Hamish MacLeod has welcomed this change into a much bigger and scarier school. He enjoys the fact that he has a different teacher for each subject compared to primary school having the same teacher all day. At the start of the year, all the Year 9s travelled to Castle Hill for their first camp in high school, which Hamish thoroughly enjoyed, making it one of his highlights. Another highlight for him this year is being selected into the Boys’ Second XI hockey team and has enjoyed a very successful season. Hamish is looking forward to his next four years at StAC.

One of the things I enjoy about Year 11 is the amount of internals allowing you to achieve Excellence endorsement purely just off internals. Luckily there is nothing I don’t enjoy about the year which is good. The people in Year 11 are awesome: they are a great bunch of people with plenty of good banter. It is also a very diverse and inclusive year group. There is nothing so far that I would have done differently, it’s been a great year thus far. I am excited for next year because of the detail and wide choices of subjects and topics.

Jenna Turner Y10 J E SS A L L A N ( Y 1 3 )

JESS I hope you have really enjoyed your time at StAC. If you had to pick one thing that was your best experience, what would it be?

JESS What’s life like in Australia in comparison to here in New Zealand?

Cameron Miles Y12 JACK BALLARD (Y13)

PLC Sydney Exchange Student

JESS Have you enjoyed your time on exchange? Are you happy you spent half of your year to come and experience this?

Pickering: Cricketer, Educator, Loyal Servant of the Queen

JENNA I would definitely have to say when I got to go on the Year 10 school camp – that was really good going up to Castle Hill.

Cameron Miles, is a Year 12 student who leads a busy life. He manages to fit Calculus, Business, Economics, Graphics, English, and his favourite subject Physics into his routine. After school on Monday and Tuesday he has football training with the First XI. Sadly, due to a massive spinal injury (a minor tweak of a back muscle), he can only watch the team from the sideline at the moment. When not injured, he likes to splash 3’s playing basketball in the Gymnasium at lunchtime. This is the general day in the life of ‘Milsy’, a Year 12 student at St Andrew’s College.

Rosaria Marsh Y13

JENNA So, life in Australia, I go to boarding school, whereas life in New Zealand I have lived in a homestay family, which has been a lot different!

JESS And I know you have been to New Zealand a couple of times, how does this experience compare?

JENNA Yes definitely! It has been awesome and I rate it 110% out of 100.

JENNA Well, I just loved going to school here, it’s awesome.

ROSARIA MARSH (Y13)

Year 13 – the last year of high school! NCEA Level 3 is a huge step up from Levels 1 and 2. With internals in every subject, it is hard to balance school life with social life. Since I am a boarder I attend prep every night for two hours. This helps me complete my homework so I still get time to take part in other extracurricular activities, such as basketball. With the end of the year looming, I am starting to make decisions about university. Year 13 is an extremely busy and fun year, but I am looking forward to the future!

RNZ National: Ata mārie it’s 6.00am. Deo Gratias – Pat wife, kiss dog? Shower, cups (and saucers) two cups of tea. Don tweed, stride it out man, stride it out… never forget the brolly – always, always carry a brolly, essential in driving off dragons and goblins on the heroic quest. Into the dining room “Morning Jude.” a banana, through the door, cup of tea (the third). Read paper? No, a PE teacher will fill me in, reading age appropriate. Bell, Tutor Group. Notices: 1: Lost Smiggle pencil case. 2: Convoluted grammar hinting at a rugby meeting somewhere. 3: Request students to bring money for something (possibly rugby). Bell. P1 Terrorism. P2 Hurricanes. P3+4 World War II – have mercy! Feeling like the harbinger of doom. Lunch, plan weekend, plan other people’s weekends, plan anything but the next lesson. Bell. P5+6 Essay composition – student says, “Thanks for the help” aww. Bell. Consider walking dog… nap. Back for House Duty. 10.30 – lock up, off to Homefordshire and a welcome last cup of tea. Deo Gratias.

BOARDING REPORT MRS DIANNE MACDONALD, D I R E CTO R O F B O A R D I N G

MR BRENT CUMMACK PHYSICS TEACHER

3.00AM: Wide awake. Brain going flat out … thinking “I wonder what I can do to help my Year 12 Physics Class achieve at the end of the year… I know, a Physics Streak… Brilliant… Can’t wait for tomorrow… oh no… now I can’t get back to sleep.” 3.05AM: Sound asleep. 5.30AM: Alarm goes off “Don’t push sleep, don’t push sleep,” don’t, and up. Spend 45 minutes on cycle wind trainer. Imagine I am leading the Tour de France up a long climb in the Pyrenees. 6.30AM: Breakfast, make lunches, iron shirt, try to co-ordinate shirt and tie, fail more often than succeed. 7.25AM: Off to work hoping for a park in the staff carpark. Miss out again. Find one near Rangiora and walk to work. 8.15AM: First meeting. Neuroscientists say the brain only has five short-term memory slots. Mine full within 15 seconds so I have no idea what is talked about for the next 14½ minutes. 8.30AM: First class on electricity. Try to make topic interesting by electrocuting students… fail on both counts.

Boarding is at the heart of St Andrew’s College. There is a real sense of community built around long-lasting friendships, which have been created over the years.

9.30AM: Tutor Group: Yahoo its AC/DC Thunderstruck Thursday. Also find out that speakers in my room don’t play things very loud. “How can you play soft Acca Dacca?”

There are 170 Boarders at St Andrew’s College and their educational experience is enriched by being a boarder.

10.30AM: Morning Tea. Yahoo… sausage rolls… Today just got a whole lot better.

The house staff, who are constantly visible, available and approachable, with the support of day staff, can deliver a high level of Pastoral Care, as they are responsible for the welfare, personal and academic directions of every student in their care. Students are prepared to enjoy life and be of good influence after they leave school. Contrasts over the years include co-ed boarding, wonderful new boarding houses and facilities, and computerised leave systems. The catering crew is a top team who deliver and cater for all, and the food is exceptional. Gone are the long tables and ‘pig buckets’ for leftover food – replaced with round tables, tablecloths and flowers.

“We delight in the experiences when Old Cols attend reunions and share their stories of boarding school days. Every day is a gift when you are associated with boarders at StAC,” says Mrs Mac.

10.50AM: Year 12 class. Outline 3.00am plan. Greeted with some acceptance. Decide idea is still brilliant. 12.35PM: Yahoo lunchtime: even the leftovers from last night are looking good. 1.00PM: Duty: put resting grumpy face on and patrol the grounds. 2.20PM: Last class of the day. Decide electrocuting students is not good for career prospects so decide not to do this. End up burning myself on hot nail. Class thinks this was hilarious. Need new strategy for tomorrow. 3.20PM: End of school day. 3.30PM: Basketball practice.

A BLAST FROM THE PAST Quotes from past Thistledown Magazines C O L L AT E D B Y L I Z Z I E S T E V E N S O N

First Editorial

Editorial

Trials of an Exam Candidate

Dangerous Beasts

“What’s in a name? We hasten to assure our readers that we have not chosen the title of our magazine in a spirit of unspeakably Scottish exclusiveness, though, of course, we must be pardoned for making some concession to national bias in our selection of a name…”

“As in every other school activity, a vigorous spirit of co-operation is essential to success, and boys should realise that if the boat is to go, each must pull his own weight.”

“A number of us entered for examinations, and so for the last month or two we have been floundering out of our depth in the deep dark abyss of ‘swat’ in the distant hope of being in a fit condition to ‘make a decent hash of it,’ as one of our masters termed it.”

“The teacher had been telling the class about the rhinoceros family. “Now, name some things,” said she, “that are very dangerous to get near to and that have horns.” “Motor cars,” replied little Jimmy Jones promptly.”

– 1917 THISTLEDOWN –

– 1917 THISTLEDOWN –

(Things haven’t changed!)

– 1919 THISTLEDOWN –

(Very fitting in StAC’s Maadi Cup winning year!)

– 1919 THISTLEDOWN –

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THISTLEDOWN | CENTENARY EDITION | SEPTEMBER 2017

5.00PM: Home for tea. 7.30PM: Preparation for tomorrow. Better look at internal to make sure that it makes sense. 9.30PM: Need early night as am really enjoying book. 3.00AM: Wide awake. Think “Instead of trying to electrocute students why don’t I electrocute myself?”… Brilliant… Bother now I cannot get back to sleep.

THISTLEDOWN | CENTENARY EDITION | SEPTEMBER 2017

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Thistledown - Centenary edition!  
Thistledown - Centenary edition!  

100 years ago, in 1917, the students of St Andrew’s College distributed a newsletter: Thistledown – written by students, for students. The t...