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Curriculum 2021 Secondary School 1


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Curriculum 2021 TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Introduction

2

Heads of Department

3

The New Zealand Curriculum

4

In Addition to the Curriculum

4

Selecting your 2021 Options

8

How Parents can Help

9

St Andrew’s College Academic Curriculum Reference Chart 10 Middle School Curriculum

13

Year 9 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 15 Year 10 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects

27

The National Certificate of Educational Achievement

38

NCEA Quick Reference Guide

40

Year 11 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects

45

Senior College Curriculum

58

Year 12 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 59 Year 13 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects

77

NCEA – University Entrance Requirements

78

New Zealand Scholarship

78

NZQA Approved Subjects for University Entrance

79


Introduction This book is designed to help you plan your courses for next year and beyond. At St Andrew’s College we have a flexible curriculum and we try hard to cater for all types of course combinations, so that students can be confident about being able to study the type of course they wish, year by year. Your choice of course will largely dictate our options structure and you are asked to consider carefully and select from the courses open to you.

PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE We recommend you follow a broad course of study in your time at St Andrew’s. As you move through the College, you should also keep in mind the requirements for future study and careers so that you are making a connection between the ‘here and now’ and the future. This applies particularly to study in Years 12 and 13 and to those students planning to move on to study at tertiary level.

DECISION MAKING Students and parents should read this book and keep it for future reference. It is important to discuss option choices before making a final selection. Keep in mind the information and the advice provided here on courses and on making a good career choice. We work hard to provide a course of study that meets the needs of each and every student, and consultation and guidance are available.

CORE AND OPTION SUBJECTS All the courses are grouped according to year level. The course structure diagram at the beginning of each level indicates the core and the option courses at that level. Students and parents in Year 9 (2021) are asked to read the guidelines and requirements for subject selections very carefully. In Year 11, English, Science and Mathematics make up the compulsory core and you are also able to choose from a wide range of option subjects, many of which are also taught in Years 9 and/or 10. In Year 12, with the exception of English, you are largely free to choose the courses that you wish to take. The College does, however, recommend that in Years 11, 12 and 13 some students take certain courses which are considered to provide additional support to their learning. It is important that the programmes you choose are best suited to your academic ability and future plans.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS In Years 11, 12 and 13 class placement depends mainly on the choice of subjects and on students having met specific entry requirements. These entry requirements set a minimum level of performance on which a student is able to base sucessful study in a particular year and are designed to guide, not limit, students’ options. Where a particular requirement is stated, a student is expected to meet that in order for their selection to be approved. Please read these carefully.

CLASS SIZES AND SUBJECT SELECTION It is very important that the level of staffing we have matches the demand for subjects. Option subjects will operate only if they maintain a suitable class size. While we hope that it does not occur, it is possible that some students may not get all of their preferred options, and this is why you must provide more than the minimum number when making your selections. ‘Back-up’ subject selections must be provided.

DEADLINES All course selections are made online. Course selections must be made no later than Tuesday 8 September. Selections made after this date will likely mean that an alternative course will need to be chosen. The same will apply to any student who wishes to change options later on. Changes are possible only if the courses are not full and if the new choices fit the option lines. If a student changes their mind about options after the completion of the timetable, it may not be possible to accommodate those changes. If you require further help, you must contact the Dean and the Head of Department of the course in which you are interested. A staff list is detailed on the following page.

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Head of Teaching and Learning

Mr David Bevin

2021 Deans

Mrs Dayna Stirling Year 9 Dean

Mr Riley Gain Year 10 Dean

Ms Donna Jones Year 11 Dean

Ms Sarah Bishop Year 12 Dean

Miss Liz Gormack Year 13 Dean

Heads of Department AGRIBUSINESS AND AGRISCIENCE Mrs Natasha Cloughley

HISTORY AND CLASSICAL STUDIES Mr Hamish Faulls

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION Rev. Paul Morrow

ARTS Ms Mallory Swadel

LEARNING SUPPORT Mr Brett Clark

SCIENCE Mr Brent Cummack

ATHLETE SPORTS PROGRAMME Mr Riley Gain

MATHEMATICS Mr Mitch Howard

GEOGRAPHY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES Mr Kane Boulton

COMMERCE Mr Phil Temple

MEDIA STUDIES Miss Mia Silverman

COMPUTING Mr Phil Adams

MODERN LANGUAGES Mrs Bronwyn Radcliffe

DRAMA Mr Laurence Wiseman

MUSIC Mr Duncan Ferguson

ENGLISH Ms Jacqueline Gilbert

OUTDOOR EDUCATION Mr Peter Dawkings

ESOL Mrs Stephanie Brooks

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Mr Ben Eves

TECHNOLOGY Mrs Allyson Duncan VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING AND ACEE Ms Ellen Hampson TRAVEL AND TOURISM Mr Ian Morrison

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The New Zealand Curriculum

In Addition to the Curriculum

The New Zealand Curriculum states that ‘all students, regardless of where they are situated, should experience rich and balanced education that embraces the intent of the National Curriculum’. The St Andrew’s College curriculum, ‘broad and balanced’, is based on the vision and requirements of the Curriculum. We interpret that vision in our aspiration that ‘St Andrew’s College students will be active participants in a dynamic community of learners and inspired to become valued citizens and enthusiastic learners for life. St Andrew’s will nurture the development of talent and creative ability through a balanced exposure to academic, cultural, service, social, spiritual and sporting opportunities.’

Education Outside the Classroom The College has a staff of professional instructors who operate our Outdoor Education programme at Castle Hill.

The New Zealand Curriculum outlines what is considered to be important in education and envisions young people who are lifelong learners, confident and creative, connected and actively involved. The five Key Competencies of thinking, using language, symbols and texts, managing self, relating to others, and participating and contributing are ‘key aspects’ in learning and living and our students learn to develop them as an integral part of their learning. The New Zealand Curriculum has clear principles on which to base all curriculum decision making. At the heart of St Andrew’s College teaching and learning lie these principles of high expectations, the Treaty of Waitangi, cultural diversity, inclusion, learning to learn, community engagement and involvement, coherence and a future focus. In addition, we cherish and promote our Scottish and Presbyterian heritage which has done so much to make us the College that we are today and will be in the future. In their planning, teachers create programmes of learning that are based on the ‘bigger picture’ aspects of the Curriculum, as well as on the detail from the eight Learning Area Statements, each of which provides a rationale, a broad focus and key emphases for learning. Teachers develop those into coherent and effective programmes that are experienced by students on a day-to-day basis through a whole range of learning activities. Teachers plan for, reflect and seek to improve on those ways which are deemed to be effective in promoting students’ learning. Our teachers engage in a process of ongoing inquiry and try to make learning a stimulating and challenging experience, so that we work towards the achievement of our vision that we share with the curriculum of students who have a lifelong desire to learn.

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There is a wide variety of activities available and these are programmed to suit each group. Weather, individual needs and group enthusiasm and abilities are all taken into consideration when programmes are planned. Students are encouraged to take part in all activities. The learning outcomes of this involvement are the development of self-esteem, teamwork, co-operation and communication. Students have fun while acquiring skills and experience in the outdoors. Year 9 This programme is held at Castle Hill in Term 1. Activities include rafting, bushcraft, rock climbing, bouldering, abseiling and the flying fox, along with an array of individual and team challenges, with a two-night overnight camp, one in the bush and one under the rock overhangs. Year 10 Snow caving and skiing are the central activities in this winter programme. Activities build on the base established in Year 9, and involve abseiling and team challenges. Students go to Castle Hill again in Term 4 to complete their Duke of Edinburgh's Hillary Award Bronze expedition. Years 12 and 13 Students doing Transition Studies have the opportunity to plan and complete expeditions in sea kayaking, mountain biking, mountaineering and tramping, which helps to develop planning and leadership skills. Supporting Curriculum The team in the Learning Support and Precision Teaching Department assist students to reach their academic potential by supporting them with any learning difficulties they face. We work closely with parents, Deans and subject teachers to identify and assess students with learning difficulties and provide the appropriate support. We refer students to outside agencies for specialist educational diagnosis and assessment of dyslexia and other learning difficulties, in order to identify the most appropriate learning support. We also help with applications to NZQA for special assessment conditions if eligibility criteria are met. The Accelerated Learning Programme In Years 9 and 10, students who have learning delays need to have their learning accelerated or else they will fall further and further behind their peers. (Google ‘The Matthew Effect’.) We are said to have accelerated a student’s learning when that student


makes more than one year’s progress in one year. In Years 9 and 10 we run Accelerated Learning classes in Mathematics and English using Direct Instruction and Precision Teaching. The goal is to accelerate the learning of these students so that they can take on the challenge of NCEA Level 1 in Year 11, needing as little learning support as possible. The Response to Inter vention Programme Learning Support also assists teachers to help students who need extra learning support in their classes. Teachers identify the students who need extra help and Learning Support provides the teachers with interventions which can be used to assist these students. The students’ responses to the intervention determine what future help is required. A Structured Literacy Programme At Years 9 and 10 we run special Literacy classes during the Options programme. The Literacy classes focus on developing students’ vocabulary, decoding fluency, reading fluency, and comprehension skills. In Years 11–13 we run study groups for selected students during their study periods and co-ordinate individual tutoring with teacher aides on a ‘user pays’ basis. After school on a Tuesday and Thursday we provide free tuition for students who need extra assistance in Mathematics and English. Finally, we organise the Special Assessment Conditions (SACs) for students who qualify for these conditions.

St Andrew’s College Ballet Company Dancers in Years 12–13 can enjoy the experience of a Ballet Company. Following on from our Year 11 Ballet and Dance Studies programme, this co-curricular subject (four+ hours/week, outside of academic classes) continues with balletic technique, performance training and productions, specialist guest tutors, and NCEA Dance credits (across the dance genres) each year. Dancers may also take the highest pre-professional examination of Solo Performance Diploma and it is also possible to gain University Entrance in NCEA Dance over the two–year period in the Company. Year 13 dancers, having completed the five–year Ballet Academy course (if commencing in Year 9), graduate with our St Andrew’s College Ballet Academy Diploma (those with fewer years due to commencing later, may apply for cross-credits from prior study, or alternatively gain the Ballet Academy Certificate). Experienced dancers, new to the programme, are very welcome to apply to join the Company. Prerequiste: New students, suitable ballet background and a short audition with Artistic Director, Dr Cairns. Current Year 11 student, recent Year 11 examination results at Commended or above, or by Head of Department discretion. NCEA Dance: 5–6 internals (22–24 credits) across the two years. Course endorsement is not available as there are no external credits. Course costs: $400 per term (includes in-class guest tutors, repertoire half tutu/character skirt use, and other incidentals). Additional costs: Examination fees, costume hires and optional classes. 5


ACADEMIC EXTENSION AND ENRICHMENT (ACEE) In the Secondary School the Years 9 and 10 ACEE programmes operate as an option subject and students who are identified as academically gifted and/or talented are formally invited into the programme. Although there is no timetabled ACEE class in Years 11–13, students are monitored and provided opportunities to deepen their learning and experiences. Overarching Statement The ACEE programme acknowledges both performance and potential, and recognises that a student’s gifts and talents will emerge at times and in circumstances which are unique to that student. ACEE Programme Vision: ACEE students contributing to the creation of a future New Zealand where extraordinary minds do extraordinary things. Key Themes, Units and Learning Aspects Year 9 students work with a specialist teacher. This programme includes learning units based on philosophy, anthropology, coding and electronics, neuroscience, political science, sustainability, robotics, physics, and astrophysics. Students complete an individual ‘impact project’ over two terms. Year 10 students also work with a specialist teacher and enjoy a deeper exploration into areas such as philosophy, neuroscience, sustainability, political science, coding and electronics. Students typically complete a group impact project. Both Year 9–10 ACEE programmes offer the opportunity for students to present their individual and group projects to parents and teachers at a showcase expo during the year. Year 9–10 ACEE students also have the opportunity to prepare for Brain Bee, a neuroscience competition for Year 11 students, participate in the Model United Nations Conference (MUNA), the Model European Union Conference, compete in the World Scholars Cup, compete in the Ethics Olympiad, attend the two philosophy conferences each year and contribute to the online Diplomacy Competition. In addition, St Andrew’s College also offers Chess, Debating, Future Problem Solving, and a writing masterclass as co-curricular activities for students who are academically gifted and talented. From Year 11, there are opportunities to continue with philosophy, the Australasian Brain Bee Competition (neuroscience-based), Model United Nations, Model European Union and Senior Future Problem Solving. Gifted and talented senior students also have the opportunity for extension, enrichment and acceleration within specific learning areas, such as English, Mathematics and Science. Higher level extension can be gained from enrolment in University of Canterbury STAR Programmes in Years 12–13.

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Course Costs There is a cost for most of the extra-curricular activities and events such as Future Problem Solving tutoring, conferences and participation in events such as Brain Bee. There can also be individual costs for expert tutoring in coding and electronics to support the development of impact projects. For further information please contact ACEE Co-ordinator, Ms Hampson on EHA@stac.school.nz.

SPEECH AND DRAMA There are two speech and drama tutors working in the College. They teach a range of skills including speech, drama, public speaking, musical theatre and performance skills. Students can have individual lessons or come in pairs or threes, depending on requirements. Lessons are organised at a time to suit the student and class teachers. Students can sit Speech New Zealand or Trinity Guildhall examinations and a number also enter the Christchurch Speech and Drama competitions. Students also come just for confidence and enjoyment. Enrolment forms are available online at stac.nz/SpeechAndDrama.


INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL TUITION The Music Department runs an extensive programme of instrumental and vocal tuition. Twenty-two tutors come into the College each week, some of them across two or three different days. For private lessons in the music suite studios, tutors charge $30.00–$35.00 per half hour lesson. Approximately 30–33 lessons are taken during the course of the academic year in school time, mostly in the morning and early afternoon, dependent on student and tutor timetables. A number of lessons are also taken after school, especially guitar and drums, however, this is again subject to tutor availability. Lessons are able to be rotated, or lesson times changed each term, to ensure students do not miss out on the same subject area each week. Feedback on student progress is provided in a weekly music diary. Theory and ear training lessons are also available. The

College has a supply of instruments for hire at between $70.00 per term (prices may be subject to change). Instrument hire is disbursed at the start of each semester. For further details on our itinerant music programme and for information about the variety of co-curricular performing groups available, please contact Cultural Co-ordinator, Ms Thorner on GTH@stac.school.nz or Head of Music, Mr Ferguson on DFE@stac.school.nz. A department information booklet which includes an online application form is available upon request. Information Booklet: stac.nz/MusicHandbook Online Application: stac.nz/InstrumentTuition

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Selecting your 2021 Options All 2021 Course Selection forms must be completed online by Tuesday 8 September 2020.

GUIDELINES FOR OPTION CHANGES Students may re-enter their choices as many times as they wish, online, as only the final submission will be taken after the Tuesday 8 September deadline has passed. Students must choose carefully as it is not possible to amend subject choices after the final submission date. Student selections are submitted to Heads of Department for approval, based on each student’s eligibility and/or academic suitability for a particular course (see ‘Years 11–13 Subject Entry Requirements for 2021’ on page 40). If students are not able to take a course that they have indicated a preference for they will be notified of this in writing. If there is a clash of option choices, which can only be resolved by a change to a course, Deans will work with the student to make an alternative selection. Students will receive a confirmation of their subjects for 2021. Should students wish to make any changes they will only be able to do this by attending the Course Change Day on Monday 30 November. We will be unable to process requests made before or after this date. For a subject change to occur it is necessary that: • there is a written request from parents to the Head of Middle School or Head of Senior College outlining the reason and giving their approval; 8

• the student meet with their Dean to present their reason for a course change • the Head of Department/Teacher in Charge of both the subject dropped and the proposed subject are in agreement; • any class limit of students, which has been set, is not exceeded. Due to the number of essential steps in this process, it is not possible to consider a subject change request via email when school is closed for the summer holiday break. As a consequence, students who wish to request a change, based on NCEA examination results, will need to attend Course Confirmation Day, in person, on Friday 22 January 2021. On both course change days all of the necessary staff will be available to ensure that all steps in the process can be completed quickly and with ease. Along with all Deans and Heads of Department/Teachers in Charge being present, Mr Webster, Careers Advisor, will be available to provide information on future pathways and make recommendations on subject requirements for tertiary courses and career paths. Our Timetable staff will also be on hand to check whether subject changes are possible and to monitor class sizes. All option changes must be made by Friday 12 February 2021. After this final date, changes will not be allowed unless there are exceptional circumstances and any proposed changes will be subject to approval from the Head of the Secondary School, Mr van Florenstein.


CAREERS EDUCATION ON OUR CAREERS WEBSITE One of the most useful guides for helping make informed subject selections can be found on our Careers website: stac.nz/careers

How Parents can Help Here are some ideas to help parents give useful advice and guidance: • check out the information on the StAC Careers website – ‘Helpful Information’ – ‘How to choose subjects for next year’; • ask your son/daughter questions which will help them look at themselves. Focus on their interests, things they are good at, and their personal values about work; • if your son/daughter doesn’t know what career they want, ask them to define broad areas of interest, such as helping people or scientific work. Then encourage them to investigate lots of options within each field. Pursuing work or study in an area of interest is vital for sustaining satisfaction and getting through the tough times;

CAREER EDUCATION LINKS The link below provides tips and advice on how to choose subjects for next year. The information is regulary updated and includes links to reccomendations by the tertiary providers. This gives an informative way of future proofing yourselve in terms of keeping your options open. stac.nz/how-to-choose

• discuss what your son/daughter needs or wants most from their career. Attitudes to the need for money, security or self-development vary from person to person; • try not to impose your ideas, but help by using questions which will clarify the issues – for example, “This job doesn’t have much physical activity in it and you’ve said that’s important to you. How much will that matter?” • point your son/daughter towards sources of information about careers and let them follow it up. Encourage them to see their Careers Advisor, use careersnz (www.careers.govt.nz) and/or visit the Careers Centre; • prior to dropping Science or Mathematics in the senior year levels consider the implications, if any, that this may have on entry into further study; • ask about the Career Education Programme at the College and urge your son/daughter to take part in work exploration or any tertiary visits which are available. These give an opportunity to find out what a job or training course is really like;

CAREER EDUCATION EVENTS IN TERM 3 Careers Expo (parents and students) Wednesday 29 July, 5.00pm–8.30pm. Senior College Senior Pathways Seminar (parents)

• encourage your son/daughter in any activity that develops skills. Many of the important transferable skills which employers look for are developed at school through the general curriculum. Skills are also gathered from part-time or holiday jobs and from leisure or sporting activities. In the workforce, what a person can do is often more important than the knowledge they hold; • discuss subject choice with your son/daughter each year. Which subjects will best suit their plans for the future? • do you agree with their reasoning?

Thursday 13 August (overlapping with parent teacher interviews) 6.00pm–6.45pm. Centennial Chapel

• if you have concerns, sit down with the teacher, Careers Advisor or other staff. Find out what they think; does the College know something you don’t? Do you know something the College doesn’t?

Course Selection Afternoon (parents and students)

• encourage them to see their Careers Advisor, use the StAC Careers website and/or visit the Careers Centre.

Friday 21 August, 3.45pm–5.00pm. Gym 1

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St Andrew’s College Academic Curriculum Reference Chart Compulsor y Subjects and Options for Years 9–13

AGRISCIENCE

9

10

11

12

13

MATHEMATICS

9

10

Mathematics

C

C

Mathematics Applied

Mathematics General

Agribusiness Agriscience

Agristudies

11

12

C

Mathematics with Calculus

ART

9

10

11

Art

12

13

 C

Mathematics and Statistics

Statistics

Art: Design

Art: Painting

PERFORMANCE ARTS

9

10

11

12

13

Art: Photography

Drama

Media

 

CL A SSICS AND HISTORY

9

10

11

Classical Studies Classical Studies and History History

COMMERCE

9

13

Media Studies

Media Production

10

Media Broadcast Production 

Music

11

12

13

PHYSICAL EDUCATION HE ALTH/NCE A

Business Management Economic Studies

12

Accounting

 C

9

10

11

12

13

Health Education Physical Education and Health

Economics

C C

C

Physical Education (NCEA)

ENGLISH

9

10

English

C

C

11

12

13

C

C

C

English Literature

 

C

C

C

Physical Education and Leadership

(NCEA)

SCIENCE

9

10

Biology

L ANGUAGES

9

10

11

12

13

Chemistry

French

Physical Science

Japanese

Physics

Spanish

Te Reo Māori

Tikanga Māori

C

Choice available at this level

Compulsory Subject

C

C

Physical Education and Health (NCEA)

10

13

11

12

13

Practical Science

C

Science

C

C

C

SOCIAL STUDIES AND GEOGR APHY

9

10

11

12

13

Geography

Social Studies

C

C

 


TECHNOLOGY

9

10

11

12

13

STUDENTS ARE SELECTED

9

10

Design and Visual Communication

ACEE

Digital Literacy

C

Athlete Sports Development

Digital Technology

Food and Nutrition

Athlete Sports Performance

Ballet and Dance Studies

Materials Technology

ESOL

Textile Technology

Literacy

English Extension

9

10

Religious Education

C

C

Te Waka Travel and Tourism

11

13

C C

13

Mathematics Extension

C

C

Mathematics with Calculus Extension

Mathematics Algebra Focus

12

C

12

C

Food Technology

OTHER

11

C

 

Physics and Chemistry Extension Vocational Education and Training

 

11


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Middle School Curriculum

The major aims for learning in the Middle School are: • to give students a sound grounding in the core subjects; • to give students the opportunity to explore and experience a wide range of other curriculum areas with specialist teachers; • to give students a sound preparation in the subjects they are studying for external awards and qualifications.

Ways to help you learn – be sure to: 1. Set yourself both short-term and long-term goals. A Year 11 student might set NCEA Level 1 as a long-term goal and making the First XI as a short-term goal. 2. Each week, plan your time after school so that all aspects such as homework, sports and social life can be fitted in. Make sure you prioritise so that the important things get done. 3. Take good notes in class and try to personalise them.

Years 9 and 10 The curriculum is structured so that students experience a wide range of subjects, core and options, through a wide range of learning situations and experiences over these two years. It is important that students do not specialise in particular subject areas at this level. Gaining a broad experience is one of our key principles.

Year 11 While this year is the first year of study for external qualifications for most students, courses at this level should also be broad‑based so that students have a number of different options in the future. Students will start to specialise more in Year 12 and this will be continued with greater depth in final year studies.

4. Participate in each lesson. 5. Keep up with your homework. If there are any concerns, seek help from your teacher or other support people such as fellow students, your tutor or the Dean. Use your homework time to review what you have been studying – this is a particularly good thing to do in those times when you don’t actually have any homework. 6. Have a wall planner at home and enter all dates for assessments, tests and projects for each term. Take internal assessment seriously. Internal assessment is the ‘real thing’. It provides results which stay on your Record of Achievement. Make sure you know precisely what is required for an assessment and, if possible, practise using exemplars from the NZQA website. 7. Make sure you have written down all key dates, homework and other events in a diary. 8. Know what is required to gain an NCEA Level qualification.

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Year 9 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 28 Lessons per week

Compulsory Core Subjects

Option Subjects

All students must study these subjects:

Select six subjects, two of them being back-up subjects, each being three lessons per week:

Compul sor y Core Subjects

Lessons per week

Agriscience

9AGSC

9DLIT

1

Art

9ARTA

English

9ENGL

4

Design and Visual Communication  

9DEST

Mathematics

9MATH

4

Digital Technology  

9INTE

Music  

9MUSC

1

Physical Education  and Health

9PHEC

Religious Education  

9RLED

1

9SCIE

4

Social Studies  

9SOST

3

History

9HIST

Tikanga Māori  

9TIKA

1

Japanese *** 

9JAPA

Digital Literacy  

Science

3

Drama ** 

9DRAM

Economic Studies  

9ECON

Food Technology  

9FOTE

French ***

9FREN

Geography

9GEOG

Materials Technology  

9MTEC

Academic Extension and Enrichment (ACEE)

Media ** 

Students are selected into this one semester programme. Involvement in this class counts as one of a student’s option selections.

Music

9MUSP

Te Reo Māori * 

9MAOR

Textile Technology 

9MED

9CLTX

Semester Courses Semester courses run for approximately four and a half months each.

By Application ACEE  

9ACEE

Athlete Sports Development

9ATHD

Selecting your Options for Year 9

Ballet and Dance Studies***

9BALL

Select six subjects with two of them being back-up subjects.

ESOL  

9ENSL

Each course = approximately 50 lessons.

The selection of a language (French, Japanese) or Ballet and Dance Studies equates to two of your subject options because they are full year courses, that is, they run in both Semester 1 and Semester 2.

Literacy  

9LITE

* May be studied for a full year (counts as two options) or a semester (counts as one option). ** Can study only one of these in the year. *** Counts as two options and requires a full year of study.

If studied for a full year, Te Reo Māori equates to two of your subject options. If studied for one semester it is one of your options.

Please note, once subject selections are made, it is very difficult to make changes thereafter. Please select carefully. 15


YEAR 9

ACADEMIC CURRICULUM CORE AND OPTIONS 28 Lessons per week

CORE SUBJECTS DIGITAL LITERACY (9DLIT) This is a short compulsory course which aims to develop an ability to effectively use a computer and create digital outcomes. It consists of two aspects: the ability to use the computer hardware as well as understand how computers work. In one part of the course the students will develop knowledge and skills about managing programmes e.g. OneNote within the St Andrew’s College environment. They will explore the concept of digital citizenship. In the other part of the course, students will develop skills in computational thinking and developing digital outcomes. This will include decomposing problems to create simple algorithms using three building blocks of programming: sequence, selection and iteration. Students will have an opportunity to design and produce quality, fit-for-purpose digital outcomes. Students interested in extending their knowledge and skills in digital technology are encouraged to also take the Digital Technology option. For further information, see Mrs Duncan.

ENGLISH (9ENGL) The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. This programme enables students to develop the skills needed to understand, use and create oral, visual and written texts. Through engaging with a range of texts, students will become increasingly skilled and sophisticated speakers and listeners, writers and readers, presenters and viewers.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ONLINE OPTION SELECTIONS, VISIT: stac.nz/options

Year 9 English provides students with opportunities to engage with and develop the key skills and competencies of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Levels 4 to 5) in diverse contexts. In doing so, students will gain a better understanding of language, literature, and the world around them.

Course costs: $20.00* Education Perfect subscription * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Gilbert or Ms Ruwhiu. Option Selections will open from 3.00pm on Friday 21 August 2020 Once open, you will receive an email with a link to make your online Option Selections. Option Selections will close at 9.00am on Tuesday 8 September 2020 16


MATHEMATICS (9MATH) Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. The course covers achievement objectives from Levels 4 and 5 of the Mathematics strands of the New Zealand Curriculum. All classes follow the core Curriculum objectives and students also work at their individual level (Levels 3 to 5). Middle band classes have an additional teacher for one or two periods a week to support individual and small-group needs. The top band classes are streamed into three smaller groups to cater for the lateral extension built into the programme.

Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required, subscription to Education Perfect and an online textbook. For further information, see Mr Howard.

MUSIC (9MUSC) Exploration of sounds and technologies for creating, interpreting and representing music ideas. This course, taken by all Year 9 students for one lesson per week, covers the following areas:

This course fosters critical thinking and action and enables students to understand the role and significance of physical activity for individuals and society. The course is assessed through practical performance, reflective logs and end of unit assessments. The physical education learning areas are: • Part of the team – developing self-management skills that enable students to work together with peers in different roles, and develop positive interpersonal skills so that students can successfully participate in a variety of team games and activities; • Fitness for fun – investigating components of fitness and methods of training in a range of fitness-based games and activities; • Sociology of sport – investigating the way in which society influences our perceptions and participation in physical activity e.g. The Olympic Games; • Physical literacy – acquire skills, develop techniques and game tactics in a range of physical contexts such as volleyball, badminton, hockey and football; • Safety and risk management – identifying and managing risks in a range of physical activity contexts; • Putting it all together – taking charge and extending your learning in Physical Education. This is student driven and combines all of the previous units through competitive class/ interclass games based on a Sports Education model. The health learning areas are:

• singing – the development of strong communal singing, both for chapel and assembly hymns and for recreational singing; • piano and guitar – students at all levels of development can be catered for in this environment, through group lessons on keyboards and guitars with specialist tutors; • technology – students learn how to compose and record MIDI and audio; • performance – students will engage in full class, group and individual performance on a variety of instruments; • general musical knowledge – this includes such topics as the nature of sound and the ways it is generated. Terms such as pitch, dynamics and timbre are explored. Programme music, music in movies, modern music and the instruments of the orchestra are also covered; • composition – students are taught to compose basic melodies for instruments and to create computer music compositions using Soundtrap (www.soundtrap.com).

• This is me – understanding and applying the concepts of well-being, Hauora, PERMA-V, character strengths, virtues and values; • Developing strategies – to develop and maintain friendships, the influence of social media on well-being and anti-bullying strategies; • Changes in me – sexuality education including, puberty, body image, informed decision making, relationships, contraception and that influence that these factors have on well-being.

For further information, see Mr Ferguson.

A study of the background, scriptures, themes, key events and key people which have been influential in the development of the Christian religion.

For further information, see Ms Register.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (9RLED)

Topics for study are:

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH (9PHEC) The well-being of students, other people and society through learning in movement and health-related contexts. Physical Education and Health is all about the students. The focus is on their well-being (Hauora), the way that they learn to move, how they develop relationships in teams and groups and how physical activity and health is influenced by different aspects of society.

• • • •

the big story: Introduction to the Bible; the case of the vanishing corpse (Jesus Resurrection); good and evil; the roots of Christmas.

For further information, see Rev. Morrow.

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Year 9 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

SCIENCE (9SCIE) Investigating, understanding and explaining our natural, physical world and the wider universe. Science involves generating and testing ideas, gathering evidence – including by making observations, carrying out investigations and modelling, and communicating and debating with others, in order to develop scientific knowledge, understanding, and explanations. The course begins with an introduction to the equipment and methods of Science, including working safely in the laboratory and follows the learning strands of Living World, Material World, Physical World and ‘Planet Earth and Beyond’. The interrelationship of living things in communities, the biology of life at the level of cells, and the way living things reproduce make up the living world segment. The material world is studied through the theme of interactions including atoms, molecules, the periodic table, mixtures and compounds, and the reactions of substances. The physical world is considered through the role of energy as an overarching theme in most units, and in the study of the nature of light. The ‘Planet Earth and Beyond’ section studies Astronomy. An emphasis of this course is on Science skills and the skills of experimental planning, collection of data and the interpretation of results through all topics. There will be an emphasis on SOLO taxonomy to deepen students’ thinking skills.

Course costs: Entry to the Australasian Science examination, purchase of a write-on workbook and a $20.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Hamburg.

SOCIAL STUDIES (9SOST) How people participate and take action in society in the past and in the present. The Social Studies course focuses on how societies work and how people can participate as critical, active, informed and responsible citizens. Contexts are drawn from the past, present and future, and from places within and beyond New Zealand. Students will be given the opportunity to collaborate, inquire and be creative in their thinking. Students will investigate a range of topics. These will include: • gamechangers – an examination of key events and people both internationally and within New Zealand. Students understand that events have causes and consequences;

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• rich world poor world – an examination of the different levels of global development. Students understand the reasons for disparities in economic development and consider strategies to reduce inequalities; • government – an examination of different systems of government around the world. Students learn to compare and contrast New Zealand’s system of government with others around the world; • sustainable use of resources – an examination of global resource use. Students learn how and why resources should be used in a sustainable way. Throughout the year, emphasis will be placed on developing the skills that students will need when they take Social Science subjects at NCEA level. These include paragraph writing skills, information literacy strategies needed for effective research, comprehension, inquiry, group work, critical thinking, social decision making, understanding different perspectives, mapping and graphing skills. An examination of current events and issues forms an integral part of the course. For further information, see Mrs Roest.

TIKANGA MĀORI (MĀORI CULTURE) (9TIKA) All Year 9 students take this course for one lesson per week. The course will expose students to a wide range of aspects of Māori culture. Students will learn basic Te Reo Māori, Tikanga (culture), myths and legends, Māori history, Toi Māori (Māori art), Māori games and waiata. There is the also the opportunity for students to join the Māori and Pasifika group, which is open to all students, and operates outside this course. For further information, see Mr Westrupp.


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Year 9 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

OPTION SUBJECTS

DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION (9DEST) Developing drawing skills within a design context.

AGRISCIENCE (9AGSC) Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. The purpose of this course is to provide students, both urban and rural, with an introduction to the New Zealand primary industries with a focus on agriculture. Agriscience is an excellent option for students who are interested in animals, farm life and Science. There is an emphasis on project based inquiry learning, allowing students to explore areas of interest. Dairy, sheep and beef farming are covered in detail. There will be the opportunity to discover the many different careers available in the agriculture industry, from on-farm practical jobs to science-based endeavours. Students will be given the opportunity to conduct their own farm management simulation, looking at financial and production impacts. Topics studied are: • introduction to New Zealand’s primary industries; • animal breeds and uses; • agritech;

Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is an area of learning within the New Zealand Curriculum, where students learn about design, develop their practice of designing, and develop their design thinking in specific contexts. The students develop an awareness of design by using visual communication skills to conceptualise and develop design ideas. They apply their visual literacy through using sketching, digital modes and other modelling techniques to effectively communicate and present design ideas. Students learn that designers identify the qualities and potential of design ideas in terms of the broad principles of design (aesthetics and function) and of sustainability. Working towards achieving high standards of presentation is expected. Assessment is based on course work looking at Design Heritage, Design Thinking and Visual Communication.

Course costs: A list of required stationery is provided and the items on this list should be purchased prior to starting the course. Items of a consumable or specialised nature are carried by the department and the costs for these can be disbursed to student accounts. For further information, see Mr Kerrison.

• farm management.

Course costs: $40.00* approximately for one field trip. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

ART (9ARTA) Skills and vocabulary relevant to the Visual Arts. Students will learn and use vocabulary relevant to the Visual Arts and broaden their understanding by studying work by international and New Zealand artists. Through a series of varied and stimulating exercises, students are introduced to different art making techniques. Practical class work includes Drawing, Painting, Printmaking (etching, woodcut) and 3D modelling. The course provides an essential foundation for further study of the Visual Arts in Year 10 and beyond.

Course costs: $65.00* for materials. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Swadel.

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DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY (9INTE) Develop basic skills and understanding in a digital environment. An introduction to Digital Technology for students with a passion for Technology, built around project-based learning and design thinking. Working in design teams, students will develop solutions to identified issues. Through this process they will have the opportunity to experiment with new technologies and develop a solution-based mindset. There will also be a focus on the collaborative skills often sought after in today’s economic world. Emphasis for this course will be: • solution-based learning; • a structured coding programme; • a design focused project which will involve creating an outcome to meet a need. Tools and skills will be project dependent but may include App Lab or App Inventor. This course will be a good introduction for students interested in or curious about, a pathway into NCEA Digital Technology.


Course costs: Most software used is open source. There will be a small charge for licensing costs. Additional costs may be incurred for competition fees (optional). For further information, contact Mr Adams or Ms Lee.

DRAMA (9DRAM) Exploration of the foundation skills of Drama. Drama prepares students for life beyond the College by building confident communication skills, skills in reading body language and subtext, in working collaboratively, in thinking analytically, creatively, and independently. The course aims to provide students with a depth and breadth of experience to take in future pathways. This course provides students with a variety of drama experiences and encourages them to explore their creativity by selecting and refining ideas to achieve performance goals. Students experiment with the use of drama techniques of voice, body, movement and space in both scripted and devised drama. Students are introduced to drama elements, conventions, and technologies, and learn how these aspects combine to convey meaning. They work individually and collectively in their analysis and creation of drama, supporting each other’s learning with peer feedback and feed forward. They learn the foundation skills to give them a head start if taking NCEA Drama in Year 11. Students are encouraged to audition for the Years 9–10 productions.

Some of the units of work studied are the relationship between wants and scarce resources, the development of money, cash and credit buying, income, budgeting, consumer protection, saving and marketing. For further information, see Mr Temple.

FOOD TECHNOLOGY (9FOTE) Develop skills and knowledge related to snack choices. The focus in this course is on exploring foods marketed to teenagers. The students will use the technological process to plan, design and prepare a range of foods with a focus on snack foods and calcium rich foods. This will include exploring snack foods and calcium rich foods already available. As part of this work students will develop an understanding of the main food groups and the need to eat a variety of foods and the importance of calcium in a teenager’s diet. Students will develop food preparation skills to trial, test and evaluate a range of snack and dairy products. They will design and create their own products to meet given design briefs. This will include using stakeholder feedback to improve their outcome. Students will consider how these foods are marketed. They will create a food label to promote their own product.

Course costs: Food costs and some photocopy costs will be disbursed.

For further information, see Mr Wiseman.

ECONOMIC STUDIES (9ECON) A study of money, its purpose, uses and impact in the world of consumers. The main objective of this course is to foster an interest in, and give a basic understanding of, today’s world of commerce and economics, particularly as it applies to consumers. The emphasis is on individual students and their immediate groupings such as family and whānau. A simplified approach is adopted in which the emphasis is not on detail and theory but on life/living skills, such as managing personal limited means, being able to make informed choices, and being aware of differing values and the opportunity cost of such decisions.

For further information, see Mrs Duncan.

FRENCH (9FREN) (Full year, double semester, counts as two options)

Understanding and using familiar expressions and everyday vocabulary in simple contexts. Spoken by 275 million people in 56 countries worldwide, French is one of the official languages of the United Nations and the International Olympics Committee. In Year 9 French students study topics such as introductions/greetings, descriptions, school, likes/dislikes, home and family, time, leisure activities, and aspects of French culture. The four skill areas of listening, reading, writing and speaking are all emphasised. Using fun activities, students are encouraged to speak individually, in pairs and in group role-play situations as the speaking skill is critical in early learning of a second language. Students establish a good basic vocabulary and learn some of the basics of French grammar. 21


Year 9 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

An online textbook is used which enables students to readily access the textbook at home and catch up on any missed work. Regular use is also made of suitable websites, where students reinforce their learning in class at their own pace and in a fun way. The websites Linguascope and Education Perfect are also used to enable students to learn French interactively online. Cultural elements and aspects of typical French life are integrated into our learning over the course of the year in order to allow students to deepen their understanding of another culture.

HISTORY (9HIST)

Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect and online textbook subscription.

Students will gain knowledge, skills and experience to understand the causes and consequences of past events which are of significance to New Zealanders, and that shape the lives of people and society.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

A study of people, places, and change over time. This course is designed to introduce students to history by studying some of the places, people, events, and changes that have shaped the world we live in today. It encourages students to ask questions about the past, make good decisions about people and events, and to look carefully at clues from the past so that they can decide for themselves what really happened and why.

For further information, see Mrs Radcliffe or Mrs Marshall. Topics covered will include:

GEOGRAPHY (9GEOG) The study of how people and the environment interact. This course is designed to introduce students to Geography by having them study a broad range of local, national and global topics. The course encourages students to think critically about the world in which they live, and to understand the responsibility they have in relation to other people, the environment, and the long term sustainability of the planet.

• • • • •

Ancient civilisations and mythology; Parihaka; Hiroshima (WWII); History skills; Siege of Masada;

• Rwandan genocide. For further information, see Mr Faulls.

From this course students will develop an understanding of:

JAPANESE (9JAPA)

• physical geography – aspects of the natural world with a selection of landscape studies; • human geography – the relationship between people and the environment through using international, national and local examples; • the application of a range of geographic skills and ideas; • geographic skills; map interpretation, Google Earth investigations, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

(Full year, double semester, counts as two options)

Potential case study topics that may be covered, depending on student interests: • • • • •

how wolves change rivers: ecosystem investigations; the global distribution of coral reefs and deserts; water wars 'happy' cities of the future: Urban Planning; development studies: Mozambique.

For further information, see Mr Boulton.

Understanding and using familiar expressions and everyday vocabulary in simple contexts. Japanese is spoken by over 127 million people. Japan is New Zealand’s fourth most important trading partner and every year increasing numbers of Japanese tourists visit here. During this year-long course students are introduced to the Japanese language, culture and the hiragana writing system, and gain an understanding of how the Japanese language and culture are closely intertwined. Students learn how to give their self-introduction and talk about themselves, their family, and learn the numbers. As the year progresses, students expand their language knowledge through three main topics: the classroom, shopping and saying where things are, from which they learn relevant expressions, vocabulary and grammatical patterns. Throughout the year students are encouraged to use and apply the language as often as possible through a variety of speaking, listening, writing and reading tasks. Students learn to write and recognise the hiragana symbols and the kanji characters for the numbers. Interactive websites, the Education Perfect programme and OneNote exercises are used to reinforce their learning of the script, vocabulary and aural skills.

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Course costs: $30.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

30 to 45-minute live show, under real studio conditions. The show may include a variety of music and dance, as well as interviewing and presenting.

For further information, see Mrs Simcock. This course would suit students who have an interest in all things media and want to know more about how media products are planned and produced, from writing, directing, and performing, to technical operations.

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY (9MTEC) Within the context of Hard Materials Technology students develop skills and knowledge to manage resources to produce a designed outcome. Students gain knowledge of a range of materials and processes through a ‘design and make’ programme. They will have an opportunity to produce individualised projects.

We encourage all Media students to join our after school Television and Film Academy, where students can gain even more experience and develop their production skills in preparation for our Year 10 and senior Media Studies courses. For further information, see Miss Silverman.

They gain: • experience in various forms of graphic communication; • knowledge of resistant materials; • specific knowledge of processes by which these materials are worked; • experience using a wide range of equipment. Given various briefs, students are taught the design process to develop their own project outcomes. Students are given the opportunity to experience a wide range of materials and manufacturing processes to produce their work. The course consists of design briefs which focus on a range of materials and processes. Students are encouraged to extend and advance their knowledge to a higher level. There are two areas of learning and students will be placed in whatever area their timetable allows. Both areas of learning use the same process to develop skills and knowledge.

Course costs: Materials and consumables used and applied finishes.

MUSIC (9MUSP) This course is for students who wish to extend themselves with music beyond what the core music course is able to do. It is expected that students will already have limited experience learning an instrument or are starting learning an instrument at the beginning of Year 9. This course is primarily practical and gives a grounding in performance, composition and theory. The elements of music and listening skills will be explored so that students will be better able to determine the differences in tone-colour, texture, phrasing, harmony and contrasts. The theory component is included for students wishing to continue Music in future years. The course, with its emphasis on performance skills, often results in the formation of a ‘classroom orchestra’, where all students (whether beginners or more advanced) are given a part to play within their own ability.

For further information, see Mr Hamilton or Mr Murphy.

This experience of playing together assists students when later writing their own music, boosts their listening skills and often results in them continuing their study of an instrument with a private tutor when the semester is completed.

MEDIA (9MED)

For further information, see Mr Botting.

Exploration of the foundation skills in media production. This semester course is mostly based in our professional broadcast studio, beginning with basics of broadcast television, both in front of and behind the camera. Students experience both the creative and technical aspects of television production, and learn how the whole production team, from a director to camera operator work together to create a TV show. The key competencies underpin this course, teaching teamwork, problem-solving, leadership, and discipline. The course culminates in the students planning and producing a

TE REO MĀORI (MĀORI LANGUAGE) (9MAOR) (Students can choose to do one semester or a full year, double semester) This beginners’ course covers the fundamentals of Te Ao Māori (the Māori world) with culture being a significant focus. It involves a more in-depth exposure to the aspects provided in the compulsory Year 9 Tikanga course. (Tikanga, Te Reo/language, myths and legends, Toi Māori and waiata). 23


Year 9 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

The course provides time and opportunity for students to learn a range of aspects across theory, written, spoken, aural, and practical learning. Students are provided with the opportunity to improve/gain confidence in pronunciation, reading/writing, and begin to develop insight and depth in their understanding of Māori language and culture. They will be given personalised programmes to follow dependent on their level of learning and experience.

Course costs: This course will have associated costs that may cover things such as workbooks, online learning, trips and other items as the programme is developed. For further information, see Mr Westrupp.

BY APPLICATION ACADEMIC EXTENSION AND ENRICHMENT (9ACEE) The Year 9 ACEE programmes operates as an option subject, students who are academically gifted and/or talented are formally invited into the programme. For full information on the ACCE programme please refer to page 6. Course application process: Students should express their interest and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 9 option selections. Further information will be forwarded to students on receipt of the application.

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY (9CLTX) Within the context of Textile Technology students design and produce a product. Students undertaking this course will be challenged and encouraged to unleash their creativity and take risks while learning to problem-solve as they design and make textile products. They will learn how to use the design process to plan and create a technological outcome.

stac.nz/Options

Course costs: $150.00* per annum (includes registration fees for the Academy Philosophy Conferences, Model EU and Model UN) Conferences). * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see stac.school.nz or Ms Hampson.

The focus will be on developing skills and knowledge about: • the design process including creating designs; • construction techniques and methods used when working with textiles; • managing resources; • using emerging technologies with textiles where appropriate; • making and using a pattern; • how to evaluate textile products. This course is a pathway towards a range of tertiary programmes in design. This may include for example: Fashion Design, Textile Design, Project Management, Interior Design, Product Design, Exhibition Design, Costume Design, Stage Set Design and Spatial Design.

Course costs: A disbursement is made for any school supplied materials, pattern drafting and photocopy costs. For further information, see Mrs Thomson or Mrs Duncan.

ATHLETE SPORTS DEVELOPMENT (9ATHD) Semester Programme (17 weeks), runs in both Semesters 1 and 2, students participate in one semester only.

Build the key skills to ensure that students are able to achieve to their potential in both their schooling and in sport. This innovative sports programme is designed for students who are determined to work hard to achieve their sporting and academic goals and develop skills and understanding around balance and performance. The course aims to build sports specific knowledge and develop growing awareness by building a sporting performance plan in an environment which encourages physical, academic and personal excellence. The key focus is on the development of organisation, planning, and athletic education. Course content: • the course contains both practical and theoretical content; • the course provides an opportunity for student athletes to be extended in addition to the regular Physical Education curriculum; • the course will provide time for sport specific training for enhancement of skill development; • the course will prepare students to become independent, self-motivated student athletes through developing an understanding of preparation and time management; • the course will give students the skills to be able to succeed in all areas of their schooling.

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Selection criteria: It is desirable that applicants are competing at a representative level in their chosen sport and/or are a proven high-level performer in their respective current schools. Only a set number of places are available each year. Students are selected to enter on an application basis.

Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 9 option selections. stac.nz/Options

Exemptions: Any student on a Music Scholarship or selected for the ACEE programme, may not be able to participate in the Athlete Sports Development programme, due to possible timetable constraints.

Student outcomes: With three classes per week, students deepen their understanding of the art form, by: • improving their technique to the best of their ability;  • aiming to understand, and express, the correct dance style aesthetic; • learning the importance of ballet professionalism, and integrating it into their personal work ethic; • engaging with a broad range of dance genres and choreography, exploring both style and process.

Entry and prerequisites: New students, suitable ballet background and a short audition with Artistic Director, Dr Cairns. Current Year 8 students, recent Year 8 examination results at Highly Commended or above, or by Head of Department discretion. Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 9 option selections.

Course costs: $90.00* maximum for the year. * Estimated disbursed course costs

stac.nz/Options

For further information, see Mr Gain.

Course costs: $85.00* per term (includes guest tutors, repertoire half tutu and character skirt use, and other incidentals). * Estimated disbursed course costs

BALLET AND DANCE STUDIES (9BALL) St Andrew’s College Ballet Academy Diploma – First Year (Counts as two options and requires full year of study)

Understanding the art of dance: establishing balletic technique, exploring dance genres, and experiencing performance. The Ballet Academy Diploma Programme commences with the Year 9 Ballet and Dance Studies course and continues through to Year 13, with graduates receiving their five-year Diploma. The Year 9–11 programmes are integrated within the school day, offering a seamless transition from academic class to ballet studio. Quality tuition focuses on classical technique with development of the dancer’s musicality and artistry (with annual examination). In addition, to train today’s currentdancer, students are extended beyond the balletic frame into various dance genres (jazz, national, character, lyrical and contemporary). This builds a strong foundation of knowledge and prepares them for the NCEA Dance programme which commence in Year 10, adding further academic rigor to the programme. Performance work is a highlight; opportunities include the annual ‘Dance Revue’, Ballet Academy production season, showcases, and more as available. Guest tutors are invited to take classes, giving students the experience of masterclasses, open work, and new repertoire. Additional classes include Dance/Pilates, Pointe (Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced), and extension classes as available.

Additional costs: Examination fees, costume hires and optional classes. For further information, see stac.school.nz or Dr Cairns.

ESOL (9ENSL) A study of English for academic purposes. Entry into this course is based on an English assessment completed on admission. It is for students who do not have English as their first language and wish to improve their language skills for mainstream classes. Students can enrol in a single option semester. This course is run in addition to mainstream English classes and is designed to assist students to write clear, accurate English, to read with understanding, and to speak fluently and clearly. Each course is carefully structured according to individual needs and there is a strong emphasis on subject support. Ongoing assessment gives students valuable feedback on their progress and helps indicate which English courses would be most appropriate for them in the future. For further information, see Mrs Brooks.

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Year 10 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 28 Lessons per week

Compulsory Core Subjects

Option Subjects

All students must study these subjects:

Select six subjects, two of them being back-up subjects, each being three lessons per week:

Compul sor y Core Subjects

Lessons per week

Agriscience  

10AGSC

English

10ENGL

4

Art  

10ARTA

Mathematics

10MATH

4

Classical Studies and History  

10CLST

Physical Education   and Health 

10PHEC

Design and Visual Communication  

10DEST

Religious Education  

10RLED

1

Digital Technology  

10INTE

10SCIE

4

10SOST

4

10WAKA

3

Science* Social Studies  Te Waka  

2

* Science – some students will be selected to study NCEA Level 1 Science instead of Year 10 Science.

Academic Extension and Enrichment (ACEE)

Drama ** 

10DRAM

Economic Studies  

10ECON

Food and Nutrition  

10FOTE

French  

10FREN

Geography  

10GEOG

Japanese  

10JAPA

Materials Technology  

10MTEC

Media ** 

Students are selected into this year long programme which counts as two options. Students will be invited later in 2020.

10MED

Music  

10MUSP

Spanish * 

10SPAN

Semester Courses

Te Reo Māori * 

10MAOR

Semester courses run for approximately four and a half months each.

Textile Technology  

Each course = approximately 50 lessons.

By Application

10CLTX

ACEE  

10ACEE

Selecting your Options for Year 10

Athlete Sports Development  

10ATHD

Select six subjects with two of them being back-up subjects.

Ballet and Dance Studies*** 

10BALL

ESOL  

10ENSL

The selection of a language (French, Japanese) or Ballet and Dance Studies equates to two of your subject options because they are full year courses, that is, they run in both Semester 1 and Semester 2.

Literacy  

10LITE

\

* May be studied for a full year (counts as two options) or a semester (counts as one option). ** Can study only one of these in the year. *** Counts as two options and requires a full year of study.

If studied for a full year, Te Reo Māori equates to two of your subject options. If studied for one semester it is one of your options. \

Please note, once subject selections are made, it is very difficult to make changes thereafter. Please select carefully. 27


YEAR 10

ACADEMIC CURRICULUM CORE AND OPTIONS 28 Lessons per week

CORE SUBJECTS ENGLISH (10ENGL) The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. This programme enables students to continue to develop the skills needed to understand, use and create oral, visual and written texts. Through engaging with a range of texts, students will become increasingly skilled and sophisticated speakers and listeners, writers and readers, presenters and viewers. Year 10 English provides students with further opportunities to engage with and develop the key skills and competencies of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Levels 5 to 6) in diverse contexts. In doing so, students will gain a better understanding of language, literature, and the world around them.

Course costs: $20.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Gilbert or Ms Ruwhiu.

MATHEMATICS (10MATH) Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. The course covers achievement objectives from Level 5 of the Mathematics strand of the New Zealand Curriculum. All classes follow the core curriculum objectives and students also work at their individual level (Levels 4 to 6). One NCEA Level 1 Achievement Standard is offered (either AS91026 Numeric Reasoning or AS91030 Measurement). Middle band classes have an additional teacher for one or two periods a week to support individual and small-group needs. The top band classes are streamed into three smaller groups to cater for the lateral extension built into the programme.

Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ONLINE OPTION SELECTIONS, VISIT:

and subscription to Education Perfect and an online textbook. For further information, see Ms Hill Taiaroa.

stac.nz/options

Option Selections will open from 3.00pm on Friday 21 August 2020 Once open, you will receive an email with a link to make your online Option Selections. Option Selections will close at 9.00am on Tuesday 8 September 2020 28

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH (10PHEC) The well-being of students, other people and society through learning in movement and health-related contexts. Continuing from Year 9 Physical Education, the focus is centered on your well-being (Hauora). Students develop critical thinking skills, the ability to participate and contribute positively in a


variety of movement contexts and understand the significance that physical activity has on self, others and society. The course includes practical performance, written logs and assessments in preparation for NCEA. The Physical Education learning areas and teaching activities are: • Top team – students are encouraged to work together with their peers in different roles with increasing levels or responsibility. It aims to further develop positive interpersonal skills so that students can successfully participate and lead a variety of team games and activities; • Fitness for me – what is the sport science behind training? What are components and methods of training? What are the principles of training? What happens to my body when I train?; • Sociology of sport – this unit investigates the way in which society influences our perceptions and participations in sport e.g. The Olympic Games, minority sports; • Physical literacy – Exploring the wide world of sport. Students will learn about the skills and strategies for a range of New Zealand and foreign sports; • Safety and risk management – what are the risks in a given situation or environment? How do you identify risks to people, equipment and the environment? What strategies can you use to minimise these risks? • Putting it all together – taking charge and extending your learning in Physical Education. This is student driven and combines all of the previous units through competitive class/interclass based Sports Education model. Year 10 Health is covered in the Te Waka Programme. For further information, see Ms Register.

SCIENCE (10SCIE) Investigating, understanding and explaining our natural, physical world and the wider universe. The Year 10 course builds on the Year 9 Science course. Science is able to inform problem-solving and decision making in many areas of life. Many of the major challenges and opportunities which confront our world need to be approached from a scientific perspective, taking into account social and ethical considerations. SOLO taxonomy is used to develop students’ ability to communicate their knowledge in the following topics: • Chemistry – students look at the structure of the atom and how it influences chemical and physical properties of substances. Acids and bases are also studied in this topic; • Medical Science – students look at the circulation and respiratory systems in the human body; • collisions – students identify and describe the patterns associated with physical phenomena found in everyday situations involving motion and forces. The effect of these situations on the body will also be a key element of this topic; • catastrophes – students investigate the composition, structure and features of Earth’s geosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. There is a strong focus on the effect of human activity upon Earth and the implications this activity is having and may continue to have.

Course costs: Entry to the Australasian Science examination, purchase of write-on workbook and $20.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Marsh-Smallman.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (10RLED) A study of five major world religions: basic facts followed by focus questions that enable students to explore different religious responses to key human issues. A study which explores our humanity through the Christian worldview, while considering our cultural framework and alternative worldviews, both secular and religious. Topics for study are: • world religions (Islam, Hinduism, Christianity, Buddhism and Judaism); • being human; • biblical storybook project; • early New Zealand stories: Missionaries, Māori and Christianity. For further information, see Rev. Morrow.

SOCIAL STUDIES (10SOST) How people participate and take action in society in the past and in the present. The Social Studies course focuses on how societies work and how people can participate as critical, active, informed and responsible citizens. Contexts are drawn from the past, present and future, and from places within and beyond New Zealand. Students will be given opportunity to collaborate, inquire, and to be creative in their thinking. Students will investigate a range of topics which include: • human rights – an examination of what constitutes basic human rights. This is followed by a look at a specific time or place when this has been abused, as well as a focus on people and groups fighting for the protection and preservation of human rights today; • continuity and change – an examination of the key elements of the 1960s to understand continuity and change in politics, technology, geography, gender roles, and popular culture;

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Year 10 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

• Young Enterprise Studies – an examination of the role of enterprise and innovation today. Students learn what skills are needed to be a successful entrepreneur, and about sustainable business; • migration – an examination of why people have moved in the past and why they move today. Students consider the impact of migration on the cultural identity of places.

Term 2

Throughout the year, emphasis will be placed on developing the skills that students will need when they take Social Science subjects at NCEA level. These include essay and paragraph writing skills, comprehension, inquiry, group work, critical thinking, social decision making, understanding different perspectives, mapping and graphing skills.

Term 4

An examination of current events and issues forms an integral part of the course. Year 10 Social Studies leads into the NCEA courses of History, Geography, Economics and Classical Studies. For further information, see Mrs Roest.

TE WAKA (10WAKA) A holistic approach to the well-being of students, others and society through The Rite Journey, Health Education, Outdoor Education and Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award. Te Waka is a unique educational Life Skills Programme for Year 10 students designed to build respect, responsibility and resilience. It provides Year 10 students with an overarching focus and purpose. The programme brings together strands which already exist at the College – the Duke of Edinburgh’s Hillary Award, Health Education, Outdoor Education and Tikanga Māori – combined with a new Life Skills course known as The Rite Journey. The Rite Journey reinvents the traditional process of a Rite of Passage to assist in transforming adolescents from dependency to responsibility. It is designed to link the hearts and minds of our Year 10 students with Rite of Passage ceremonies, class discussion and self-reflection. A male and a female Te Waka class are created from each Year 10 core class. The classes will be timetabled together to make the most of the co-educational environment and deliver the programme, based on need, either separately or together as a core class. Three single-period lessons are timetabled each week with a same-gender teacher and a workbook is provided. The year is spread over the following areas:

Term 1 Relationship with self – Who am I really?

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Relating to Others (masculinity, body image, friendships, relationships). Challenge-based activities.

Term 3 Health Education – decision making based around the topics of alcohol and sexuality.

Reflection – Where to from here? In each area the students explore consciousness, connection, communication, challenge and celebration. We encourage the family of the student to select a person of the same sex to act as a mentor for the year. This is usually someone they know well with life experience, e.g. a grandparent, aunt, uncle, mother or father. The student will spend time with their mentor over the course of the year. The Rite of Passage for the student is celebrated through key milestone ceremonies (The Calling, The Departure, Challenges, The Abyss and The Homecoming). Information surrounding these ceremonies and also the activities arranged through our Outdoor Education Department will be communicated to parents via newsletters. To graduate and receive their Te Waka badge, students will need to have completed a mixture of the following requirements (unless unable to because of illness or injury): • Attended and participated in classes and ceremonies; • Completed a range of challenges including: Connecting with others, Creativity, Home Skills, Community, Physical, Work Experience and SOLO; • Solo camp in Term 4 completed; • Displayed a positive attitude in class.

Course costs: $240* for workbooks, ceremonies and activities. * Estimated disbursed course costs

Further information about this programme can be found at stac.nz/TeWaka. Alternatively, you may wish to contact either Mr George (Male Co-ordinator, SGE@stac.school.nz) or Mrs Price (Female Co-ordinator, APR@stac.school.nz).


OPTION SUBJECTS AGRISCIENCE (10AGSC) Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. This course places an emphasis on the knowledge of agriculture from pasture to plate. It is not necessary to have taken Agriscience in Year 9 to enter this course as the material covered in each course is independent of the other. This course provides valuable background for NCEA Level 1 Agriscience and enhances scientific knowledge and skills. There is an emphasis on the practical application of content taught in class with students participating in activities such as plant growing, soil testing, and product testing. Students develop their own agricultural based food product and market it to a panel of judges using a video campaign. Topics studied are: • soils and pastures; • animal digestion, reproduction and production; • meat, milk and wool – product development and marketing.

CLASSICAL STUDIES AND HISTORY (10CLST) A half-semester study giving experience in investigating the past. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to understand what these two subjects involve, and to help them develop the skills that will assist them with study in the future. Students will gain knowledge, skills and experience to: • understand how the causes and consequences of past events are of significance to New Zealanders and shape the lives of people and society; • understand how people’s perspectives on past events differ. This course is designed to give students a short glimpse of history as an academic discipline, and to inspire students in high interest topics. A research assignment is also included, involving a researched written report about people who are pioneers to New Zealand. A prize is awarded annually for the best written report. Focus is given to stimulating an interest in History and Classical Studies and developing skills and abilities appropriate to the subject in preparation for the NCEA courses. Topics covered will include: Ancient Greece; Mythology; US Civil War; Ghettoisation of Jews in WWII; Pioneers to New Zealand.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

• • • • •

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

For further information, see Mr Faulls.

Course costs: $75.00* for practical farm experience and field trip.

ART (10ARTA) A practical course of study exploring aspects of terminology relevant to drawing, painting and design. In this course students will use a range of drawing media and techniques to generate ideas. Students will look at a variety of artist models from New Zealand and around the world to help broaden their understanding of why Art is made and valued. Practical work includes Drawing as a research tool, Painting and extending ideas, 3D modelling and if time allows, introduction to Photography. The aim of this course is to build strong skills in Drawing and Painting as a foundation for NCEA Art at Year 11.

Course costs: $70.00* for materials. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Swadel.

DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION (10DEST) Developing designing skills within a specific context. Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is an area of learning within the New Zealand Curriculum, where students learn about design, develop their practice of designing, and develop their design thinking in the context of Spatial and Product Design. The students develop an awareness of design by using visual communication skills to conceptualise and develop design ideas. They apply their visual literacy through using sketching, digital modes and other modelling techniques to effectively communicate and present design ideas. Students learn that designers identify the qualities and potential of design ideas in terms of the broad principles of design (aesthetics and function) and of sustainability. Working towards achieving high standards of presentation is expected. Assessment is based on course work looking at Design Heritage, Design Thinking and Visual Communication.

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Year 10 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

Course costs: A list of required stationery is provided and the items on this list should be purchased prior to starting the course. Items of a consumable or specialised nature are carried by the department and the costs for these can be disbursed to student accounts. For further information, see Mr Kerrison.

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY (10INTE) Students design and develop digital outcomes. This course is an introduction to Digital Technology for students with a passion for Technology, built around project-based learning and design thinking. Working in design teams, students will develop solutions to identified issues. Through this process they will have the opportunity to experiment with new educational technologies and develop a solution-based mindset. There will be a focus on the collaborative skills often sought after in today’s economic world. Students will learn the basics of algorithms and programming, taking them beyond the realm of command block coding into text based coding languages. Emphasis for this course will be on: • solution-based learning; • structured coding programme built around I.O.T. (Internet of Things) – students will use their improving coding ability to work with internet connected devices and sensors; • a design focused project which will involve creating a prototype to meet a need. Tools and skills will be project dependent but focused around BBC micro:bit. This course will be a good introduction for students interested or curious about a pathway into NCEA Digital Technology. There is no entry requirement that students have completed Digital Technology in Year 9.

Course costs: Most software used is open source. There will be a small charge for licensing costs. Additional costs may be incurred for competition fees (optional). For further information, see Mr Adams or Ms Lee.

DRAMA (10DRAM) Exploration of the foundation skills of Drama. Drama prepares students for life beyond school by building confident communication skills, skills in reading body language and subtext, in working collaboratively, in thinking analytically, creatively, and independently. The Drama course aims to 32

provide students with a depth and breadth of experience to take into future pathways. This course aims to increase students’ knowledge of drama techniques, elements and conventions. Students work collaboratively to create devised and scripted drama and learn to perform as part of an ensemble. The course aims to build skills in analysing performance, offering and applying feedback and feed forward, maintaining ‘role’, and stagecraft. Students carry out research, structure work to convey targeted dramatic intentions, and investigate the purpose and function of drama. This course is valuable preparation for NCEA Level 1 Drama. Students are encouraged to audition for the Years 9–10 productions. For further information, see Mr Wiseman.

ECONOMIC STUDIES (10ECON) How economic decisions impact on people, businesses and communities. The objectives of the course are to develop an interest in, and an understanding of, the many facets of economics and accounting as they affect consumers in their everyday lives. Together with Year 9 Economic Studies, this course completes an introduction in this subject area and leads to Economics in Years 11–13. By completing this course students will also have been exposed to accounting and entrepreneurship, which will be of value in any future study in these areas. Some of the units of work studied are the economic problem, the relationships between the concepts of specialisation/production/ exchange/interdependence in an economy, enterprise, consumer demand, the New Zealand Stock Exchange, and an introduction to Accounting. For further information, see Mr Temple.

FOOD AND NUTRITION (10FOTE) Develop skills and understanding to make food choices for good health. Being able to select and prepare food is an important skill for teenagers to learn. Students will develop food preparation skills and basic nutrition knowledge to enable them to make good food choices and therefore take responsibility for their own health. They will learn how to adapt recipes to make them healthier. Students will develop skills to evaluate whether a food product is healthy.


Students will consider the influences on food choice by studying our bicultural food heritage, which will then lead on to other cultures that now contribute to our changing food habits. They will explore ingredients and cooking methods of some of these food cultures.

to think critically about the world in which they live, and to understand the responsibility they have in relation to other people, the environment, and the long term sustainability of the planet.

Food preparation tasks are a key component of this course.

• physical geography – aspects of the natural world through a study of weather and climate; • the application of a range of geographic skills and ideas; • human geography – the relationship between people and the environment through a study of the impacts of tourism; • geographic skills; map interpretation, Google Earth investigations, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis.

Course costs: Food costs and some photocopy costs will be disbursed. For further information, see Mrs Duncan.

FRENCH (10FREN) (Full year, double semester, counts as two options)

Understand and create language in familiar, simple contexts. Year 10 students will also be using an online textbook, which allows them to access the book readily at home and easily catch up on any work missed. The course builds on work covered in Year 9, learning through topics such as food, shopping, getting about town, daily life, sport and leisure activities, school and talking about the past. The four skill areas of listening, reading, writing and speaking are still emphasised, and students continue to be encouraged to speak individually, in pairs, groups and through role-play situations. The development of good and accurate pronunciation continues to be important along with developing a range of language to enable students to cope with a wider range of situations.

From this course students will develop an understanding of:

Potential topics covered (final decision based on students’ interests): • nowboarding in the desert, The impact of tourism in Dubai; • the proposal and design of Christchurch’s Stadium; • extreme natural events; Hurricane Katrina and the Eyjafjallajokull Volcanic Eruption; • Freedom camping in New Zealand: A Contemporary Geographic Issue; • climatic investigations: The ‘Beast from the East’ and other local and global studies. For further information, see Mr Boulton.

JAPANESE (10JAPA) (Full year, double semester, counts as two options)

The websites Linguascope and Education Perfect are used to supplement the text and enable students to learn French interactively online. During a French Activities Day, students join in a range of off-site activities, including a Pétanque tournament and a French film. Students also have the opportunity to take part in a lunchtime French club in Terms 2–4 with activities such as films, games, French food and quizzes.

Understand and create language in familiar, simple contexts.

Course costs: $50.00* Online Textbook and Education

• • • • •

Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Radcliffe or Mrs Marshall.

This course builds upon the language foundation of the Year 9 course. During the year, students study a variety of texts which introduce them to grammar, vocabulary and cultural information in greater depth. The topics covered are: going places; daily routines; giving directions and commuting; the family; short unit on adjectives.

Students use the vocabulary and grammar they have learnt in relevant, everyday language situations.

GEOGRAPHY (10GEOG) The study of how people and the environment interact. This course is designed to introduce students to Geography by having them study a broad range of local, national and global topics. It is not necessary to have taken Geography in Year 9 to enter this course, as the material covered in each course is independent of the other. The course encourages students

Throughout the year students hone their hiragana writing skills and are introduced to the katakana writing system and some more basic kanji. Interactive websites, OneNote, and the Education Perfect programme are used to reinforce the students’ script learning and vocabulary. Students are encouraged to actively use the language whenever possible through a variety of listening, speaking, reading and writing tasks during each topic. 33


Year 10 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

Course costs: $30.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

group work are enhanced by introducing students to television and film production both in the field and our multi-camera TV studio.

For further information, see Mrs Simcock.

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY (10MTEC) Within the context of Hard Materials Technology students will develop skills and knowledge to manage resources to produce a designed outcome. The study of Materials Technology allows students to gain: • knowledge of materials through a ‘design and make’ programme; • experience in various forms of graphic communication and graphic presentation techniques; • an understanding of the design process; • specific knowledge of fundamental materials, i.e. metals, timber and synthetic; • specific knowledge of processes by which these materials are worked. Given various briefs, students are taught the design process to develop their own project outcomes. They will have an opportunity to produce individualised projects. The course consists of design briefs which focus on a range of materials and processes so that students are given the opportunity to experience a wide range of materials and manufacturing processes when producing their work. Students are encouraged to extend and advance their knowledge to a higher level.

This course would suit students who have an interest in all things media and want to know more about their own relationship with the media and how media products are planned and produced, from writing, directing, and performing, to technical operations. We encourage all Performing Arts students to join our after school Television and Film Academy, where students can gain even more experience and develop their production skills in preparation for our senior Media Studies courses. For further information, see Miss Silverman.

MUSIC (10MUSP) Exploration of sounds and technologies for creating, interpreting and representing music ideas.

There are two areas of learning. Students will be placed in whatever area their timetable allows. Both these areas of learning use the same process to develop skills and knowledge.

The Year 9 semester course is not a prerequisite for this option. The following outline should be used as a guide for entry into this course. The specific content is rewritten each year by Mr Ferguson to adapt to the musical backgrounds of the students in each year group.

Course costs: Materials and consumables used and applied finishes.

However, much emphasis is given to the creative aspect of music, such as:

For further information, see Mr Hamilton or Mr Murphy.

MEDIA (10MED) This semester course explores the foundation skills in Media Studies. Students builds on skills developed in Year 9 Media and provides a strong foundation for our senior Media Studies courses. Underpinned by the Key Competencies, this exciting course enhances what students learnt in Year 9 Media and begins to develop media literacy skills that are crucial in our ever changing and complex technological world. Collaboration and

34

Students will study a range of different media products to understand how they are constructed, before working in small groups to create their own. They will also work in our multicamera TV studio to build on their live broadcasting skills both in front of and behind the camera. As with our year 9 course, the semester will culminate in the planning and production of a live studio show for which students may perform, present, produce or be part of the technical crew.

• techniques of composition and songwriting – from simple melodic writing to composing for solo instruments and ensembles, students develop the art of composition using the instruments played by members of the class or using software such as GarageBand and Soundtrap.com; • rudiments of music – this involves the theory of music: notation, scales, time signatures, intervals, terms and signs. The basics of chords and harmony will be introduced; • aural skills – using software students learn to identify, describe and transcribe musical patterns; • classroom orchestra and band – regular classroom performance is a vital part of this course. Soloists are encouraged to perform in our Term 1 and 2 Performance Evenings; • music technology – students are involved with recording and mixing songs and learning about the associated technologies.


It is a requirement of all students taking the Year 10 Music option that they have an instrumental tutor and are receiving weekly lessons. Students should organise this in the first week of the year by talking to Mr Ferguson if they don’t already have an instrumental tutor. Please note: this course is not ideal for Pipe Band drummers or pipers due to the difficulty of integration into classroom orchestra work. Please see Mr Ferguson for clarification.

Course costs: Students may be required to use the 'Music Ecademy' and Melodics.com online learning tools at a cost of $50.00* for a one year subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Ferguson.

Year 9 Tikanga course. (Tikanga, Te Reo/language, myths and legends, Toi Māori and waiata). The course, that works alongside the Te Reo Māori curriculum, provides time and opportunity for students to learn a range of aspects across theory, written, spoken, aural, and practical learning. Students are provided with the opportunity to improve/gain confidence in pronunciation, reading/writing, and begin to develop insight and depth in their understanding of Māori language and culture. They will be given personalised programmes to follow, dependent on their level of learning and experience. The course is open to any Year 10 student.

Course costs: This course will have associated costs that may cover things such as workbooks, online learning, trips and other items as the programme is developed. For further information, see Mr Westrupp.

SPANISH (10SPAN) (Full year, double semester, counts as two options)

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY (10CLTX)

Understand and create language in familiar, simple contexts.

Within the context of Textile Technology students will design and produce a product.

With over 350 million people speaking Spanish around the world, learning it will open doors for business and job opportunities, as well as providing opportunities to learn and experience new cultures first-hand. This is an introductory course for beginners. No prior knowledge of Spanish is necessary, but previous learning of another language would be an advantage. The course follows the National Curriculum up to and including Level 5, with equal emphasis on listening, reading, writing and speaking. The course aims to prepare students for NCEA levels and give them a foundation from which to build confidence in the language. Learning is focused on vocabulary acquisition, basic grammar, reading and comprehension, as well as learning about the culture behind the language. All assessment is formative, with weekly vocabulary tests, ongoing teacher observations, and end of unit tests.

Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect subscription and Renash Level 1 booklet. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Evlampieff.

Students undertaking this course will be challenged and encouraged to unleash their creativity and take risks while learning to problem-solve as they design and make textile products. They will learn how to use the design process to plan and create a technological outcome. The focus will be on developing skills and knowledge about: • the design process including creating designs; • construction techniques and methods used when working with textiles; • managing resources; • using emerging technologies with textiles where appropriate; • making and using a pattern; • how to evaluate textile products. Students are encouraged to extend and advance their knowledge and skills to a higher level. This course is a pathway towards a range of tertiary programmes in design. This may include for example; Fashion Design, Textile Design, Project Management, Interior Design, Product Design, Exhibition Design, Costume Design, Stage Set Design and Spatial Design.

Course costs: A disbursement is made for any school supplied materials, pattern drafting and photocopy costs.

TE REO MĀORI (MĀORI LANGUAGE) (10MAOR)

For further information, see Mrs Thomson or Mrs Duncan.

(Students can choose to do one semester or a full year, double semester) This course covers the fundamentals of Te Ao Māori (the Māori world) with culture being a significant focus. It involves a more in-depth exposure to the aspects provided in the compulsory 35


Year 10 Academic Curriculum Core and Options

BY APPLICATION ACADEMIC EXTENSION AND ENRICHMENT (10ACEE) The Year 10 ACEE programme operates as an option subject, students who are academically gifted and/or talented are formally invited into the programme. Students can also self-select this programme. For full information on this ACEE programme please refer to page 6.

Selection criteria: There are only a set number of places available in this course and only a certain number of applications will be accepted. It is desirable that students will have completed 9ATHD in 2020, and previous attitude and level of commitment in Athlete Sports Development in Year 9 will be taken into consideration if applicable.

Course application process: Students should express

Course application process: Students must apply and

their interest and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 10 option selections. Further information will be forwarded to students on receipt of the application. stac.nz/Options

Course costs: $150.00* per annum (includes registration fees for the Academy Philosophy Conference, Model EU and Model UN) Conferences) * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see the College website or Ms Hampson.

ATHLETE SPORTS DEVELOPMENT (10ATHD) Semester Programme (17 weeks), runs in both Semesters 1 and 2, students participate in one semester only.

Build the key skills to ensure that students are able to achieve to their potential in both their schooling and in sport. This innovative sports programme is designed for students who are determined to work hard to achieve their sporting and academic goals and develop skills and understanding around balance and performance. The course is an extension from 9ATHD where students build on key skills learnt but looks further into key areas of performance. These include the implementation of supervised fitness centre training development, goal-setting, teaching around sports nutrition, sports psychology, and injury prevention.

Course content: • contains both practical and theoretical content; • investigates the relevance of specific training methods and their impact on performance; • provides opportunity for sport specific training for enhancement of skill development; • requires students to look at the effects of exercise on the body, and how we maximise the effectiveness of training using key principles;

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• prepares students to become independent, self-motivated student athletes through developing an understanding of preparation and time management; • gives students the skills to be able to succeed in all areas of their schooling.

complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 10 option selections. stac.nz/Options

Exemptions: Any student on a Music Scholarship or selected for the ACEE programme, may not be able to participate in the Athlete Sports Development programme, due to possible timetable constraints.

Course Costs: $90.00* maximum for the year. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Gain.

BALLET AND DANCE STUDIES (10BALL) St Andrew’s College Ballet Academy Diploma – Second Year (Counts as two options and requires full year of study)

Understanding the art of dance: developing balletic technique, exploring dance genres, discovering the process of choreography, and experiencing performance. This course, the second year of the Ballet Academy Diploma programme, is a continuation of Year 9 Ballet and Dance Studies course, with the addition of NCEA Dance from this year and onwards (see Middle School section of the website for the Year 11 Ballet and Dance Studies Course and Senior College for the Ballet Company programme in Years 12–13). With a strong foundation now in place, students strive to improve and refine their balletic technique, develop and express the correct dance style aesthetic, engage in the processes of choreography, and further explore various dance styles and repertoire. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of ballet professionalism in all they do in class, and in stage work. A programme of guest tutors and special guests continues, along with performance opportunities and additional classes.


NCEA Dance: 2 internals, 10 credits. Certificate endorsement given as no external credits.

Entry and prerequisites: New students, suitable ballet background and a short audition with Artistic Director, Dr Cairns. Current Year 9 students, recent Year 9 examination results at Commended or above, or by Head of Department discretion.

Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 10 option selections. stac.nz/Options

Course costs: $85.00* per term (includes guest tutors, repertoire half tutu and character skirt use, and other incidentals). * Estimated disbursed course costs

Additional costs: Examination fees, costume hires, additional classes, exam prep or private lessons. For further information, see the College website or Dr Cairns.

ESOL (10ENSL) A study of English for academic purposes. This course is for students who do not have English as their first language and wish to improve their language skills for mainstream classes. Students can enrol in a single option semester. This course is run in addition to mainstream English classes and is designed to assist students to write clear, accurate English, to read with understanding, and to speak fluently and clearly. Each course is carefully structured according to individual needs and there is a strong emphasis on subject support. Ongoing assessment gives students valuable feedback on their progress and helps indicate which English courses would be most appropriate for them in the future. For further information, see Mrs Brooks.

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The National Certificate of Educational Achievement The National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) is New Zealand’s national qualification for senior secondary students. NCEA is part of the New Zealand Qualifications Framework and is the main secondary school qualification.

For further information please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz

ASSESSMENT IS STANDARDS BASED Nationally prescribed Standards for all subjects show what students need to know/do in the important aspects of a subject.

Standards describe the level of work students need to produce and how well they’ve done.

Students know exactly what they have to do to achieve the Standard.

STUDENTS GAIN CREDITS Every Standard is worth a set number of credits.

ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS

UNIT STANDARDS

In nearly all school subjects.

In a few subjects.

Three levels of achievement: • Achievement • Merit • Excellence

NCEA LEVEL 1 80 credits at Level 1 or higher

One level of achievement: • Achievement

NCEA LEVEL 2 80 credits

NCEA LEVEL 3 80 credits

Includes:

Includes:

Includes:

• 10 credits from literacy Standards

• at least 60 credits at Level 2 or higher

• at least 60 credits at Level 3 or higher

(not just in English);

• 10 credits from numeracy Standards (not just in Mathematics).

and 20 credits at any other Level (these

and 20 credits at Level 2 or higher (these

may include credits which counted

may include credits which counted

towards the Level 1 certificate);

• students should also plan to gain literacy

towards the Level 2 certificate);

• Level 1 literacy and numeracy.

credits in Level 2 English for their University Entrance the following year;

• Level 1 literacy and numeracy.

For further information about Literacy and Numeracy Standards please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz/ncea/subjects/literacy-and-numeracy/level-1-requirements

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For further information about Certificate and Course Endorsement please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz/ncea/understanding-ncea/how-ncea-works/endorsements

CERTIFICATE ENDORSEMENT To qualify for an endorsement with Excellence, students must gain 50 credits at Excellence. Excellence credits at a particular NCEA level can be accumulated over more than one year (applies for Merit endorsement).

The Interim Results Notification, available in mid-January when results become available, shows if candidates have gained a course endorsement in a particular subject.

CERTIFICATES An endorsement with Merit requires 50 credits at Merit (or Merit and Excellence).

For example, a student gains a Standard, worth 5 credits, with Merit and so gains 5 Merit credits. These credits can be gained from both internally and externally assessed Achievement Standards (Unit Standards that do not have at least a Merit achievement level are not included). The Interim Results Notification in mid-January will show if candidates have qualified for Certificate Endorsement.

COURSE ENDORSEMENT Students gain an endorsement for a course (subject) where they achieve:

1

14 or more credits at Merit or Merit and Excellence = endorsement with Merit

2

14 or more credits at Excellence = endorsement with Excellence.

3

Included in the 14 credits must be at least 3 (Merit or Excellence) credits from externally assessed Standards and 3 (Merit or Excellence) credits from internally assessed Standards (this does not apply to NCEA Physical Education as this subject has no external assessment).

4

Sufficient credits in a single school year.

NOTE: • subjects in our curriculum which provide assessments that award Merit and Excellence grades are eligible for course endorsement; • subjects in which there is assessment of Standards from more than one NCEA ‘domain’ are eligible for course endorsement, e.g. Year 11 Physical Science (Physics and Chemistry); • students who change schools in a school year may still be eligible for course endorsement; • students who are studying multi-level courses can gain endorsement, however, the endorsement is awarded at the lower level. For example, a student studying Year 13ENGL who gains 8 Merit credits at Level 3 English and 6 Merit credits at Level 2 gains a Level 2 Merit endorsement in Year 13 English (this assumes that a minimum of 3 of those Merit credits are external and 3 internal).

The Record of Achievement is ordered from NZQA through a student’s ‘Learner Login’.

RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENT: The Record of Achievement is the official ‘academic transcript’ and is available from mid-April each year. It displays all Standards with results of Achievement/Merit/ Excellence. The ROA is usually requested as ‘evidence’ for various university applications.

For further information about Certificates please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/ results-2/ordering-result-documents

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT Many skills are assessed internally with teachers setting and marking assessments. Marking samples are checked by external moderators to maintain standards nationally.

EXTERNAL ASSESSMENT • usually in the form of a three-hour examination where one or more Standards are assessed (November); • some subjects have no examination (e.g. Physical Education, Arts and Technology); • some subjects require students to submit a portfolio which is completed in school but assessed externally (e.g. Design and Visual Communication and Arts); • other subjects require students to do practical design projects which are completed in school and assessed externally (e.g. Technology).

EXAMINATIONS Examination subjects have formative (practice) assessments during the year and a school Prelim examination in September to provide students with practice in the external Standards and derived grades for NCEA externals. These provide evidence of student achievement and progress in these Standards.

NCEA FEES There is no fee for domestic students. For international students, the fee is $383.30 per student.

39


NCEA Quick Reference Guide Years 11–13 Subject Entr y Requirements for 2021

Please note: these guide students in their subject selections for NCEA Levels. Deans and Heads of School use these when reviewing students’ selections and will also refer to the relevant Head of Department as necessary. Please read these carefully. Subject Accounting

Year 11 NCEA Level 1 At the discretion of Head of Department.

Agribusiness

Year 13 NCEA Level 3

14 credits in Level 1 Accounting or at the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 2 Accounting or at the discretion of Head of Department.

No previous study of Agriscience required. 12 credits in one of the Level 1 Agriculture subjects or at discretion of Head of Department.

No previous study of Agriscience required. 12 credits in one of the Level 2 Agriculture subjects or at discretion of Head of Department.

Agriscience

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum 12 credits (4 from external Standards) in one of the Level 1 Agriculture subjects.

Minimum 12 credits (8 from external Standards) in one of the Level 2 Agriculture subjects.

Agristudies

At the discretion of Head of Department.

At the discretion of Head of Department. Students need to have been enrolled in Term 4 previous year at the National Trade Academy.

At the discretion of Head of Department. Students need to have been enrolled in Term 4 previous year at the National Trade Academy.

Art

No entry requirements, but Year 10 Art is highly recommended.

Art: Design

Achievement or better in Level 1 Art or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Achievement or better in Level 1 and/or Level 2 Art or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Art: Painting

Achievement or better in Level 1 Art or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Achievement or better in Level 1 and/or Level 2 Art or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Art: Photography

Achievement or better in Level 1 Art or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Achievement or better in Level 1 and/or Level 2 Art or at the discretion of Head of Department.

8 credits from Level 1 Science or at the discretion of Head of Department.

8 credits in Level 2 Biology gained from external formatives or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Business Management

Level 1 English Standards: AS 1.1 or 1.2 (external) or AS 1.4 (internal) or at the discretion of Head of Department.

13 credits or more inLevel 2 Business Studies or at least one of the following Level 2 English Standards: AS 2.1, or AS 2.2 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Chemistry

12 credits in Level 1 Science or at the discretion of Head of Department.

12 credits in Level 2 Chemistry gained from external formatives or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Biology

40

Year 12 NCEA Level 2

At the discretion of Head of Department.


Subject

Year 11 NCEA Level 1

Classical Studies

Year 12 NCEA Level 2

Year 13 NCEA Level 3

14 credits in Level 1 History or English of which at least 6 must be from external Standards or at the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 2 Classical Studies, English or History of which at least 6 must be from external Standards or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Dance

Year 9 Ballet and Dance Studies, or prior equivalent experience. Subject to the discretion of the Head of Department.

Design and Visual Communication

Either a Year 9 or 10 Design and Visual Communication course recommended.

15 credits in Level 1 Design and Visual Communication or at the discretion of Head of Department.

12 credits in Level 2 Design and Visual Communication or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Digital Technology

Either a Year 9 or Year 10 Digital Technology course is an advantage.

14 credits in Level 1 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 2 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Drama

Year 9 or 10 Performing Arts, or prior experience, subject to the discretion of Head of Department.

Level 1 Drama, or prior experience, subject to the discretion of Head of Department.

Level 1 or 2 Drama or prior experience, subject to the discretion of Head of Department

Economics

At the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 1 Economics or at the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 2 Economics or at the discretion of Head of Department.

English

A course for students who are not yet achieving at Level 6 of the New Zealand Curriculum and/or lacking confidence with their skills in English. Your Year 10 English teacher, in consultation with the Head of Department, you, and your parents/caregivers, will recommend this course for you. Enrolment is this course is at the discretion of the Head of Department.

A course for students who are not yet achieving at Level 7 of the Curriculum and/or lacking confidence with their skills in English. The Year 11 English teacher in consultation with the Head of Department, you and your parents/caregivers, will recommend this course for you.

12 credits in Level 2 English Literature or at the discretion of Head of Department. School examination results will be used for pre-entry.

English Literature

Working at Level 6 of the New Zealand Curriculum.

14 credits in Level 1 (at least 4 of these need to be from an external assessment) or at the discretion of Head of Department. School examination results will be used for pre-entry.

12 credits in Level 2 English Literature or at the discretion of Head of Department. School examination results will be used for pre-entry.

English Extension

Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement in Year 10 and who are creative and critical thinkers may be invited into the 11ENGLX class.

Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement in Year 11 and who are creative and critical thinkers may be invited into the 12ENGLX class. Inclusion in 11ENGLX does not mean automatic entry to this course.

Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement in Year 12and who are creative and critical thinkers may be invited into the 13ENGLX class. Inclusion in 12ENGLX does not mean automatic entry to this course.

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NCE A Quick Reference Guide

Subject

42

Year 11 NCEA Level 1

Year 12 NCEA Level 2

Year 13 NCEA Level 3

ESOL

At the Teacher in Charge of ESOL’s discretionand based on an English assessment completed at the end of Year 10.

At the Teacher in Charge of ESOL’s discretion and based on Level 1 results.

At the Teacher in Charge of ESOL’s discretion and partly based on Level 2 results.

Food and Nutrition

Year 9 Food Technology or Year 10 Food and Nutrition is an advantage.

14 credits in Level 1 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 2 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

French

Year 10 French or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum of 14 credits in Level 1 French or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum of 14 credits in Level 2 French or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Geography

At the discretion of Head of Department.

12 credits in Level 1 Geography of which at least four must be from external Standards. If Geography was not studied at Level 1, entry will be at the discretion of Head of Department based on the results in similar subjects.

12 credits in Level 2 Geography of which at least four must be from external Standards.If Geography was not studied at Level 2, entry will be at the discretion of Head of Department based on the results in similar subjects.

History

A good standard of literacy is advisable.

Previous experience in the study of History is helpful but not essential. However, a reasonable standard of literacy is required. Consult Head of Department if in doubt about requirements.

Previous study of History at earlier levels is helpful but not essential. However, a reasonable standard of literacy is required. Consult Head of Department if in doubt about requirements.

Japanese

Year 10 Japanese or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum of 14 credits in Level 1 Japanese or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum of 14 credits in Level 2 Japanese or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Materials Technology

Year 10 Materials Technology or Design and Visual Communication is an advantage.

14 credits in Level 1 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

14 credits in Level 2 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Mathematics (Algebra Focused)

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Mathematics Applied

For students working at Level 4 of the New Zealand Curriculum.Students are selected at the discretion of Head of Department.

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Mathematics with Calculus

At least two Merit grades from Algebra 1.2, Graphs 1.3 or Geometry 1.6.

Year 12 Calculus: a minimum of 14 credits in Level 2 including Merit in both Algebra 2.6 and Calculus 2.7.

Mathematics with Calculus Extension

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Year 13 Calculus: a minimum of 14 credits in Level 3 including Merit in Algebra 3.5, Differentiation 3.6, andIntegration 3.7.


Subject Mathematics Extension

Year 11 NCEA Level 1

Year 12 NCEA Level 2

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Mathematics General

Mathematics and Statistics

Year 12 Mathematics with Statistics or Calculus: a minimum of 14 credits in Level 2 including Achievement in Probability 2.12. Completion of Year 10 with competence in Level 5 of the New Zealand Curriculum or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Achievement in Statistics 1.10 plus Achievement in either Algebra 1.2 or Graphs, Tables and Equations 1.3 or Chance and data 1.12.

Statistics

Year 12 Mathematics with Statistics or Calculus: a minimum of 14 credits in Level 2 including Merit in Probability 2.12.

Media Studies

Year 9 and/or Year 10 Performing Arts. Level 1 English including at least 10 Level 1 literacy credits, a passion for film and television, and a desire to understand the inner workings of the media industry. The ability to work independently and as part of a team is important.

Media Broadcast Production

At least 13 credits in Level 2 Media Studies. Students new to Media Studies may join this course with approval from the Head of Department. Students must be strong in English, have a passion for film and television, and a high level of creativity. The ability to work independently and as part of a team is crucial. Year 9 and/or Year 10 Performing Arts and at least 13 credits in Level 2 Media Studies. Students new to Media Studies may join this course with approval from the Head of Department. Students must have a passion for film and television, and a high level of creativity. The ability to work independently and as part of a team is crucial.

Media Production

Music

Year 13 NCEA Level 3

Year 9 and/or Year 10 Performing Arts, and Level 1 English, highly motivated creative thinkers with a passion for broadcast journalism or television production. Students need to have engaged in music in the form of weekly instrumental lessons since Year 9 or be regularly composers of music using laptops for at least one year. Students should consult with the Head of Department if they feel they do not meet the requirements for the course. Note, there is no pre-requesite for theory and reading of music notation but all students will be expected to learn this as part of the Year 11 course.

Successful completion of Year 11 Music or at least Achievement in 1.1 or 1.2, 1.3 and 1.6 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Successful completion of Year 12 Music or at least Achievement in 2.1, 2.2, 2.3 and 2.7 or at the discretion of Head of Department.

43


Subject Physical Education (NCEA)

Year 11 NCEA Level 1 Interest in sport, exercise and health is expected.

Physical Education and Health

Year 12 NCEA Level 2

Year 13 NCEA Level 3

Interest in sport, exercise and health is expected. Leadership and people skills exhibited in physical activity (and schoolwide) contexts. Contingent on attaining 14 Level 1 Physical Education credits; entry at the discretion of Head of Department if this course was not taken.

Interest in sport, exercise and health is expected. Leadership and people skills exhibited in physical activity (and schoolwide) contexts. Contingent on attaining 14 Level 2 Physical Education credits; entry at the discretion of Head of Department if this course was not taken.

As per Physical Education Level 2 (NCEA) requirements; please discuss preferred pathways with your Physical Education teacher Head of Department.

Physical Education and Leadership

Physical Science

As per Physical Education Level 2 (NCEA) requirements; please discuss preferred pathways with your Physical Education teacher Head of Department. At the discretion of Head of Department.

Physics

8 credits in a Level 2 Science subject gained from external formatives or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Practical Science

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Science

At the discretion of Head of Department.

At the discretion of Head of Department.

At the discretion of Head of Department.

Spanish

Year 10 Spanish or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum of 14 credits in Level 1 Spanish or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Minimum of 14 credits in Level 2 Spanish or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Te Reo Māori

Year 10 Te Reo Māori or at the discretion of Teacher In Charge of Te Reo Māori.

Textile Technology

Year 9 and/or Year 10 Textile Technology course recommended.

10 credits in Level 1 Textile Technology or at the discretion of Head of Department.

10 credits in Level 2 Textile Technology or at the discretion of Head of Department.

No prerequisites.

No prerequisites.

Consult with the Dean and Ms Hampson.

Consult with the Dean and Ms Hampson.

Travel and Tourism Vocational Education and Training

44

12 credits in a Level 1 Science subject from external formative or at the discretion of Head of Department.

Consult with the Dean and Ms Hampson.

Students’ PRELIM examination results are extremely important when considering applications for entry to an NCEA subject.


Year 11 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 28 Lessons per week At Year 11, all students study English, Mathematics and Science and are required to participate in the Physical Education/ Life Skills/Study Programme. All students are also required to take three other option subjects. They study six subjects for NCEA.

Compulsory Core Subjects

Option Subjects

All students must study these subjects: (Full year, 4 lessons each.)

Select three Option subjects: (Full year, 4 lessons each. Total of 12 lessons a week)

Compul sor y Core Subjects

Option Subjects

(Select one of) ENGLISH/ENGLISH LITERATURE

Accounting

11ACCO

French

11FREN

Agriscience Agriscience

11AGSC 11AGSC

Geography Geography

11GEOG 11GEOG

Agristudies Agristudies

11AGST 11AGST

History History

11HIST 11HIST

Art Art

11ARTA 11ARTA

Japanese Japanese

11JAPA 11JAPA

(Select one of) MATHEMATICS ALGEBRA FOCUS/ MATHEMATICS APPLIED/MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS (Select one of) SCIENCE/PRACTICAL SCIENCE (Students select one of these science subjects if they have not completed Level 1 Science (students of 10N and 10O). BIOLOGY/PHYSICAL SCIENCE (Students who have completed Level 1 Science in Year 10, will need to select one of these subjects, in addition to five optional subjects.) PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH/HEALTH EDUCATION/ STUDY (2 lessons Physical Education and Health, 1 lesson Health Education, 1 lesson Study)

Course Requirements

Design and Design and Visual Visual   Communication Communication Digital Digital Technology Technology   

11DRAM 11DRAM 11ECON

Economics Food and Nutrition  Food and Nutrition 

Materials Technology  Technology  11MTEC 11MTEC Materials Music  Music  Physical Education Physical (NCEA) Education  

11MUSP 11MUSP 11PHED 11PHED

(NCEA) Spanish

11SPAN

11ECON 11FOTE

Spanish Te Reo Māori

11SPAN 11MAOR

11FOTE

Transition Studies   Textile Technology

11TRAN 11CLTX

Can study only one of these, unless you are sitting the NCEA Level 1 Science examination in November of this year (2020) Biology

• students may study more than one Technology-based subject, but should be aware that there may be Standards common to both subjects; • where a same Standard is assessed in different subjects, only one of the grades for that Standard can be counted for credits towards a Level certificate and for an endorsement.

Physical Science 

Science students may study either Science or Science and Biology. Students studying Science and Biology may study Physical Science only with the Head of Department’s permission.

11INTE 11INTE

Drama  Drama Economics

In addition to the subject entry requirements:

Sciences:

11DEST 11DEST

11BIOL 11PHYS

By Selection Athlete Sports Performance

11ATHP

Ballet and Dance Studies

11BALL

English Extension

11ENGLX

ESOL

11ENSL

Mathematics Algebra Focus

11MATA

Mathematics Extension

11MATX

Vocational Education and Training 

11VETR

NCEA FAQs: The link below provides helpful information for parents and students for NCEA: stac.nz/NCEA_FAQs_Y11

Note: On the following pages, for all NCEA subjects, details are also given of the number of internal and external Standards, and total credit values.

Please note, once subject selections are made, it is very difficult to make changes thereafter. Please select carefully. 45


YEAR 11

ACADEMIC CURRICULUM CORE AND OPTIONS 28 Lessons per week

CORE SUBJECTS ENGLISH (11ENGL) 3 Internals (= 14 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. This is a supported programme designed for students who are working well below Level 6 of the curriculum in Year 10 English. It allows students to build their engagement, skills and confidence in English. Students work towards achieving a range of NCEA Level 1 Standards that assess the written, visual and oral strands of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Level 6). Enrolment in this course is at the discretion of the HOD of English and the student’s Year 10 English teacher. The key differences between this course and Year 11 English literature are: • a reduced external workload; • a focus on using visual texts to engage students; • a pace of learning that supports specific learning needs. Students will study a variety of texts that are often linked through a theme(s) and make connections between these and the world around them. This course leads on to Year 12 English. See the ‘Subject Entry Requirements’ page for details.

Course costs: $20.00* Education Perfect subscription * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

ENGLISH LITERATURE (11ENGLT) 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. This is our standard English programme.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ONLINE OPTION SELECTIONS, VISIT: stac.nz/options

Option Selections will open from 3.00pm on Friday 21 August 2020 Once open, you will receive an email with a link to make your online Option Selections. Option Selections will close at 9.00am on Tuesday 8 September 2020 46

This programme allows students to build their engagement, skills and confidence in English. In the process, students work towards achieving a range of NCEA Level 1 Standards which assess the written, visual and oral strands of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Level 6). Students will study a variety of texts that are linked through a theme(s) and make connections between these and the world around them. This course leads on to a Year 12 English Programme: Year 12 Extension English, Year 12 English Literature or Year 12 English. See the ‘Subject Entry Requirements’ page for details.


Course costs: $20.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

• participate in creating healthy communities and environments by taking responsible and critical action.

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

Topics include:

ENGLISH EXTENSION (11ENGLX)

Entry to subject by selection. 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement in Year 10 and who are creative and critical thinkers may be invited into the 11ENGLX class.

• sexuality education – sexual decision-making, contraception and STIs; • decision making around driving, drugs, alcohol and parties; • building resilience – mental health, stress and relaxation; • relationships and friendships – interpersonal skills; • nutrition – adolescence nutrition to make healthy enhancing recommendations. All students will have the opportunity to gain 4 credits in this subject through the Achievement Standard 1.3 (AS91097): Demonstrate the understanding of ways in which well-being can change and strategies to support well-being. For further information, see Mrs Stirling.

Being in 11ENGLX does not guarantee entry to 12ENGLX. Using the same NCEA Level 1 assessments as Year 11 English, this class focuses on:

MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS (11MATS)

• extending and deepening students’ knowledge of language and literature and the issues explored; • building on the learning skills needed for New Zealand Scholarship students, active participation in class discussions, synthesising information, critical thinking and reflection, developing independent thinking and learning skills, personal responsibility and a strong work ethic.

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data.

Course costs: Education Perfect subscription and ‘In Perspective’ text $40.00*. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

HEALTH EDUCATION (11HLEC)

4 Internals (= 13 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Students who are not wishing to continue on to Calculus in Level 2 are selected into this course. This course provides the general skills and knowledge to apply mathematics in everyday life and develop the skills in the specific areas necessary to proceed to the Level 2 Mathematics and Statistics course and beyond.

Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required, workbooks and subscription to Education Perfect. A Casio graphics calculator is an advantage. For further information, see Mr Howard.

Health is compulsory for one period per week Topics are taught based around the Health and Physical Education Curriculum and cover a range of relevant topics that are essential for students to develop knowledge, understanding and awareness of different health concepts. Currently classes rotate amongst teachers that each cover an individual topic. Next year (2021) students will stay with one teacher who will cover all health topics. This is aimed to prevent disruption and allow meaningful connections and foster a supportive environment where students feel comfortable engaging and contributing to the learning. These topics relate to the Health and Physical Education curriculum and the aims of the course are to: • develop the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes needed to maintain and enhance personal health and physical development; • develop understanding, skills and attitudes that enhance interactions and relationships with other people;

MATHEMATICS ALGEBRA FOCUS (11MATA)

Entry to subject by selection. 2 Internals (= 7 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits including one Standard which is assessed in September as a Common Assessment Task)

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. Students who have demonstrated strong algebraic and problem-solving ability will be selected into this 11MATHA class. This course provides the general skills and knowledge to apply mathematics in everyday life and develop the skills in the specific areas necessary to proceed to all Mathematics courses at Level 2 and beyond. 47


Year 11 Academic Curriculum and Options

Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required, workbooks and subscription to Education Perfect. A Casio graphics calculator is an advantage. For further information, see Mr White.

MATHEMATICS APPLIED (11MATP) 5 Internals (= 16 credits)

• building on the learning skills needed to succeed at the highest levels of NCEA; • active participation in class; • discussion, synthesising information, critical thinking and reflection, developing independent thinking and learning skills, personal responsibility, and a strong work ethic.

Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required, workbooks and subscription to Education Perfect. A Casio graphics calculator is an advantage. For further information, see Mr White.

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. Students who are predominantly working at Level 4 of the Curriculum may be invited in the 11MATP class. This course provides students with the fundamental numeracy skills required in everyday life and is by invitation only. The course ensures that students gain the 10 Numeracy credits necessary to meet the Level 1 and University Entrance Numeracy requirement. The course also offers up to five Achievement Standards (15 credits). Students who make sufficient progress and wish to progress to Level 2 Mathematics with Statistics in Year 12 may sit an algebra test to gain entry. Students who are working predominantly at Level 4 of the Curriculum in Year 10 will be selected for this course after the final examination at the end of Year 10.

Future pathways: For most students this course can be followed by Year 12 Mathematics Applied. Achievement grades in three Level 1 Achievement Standards and in the optional algebra test will allow entry to the Level 2 Mathematics with Statistics course.

Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required, selected commercial workbooks and subscription to an online learning tool. For further information, see Mr Clark.

MATHEMATICS EXTENSION (11MATX)

The well-being of students, other people and society through learning in movement contexts. Physical Education is compulsory for all students. Emphasis is placed on the holistic development of students as active participants within New Zealand society. Equally important is the demonstration of personal responsibility, leadership, co-operation and self-management when participating in a physical activity. The topics studied are: • selection of a personal fitness or recreational programme; • games, sports and individual pursuits as examples of physical activity beyond school; • sports education – developing interpersonal skills in a sport setting. Students are assessed in areas measuring physical, social and interpersonal skills through physical activity and the sports education topic. For further information, see Mr Leota.

PRACTICAL SCIENCE (11SCIEC)

Entry to subject by selection.

5 Internals (= 20 credits)

2 Internals (= 7 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits including one Standard which is assessed in September as a Common A ssessment Task)

Investigating, understanding and explaining our natural, physical and material worlds.

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. Students who have demonstrated a high level of algebraic and problem-solving ability may be invited into the 11MATX class. Using the same NCEA Level 1 assessments as Year 11 Mathematics this class focuses on: • extending and deepening students’ knowledge and understanding of problem-solving and algebraic thinking; 48

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH (11PHEC)

This is a fully internally assessed course that is designed for students who would find external written examinations difficult.

This course covers: • a Physics practical that is the same as the one done by all Year 11 students; • a stream study; • heat (i.e. keeping your home warm); • astronomical event; • and selected chemical reactions.


All assessments have a practical component as well as some research.

OPTION SUBJECTS

This course is designed to lead on to Year 12 General science, and the Year 13 General Science course rather than subjects like Physics, Chemistry and Biology.

ACCOUNTING (11ACCO)

It is not possible to gain a subject endorsement in this subject. The course is by invitation only and is by recommendation from the student’s Year 10 Science teacher, however, final entry is at the discretion of the HOD Science.

A general introductory course in Accounting.

For further information, contact Mr Cummack.

SCIENCE (11SCIE) 2 Internals (= 8 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining our natural, physical and material worlds. This is our Year 11 foundation course, with most students opting to do this subject in preparation for Year 12 specialist Science subjects.

2 Internals (= 8 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

A student looking for a general introductory course in Accounting or a one-year study in this subject would benefit from this course. A foundation will have been laid for further study, possibly in conjunction with a career goal. Accounting builds on work already learnt. Throughout, the emphasis is on comprehending and applying double entry accounting. At the completion of the year’s study, students should have an understanding of accounting procedures and of the conceptual framework. They should be able to prepare, analyse and interpret final accounting reports for a sole proprietor and have an understanding of the accounting process by which information flows through an accounting system.

Course costs: $40.00* for workbooks. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Temple.

Teachers select material from the following strands: • physical world – the study of motion; • material world – the study of some basic chemistry; • living world – a study of genetics. The internal Standards test a student’s experimental technique and ability to write up an experiment. Students with Achievement grades in this subject with a Merit grade in their advancing subject should be able to reach at least ‘Achievement’ level in Year 12 Physics, Year 12 Chemistry or Year 12 Biology. Students in this band will have the option of studying either only Science or Science and Biology (= two Science-based subjects). A third option is Science and Physical Science. Physical Science will be available as an option subject to these students only with the permission of the Head of Science. Those students who sat Level 1 NCEA subjects in Year 10 can take Year 11 Physical Science or Year 11 Biology or both.

Course costs: Purchase of write-on workbook, $20.00* Education Perfect fee. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, contact Ms Blay.

AGRISCIENCE (11AGSC) 4 Internals (= 15 credits) 2 Externals (= 9 credits)

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. There are no specific entry requirements for Year 11 Agriscience other than a genuine interest in the subject. This course caters equally for those interested in on-farm practice, and in the scientific basis of agriculture. A number of practical skills catered for on the school grounds allow students to become highly proficient in these tasks. The emphasis is on the interaction of soils, plants and animals in producing quality products. Students can take both Agriscience and Agristudies. Field trips will be based around the application of practical skills. Topics studied are: • • • •

soils – properties, management; animals – nutrition, breeding, health/disease; mastitis investigation; practical skills;

• pasture and crop management practices. 49


Year 11 Academic Curriculum and Options

Course costs: $120* for two practical skills based field trips. * Estimated disbursed course costs

(This subject will run subject to numbers).

Students will work on an individually led programme based around a theme of their choosing. They will study a range of artist models and apply the knowledge, skills and techniques learnt into their own work.

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

Students will complete three assessments during the year. This will include an extensive two-panel folio where students will demonstrate work within the visual disciplines of Drawing, Sculpture, Painting and Printmaking.

AGRISTUDIES (11AGST)

Year 11 Art is a good foundation course which covers many of the essential skills required for success at higher levels. It leads directly to the senior specialist Art disciplines of Design, Photography and Painting.

6 Internals (= 21 credits) 1 External (= 5 credits)

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. There are no specific entry requirements for Year 11 Agristudies other than a genuine interest in the subject. This course caters for those mainly interested in the practical nature of Agriculture and Horticulture. Internal assessments focus on the application of agricultural and horticultural knowledge in primary production practices.

There are no entry requirements, however, Year 10 Art is highly recommended.

Course costs: $150* to cover basic materials. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Swadel.

Students can take both Agriscience and Agristudies. Field trips will be based around the application of practical skills.

Topics studied are: • • • • • •

plant propagation; geographic distribution of agriculture and horticulture; plant management; practical skills; landscape project; environmental issues arising from agricultural production.

Course costs: $120* for two practical skills based field trips. * Estimated disbursed course costs

(This subject will run subject to numbers). For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

ART (11ARTA) 2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 External (= 12 credits)

A practical course of study exploring aspects of terminology relevant to drawing, painting and design. This is an ideal course for those who enjoy working in the Visual Arts and who are interested in developing their skills and understanding in the subject.

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BIOLOGY (11BIOL) 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 7 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining about living things and how they interact with each other and the environment. This course is a good foundation for students planning to continue on in Biology as it covers many of the skills essential for success at higher levels. Students will investigate mammals, including humans, body systems, and the interactions between humans and their environment. They will learn useful techniques for planning experiments and processing and analysing data. Having completed Year 11 Biology students will find the Year 12 Biology course easier. Students in this band will have the option of studying either only Science or Science and Biology (= two Science-based subjects). A third option is Science and Physical Science. Physical Science will be available as an option subject to these students only with the permission of the Head of Science. Those students who sat Level 1 NCEA subjects in Year 10 can take Year 11 Physical Science or Year 11 Biology or both.

Course costs: A number of workbooks will need to be purchased, together with an end-of-year revision book that will help with revision before the external examinations. For further information, see Mrs Carline.


DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION (11DEST) 3 Internals (= 12 credits) 2 Externals (= 6 credits)

Produce design solutions using a range of drawing methods. Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is an area of learning within the New Zealand Curriculum, where students learn about design, develop their practice of designing, and develop their design thinking in the context of Spatial and Product Design. The students develop an awareness of design by using visual communication skills to conceptualise and develop design ideas. They apply their visual literacy through using sketching, digital modes and other modelling techniques to effectively communicate and present design ideas. Students learn that designers identify the qualities and potential of design ideas in terms of the broad principles of design (aesthetics and function) and of sustainability. This course is portfolio-based with no external examination and is foundational for Year 12 Design and Visual Communication.

Course costs: A list of required stationery is provided and the items on this list should be purchased prior to starting the course which will include coloured pencils, pigment liners and markers costing around $45.00. Items of a consumable or specialised nature are carried by the department and the costs for these can be disbursed to student accounts.

• an awareness of the process involved in the creation of the various components of a digital outcome, from the initial plan to the finished product; • competence in how to use a computer in general from word processing to file structures, to how the internet works; • using online resources such as shared documents, discussion forums, video and online tutorials. This course provides the foundation for Year 12 Digital Technology.

Course costs: None. All software used is open source. For further information, see Mr Adams or Ms Lee.

DRAMA (11DRAM) 4 Internals (= 18 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Researching, analysing, interpreting and creating drama contexts to convey meaning to an audience. Drama is not just for those who wish to become actors, but for those who wish to pursue any career which deals with people and the understanding of them.

For further information, see Mr Kerrison.

Performance skills covered will include acting technique, the devising process and theatre forms. Students will also be involved in a class play which will be performed to an audience of family and friends.

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY (11INTE)

Compulsory internal assessments take place throughout the year covering the application of drama techniques, devising and performing a drama, using drama/theatre forms in a performance, and performing an acting role in a scripted production.

3 Internals (= 12 credits) 2 External (= 6 credits)

Develop basic skills and understanding in a digital environment. In this course students learn a wide variety of IT skills, as well as being introduced to computer science concepts. They will learn how algorithms are formed and used by computers and analyse website and application interfaces. While students create a website and develop a programme, they will gain experience in planning, decision making and appraising the quality of their solutions through the planning, creation and testing stages.

External assessment focuses on drama elements, techniques, conventions and technologies within live performances.

More specifically the course should enable students to develop:

2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 Optional Internal (= 4 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

• competence in using either industry standard software or free open source software in digital imaging and web authoring, as well as using HTML and CSS to create websites; • the ability to plan and create a MySQL database, integrating content with a website using PHP; • a knowledge of introductory programming in Python; • an understanding of design theory and competence in setting out effective, well-designed websites;

For further information, see Mr Wiseman.

ECONOMICS (11ECON)

Understanding the decisions made by different sectors of the economy and their interdependence. This course aims to develop students’ understanding of why and how people as consumers and producers make economic choices and decisions to satisfy their wants, by allocating and managing scarce resources in the context of the New Zealand economy. 51


Year 11 Academic Curriculum and Options

The year’s work is divided into three major sections:

FOOD AND NUTRITION (11FOTE)

• producers – types of producers, their interdependence and the decisions they make about the use of resources to supply goods and services; • consumers – how consumers resolve the conflict of limited means relative to wants along with factors which influence the demand for goods and services; • market – the market where producers and consumers interact resulting in the allocation of resources and market equilibrium.

3 Internals (= 15 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Course costs: $40.00* for a workbook. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Temple.

ESOL (11ENSL)

Entry to subject by selection. A study of English for academic purposes. Entry into the Year 11 ESOL course is based on an English assessment completed at the end of Year 10. It is for students who do not have English as their first language and wish to improve their language skills for mainstream classes. Students new to the College would be expected to have reached a minimum of intermediate level. This course is designed to support the student’s mainstream English course. It also assists in providing a pathway to NCEA Literacy at Level 1 and is run in close collaboration with teachers in the English Department. The course is designed to assist students to write clear, accurate English, to read with understanding, and to speak fluently and clearly. Support in other curriculum areas is also offered and this is done in close co-operation with subject teachers, tutors and the Dean. Each course is carefully structured according to individual needs and there is a strong emphasis on subject support. Assistance is provided for understanding the NCEA English Standards. Ongoing assessment gives students valuable feedback on their progress and helps indicate which English courses would be most appropriate for them in the future. Students are provided with resources which are relevant to their cultural background. Students achieve very pleasing results in this course and improve their formal reading and writing skills in preparation for University Entrance Literacy assessment at Level 2. For further information, see Mrs Brooks.

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Develop understanding and skills related to food to enable students to enhance their own well-being. Students are encouraged to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes to take responsibility for their own well-being, particularly in relation to food choice. Initially, students focus on developing their practical skills and particularly working hygienically to prevent bacterial contamination. In the second unit of work the focus is on making informed choices about food and understanding key nutrition concepts. Students are expected to be able to apply this knowledge to feeding a teenager. This includes interpreting nutrition and packaging information and being able to make decisions about good food choices. Students will also consider the influences on food choice. The last unit considers New Zealand’s food culture and explores how other cultures have influenced food habits in New Zealand. Students explain how we have adopted and changed these ‘new’ foods. Food preparation work is an integral part of all units of work. This course provides the foundation for Year 12 Food and Nutrition.

Course costs: Food costs and some photocopy costs will be disbursed each term. For further information, see Mrs Duncan.

FRENCH (11FREN) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

Understand and create more developed ideas with more complex language. This course continues to build on the language learnt in the previous two years. The online text Tricolore 3 is used as a basis for study. Grammar and vocabulary continues to be taught and extended to allow students to communicate beyond the immediate context. Weekly vocabulary worksheets, where the vocabulary is used in context, assist the students with mastery of vocabulary and Level 1 structures. Students are encouraged to speak French and to improve their accent and fluency. Considerable effort is put into developing a range of language that enables students to cope in a wider range of situations. Students learn to write French with more developed ideas and with language that is more grammatically accurate and varied. Listening and reading skills are further developed through a variety of texts and listening to native speakers on audio files.


Course costs: $50.00* Online Textbook and Education Perfect subscription.

• defining a problem; • gathering and processing information.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Radcliffe or Mrs Marshall.

GEOGRAPHY (11GEOG) 4 Internals (= 13 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study of how people and the environment interact. During this course students will develop and apply the skills and techniques used in geographic inquiry and interpretation. They will also take an interest in, and gain an appreciation of, the qualities and needs of the environment. They will be encouraged to contribute to society through being able to participate in making sound decisions about the relationships between people and the natural environment and associated issues. From this course students will develop an understanding of: • the causes and effects of extreme natural events, focusing on local and international case studies; • how environments are managed in sustainable way (on the West Coast); • GIS (Geographic Information Systems); • the nature of a contemporary geographic issue; • conduct geographic research (case study: Blackpool) • how to apply a range of geographic skills and ideas.

Course costs: Students are required to participate in a three-day field trip to the West Coast. The field trip will cost approximately $235*. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Boulton.

The topics covered will include: • Weimar Germany and the Great Depression; • Black Civil Rights in the USA 1954–1970 and its significance for New Zealanders; • Pandemic and its consequences; the great plague in England and the influenza epidemic in New Zealand in 1918. Students will gain knowledge, skills and experience to: • understand how the causes and consequences of past events that are of significance to New Zealanders and shape the lives of people and society; • understand how people’s perspectives on past events that are of significance to New Zealanders differ. For further information, see Mr Faulls.

JAPANESE (11JAPA) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

Understand and create more developed ideas with more complex language. This course builds further on the foundation of the language basics learnt in the previous two years. The grammar and vocabulary covered are up to Level 6 of the Curriculum. Students read and write all work in the kana scripts and learn to read and write the 55 kanji required for this Level. Students are encouraged to speak in the language, develop good pronunciation and fluency and develop a range of language that will enable them to cope in a wider range of social situations. Through the topics that are learnt this year students increase their vocabulary and grammar knowledge markedly, relating them to real life situations.

HISTORY (11HIST)

Course costs: 50.00* Education Perfect subscription and

3 Internals (= 12 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

* Estimated disbursed course costs

A study of significant developments and differing perspectives on past events of significance to New Zealanders.

Renash booklet.

For further information, see Mrs Simcock.

This course is designed for students taking History for the first time. It aims to encourage a genuine appreciation of history, i.e. to develop knowledge of crucial events in our past (e.g. World War II), and interest in important people (e.g. Martin Luther King Jnr) whose actions and beliefs have shaped our lives today.

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY (11MTEC)

The course also develops particular skills in:

Within the context of Hard Materials Technology students will design, plan and produce a manufactured outcome.

• communication (especially essay writing); • the ability to enter imaginatively into the past; • critical thinking;

3 Internals (= 16 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Materials Technology is a practical activity-based course consisting of three learning activities: technological practice, technological knowledge and nature of technology. 53


Year 11 Academic Curriculum and Options

Materials Technology enables students to: • gain experience in technical graphics and develop skills in graphic communication; • develop a comprehensive knowledge of, and experience in, a wide range of materials and processes; • develop design skills that allow the translation of knowledge and ideas into practical realities. Through challenging design briefs students are encouraged to experiment and be innovative through the design process. Design activities include transposition of ideas, conceptualisation, prototyping, development and evaluation. Students are exposed to a range of practical skills and processes with a variety of materials. Other topics include manufacturing processes, health and safety in the workshop and issues concerning the environment. There are two areas of learning in hard materials. Students will be placed in whatever area their timetable allows. Both these areas of learning use the same process to develop skills and knowledge.

Students will complete a mixture of Achievement Standards and Unit Standards, all of which have Achievement/Merit/Excellence grades available and all contribute to Course endorsement. Students will be working to develop personalised courses in their areas of interest.

Course costs: Students who require an accompanist for NCEA solo performance assessments should expect to pay $20.00–$50.00* per term. There is also a one-off cost for a course textbook of $20.00*. * Estimated disbursed course costs

Due to the dominance of the Apple Mac platform and Logic Pro recording software in the music industry, it is highly recommended that students have a MacBook of some variety with Logic Pro (around $300). However, this is not compulsory, students with other systems will still be able to complete the requirements of the course. For entry to this course, students do not need to have taken option Music in Years 9 or 10, but they do need to have been playing an instrument for a minimum of two years or have a body of work they have composed.

Course costs: Materials used. For further information, see Mr Ferguson. For further information, see Mr Hamilton or Mr Murphy.

ACOUSTIC MUSIC 4 Internals (= 22 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

MUSIC (11MUSP) Exploration of sounds and technologies for creating, interpreting and representing music ideas. Students are free to construct their own individual course (in consultation with Mr Ferguson) based upon the following two streams: Contemporary Music Production and Acoustic Music.

CONTEMPORARY MUSIC PRODUCTION 5 Internals (= 24 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits) The aim of this course is to equip students with the skills they need to excel in the modern music industry. There are three main aspects to this course: • tools – students will learn how to record and mix music using the technology and tools in our world-class recording studio; • progressive and innovative programmes – students will learn composition, performance and musical production techniques. They will develop a basic musical vocabulary of understanding theory and aural skills. However, these will not be taught like traditional theory examinations, all theory and aural will be immediately applicable to the performance, composition and production work students are doing; • collaborative culture – through Project Based Learning students will learn to be interdependent as they create quality music. We will have a culture of collaboration, embracing change, celebrating success and progress as this course adapts to student needs. 54

The aim of this course is to give students a solid foundation in performance, composition, notation and music analysis. It is perfect for the student that wishes to sit Level 3 Scholarship Music in the future and who may want to undertake university study in music. The emphasis of this course is on practical music-making. Twenty-two credits are internally assessed for solo performance, group performance, composition and music knowledge. Eight credits are externally assessed in the subjects of transcription (aural) and score reading. Students will enter for all Standards.

Course costs: Students who require an accompanist for NCEA solo performance assessments should expect to pay $20.00–$50.00* per term. There is also a one-off cost for a course textbook of $20.00*. Students needing extra theory help will be expected to use the Musition and Auralia online learning tools at a cost of $50.00* for a one year subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

A prerequisite for this course is theory/rudiments knowledge to about a Grade 2–3 Level or equivalent. Students must also have been playing their instrument for a minimum of two years. For further information, see Mr Ferguson.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION (NCEA) (11PHED) 5 Internals (= 20 credits)

The well-being of students, other people and society through learning in movement and health-related contexts. There is no prerequisite for this course. A genuine interest in sport and physical activity is important, as is the desire to improve your knowledge and ability in sport, personal development, and leadership.

Students can opt for this course but the final decision as to whether or not students are accepted rests with the Head of Science.

Note: Those students who sat Level 1 NCEA subjects in Year 10 can take Year 11 Physical Science or Year 11 Biology, or both. Course costs: Purchase of write-on workbook. For further information, see Mr Cummack.

Students will experience and participate in a wide range of physical activities, in a variety of contexts. The main areas of study will be chosen from: • • • • • •

demonstration of interpersonal skills; active participation and well-being; safety and self-responsibility; Sports Science as applied to sporting situations; performance in physical activities and sports; leadership and self-management in practical activities.

There will be ongoing practical and theoretical assessment throughout the year in each of the Standards

Course costs: Field trips including Outdoor Education, approximately $70.00* per year. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr O’Reilly.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (11PHYS) 3 Internal (= 11 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining physical phenomena, matter and the changes it undergoes. This course is for more able students or students with an interest in Science who possibly see themselves pursuing a career in Science. It is designed to give Science students more depth and breadth to their Science education. Students have found this course very good preparation for either Year 12 Physics or Year 12 Chemistry. This course will target Merit and Excellence endorsement.

SPANISH (11SPAN) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

Understand and create more developed ideas with more complex language. This course will build on knowledge gained in Year 10 and will introduce more complex vocabulary and grammar, focusing on expanding these areas and making it a significant part of the student’s ability to use the language. The course follows the National Curriculum Statement up to and including Level 6 with equal emphasis on listening, reading, writing and speaking. Some of the topics covered in this course are giving out personal information, the Spanish alphabet focusing on letter sound and spelling rules. All the topics in this course aim to develop students’ vocabulary and grammar knowledge, as well as relating to real life situations. By the end of the course, the students will be confident enough to seek out opportunities to use Spanish and initiate and sustain a conversation with a sympathetic native speaker. The cultural element of the course involves finding out about the history, customs and culture of Spanish-speaking countries.

Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect subscription and on-line textbook Zoom 2. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Evlampieff.

Topics in this course may include:

TE REO MĀORI (MĀORI LANGUAGE) (11MAOR)

• electricity and magnetism; • wave behaviour; • aspects of chemical reactions;

2 Internals (= 12 credits) 1 External (= 6 credits) Unit Standard Internals (= 6 credits)

• carbon chemistry. These Standards have been selected from either the Physics or the Chemistry Level 1 Achievement Standards. This course will give those students an advantage when it comes to taking Year 12 Physics or Year 12 Chemistry.

Understand and create more developed ideas with more complex language. This course continues to build on the language and cultural elements covered in the previous two years. Reading, writing, speaking and listening continues to be taught and extended to allow students to communicate beyond the immediate context as well as the continuation of elements of tikanga and other 55


Year 11 Academic Curriculum and Options

Māori customs and traditions. Weekly vocabulary worksheets, where the vocabulary is used in context, assist the students with mastery of vocabulary and Level 1 structures. Students are encouraged to speak Te Reo Māori and to improve their pronunciation. Students learn to write in Te Reo Māori with more developed ideas and with language that is more varied. Speaking and listening skills are further developed throughout the year also.

Design, Project Management, Interior Design, Product Design, Exhibition Design, Costume Design, Stage Set Design and Spatial Design. Course costs: A disbursement is made for any school supplied materials, pattern drafting and photocopy costs. For further information, see Mrs Thomson or Mrs Duncan.

This course is designed to cater for students who have at least two years of learning Te Reo. Students will be assessed through 2 internals (12 credits) and 1 external (6 credits.) The course will also cater for students who are new to Te Reo and they will be able to do a combination of Unit Standards and Achievement standards.

Course costs: $50.00. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Westrupp.

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY (11CLTX) 3 Internals (= 16 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Within the context of Textile Technology students will design and produce a product. Students undertaking this course will be challenged and encouraged to unleash their creativity and take risks while learning to problem-solve as they design and make textile products. They will apply the design process to produce a technological outcome using available resources to meet the given need or opportunity. The focus will be on developing skills and knowledge about: creating designs to meet a design brief; refining design ideas; drawing skills to communicate ideas; trialling ideas to make informed decisions; using emerging technologies with textiles where appropriate; pattern manipulation; applying construction skills to make high quality textile products; • using material knowledge to select and evaluate appropriate material for the designs; • using stakeholder feedback to help make decisions about designs and outcomes. • • • • • • •

This course provides a foundation for Year 12 Textile Technology and is a pathway towards a range of tertiary programmes in design. This may include for example: Fashion Design, Textile 56

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (11VETR) Entry to subject primarily by selection. Students can indicate their preference for entry via discussion with their Dean and Ms Hampson. All Internal Assessment Unit Standards = 30+ credits Does not count for course endorsement.

Learning skills required to successfully enter the working world. The purpose of Year 11 Vocational Education and Training is to provide a programme of study with an emphasis on applied literacy and numeracy, key employment knowledge and skills, and participation in outdoor education for the development of character, peer and personal leadership, and interpersonal skills. Unit Standard assessment is undertaken in: • • • • • • • • • •

core generic skills: self-management; financial capability; social and cooperative skills; work and study skills; service sector skills. communication skills; primary industries – e.g. horticulture; Health and Safety; Outdoor Education;

• career planning.

Course costs: $100.00* for the Outdoor Education course. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Hampson.


BY APPLICATION ATHLETE SPORTS PERFORMANCE (11ATHP) Successful applicants will have two allocated periods which will occur during their scheduled Physical Education (Core) class. During this time students will have the opportunity to train and study depending on sporting workload as well as be part of key ‘pillar’ sessions in the classroom where we go into further depth in developing the key pillars of high performance to help with being a successful student athlete. Selection criteria: The selection criteria for this course will be based on level of representation of sport involved in and attitude.

– offered in Years 12– 13 and which completes the five-year Diploma programme (see the Senior College section of the website for the Ballet Company programme in Years 12–13). A programme of guest tutors and special guests continues, along with performance opportunities and additional classes. NCEA Dance: 3 internals, 16 credits. Certificate endorsement given as no external credits.

Entry and prerequisites: New students, suitable ballet background and a short audition with Artistic Director, Dr Cairns. Current Year 10 students, recent Year 10 examination results at Commended or above, or by HOD discretion.

Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 11 option selections.

The representation will be tiered form: • • • • • •

New Zealand representative; South/North Island representative; regional representative; school/club first team; attitude and application; previous involvement in the programme is also recommended.

stac.nz/Options

Course costs: $85.00* per term (includes guest tutors, repertoire half tutu and character skirt use, and other incidentals). * Estimated disbursed course costs

Entry at the discretion of the Head of Department.

Additional costs: Examination fees, costume hires, additional

Only a set number of places are available each year. Students are selected to enter on an application basis.

For further information, see the College website or Dr Cairns.

classes, exam prep or private lessons.

Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 11 option selections. stac.nz/Options

For further information, see Mr Gain.

BALLET AND DANCE STUDIES (11BALL) St Andrew’s College Ballet Academy Diploma – Third Year

Understanding the art of dance: strengthening balletic technique, exploring dance genres, developing choreography, and experiencing performance. This course, the third Year of the Ballet Academy Diploma programme, is a continuation of Year 10 Ballet and Dance Studies course. In Year 11, our experienced dancers take the Advanced Diploma Examination - a high level qualification exam, entitling successful candidates the use of ‘letters’ after their name. The NCEA Dance program continues with up to 16 credits being gained. This course leads into the Ballet Company 57


Senior College Curriculum

The Senior College curriculum is designed to provide a wide range of options which allow students to follow their chosen path of study and work towards achieving their potential. The expectation is that all students will strive for academic excellence. Excellence is recognised as ‘doing one’s best’. A high level of academic achievement should give students greater access to the tertiary institution of their choice or to a position in the workforce. Most subjects in the Senior College, and many tertiary courses, have entry requirements. For this reason we advise students to plan ahead to ensure that possible avenues of study are not closed. Year 12 English is the only compulsory academic subject in the Senior College curriculum. When choosing subjects, students need to be mindful of their own abilities and be realistic in their choices. If it suits a student’s particular needs, they are able to take subjects at more than one Level in the same year. This is called multi-level study and is a regular feature of senior secondary schooling. We also advise students to keep their course as broad as possible within the framework of subjects offered in the Senior College. In summar y, students should:

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• choose wisely and broadly from the many courses offered; • have a sense of direction for their academic studies; • seek course counselling from relevant staff as and when required; • have a meaningful and personalised academic pathway for themselves; • seek to develop analytical thinking skills and to become independent learners.

Ways to help you learn – be sure to: 1.

Set yourself some goals – both short-term and long-term. A Year 12 student might set NCEA Level 2 as a long-term goal and taking part in the school production as a short-term goal. 2. Plan the time you have available after school so that homework, co-curricular involvement like sport or music, and your social life can all be fitted in. Make sure you prioritise so that the important things get done. 3. Take good notes in class. 4. Participate in each lesson. 5. Keep up with your homework. If there are any concerns seek help from your teacher or other support people like fellow students or your Dean. Use your homework time to review what you have been studying – this is a particularly good thing to do in those times when you don’t have any specific homework from teachers. 6. Have a wall planner at home and enter all assessments (tests and projects) for each term. 7. Take internal assessment seriously; it provides results that stay on your Record of Achievement. 8. Make sure you know precisely what is required for an assessment and, if possible, practise using sample papers from the NCEA and TKI websites. 9. Make sure you spend time preparing for every assessment. 10. Know what is required to gain each NCEA Level qualification and University Entrance.


Year 12 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 28 Lessons per week At Year 12, all students study English and are required to participate in the Physical Education/Religious Education/Study/ Senior College Options Programme. All students are also required to take five other subjects, studying six subjects for NCEA.

Compulsory Core Subjects

Option Subjects

All students must study these subjects: (Full year, 4 lessons each.)

Select five Option subjects: (Full year, 4 lessons each. Total of 20 lessons a week)

Compul sor y Core Subjects

Option Subjects

(Select one of) ENGLISH /ENGLISH LITERATURE

Accounting

12ACCO

Geography

Agribusiness Agribusiness

12AGBS 12AGBS

History

12HIST

Agriscience Agriscience

12AGSC 12AGSC

Japanese Japanese

12JAPA 12JAPA

Agristudies Agristudies

12AGST 12AGST

Materials Materials Technology  Technology  12MTEC 12MTEC

Art: Design  Design  Art:

12ARTD 12ARTD

Mathematics Mathematics Applied Applied    12MATP 12MATP

Art: Art: Painting Painting   

12ARPA 12ARPA

12MATC 12MATC

Art: Photography   Art: Photography   Biology Biology Business Management Chemistry

12ARTP 12ARTP 12BIOL 12BIOL 12BUSS 12CHEM

Mathematics Mathematics with with    Calculus Calculus Mathematics and   Mathematics with   Statistics Statistics   Media Studies

12MATS 12MATS

Chemistry Classical Studies  

12CHEM 12CLST

Classical Studies   Design and Visual  

12CLST 12DEST

Design and Visual Communication Communication  

12DEST

Digital Technology  

12INTE

Drama Drama Economics Economics Food and Nutrition  Food and Nutrition  French French Geography

12DRAM 12DRAM 12ECON 12ECON 12FOTE 12FOTE 12FREN 12FREN 12GEOG

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/RELIGIOUS EDUCATION/STUDY/ OPTIONS PROGRAMME (1 lesson for each, one term Leadership Programme instead of Study)

Course Requirements In addition to the subject entry requirements: • students may study up to three Sciences; • entry into any Year 12 Science subject is possible from Year 11 Science but is not possible from Practical Science; • students who take Year 12 Science may study only one other Year 12 Science-based subject; • students may study more than one Technology-based subject but should be aware that there may be Standards common to both subjects. Where the same Standard is assessed in different subjects, only one of the grades for that Standard can be counted for credits towards a Level certificate and for an endorsement; • students may not study both Media Studies and Media Production. There are a number of Standards common to both subjects (the rationale applying to Technology-based subjects applies in the context of these subjects);

Mathematics: • four courses are offered at Year 12; • students who choose Mathematics will be entered in the course according to the entry criteria they meet; • students who choose not to enter a Year 12 Mathematics course should ensure that they have already gained the Numeracy requirements for University Entrance; • students may study both Mathematics with Calculus and Mathematics with Statistics.

Spanish

11SPAN

Spanish

11SPAN

Students study only one NCEA course.

12MEST

Media Studies: Film   12MESF Media Production  12MEPR Media Music Studies:   Television Physical Education   (NCEA) Music

12MEST 12MUSP 12PHED 12MUSP

Physical Education Education    Physical and Health (NCEA) (NCEA) Physics Science Science Spanish Spanish Textile Technology  Textile Technology 

12PHHE 12PHED

Travel and Tourism  

12THTR

12PHYS 12SCIE 12SCIE 12SPAN 12SPAN 12CLTX 12CLTX

Students are selected:

Textile Technology Athlete Sports Performance 11CLTX English Extension ESOL

Physical Education for NCEA:

12GEOG

Mathematics with Calculus Extension   Vocational Education and Training  

12ATHP 12ENGLX 12ENSL 12MATCX 12VETR

NCEA FAQs: The link below provides helpful information for parents and students for NCEA: stac.nz/NCEA_FAQs_Y12

Please note, once subject selections are made, it is very difficult to make changes thereafter. Please select carefully.

Note: On the following pages, for all NCEA subjects, details are also given of the number of internal and external Standards, and total credit values.

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YEAR 12

ACADEMIC CURRICULUM CORE AND OPTIONS 28 Lessons per week

CORE SUBJECTS ENGLISH (12ENGL) 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. This programme is designed for students who require more support in their progress towards achieving Level 2 English Standards. Students will complete a variety of activities that will help build their engagement, skills and confidence in English. In the process, students work towards achieving a range of NCEA Level 2 Standards that assess the written, visual and oral strands of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Level 7). The key differences between this course and Year 12 English Literature are: • a reduced external assessment workload; • a focus on using visual texts to engage students; • a pace of learning that supports specific learning needs. Students will study a variety of texts that are often linked through a theme(s) and make connections between these and the world around them. Students can gain the University Entrance literacy requirement, which is five credits in reading and five credits in writing. This course leads on to the Year 13 English programme. See the ‘Subject Entry Requirements’ page for details. For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

ENGLISH LITERATURE (12ENGLT) 3 Internals (= 13 credits) 2 Externals (= 12 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ONLINE OPTION SELECTIONS, VISIT: stac.nz/options

Option Selections will open from 3.00pm on Friday 21 August 2020 Once open, you will receive an email with a link to make your online Option Selections. Option Selections will close at 9.00am on Tuesday 8 September 2020 60

Year 12 English Literature is our standard English programme. It is a course designed for students who enjoy literature and who are reasonably confident with their skills in this subject. It builds on the skills developed in previous years. There is a greater emphasis on the analysis of texts and on crafting, developing and sustaining ideas in a range of different contexts, including the written and oral strands of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Level 7).


In the process, students work towards achieving a range of NCEA Level 2 Standards. Students will study a variety of texts that are often linked through a theme(s) and make connections between these and the world around them. Students can gain the University Entrance literacy requirement, which is five credits in reading and five credits in writing. This course leads on to a Year 13 English programme: Year 13 Literature or Year 13 English. Some students may be invited into the 13 Extension English programme from this course. See the ‘Subject Entry Requirements’ page for details. For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (12PHEC) The overall course emphasis is on developing a positive attitude towards physical activity by accepting challenges and extending personal capabilities and experiences. Through experiencing new activities students learn to adapt skills, develop selfconfidence, and an awareness of the needs of others. One period per week for whole year. The following activities are undertaken – recreational and leisure activities, team and individual sports, foreign games and sports education units, regular sessions of recreational choice where students can pursue their own interests or try something new. They are given the opportunity to develop self-discipline, independence and personal organisation. For further information, see Mrs Price.

ENGLISH EXTENSION (12ENGLX)

Entry to subject by selection. 3 Internals (= 13 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (12RLED) This course leads to students being given the opportunity to explore confirmation or baptism for themselves.

Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement in Year 11, and who are creative and critical thinkers may be invited into the 12ENGLX class. Being in 11ENGLX does not guarantee entry to 12ENGLX.

The course covers the ultimate questions of life – Why are we here? Where did we come from? Where are we going? The curriculum aim is for students to be able to answers these questions developed by philosophers and theologians throughout the ages.

Using the same NCEA Level 2 assessments as Year 12 English Literature, this class focuses on:

For further information, see Rev. Morrow.

• extending and deepening students’ knowledge of language and literature and the issues explored; • building on the learning skills needed for Scholarship students: active participation in class discussions, synthesising information, critical thinking and reflection, developing independent thinking and learning skills, personal responsibility and a strong work ethic; • preparing students for the Scholarship English examination in addition to the NCEA Level 2 qualification.

Course costs: Unravelling Scholarship English text $45.00*. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

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Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

OPTION SUBJECTS

Course costs: $50.00* for practical experiments.

ACCOUNTING (12ACCO)

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

2 Internals (= 7 credits) 3 Externals (= 13 credits)

Development of Accounting processes, concepts and presentation of reports. The successful completion of Level 1 Accounting is a distinct advantage for students as Year 12 Accounting builds on work already learnt. Students new to the subject will be required to complete basic Level 1 revision during the holidays. At the completion of the year’s study students should be able to record and process financial data from the source documents, and present and report the results of operations and the financial position of an entity to interested end users. Topics studied in more depth are inventory control, processing data using software, preparation and analysis of financial reports.

AGRISCIENCE (12AGSC) 4 Internals (= 16 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. Students can enter this subject without previous study of Agriscience, however, an interest and ability in Science is important due to the theoretical nature of the content. Field trips will be undertaken throughout the year that support the learning in a number of Standards.

Students will use a MYOB accounting software package to produce financial reports from source documents.

Students can take only one of Agriscience or Agristudies.

Course costs: $40.00* for a workbook.

Topics covered include:

* Estimated disbursed course costs

• • • • • •

For further information, see Mr Temple.

AGRIBUSINESS (12AGBS) 5 Internals (= 19 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

modifying physical factors of the environment; livestock growth and development; landscape design; environmental sustainability; practical investigation – chicken growth; modification of livestock reproductive performance.

Course costs: $100* for three field trips. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with the supply of primary products in New Zealand. Students can enter this subject without previous study of Agriscience or Business, however, an interest and ability in the agricultural supply chain is important due to the theoretical nature of the content. Agribusiness looks at growing value in New Zealand primary products through innovation, science, technology, management, and marketing. This course has a specific focus on the veterinary industry, salmon farming, dairy farming, and beef. Students can take both Agriscience and Agribusiness. Topics covered include: • • • • • •

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future proofing; use of organisms to meet future needs; Agribusiness structure; cash flow forecasting; the impacts of personal values on sustainability; agricultural and horticultural land use in New Zealand.

AGRISTUDIES (12AGST) 4 Internals (= 16 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. Students can enter this subject without previous study of Agriculture; however, it mainly caters for those interested in the practical nature of Agriculture. This course aims to provide students with the skills and knowledge to gain employment in a career based on-farm. On completion of this course students gain the New Zealand Certificate in Primary Industry Skills Level 2 with a focus on either dairy, sheep or cattle. Unit Standards in a mix of Livestock Management, Agri vehicle (ATVs, tractors, motocycles), Health and Safety, and a chosen strand (Dairy, Sheep or Cattle), are completed both in class and during personal study time.


Entry into this course is by Teacher in Charge and Dean approval only, due to the commitment and off-site time required. Three two day practical courses are needed to complete this course and students must be able to demonstrate safe and appropriate behaviour to attend.

Course costs: $200* to cover basic materials, printing and folio boards. Students will also be required to purchase their own external hard drive or a USB (minimum 4GB). * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Swadel. Students can take only one of Agriscience or Agristudies.

Topics covered include: • • • • •

modifying physical factors of the environment; landscape design; environmental sustainability; practical investigation – chicken growth; livestock reproduction.

Course costs: $560* for Unit Standard administration and courses run by the National Trade Academy. This course could be fully funded through St Andrew's College funding. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

ART: PAINTING (12ARPA) 2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 External (= 12 credits)

A study in drawing and painting. Students research a theme based on their choice of subject matter, techniques and processes. They then generate and develop ideas through series of works that use wet and dry media. Traditional and contemporary artists inform, challenge and influence the production of work for a folio that shows understanding of art-making methods and ideas.

Course costs: $250* for materials. * Estimated disbursed course costs

ART: DESIGN (12ARTD)

For further information, see Ms Lawrence.

2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 External (= 12 credits)

A practical study of visual communication through the manipulation of text and image. In this course students are taught to combine Art and Technology to communicate ideas with a focus on Graphic Design. Students learn the basic principles of Design and the ways in which designers work. In particular, they will learn about the design process and how to apply this process to a range of tasks, including logo, poster, magazine and package design as well as an in-depth look at typographic layout and the use of computers as a design tool. The aim of this course is to provide students with a thorough grounding in Design, which involves understanding a brief, how to carry out research, generating ideas and developing these ideas in a systematic way through to the finished artwork. Drawing plays a major part in this course as the central means of generating ideas. Drawing is carried out by hand in conventional ways and also by using a computer, Wacom tablet and the camera. Students will work on an individually led programme based around a theme of their choosing. There are no entry requirements for Design, however, where the Level 1 Visual Art External Standard has been attempted and not achieved, entry into Level 2 Design is at the discretion of the Head of Department.

ART: PHOTOGRAPHY (12ARTP) 3 Internals (= 12 credits) 1 External (= 12 credits)

A study in image-making through photographic processes. In this course students will study selected artist models, both traditional and contemporary, to help inform their own work. They will learn how to analyse photographs in order to understand photographic techniques and approaches. Skills like composition, camera functions, lighting (natural and artificial) and editing are practised until proficient. Students learn how to develop their personal interests and ideas into successful bodies of work through evaluation, critiquing and editing. Black and white film and the darkroom process are used in the first half of the year (we supply the cameras, film, paper and chemistry for this process). Digital processes are used in the second half, when students will need their own DSLR camera for classwork. Year 11 Art is recommended, or a submission of photographic images approved by Ms Lawrence before the course selection deadline.

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Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

Course costs: Approximately $200* or $400* depending whether darkroom or digital is used. Students will also be required to have their own DSLR camera. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, particularly regarding the submission detailed above, see Ms Lawrence.

ATHLETE SPORTS PERFORMANCE (12ATHP)

Entry to subject by application. In Year 12 successful applicants will have Athlete Sports Performance as one of their six curriculum subjects. We do not offer NCEA credits but provide one on one mentoring for each student to help with the balance needed to be a successful student athlete. Students applying for this need to be motivated and high achieving in their sports. The one-on-one mentoring is a key part of this course to aid with support. Students will also be involved in classroom learning around the key pillars of high performance. The representation will be tiered form: • • • • • •

New Zealand representative; South/North Island representative; regional representative; school/club first team; attitude and application; previous involvement in the programme is also recommended.

BIOLOGY (12BIOL) 3 Internals (= 11 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining about living things and how they interact with each other and the environment. This course covers all the main areas of Biology – ecology, genetics, evolution and the way cells work. Students will enhance scientific inquiry skills in field work, experimentation and research. While not an absolute prerequisite for Year 13 Biology, students who feel they may need to take Biology for career reasons would be well advised to take the subject for both years. This course covers much of the fundamental theory on which the first year of Health Science Biology is based. Biology can lead to tertiary studies and employment in such areas as the Health Sciences, Biotechnology, Food Technology and Agriculture as well as extending a student’s appreciation of the environment and the rapidly expanding applied biological technologies. This course will lead to Year 13 Biology. Students who did not achieve a Merit in a Level 1 Biology Standard will find this subject difficult. This can come from Level 1 Science or Level 1 Biology.

Course costs: $25.00*for field trip and workbooks. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Carline.

Entry at the discretion of the Head of Department. Only a set number of places are available each year. Students are selected to enter on an application basis.

Selection criteria: The selection criteria for this course will be based on level of representation of sport involved in and attitude. Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 12 option selections. stac.nz/Options For further information, see Mr Gain.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (12BUSS) 2 Internals (= 12 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

Developing entrepreneurship, financial management and the skills and knowledge to run a small business. This course will introduce students to entrepreneurship and will develop their knowledge and skill in running a business. This course has a very hands-on, experiential focus and students are expected to work in groups to complete much of the internal assessment. For this reason, it is vital that students are selfmotivated, responsible and prepared to work positively with others. They must also be prepared to work on assessments in and out of the class as the nature of setting up a small business will usually require them to meet stakeholders in their own time. The external Standards provide students with business knowledge that is taught in the context of their own business. The Level 2 Standards require a high level of literacy and the ability to write clearly, especially if students aim to gain Merit or Excellence grades. It is desirable, therefore, that students have gained credits in the following Level 1 English Achievement Standards: AS 1.1 or 1.2 or AS 1.4.

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Course costs: $30.00* for a workbook.

These concepts and ideas will be covered in the topics:

* Estimated disbursed course costs

• Athenian art and architecture; • Classical influence and Pompeii; • Homer’s Odyssey.

For further information, see Mr Temple.

For further information, see Mr Faulls.

CHEMISTRY (12CHEM) 2 Internals (= 6 credits) 3 Externals (= 13 credits)

DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION (12DEST)

Investigating, understanding and explaining matter and the changes it undergoes, and the energy involved.

3 Internals (= 16 credits) 2 Externals (= 7 credits)

The course provides an insight into the chemical basis for modern technology and may lead to employment opportunities, for example in the food industry, Health Sciences, and Engineering. It is essential for most technical and tertiary study in the sciences including health-related sciences. The course is based on experimental work and competence in this area is essential and is vital for any student wishing to take Year 13 Chemistry. Students who did not achieve a Merit in a Level 1 Chemistry Standard will find this subject difficult. This can come from Level 1 Science or Level 1 Physical Science.

Course costs: Purchase of a workbook and practical manual, together with an end-of-year revision book that will help with revision before the final examination. For further information, see Mrs Hamburg.

CLASSICAL STUDIES (12CLST)

Developing design thinking skills within a specified context. Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is an area of learning within the New Zealand Curriculum, where students learn about design, develop their practice of designing, and develop their design thinking in the context of Spatial and Product Design. The students develop an awareness of design by using visual communication skills to conceptualise and develop design ideas. They apply their visual literacy through using sketching, digital modes and other modelling techniques to effectively communicate and present design ideas. Students learn that designers identify the qualities and potential of design ideas in terms of the broad principles of design (aesthetics and function) and of sustainability. This course is portfolio-based with no external examination and is foundational for Year 13 Design and Visual Communication.

Course costs: No additional equipment is necessary for students continuing on from Year 11, provided that their basic equipment has been cared for. Some ongoing material and other consumable costs for model making and presentation may need to be disbursed throughout the year. For further information, see Mr Kerrison.

2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study of literature, history and art in the context of ancient Greece and Rome. This course seeks to introduce and develop the interest and understanding of ancient civilisations, and how they have impacted on modern societies around the world. This study works hard on the development of skills and techniques of research, structured writing, and the understanding and analysis of ideas and sources. From this course students will develop an understanding and knowledge of the following concepts: • • • • • •

citizenship and society; culture and identity; empire and power; conflict; art and aesthetics; heritage.

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY (12INTE) 4 Internals (= 17 credits) 1 External (= 3 credits)

Develop skills and understanding in a digital environment. In this course students learn a wide variety of IT skills, as well as being introduced to computer science concepts. They will learn how to create a dynamic, database-driven website from the planning stage to the creating and testing stages. Students also continue to develop their programming skills using Python. There is a major focus on the how and why of web design and programming, rather than just learning the steps required to create them.

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Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

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More specifically the course should enable our students to develop: • competence in using either industry standard software or free open source software in digital imaging, web authoring, as well as programming in PHP and SQL to enable interactive and dynamic websites; • a greater understanding of design theory and competence in setting out effective well-designed interfaces; • a knowledge of advanced programming in Python; • an awareness of the creative skills involved in the creation of the various components of a website from the initial plan to the finished product; • competence in how to use a computer in general from word processing, file structure, to how the internet works; • using online resources such as shared documents, discussion forums, video tutorials.

cover the application of drama techniques and the devising and performance of a drama piece to realise a concept. The external covers drama elements, techniques, conventions and technologies within live performance. Working journal: Students will be required to keep an up-to-date working journal which documents their learning, critical reflections and development as they progress through the course.

Note: If a student does not enter the external Standard, they cannot gain a course (subject) endorsement. For further information, contact Mr Wiseman.

This course provides the foundation for Year 13 Digital Technology.

ECONOMICS (12ECON) Course costs: None. All software used is open source. For further information, see Mr Adams or Ms Lee.

DRAMA (12DRAM) 2 Internals compulsor y (= 23 credits maximum) 5 other Internals (students select up to 5) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Researching, analysing, interpreting and creating drama contexts to convey meaning to an audience.

2 Internals (= 10 credits) 3 Externals (= 12 credits)

Analysing contemporary economic issues and how they interact with government policies.. This course leads to Year 13 Economics and a large number of tertiary qualifications, as well as catering for those wanting a one-year course of study. A requirement for students to successfully complete this course is to relate what is learnt in the classroom to the economic activities currently taking place in the New Zealand and global economies. The course allows students to explore the economic issues of:

Drama is not just for those who wish to become actors, but for those who wish to pursue any career that deals with people and the understanding of them.

• economic growth; • inflation and price stability; • international trade.

Performance skills covered will include acting technique and the devising process. While others that may be looked at include, script writing, directing, understanding theatre forms, theatre practitioners and their influence on society. The specific skills will be defined by the students’ Independent Learning Programme (ILP).

Students will be able to define, measure and understand causes, identify effects and possible policies that a government may implement to address these economic issues. Students will also recognise the interdependent nature of the economy by examining the impact government policies have on various groups and to appreciate that these may have unequal consequences. The use of economic models is an integral part of this course.

Independent Learning Programmes – All Level 2 Drama students will embark upon an ILP for the duration of the year. In partnership with the teacher, students will create a programme for themselves that reflects their needs, goals, and passions. Assessments will be decided upon accordingly. It is expected that students create a programme that offers a minimum of 17 internal credits, and a maximum of 23 internal credits. If they wish, students may additionally enter the external assessment.

Course costs: $40.00*for workbooks. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Temple.

Compulsory internals are completed because the skills taught, developed and assessed provide a strong foundation in performance, and success in other assessments. They

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Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

ESOL (12ENSL)

Entry to subject by selection. A study of English for academic purposes. Entry into the Year 12 ESOL course is based on an English assessment completed at the end of Year 11. It is for students who do not have English as their first language and wish to improve their language skills for mainstream classes. Students new to the College would be expected to have reached a minimum of intermediate level. This course is designed to support the student’s mainstream English course. It also assists in providing a pathway to NCEA Literacy at Level 2 and is run in close collaboration with teachers in the English Department. The course is designed to assist students to write clear, accurate English, to read with understanding, and to speak fluently and clearly. Support in other curriculum areas is also offered and this is done in close co-operation with subject teachers, tutors and the Dean. Each course is carefully structured according to individual needs and there is a strong emphasis on subject support. Assistance is provided with understanding the NCEA English Standards. Ongoing assessment gives students valuable feedback on their progress and helps indicate which English courses would be most appropriate for them in the future. Students are provided with resources which are relevant to their cultural background. They generally achieve very pleasing results in this course and improve their formal reading and writing skills in preparation for University Entrance Literacy assessment at Level 2. For further information, see Mrs Brooks.

FOOD AND NUTRITION (12FOTE) 3 Internals (= 15 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Develop understanding and skills related to food to enable students to contribute to the well-being of themselves and other people. Students study a range of topics including expanding their knowledge of nutrition to provide appropriate food for a sportsperson taking into consideration the factors that may impact on their decisions. They will also develop an understanding of the strategies which are effective in making changes to improve well-being. The issues surrounding food security in New Zealand will be explored along with the impact that limited money has on food choice. As part of this students will consider the relationship between food choice, well-being and factors outside the control of the individual.

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Students will investigate and evaluate sustainable food related practices and consider their implications. Topics covered will give the students a good understanding of the relationship between food and health. Food preparation is a key aspect of every unit of work. This course provides the foundation for Year 13 Food and Nutrition.

Course costs: A charge is disbursed for the student’s apron, and for foods used in practical work. For further information, see Mrs Duncan.

FRENCH (12FREN) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The use of language to express, justify, support and challenge ideas. Students learn to understand, respond to, and talk about others’ experiences and needs in the contexts of reading, writing, listening and speaking. They therefore study, talk and write about ‘issues’ at a level deeper than previously studied. Topics covered are based on the online course text, AQA French. In this course, they work towards some, or all, of these objectives: • communicate about future plans; • give and respond to advice, warnings and suggestions; • express and respond to approval and disapproval, agreement and disagreement; • provide and respond to information and opinions, giving reasons; • read about, then recount, actual or imagined events in the past. Vocabulary and grammar learnt previously are reviewed and students then develop their knowledge of those key aspects of language learning so that they can use the language in increasingly varied ways and contexts. They also learn how to incorporate the language in increasingly spontaneous situations (written and spoken) so that their French becomes more sophisticated and fluent. Students will have more opportunity to speak in small groups, to write in different formats and to listen to, and read, a greater range of texts and articles.

Course costs: $50.00* Online Textbook and Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Radcliffe or Mrs Marshall.


GEOGRAPHY (12GEOG) 3 Internals (= 11 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study of how people and the environment interact. While the course is designed to bridge the gap between the level of skills, techniques and understanding required for Level 1 and the more advanced appreciation of inquiry and research skills needed for Level 3 study, it remains flexible enough for students to take up Geography for the first time at this level. It is an exciting and varied course that looks at a range of important contemporary issues on both a local and a global scale.

It is helpful but not essential for students to have experience of History as a subject. Many students take History for the first time in Year 12, however, a reasonable standard of literacy skills is required for any student taking this course. Topics covered will include: • conflicts in Vietnam 1945–1975 and their significance for New Zealanders (perspectives); • Holocaust and its significance to New Zealanders (essay); • research assignment on Protest Movements in the 20th Century which have influenced New Zealand society. For further information, see Mr Faulls.

From this course students will develop an understanding of: • how countries develop differently over time and the causes of these differences – Tanzania and New Zealand; • analysing the causes and effects of a global pattern (human trafficking case study); • the geographic research process through an individual research project at Mt Cook; • GIS (Geographic Information Systems); • the application of geographic skills and ideas.

Course costs: $250* (approximately) for field trip. * Estimated disbursed course costs

Students are required to participate in a three-day field trip to the Mt Cook region. For further information, see Mr Boulton.

HISTORY (12HIST) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 9 credits)

A study of the impact of historical forces and factors which shaped individual and group identity in the late 19th century and early 20th century. This course is designed to enhance students’ curiosity about, and understanding of, the past. It aims to develop the knowledge, skills and experience for students to understand how important forces and movements in the past (e.g. Nazism, nationalism, protests) have influenced the causes and consequences of events that are of significance to us as New Zealanders. It also aims to help students understand that people’s interpretation of past events differs and must not be accepted without scrutiny of the causes and validity of the differing perspectives.

JAPANESE (12JAPA) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The use of language to express, justify, support and challenge ideas. Knowledge and skills acquired in Year 11, the grammar patterns, kanji and vocabulary, are extended so that students are able to respond to a wider range of language situations and course materials. Language programmes such as Education Perfect/Languages in Action continue to be very useful for ongoing vocabulary and kanji revision, grammar practice and for aural and reading exercises. Four major topics are covered in depth with an emphasis on cultural similarities and/or differences between Japan and New Zealand – travel and tourism, school life, land and people, and eating and drinking. The grammar and vocabulary covered are up to Level 7 of the curriculum and will enable students to communicate in extended oral, aural, reading or written exercises. During the year, students will learn to read and write a further 56 kanji characters.

Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect subscription and Renash booklet. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Simcock.

The course also develops particular skills in: • • • •

communication (especially essay writing); the ability to enter imaginatively into the past; critical thinking; defining a problem and gathering and processing information relevant to it. 69


Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY (12MTEC) 3 Internals (= 16 credits) or 2 Internals and 1 Unit Standard (= 18 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Within the context of Hard Materials Technology students will design, plan and produce a manufactured outcome.

Future pathways: This course is intended to be a final course in Mathematics and does not lead on to studies at Year 13. Course costs: A Casio FX82 scientific calculator is required. Also selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Ms Hill Taiaroa.

This is a course based on recognising needs or opportunities and consists of three learning activities: technological practice, technological knowledge and nature of technology. Technology enables students to: • gain experience in technical graphics and develop skills in graphic communication; • develop a comprehensive knowledge of, and experience in a wide range of materials and processes; • develop design skills that allow the translation of knowledge and ideas into practical realities. The briefs vary from year to year and take a traditional approach to both material use and the manufactured outcome. Developing knowledge of a wide range of processes and technological practice is an essential learning area in the practical workshop. An emphasis on learning through experimentation with materials, trialling processes, and design through modelling is an important part of the course. The activities when recorded and evaluated form part of a design folio. The design activities focus on both aesthetic and functional design principles; graphic communication and presentation is an integral part of this activity. Promoting aesthetic awareness and seeking to establish existing solutions through observation and inquiry further develops a student’s design ability. There are two areas of learning in hard materials. Students will be placed in whatever area their timetable allows. Both these areas of learning use the same process to develop skills and knowledge.

Course costs: Materials used. For further information, see Mr Hamilton or Mr Murphy.

MATHEMATICS APPLIED (12MATP) 6 Internals (= 16 credits) Does not count for course endorsement

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. The course is fully internally assessed and is by invitation only. The focus of this course is on improving mathematical skills at a pace somewhat controlled by the needs of the students. A selection of Level 2 Standards will be offered appropriate to the individual needs of the student. Students will have the opportunity to earn up to 16 credits at Level 2. 70

MATHEMATICS WITH CALCULUS (12MATC) 2 Internals (= 7 credits) 3 Externals (= 13 credits)

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. All classes are given the opportunity to gain all grades in Achievement Standards. One extension class will be selected based on achievement in Year 11 Mathematics. Future pathways: Success in this course leads to the three Year 13 Level 3 courses: Mathematics with Calculus, Mathematics with Calculus Extension, Statistics, and Mathematics General.

Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required. Also selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr White.

MATHEMATICS WITH CALCULUS

EXTENSION

(12MATCX)

Entry to subject by selection. 2 Internals (= 7 credits) 3 Externals (= 13 credits)

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, time, and data. All classes are given the opportunity to gain all grades in Achievement Standards. One extension class will be selected based on achievement in Year 11 Mathematics. Future pathways: Success in this course leads to the three Year 13 Level 3 courses: Mathematics with Calculus, Mathematics with Calculus Extension, Statistics, and Mathematics General. Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required. Also selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr White.


MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS (12MATS)

MEDIA PRODUCTION (12MEPR)

5 Internals (= 13 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

4 Internals (= 16 credits)

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in data.

Does not count for course endorsement but contributes to NCE A Level 2

This course has less emphasis on algebraic reasoning and a major focus on statistical thinking. The aim of this course is to provide a foundation for the Level 3 Mathematics General and Level 3 Statistics courses and for the statistics required in other subject areas.

This course is for students who would like to build on skills developed in the Years 9 and 10 Performing Arts courses. They will have a strong interest in the media and a desire to learn more about the ways in which media is constructed in a rapidly changing and complex technological world.

Future pathways: Success in this course may provide entry to Level 3 Mathematics General or Level 3 Statistics.

Typical areas of focus will be an exploration of the way in which media is constructed, including the representation of issues, ideas and people, before planning, and producing either a print, radio, or television product. Students will have the opportunity to use our professional media equipment and multi-camera TV studio to develop their technical and production skills.

Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required. Also selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr Giles.

Students need to be highly motivated self-starters and strong independent learners in order to benefit from the range of transferrable skills, such as critical analysis, presenting, working with others, and problem solving taught in this subject.

MEDIA STUDIES (12MEST) 3 Internals (13 credits) 1 External (4 credits) Students will explore an ethical issue in the media before writing a feature article for a target audience of their peers with a view to the article being published in a student magazine. The remainder of the year will involve planning, producing and analysing the media, including studying aspects of a media genre. In preparation for the external standard we study the science fiction genre, its impact on western society and how it has changed over time. This course is for students with a strong interest in all things media. Students work with our advanced professional standard field cameras, lights, and microphones to produce group or individual short films. All student films will be entered into the St Andrew’s College Film Fest in Term 3. This is an academic course designed to develop students’ critical media literacy skills that are crucial in navigating an ever-changing and increasingly complex technological world. To be successful in this course, students need to be highly motivated to plan and produce a media product in their own time. It would suit those interested in working in media, writing for media/film, filmmaking, and working creatively and thinking critically about the media around them.

Course costs: A 500GB or larger external hard drive. For further information, see Miss Silverman.

MUSIC (12MUSP) 9 Internals (= 39 credits) 3 Externals (= 14 credits)

Exploration of sounds and technologies for creating, interpreting and representing music ideas. Students should have successfully completed the Year 11 course and been credited with 1.1 or 1.2, 1.3 and 1.6 or have admission to the course by the Head of Music. Students wishing to focus on the ‘Modern Music’ stream may be able to enter the course having not completed any Year 11 Standards. Please consult Mr Ferguson if you have any questions. There are two streams of music available: • ‘Traditional Music’ is suited to students who play ‘classical’ instruments and may wish to complete Scholarship Music when they are in Year 13; • ‘Modern Music’ involves Music Technology Standards and has an emphasis on composing and recording with computers and operating live sound equipment.

Course costs: A 500GB or larger external hard drive. For further information, see Miss Silverman or Ms Gormack.

Both streams share the Achievement Standards of: • solo performance (2.1 – 6 credits internal); • group performance (2.3 – 4 credits internal); • composition (2.4 – 6 credits internal); • students who play a second instrument also have the option to complete solo performance on the second instrument (2.2 – 3 credits internal). 71


Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

The ‘Traditional Music’ stream will also do the following Achievements Standards:

Course costs: $60.00* per term for two terms to cover out-of-school trips, and preparation for practical assessments.

• score reading/theory (2.6 – 4 credits external); • music works (2.7 – 6 credits external) in which you study Impressionistic Music (specifically Debussy) and Motown; • instrumentation (2.8 – 4 credits);

* Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr George or Ms Register.

• aural transcription (2.5 – 4 credits external). The ‘Modern Music’ stream will do the following Standards: • SOND2 (27703) – this Unit Standard qualifies for course endorsement. It focuses on operating live PA and recording systems. • MUSTEC 2 (27657) – this is a research assignment in which students study techniques and equipment involved with Music Technology. • MUSTEC 3 (27658) – in this Standard students learn how to create and record music on computer to a high level and how to use music notation software to an advanced level. Very high achieving students may be able to consider doing the majority of the Standards. Overall, though, students are free to ‘pick and choose’ from the Standards to create a personalised programme (but this must be done in consultation with the Head of Music who has the final say on individual course construction).

Course costs: Students who require an accompanist for

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HEALTH (NCEA) (12PHHE) 3 or 4 Internals (= 10 or 15 credits) The well-being of students, other people and society through learning in movement and health-related contexts. A genuine interest in sport and physical activity is an advantage for this course, although advanced physical ability is not a requirement. The course is fully internally assessed, with ongoing practical and theoretical assessments throughout the year. This runs concurrent to the 12PHED programme, offering increased time allowances to complete fewer assessments. Course costs: $60.00* per term for two terms to cover out-of-school trips, and preparation for practical assessments. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Eves or Mrs Stirling.

NCEA solo performance assessments should expect to pay $20.00*–$50.00* per term. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Ferguson.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (NCEA) (12PHED) 5 Internals (= 19 credits)

The well-being of students, other people and society through learning in movement and health-related contexts. A genuine interest in sport and physical activity is an advantage for this course, although advanced physical ability is not a requirement. Good organisational skills are important as the course is a combination of theoretical and practical learning. The course includes aspects of Physical Education, leadership and skills in both practical environments, and a variety of scientific principles applied to sport. It provides an ideal background for courses at tertiary level in many of the above areas, as well as being a course of genuine interest for students who want variety in their subjects. The main areas of study are biophysical principles, fitness training, skill learning, social responsibility, and risk management. These are applied in a variety of settings. The course is fully internally assessed, with ongoing practical and theoretical assessments throughout the year.

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PHYSICS (12PHYS) 1 Internal (= 4 credits) 3 Externals (= 16 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining a wide range of physical phenomena, including motion, forces, light waves, and electricity. This course provides continuing development of knowledge and skills in Physics. A foundation in the ideas and methods of Physics is established, and the course aims to enable students to apply their understanding to everyday events involving matter and energy. In each area of study, the student is required to investigate practical situations and to develop physical thinking and skills of observation, analysis and measurement. The areas of study are mechanics, light and waves, and electromagnetism. The connections and relevance of these topics to society and the lives of people is an important part of the course. This course is vital for any student wishing to take Year 13 Physics. Students who did not achieve a Merit in a Level 1 Physics Standard will find this subject difficult. This Physics Standard can come from either the Level 1 Science or Level 1 Physical Science Course.


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Year 12 Academic Curriculum and Options

Course costs: A number of workbooks will need to be purchased, together with an end-of-year revision book that will help with revision before the final examination. For further information, see Mr Cummack.

SCIENCE (12SCI) 5 Internals = (19 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining our natural, physical world and the wider universe. This course is designed for those students who wish to continue with a single science subject in Year 12. Students could take this subject along with another science subject, but this would be at the discretion of the Head of Science. The course will be negotiated with the students in each class, but Standards will be chosen from all four areas of Science; (Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Earth Space Science). These standards could include: • carry out an experiment; • demonstrate understanding of adaptation of plants or animals to their way of life; • investigate geological processes in a New Zealand locality; • investigate how organisms survive in an extreme environment; • examine an Earth and Space Science issue and the validity of the information communicated to the public; • microscopes. Students will be able to progress from Year 12 Science to Year 13 Science from this course, but would find the progression to any other Year 13 Science subjects very difficult. For further information, see Dr McIlroy.

As in the Level 1 course, the focus will be on listening, reading, writing and speaking. During the year students will perfect the skills necessary for the various assessments through a range of in-class activities and formative tests. By the end of this course the students will be comfortable interacting with native speakers of Spanish, especially those of their own age, in social situations. They will be able to take part in general conversation with native speakers, understanding most authentic materials on non-specialised topics, and write expressively for a variety of purposes. Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect subscription * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Evlampieff.

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY (12CLTX) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Within the context of Textile Technology students will design and produce product using advanced skills. Students undertaking this course will be challenged and encouraged to unleash their creativity and take risks while learning to problem-solve as they design and make textile products. They will apply the design process to produce a technological outcome using available resources to meet the given need or opportunity. The focus will be on developing skills and knowledge about: • • • • • • • •

SPANISH (12SPAN)

2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The use of language to express, justify, support and challenge ideas. This course will build on knowledge gained in Year 11 and will introduce more complex vocabulary and grammar, which will expand the student’s ability to use the language. Some of the main themes covered in this course relate to the student’s life at school, social life, and comparing cultures different to their own. Students will develop their grammar and vocabulary up to Level 7 of the National Curriculum; this will allow them to communicate in comprehensive oral, written or reading exercises.

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creating designs to meet their design brief; refining design ideas; drawing skills to communicate ideas; showing creativity and advanced skills in textiles; trialling ideas to make informed decisions; using emerging technologies with textiles where appropriate, e.g. use of Adobe Illustrator, laser cutter; pattern manipulation; applying advanced construction skills to make high quality textile products; using material knowledge to select and evaluate appropriate material for the designs; using stakeholder feedback to help make decisions about designs and outcomes.

This course provides a foundation for Year 13 Textile Technology and is a pathway towards a range of tertiary programmes in design. This may include for example: Fashion Design, Textile Design, Project Management, Interior Design, Product Design, Exhibition Design Costume Design, Stage Set Design and Spatial Design. Course costs: A disbursement is made for any school supplied materials, pattern drafting and photocopy costs. For further information, see Mrs Thomson or Mrs Duncan.


TRAVEL AND TOURISM (12THTR) Internal assessment only (= 24 credits) Does not count for course endorsement but contributes to NCE A Level 2

Introduction to the Travel and Tourism Industry. This unit standards-based programme is designed to provide students with an introduction to the major aspects of the tourism industry. The focus is ‘experiential learning’ with two field trips during the year – a day trip to Akaroa and a three-day trip to the West Coast. No prerequisites. Areas of study include: • • • • • •

world tourist destinations – focused on Italy and Egypt; tourist characteristics; work roles in tourism; regions of New Zealand; history of tourism; industry IT and literacy skills.

Unit Standards are assessed throughout the year.

Course costs: $280* for the three-day trip to the West Coast and $75.00* for the day trip to Akaroa. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Morrison.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (12VETR) Entry to subject primarily by selection. Students can indicate their preference for entry via discussion with their Dean, our Careers Counsellor, Mr Webster, and Ms Hampson. Unit Standards= 35+ credits Achievement Standards = 9 credits Does not count for course endorsement

The Year 12 programme includes the opportunity to gain nine credits towards University Entrance literacy (Reading and Writing) via Education for Sustainability achievement standards. New for 2021 is the possibility of work placements and/or offsite industry training for Year 12 students who meet the entry criteria. Our Careers Counsellor, Mr Webster, will be involved in the selection of industry training opportunities provided. Unit Standard assessment is drawn from: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

core generic skills: self-management; financial capability; social and cooperative skills; work and study skills; service sector skills. communication skills; industry – e.g. aviation, construction and infrastructure; Health and Safety; Outdoor Education mountain biking; kayaking expedition, Marlborough Sounds; alpine skills, Craigieburn Range/Castle Hill. career planning includes CV development and interview techniques. Students participate in a three-hour professional CV Seminar.

Achievement Standard assessment is drawn from Education for Sustainability and Science Domain, and includes: • policies and their impact on a sustainable future (the policies are selected from areas of student interest); • how different world views, and the values and practices associated with them, impact on sustainability (the world views are selected from areas of student interest).

Course costs: $800* for Outdoor Education trips. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Hampson.

Learning skills required to successfully enter the working world. The purpose of Year 12 Vocational Education and Training is to provide a programme of study with an emphasis on studying preferred vocational pathways alongside the opportunity of industry training and work placements. Participation in outdoor education activities, though optional, is encouraged for the development of character, peer and personal leadership, and interpersonal skills. There is the flexibility within this programme in that an Individual Learning Plan can be developed for students. Students can also study towards the achievement of University Entrance literacy via Education for Sustainability Achievement Standards. This is an optional component of the programme.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum Core and Option Subjects 24 Lessons per week At Year 13 students are required to participate in the Physical Education/Religious Education/Health Education/Study/ Senior College Options programme. All students study five subjects for NCEA. Students may choose to sit the Scholarship examination (additional to the NCEA Level 3 examination) in one or more subjects.

Compulsory Core Subjects

Option Subjects

All students must take these subjects: (Full year, 4 lessons each.)

Select five Option subjects: (Full year, 4 lessons each. Total of 20 lessons a week)

Compul sor y Core Subjects

Option Subjects

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH EDUCATION/ RELIGIOUS EDUCATION/STUDY/OPTIONS PROGRAMME

Accounting

13ACCO

Geography French

13GEOG 13FREN

Agribusiness Agribusiness

13AGBS 13AGBS

History Geography

13HIST 13GEOG

Agriscience Agriscience

13AGSC 13AGSC

Japanese History

13JAPA 13HIST

Agristudies Agristudies

13AGST 13AGST

Materials Japanese Technology   13MTEC 13JAPA

Art: Design Design    Art:

13ARTD 13ARTD

Mathematics General    13MATG Materials Technology 13MTEC

Course Requirements

Biology Art: Painting  

13BIOL 13ARPA

Mathematics with General   13MATC 13MATG Mathematics  

In addition to the subject entry requirements:

Business Management 13BUSS Art: Photography   13ARTP

• students may study up to three Sciences; • students may study both Mathematics with Calculus and Statistics; • students may study more than one Technology-based subject but should be aware that there may be Standards common to both subjects. Where the same Standard is assessed in different subjects, only one of the grades for that Standard can be counted for credits towards a Level certificate and for an endorsement; • students may not study both Media Studies and Media Broadcast Production. There are a number of Standards common to both subjects (the rationale applying to Technology-based subjects applies in the context of these subjects).

Chemistry Biology

Semester 1 1 Focus period, 1 Option + 1 PHEC or 1 RLED, 1 STDY Semester 2 1 Focus period, 1 Option + 1 RLED, 1 STDY or 1 PHEC

Mathematics: • four courses are offered at Year 13; • students who choose Mathematics will be entered in the course according to the entry criteria they meet; • students who choose not to enter a Year 13 Mathematics course should ensure that they have already attained the Numeracy requirements for University Entrance.

Classical Studies   Business Management Design and Visual   Chemistry Communication

13CHEM 13BIOL 13CLST 13BUSS 13DEST 13CHEM

Classical Studies   Digital Technology 

13CLST 13INTE

Design and Visual Communication   Drama

13DEST 13DRAM

Digital Technology  Economics Drama English Economics English Literature  English Geography English Literature  Food and Nutrition  Food and Nutrition French

13INTE 13ECON 13DRAM 13ENGL 13ECON 13ENGLT 13ENGL 13GEOG 13ENGLT 13FOTE 13FOTE 13FREN

Physical Education for NCEA:

Students are selected:

Students study only one NCEA course.

Athlete Sports Performance

NCEA FAQs: The link below provides helpful information for parents and students for NCEA: stac.nz/NCEA_FAQs_Y13

13MATC 13MESF

Media Studies  Media Studies:   Media Broadcast  Television Production

13MEST 13MEST 13MEBR

Music Music

13MUSP 13MUSP

Physical Physical Education Education    (NCEA) (NCEA)

13PHED 13PHED

Physical Education 13PHLE Physics 13PHYS and Leadership (NCEA) Physics and   Physics Chemistry Extension Science Science Spanish Spanish Statistics Statistics Textile Technology  Textile Technology  Travel and Tourism

13PHSC 13PHYS 13SCIE 13SCIE 13SPAN 13SPAN 13MATS 13MATS 13CLTX 13CLTX 13THTR

13ATHP

English Extension

13ENGLX

ESOL 13ENSL Mathematics with Calculus Extension 

13MATCX

Physics and Chemistry Extension Vocational Education and Training 

Please note, once subject selections are made, it is very difficult to make changes thereafter. Please select carefully.

Calculus Mathematics with   Calculus Media Studies: Film 

13PHSC  

13VETR

Note: On the following pages, for all NCEA subjects, details are also given of the number of internal and external Standards, and total credit values. 77


NCEA – University Entrance Requirements 14 credits in a first ‘Approved’ subject.

14 credits in a second ‘Approved’ subject.

14 credits in a third ‘Approved’ subject.

The UE requirement is the minimum requirement for entry to university, specifically: • Achievement of NCEA Level 3 (60 credits at Level 3 or higher and 20 credits at Level 2 or higher); • 14 credits in each of three Level 3 subjects from the approved List; • UE Numeracy – 10 credits at Level 1 or higher from specified Achievement Standards; • UE Literacy – 10 credits (5 in Reading and 5 in Writing) from specific Level 2 and higher Achievement Standards, or specific Te Reo Māori and Te Reo Rangatira Level 2 Standards; • Credits can be accumulated over more than one year in a subject.

New Zealand Scholarship The assessment for New Zealand Scholarship is standards based and all assessments are external. A Scholarship subject enables students to be assessed against challenging Standards, and is demanding for the most able students in each subject. A student who achieves Scholarship will have demonstrated, within complex situations, higher level critical thinking, abstraction and generalisation and the ability to integrate, synthesise and apply knowledge, skills, understanding and ideas. Scholarship is studied primarily by Year 13 students who are also studying NCEA Level 3 subjects, however, some students in Year 12 or even Year 11 may be advised to consider studying (a) Scholarship subject/s. Depending on the area of study, a student will display a range of: • • • • •

comprehensive content knowledge (breadth and depth); effective communication; original or sophisticated solutions, performances or approaches; critical evaluation; flexible thinking in unfamiliar/unexpected contexts.

If you have gained a lot of standards with Excellence throughout your school studies and are doing Level 3 Standards, you may wish to enter for New Zealand Scholarship. Scholarship assessments cover the same content as Level 3 Achievement Standards, so a separate course is not needed. The College creates a formal timetable of Scholarship tutorials that are provided for many Year 13 subjects (one tutorial per week). The College Prelim examinations timetable (September) includes practice examinations for all Scholarship subjects that have examinations. There is no fee for entering Scholarship for domestic students. For international students, the fee is $102.20 per subject. 78

For further information please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz

For further information about New Zealand Scholarship please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz/qualifications-standards/ awards/new-zealand-scholarship/


NZQA Approved Subjects for University Entrance REMEMBER: University Entrance gives entrance to university, however, more and more universities require certain subject areas to be included and some have specific entry criteria. All universities publish these details.

For a complete list of NCEA Achievement Standards for each approved subject, please visit w w w.nzqa.govt.nz/ncea/subjects

NZQ A APPROVED SUBJECTS FOR UNIVERSIT Y ENTR ANCE 2021 Accounting

English

Ngā Toi

Agriculture and Horticulture Science

Field Māori

Numeracy

Agribusiness ( Business Studies)

French

Pacific Studies

Art History

Geography

Pāngarau

Biology

German

Physical Education

Business and Management

Hangarau

Physics

Business Studies

Hauora

Psychology

Chemistry

Health

Pūtaiao

Chinese

History

Religious Studies

Classical Studies

Home Economics

Samoan

Cook Islands Māori

Japanese

Science

Computing

Korean

Social Studies

Core Skills

Latin

Sociology

Dance

Legal Studies

Spanish

Design and Visual Communication

Lea Faka-Tonga

Supported Learning

Digital Technologies

Literacy

Te Reo Māori

Drama

Māori Performing Arts

Te Reo Rangatira

Early Childhood Education

Mathematics and Statistics

Technology

Earth and Space Science

Media Studies

Tikanga-ā-Iwi

Economics

Music

Visual Arts

Education for Sustainability

New Zealand Sign Language

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YEAR 13

ACADEMIC CURRICULUM CORE AND OPTIONS 24 Lessons per week

CORE SUBJECTS HEALTH EDUCATION (13HLEC) The core Health program runs once per week for half a year; in a semester format. Topics are taught based on expression of topic interest and needs at this level. Teachers at the beginning of the year survey students of what topics they might find useful and build a curriculum around these ideas. These topics relate to the Health and Physical Education curriculum and the aims of the course are to: • develop the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes needed to maintain and enhance personal health and physical development; • develop understanding, skills and attitudes that enhance interactions and relationships with other people; • participate in creating healthy communities and environments by taking responsible and critical action; • question and challenge topics of interest and learn to be critically thinking and evaluators in classroom discussions. Topics include and are not limited to: • goal setting and well-being; • brain development and changes – talk with Head of Guidance, Tom Matthews; • information and decisions around driving, drugs, alcohol and parties; • mental health, stress and relaxation; • leadership and communication; • relationships and friendships; • independent living skills – life after StAC; • sexuality education – laws of consent, sexuality transmitted infections, pregnancy and more; • taxes/finances; • exploring career options and CV preparation.

For further information, see Mrs Stirling.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ONLINE OPTION SELECTIONS, VISIT: stac.nz/options

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (13PHEC) This compulsory course introduces students to community, recreational, leisure, sporting and club activities, and allows them to experience what is available when they leave school. The main areas of participation are:

Option Selections will open from 3.00pm on Friday 21 August 2020 Once open, you will receive an email with a link to make your online Option Selections. Option Selections will close at 9.00am on Tuesday 8 September 2020 80

• lifestyle awareness – visits to community leisure facilities, sports clubs and venues; • individual and team sports – triathlons, tournaments, new sports and activities; • leisure experiences – recreational activities of your own choice, gymnastics, racquet sports, indoor bowls, table tennis.


Activities are selected to enhance senior students’ interpersonal skills, allow for personal choice, and to help them make informed decisions about physical activity in their lives ahead.

AGRIBUSINESS (13AGBS)

The core Physical Education program runs once per week for half a year; in a semester format.

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with the supply of primary products in New Zealand.

Course costs: $30.00* for field trips.

4 Internals (= 16 credits) 2 External (= 10 credits)

For further information, see Mrs Price.

Although this course follows on from Level 2 Agribusiness, prior knowledge is not necessarily required, and the course can be picked up by a student who has not previously studied Agribusiness. An interest and ability in the agricultural supply chain is important due to the theoretical nature of the content.

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (13RLED)

Agribusiness looks at growing value in New Zealand primary products through innovation, science, technology, management, and marketing. This course has a specific focus on the wool industry, craft beer innovations and Agribusiness sustainability.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

In Year 13 students discuss morality, ethics and character formation using the Ten Commandments as a basis for discussion. At the end of the semester students are encouraged to develop their own rules to live by, taking into consideration the ancient text and the world they live in now. For further information, see Rev. Morrow.

Students can take both Agriscience and Agribusiness. Topics studied are: • • • • •

future proofing for long-term viability; strategic capital expenditure decisions; meeting market needs through innovation; sustainable primary production organisations; the impact of policies on the future of New Zealand agriculture.

Course costs: $50.00* for field trips. * Estimated disbursed course costs

OPTION SUBJECTS

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

ACCOUNTING (13ACCO) 3 Internals (= 13 credits) 2 Externals (= 9 credits)

AGRISCIENCE (13AGSC)

Advanced processing and reporting of Accounting information as a foundation for study at a tertiary Level.

3 Internals (= 14 credits) 3 Externals (= 14 credits)

The aim of this course is to provide a stimulus and foundation to the study of Accounting at university and other tertiary institutions. The Year 13 course draws heavily on the understanding accumulated in Years 11 and 12. The course involves the processing and reporting of financial and non-financial information for partnerships and companies. Other topics include the conceptual framework, accounting information for management including job cost systems, cash budgeting and decision making.

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand.

Course costs: $40.00* for workbooks. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Temple.

This course is independent of the Level 1 and 2 Agriscience programmes. Prior knowledge is not necessarily required, and the course can be picked up by a student who has not previously studied Agriscience. However, a genuine interest to learn about New Zealand agriculture and its place in our economy is essential. The course covers topics pertaining to the production of primary products so that they satisfy market and environmental requirements at a profit to the producer. There will be a focus on lamb and egg production, with students able to choose a focus product for their research assessment. Students may take only one of Agriscience or Agristudies.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

Topics studied are:

ART: DESIGN (13ARTD)

• practical investigation; • factors that influence the profitability of primary products in New Zealand; • manipulation of the production process to ensure that products meet market requirements; • analysis of production practices on the environment; • sustainability of Lake Ellesmere and mitigation strategies;

2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 External (= 14 credits)

• supply, demand and market forces.

Course costs: $100* for two field trips. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

AGRISTUDIES (13AGST) 4 Internals (= 16 credits) 1 External (= 5 credits) Unit standards (= 43 credits)

Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practices associated with food and fibre production in New Zealand. Students can enter this subject without previous study of Agriculture; however, it mainly caters for those interested in the practical nature of Agriculture. This course aims to provide students with the skills and knowledge to gain employment in a career based on-farm. On completion of the course, students gain the New Zealand Certificate in Pastoral Livestock Production Level 3. Unit Standards in Pasture Management, Livestock Feeding, Soil Management and Weed Control are completed both in class and in personal studies time. Studies are able to gain both UE and endorsement in this subject.

A practical study of visual communication through the manipulation of text and image. This course looks at combining Art and Technology to communicate ideas with a focus on Graphic Design, extending on skills taught in Level 2 Design. Students new to the subject will be taught the principles of Design and the ways that designers work. All students will learn about the design process and how to apply this process to a range of tasks, including logo, poster, magazine and package design as well as in-depth look at typographic layout and the use of computers as a design tool. The aim of this course is to provide students with a thorough grounding in Design, which involves understanding a brief, how to carry out research, looking at and interpreting artist models, generating ideas and developing these ideas in a systematic way through to the finished artwork. The subject is structured to give maximum exposure to contemporary Design thinking and practice. Those wishing to pursue a career in any of the fields of Design, (for example; graphic, industrial, fashion, advertising, illustration, architecture and interior design) are prepared for tertiary study and given guidance and advice throughout the process. There are no entry requirements for Design, however, where the Level 2 Visual Art External Standard has been attempted and not achieved, entry into Level 3 Design is at the discretion of the Head of Department. Course costs: $200* to cover basic materials, printing and folio boards. Students will also be required to purchase their own external hard drive or a USB (minimum 4GB). * Estimated disbursed course costs

Students may take only one of Agriscience or Agristudies. Entry into this course is by Teacher in Charge and Dean approval only, due to the commitment and off-site time required.

For further information, particularly regarding the submission detailed above, see Ms Swadel.

Topics studied are: • factors that influence the profitability of primary products in New Zealand; • practical investigation; • analysis of production practices on the environment.

Course costs: $600 (approximately) for Unit Standard administration and courses run by the National Trade Academy. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Cloughley.

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ART: PAINTING (13ARPA) 2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 External (= 14 credits)

A study in drawing and painting. Students select their own theme and work independently developing, extending and resolving art making ideas. As they work, they will also show an understanding of traditional and contemporary Art that inform, challenges and influences their own practice.


Throughout the year field trips to Art Galleries, Top Art Exhibitions and an artist’s studio are arranged. For those who are interested, the option of entering Scholarship Painting (8 x A3 pages documenting the year’s work) is available.

Course costs: $300* for materials. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For more information, see Ms Lawrence.

ART: PHOTOGRAPHY (13ARTP) 2 Internals (= 8 credits) 1 External (= 14 credits)

A study in image-making through photographic processes. Students gain knowledge about traditional and contemporary photographers and write their own proposal outlining a theme that they will investigate for the academic year. Film, darkroom and digital processes are all utilised to generate a range of images that show an understanding of photographic conventions. Students generate multiple series of works that explore their selected theme in depth, until a successful resolution is reached.

Selection criteria: The selection criteria for this course will be based on level of representation of sport involved in and attitude. The representation will be tiered form: • • • • • •

New Zealand representative; South/North Island representative; regional representative; school/club first team; attitude and application; previous involvement in the programme is also recommended.

Entry at the discretion of the Head of Department. Only a set number of places are available each year. Students are selected to enter on an application basis.

Course application process: Students must apply and complete the online application form (link below) when they make their Year 13 option selections. stac.nz/Options

For further information, see Mr Gain.

For those who are interested, the option of entering Scholarship Photography (8 x A3 pages documenting the year’s work) is available.

BIOLOGY (13BIOL)

Year 12 Photography is recommended, or a submission of photographic images approved by Ms Lawrence before the course selection deadline.

Investigating, understanding and explaining about living things and how they interact with each other and the environment.

Course costs: $200–$400* depending on materials used.

The course examines areas of Biology which are of particular importance to society today and in the future.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, particularly regarding the submission detailed above, see Ms Lawrence.

3 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 9 credits)

The three internally assessed Standards cover: • an investigation of an aspect of the ecological niche of an organism; • research of a socio-scientific issue; • how animals maintain a stable internal environment (thermoregulation).

ATHLETE SPORTS PERFORMANCE (13ATHP)

The two externally assessed Standards cover:

Entry to subject by application.

• plant responses and animal behaviour in relation to biotic and abiotic environmental factors; • the trends in human evolution using current scientific evidence for the origins of humans.

Year 13 Athlete Sports Performance is run during the students allocated independent learning periods. The one-on-one mentoring is a key part of this course to aid with support and balance. Students in this course can utilise their time to train and practise for their sports, develop learning around the key pillars of high performance as well as utilise the time for study when needed.

The study of Biology can lead to tertiary studies and employment in areas such as Health Sciences, Biotechnology, Agriculture and Environmental Studies.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

Students will be encouraged to attend extension class in preparation for Scholarship papers if their learning outcomes are appropriate.

The course is recommended for students contemplating a Science-based career or university course and is essential for Health Science(s).

Students who did not achieve with Merit at least two external Biology papers will find this course difficult.

Students will be encouraged to attend extension class in preparation for Scholarship papers if their learning outcomes are appropriate.

Course costs: $300* for Portobello field trip. Students are expected to purchase a course manual. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Carline.

Students who did not achieve with Merit at least two external Chemistry papers will find this course difficult.

Course costs: Purchase of a workbook and practical manual, together with an end-of-year revision book that will help with revision before the final examination. For further information, see Mrs Hamburg.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (13BUSS) 2 Internals (= 15 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Management in the context of setting up and running a small business enterprise. New Zealand is a nation of small businesses. The trend is growing. A large percentage of students are likely to be either employed by small businesses or self-employed. Students will learn experientially about how to research and create a successful marketing strategy, and how to set up and run an innovative and sustainable business of their own. Students will learn to be comfortable working together in a team environment with consultation from business specialists. The knowledge and skills gained in Business Studies, and exposure to enterprise culture, can help shape ‘creative, energetic, and enterprising’ young people (the Curriculum Vision Statement) who will contribute to New Zealand’s economic future. Due to the large written component of the course’s assessment it is desirable that students have gained Level 2 English credits in Achievement Standards 2.1 or 2.2.

Course costs: $25.00*for a workbook, $100* to travel to Kaikoura for a field trip and $35.00* to register a Young Enterprise company. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Temple.

CLASSICAL STUDIES (13CLST) 2 Internals (= 12 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The study of history and art in the context of ancient Greece and Rome. This course seeks to continue and develop the interest and understanding of ancient civilisations and how they have impacted on modern societies around the world. This study works on the development of skills and techniques of research, structured writing, and the understanding and analysis of ideas and sources. From this course students develop an understanding of knowledge and concepts of: • • • • •

citizenship and society; culture and identity; empire and power; conflict; art and aesthetics;

• heritage. These concepts and ideas will be covered both internally and in the external examinations in the topics of: • Roman Art and Architecture; • Alexander the Great. For further information, see Mr Faulls.

CHEMISTRY (13CHEM) 3 Internals (= 9 credits) 3 Externals (= 15 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining matter and the changes it undergoes, and the energy involved. The work studied in Year 12 is extended and we introduce a range of new, more challenging concepts.

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2 Internals (=12 credits) 1 External (=4 credits)

There are two main projects where students complete projects to meet supplied briefs, however the students may come up with their own project idea if they wish.

Applying design thinking skills within a specified context.

Course costs: None. All software used is open source.

DESIGN AND VISUAL COMMUNICATION (13DEST)

Design and Visual Communication (DVC) is an area of learning within the New Zealand Curriculum, where students learn about design, develop their practice of designing, and develop their design thinking in the context of either Spatial or Product Design. The students develop an awareness of design by using visual communication skills to conceptualise and develop design ideas. They apply their visual literacy through using sketching, digital modes and other modelling techniques to effectively communicate and present design ideas. Students learn that designers identify the qualities and potential of design ideas in terms of the broad principles of design (aesthetics and function) and of sustainability. This course is portfolio-based with no external examination.

Course costs: No additional equipment is necessary for students continuing on from Year 12, provided that their basic equipment has been cared for. Some ongoing material and other consumable costs for model making and presentation may need to be disbursed throughout the year. For further information, see Mr Kerrison.

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY (13INTE) 4 Internals (= 17 credits) 1 External (= 3 credits)

Develop advanced skills and understanding in a digital environment. This course has three main focuses: computer science concepts, programming and database-driven web design. In the computer science topic, students analyse a topic such as computer vision or complexity and tractability. In the programming topic students will learn advanced techniques in Python, such as developing a graphical user interface and using classes and objects to encapsulate data and methods. In the web design topic students will learn how to build a dynamic website, where content is located in a MySQL database. Students will write SQL queries and PHP code by hand to display dynamic content and to edit content within the database. There is a particular focus on the development of a design and ensuring usability of their outcome. They will also investigate encryption methods and how-to password-protect the administration section of a website.

For further information, see Mr Adams or Ms Lee.

DRAMA (13DRAM) 2 Internals, compulsor y (= 23 credits maximum) 5 other Internals (students select up to 5) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Researching, analysing, interpreting and creating drama contexts to convey meaning to an audience. Drama is not just for those who wish to become actors, but for those who wish to pursue any career which deals with people and the understanding of them. Performance skills covered will include acting technique and the devising process. Others that may be looked at include script writing, directing, understanding theatre forms, theatre practitioners and their influence on society. The specific skills will be defined by the student’s Independent Learning Programme (ILP). Independent Learning Programmes – All Level 3 Drama students will embark upon an ILP for the duration of the year. In partnership with the teacher, students will create a programme for themselves which reflects their needs, goals, and passions. Assessments and dates for these will be decided upon accordingly. It is expected that students create a programme which offers a minimum of 17 internal credits, and a maximum of 23 internal credits. If they wish, students may additionally enter the external assessment. Compulsory internal assessments are completed because the skills taught, developed and assessed provide a strong foundation in performance, and success in other assessments. They cover the interpretation of scripted text to integrate drama techniques in performance and the devising and performance of a drama piece to realise a concept. The external requires students to demonstrate understanding of a live drama performance.

Working journal: Students will be required to keep an up-to-date working journal that documents their learning, critical reflections and developments as they progress through the course. Note: If a student does not enter the external Standard, they cannot gain a course (subject) endorsement. For further information, see Mr Wiseman.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

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ECONOMICS (13ECON) 2 Internals (= 10 credits) 3 Externals (= 14 credits)

Students will study a variety of texts that are linked through a theme(s) and make connections between them and the world around them.

The study of the market mechanism and its impacts in the micro- and macro-economic environment.

See the ‘Subject Entry Requirements’ page for further details.

The objectives of this course are for students to understand economic concepts, principles and simple analytical techniques and apply them to current economic issues. Students are expected to be able to inquire into, and reason clearly and objectively about, economic issues and to interpret and present economic data and arguments in a clear and concise manner. An awareness of the interrelationships between economic, social and political issues is also required.

Course costs: $20.00* Education Perfect subscription.

The year’s work is divided into three broad sections: • resource allocation via the market system – an analytical study of the market analysing how decisions are made, their outcomes and New Zealand examples; • resource allocation via the public sector – understanding the role of government in the provision of goods and services especially where the market does not do this efficiently or equitably with New Zealand examples; • aggregate economic activity and policy – a macroeconomic approach to the economy and the impact of government action. Students will be expected to use today’s information and processing technologies in the presentation of their internally assessed work.

Course costs: $40.00* for workbooks. * Estimated disbursed course costs

* Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

ENGLISH LITERATURE (13ENGLT) 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. Year 13 English Literature continues to build on the skills developed in previous years. It is a more demanding and specialised programme than Year 13 English and is designed for students who enjoy literature and who are confident with their skills in this subject. Students need to be developing their own critical responses to sophisticated written, visual and oral texts and link them to wider contexts. In the process, students work towards achieving a range of NCEA Level 3 Standards which assess the written, visual and oral strands of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Level 8).

For further information, see Mr Temple. See the ‘Subject Entry Requirements’ page for further details. Please note that entrance to this course will initially be determined by the results from the school examinations in Year 12.

ENGLISH (13ENGL) 4 Internals (= 13 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. This programme is designed for students who enjoy English but who require more support in their progress towards gaining Level 3 English. While it is expected that students will have a sound skill base, they will complete a variety of activities that will help build their enjoyment, skills and confidence in English. In the process, students work towards achieving a range of NCEA Level 3 Standards that assess the written, visual and oral strands of the New Zealand Curriculum (Curriculum Level 8). The key differences between this course and Year 13 English Literature are: • a focus on using visual texts to engage students;

ENGLISH EXTENSION (13ENGLX)

Entry to subject by selection. 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study, use, and enjoyment of the English language and its literature. Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement in Year 12 English Literature and who are creative and critical thinkers may be invited into the 13ENGLX class. Being in 12ENGLX does not guarantee entry to 13ENGLX.

• a pace of learning that supports individual student needs.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

This class focuses on: • extending students’ breadth of knowledge of language, literature and critical theories; • consolidating the learning skills needed by Scholarship students: synthesising information, critical thinking and reflection, independent learning skills, personal responsibility, a strong work ethic; • preparing students for the Scholarship English examination in addition to the NCEA Level 3 qualification.

Course costs: Additional charge of $40.00* for Through the Literary Looking Glass: Critical Theories in Practice. * Estimated disbursed course costs

Scholarship English Students who have demonstrated a high level of engagement with literature and achievement and who are creative and critical thinkers can choose to attend the Scholarship English sessions. Any student from Years 12–13 who is interested in attending this class can discuss this further with Ms Gilbert.

For further information, see Ms Gilbert.

available during the student’s study periods if timetabled at the same time as Year 13 ESOL. Guidance and references are also provided for international students choosing to study at a New Zealand or overseas tertiary institution. For further information, see Mrs Brooks.

FOOD AND NUTRITION (13FOTE) 3 Internals (= 15 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Analyse current food issues and develop food skills to contribute to the well-being of themselves and society. This course is designed to follow and build on the knowledge gained in the Year 12 course. Its focus is on the wider issues associated with food choice and well-being in New Zealand. Students will consider the main influences on food choices and the reasons people make the choices that they do. As part of this work they will investigate the impact this has on individuals and society. Students are expected to develop their ability to think critically about food issues and to develop knowledge to challenge the beliefs and attitudes around key food issues. These key food issues will be focused on:

ESOL (13ENSL)

Entry to subject by selection. A study of English for academic purposes. Entry into this course is partly based on Level 2 NCEA results. Students new to the College need to have a minimum of upper intermediate Level English. The course is for students who do not have English as their first language and wish to improve their language skills for mainstream classes. The course is designed to assist students to write clear, accurate English, to read with understanding, and to speak fluently and clearly. Support in other curriculum areas is also offered and this is done in close co-operation with subject teachers, tutors and the Dean. Each course is carefully structured according to individual needs and there is a strong emphasis on subject support. This course is designed to support the student’s mainstream English course. It also assists in providing a pathway to NCEA Literacy at Level 2 and is run in close collaboration with teachers in the English Department. Students have a number of options in this course. They can have support either in achieving Level 2 NCEA English Literacy for University Entrance or NCEA English at Level 3. In addition, students are offered tuition for external ESOL qualifications such as the TOEFL and IELTS examinations. This course can be undertaken as a Year 13 subject. Alternatively, tuition is 88

• eating habits which lead to obesity; • the practices food multinational use to encourage consumers to buy their food and the impact on eating habits and well-being; • influence of food advertising on well-being; • food related ethical dilemmas, e.g. should food multinationals be allowed to sponsor sport? Food preparation work is an integral part of all units of work and students are expected to develop their food skills throughout the year.

Course costs: Food costs and some photocopy costs will be disbursed each term. For further information, see Mrs Duncan.

FRENCH (13FREN) 3 Internals (= 14 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The use of language to express, justify, support and challenge ideas. Topics covered are based on the online course text, AQA French and a literary text may also be studied.


By the end of this course, students can:

HISTORY (13HIST)

• take part in general, and fairly spontaneous conversation with French speakers; • understand much of what is said; • contribute relevant comments, explain and discuss many of their own ideas and opinions; • read a variety of authentic materials; • write expressively for a range of purposes; • use language creatively;

2 Internals (= 10 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

• use a range of language-learning strategies effectively. Students are encouraged to read from a wide variety of sources to gain a more up-to-date knowledge and appreciation of things happening in France. Students continue to develop their skills in speaking French, including more opportunities to speak in small groups on current topics, in writing essays, and in the listening and reading of texts and articles. Students further develop their vocabulary and grammar, which continues to be taught in greater depth. Expanding vocabulary and grammar knowledge of French and incorporating this into the productive skills of writing and speaking continues to be a significant aspect.

Course costs: $50.00* Online Textbook and Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Radcliffe or Mrs Marshall

A study of the causes and consequences of past events to develop an understanding of their complexity and contested explanations. As with previous years’ courses, this course is designed to enhance students’ curiosity about and understanding of the past. While it is helpful for students to have previous experience of History as a subject it is not essential. Many students successfully take History for the first time in Year 13, however, a good standard of literacy skills is required for any student taking this course. Students will gain knowledge, skills and experience to: • understand that the causes, consequences and explanations of historical events that are of significance to New Zealanders are complex, and how and why they are contested; • understand how trends over time reflect social, economic, and political forces. The course also develops particular skills in: • • • •

communication (essay writing, source evaluation); the ability to enter imaginatively into the past (empathy); critical thinking (perspectives); defining a problem and gathering and processing information relevant to it (research).

Topics covered will include:

GEOGRAPHY (13GEOG) 3 Internals (= 11 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

The study of how people and the environment interact. This course is designed to enable students to build upon their studies of the past two years. However, it is flexible enough to enable students to take up the subject for the first time at this level if they are prepared to work hard and have good literacy skills. This decision should be discussed with the teacher in charge. From this course students will develop an understanding of: • analyse a contemporary geography issue (student choice) • analyse how natural process interact and shape an environment (Canterbury Coastline) • the geographic research process through an individual research project; • the analysis of the global pattern (student’s choice of topic); • the selection and application of geographic skills and ideas; • GIS (Geographic Information Systems). Students choice of topic. For further information, see Mr Boulton.

• Elizabeth I, 1558–1603: religion, rebellion and treason; • Middle East Conflict and terrorism; • research assessment on a significant event in New Zealand history; • perspectives assessment on the trial and execution of Mary Queen of Scots, or the de-bate about the dropping of the atomic bombs. For further information, see Mr Faulls.

JAPANESE (13JAPA) 3 Internals (= 14 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The use of language to express, justify, support and challenge ideas. Students further build on their acquired language skills by covering the vocabulary and grammatical requirements of Level 8 of the Curriculum. Three main topics are studied throughout the year, which cover in greater depth the economic, social and cultural aspects of the country – sports and leisure, family life, Japan at work, and current issues.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

Students further improve their ability to use their language skills to contrast, either in a verbal or written form, the differences and similarities between our two countries. This year students learn to read and write a further 50 kanji characters. Students continue to develop in the four language skill areas through increased exposure to a range of texts and resources. Education Perfect/Languages in Action continue to be a very useful tools for ongoing vocabulary and kanji revision and for aural and reading exercises. The ability to apply the expanded vocabulary and grammar structures to a variety of situations is an important aspect of this course.

Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect subscription and Renash booklet. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mrs Simcock.

Course costs: Materials used. For further information, see Mr Hamilton.

MATHEMATICS GENERAL (13MATG) 4 Internals (= 14 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Exploration of patterns and relationships in data, quantities, space, and time. The course is designed to develop skills and knowledge in statistical methods as well as some applied linear methods. All classes have the opportunity to achieve all grades in each Achievement Standard. This course should not be done in combination with the Level 3 Statistics course. Students wishing to aim for a Scholarship in Statistics should not take this course but instead take the Level 3 Statistics course. This course provides a statistical and mathematical background for some university or polytechnic study in the Social Sciences, Biological Sciences, and Management Science, but not University Level Mathematics.

MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY (13MTEC) 2 Internals (= 12 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Within the context of Hard Materials Technology students will design, plan and produce a manufactured outcome. Learning in Materials Technology is about becoming confident in using a variety of means to address needs and opportunities and solve practical problems. It focuses on practical competencies as well as technological knowledge. It encourages risk-taking and lateral thinking, the development of multiple solutions to problems, trial and error, teamwork and the management of resources effectively and efficiently. This course involves working on a negotiated project of the student’s choice as a vehicle for furthering a range of practical skills, graphic communication skills and understanding of technological practice. The course aims to offer as much practical activity and experience as possible. Building on the foundation of understandings, practices and skills established in the previous year, Materials Technology focuses on: designing and planning; modelling and testing to resolve issues; safe use of portable power tools and fixed machinery; identification and sourcing of materials and sequencing for manufacture; • fabrication assembly of finishing methods. • • • •

Previous experience in this subject is strongly recommended.

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Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required for this course and selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr Giles.

MATHEMATICS WITH CALCULUS (13MATC) 1 Internal (= 4 credits) 3 Externals (= 17 credits)

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, and time. The course is designed to extend students’ skills and knowledge in algebra, trigonometry and calculus methods. All classes have the opportunity to achieve all grades in each Achievement Standard. An extension class will have a strong emphasis on gaining Excellence grades in Level 3 and will prepare selected students for Scholarship. This course leads on to pure Mathematics courses at university, and higher-level study in fields such as Engineering, Economics, and Physics.

Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required for this course and selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr White.


MATHEMATICS WITH CALCULUS

EXTENSION

(13MATCX)

Entry to subject by selection. 4 Internals (= 11 credits)

Exploration and use of patterns and relationships in quantities, space, and time. This course is designed to complement the Year 13 Calculus course for those students intending to sit Scholarship Calculus. It is set up primarily for students who have already completed the Year 13 Calculus course, although it is possible to apply for this course without having done so. Each application will be considered on a case-by-case basis. The course consists of four internal Mathematics Achievement Standards, with the remainder of the time focusing on Scholarship preparation.

Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required for this course and selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr White.

STATISTICS (13MATS) 3 Internals (= 12 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

Modelling, analysis and exploration of patterns and relationships in data. Students in this course will develop and extend their skills in undertaking statistical investigations with real life contexts and data. They will apply statistical literacy, probability theory, experimental method, analysis of data displays, technology and statistical methods to manage uncertainty, make informed decisions such as forecasts, causal claims and formal inferences. The Level 3 Statistics should not be done in combination with the Level 3 Mathematics General course. Students hoping to obtain a scholarship in Statistics should choose this Level 3 Statistics course over the Level 3 Mathematics General course. This course provides a strong statistical background for Health and Physical Sciences, Agriculture, Psychology, Social Sciences, research and many other tertiary courses.

Course costs: A Casio graphics calculator is required for this course and selected commercial workbooks and revision material. For further information, see Mr Howard.

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Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

MEDIA STUDIES (13MEST) 4 Internals (= 16 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits) A course for those with a passion for all things media, students will explore the representation of New Zealand culture in the media and the ways in which media constructs meaning. The remainder of the year will involve planning, producing and analysing the media, including studying the relationship between genre and society. A major component of the course will be the production of a short film using our own high-end equipment. Students will work individually to write a screenplay, before working in small groups to plan, shoot, and edit one major film project. This process will provide 13 credits from three related assessments. All student films will be entered into the St Andrew’s College Film Fest in Term 3. As part of our genre study in preparation for the external examinations at the end of the year, we will study several films of the horror genre, exploring the relationship between genre and society. This is an academic course designed to develop students’ critical media literacy skills that are crucial in navigating an ever-changing and increasingly complex technological world. To be successful in this course, students need to be highly motivated to plan and produce a media product in their own time. It would suit those interested in working in media, writing for media/film, filmmaking, and working creatively and thinking critically about the media around them. Students who have enjoyed Level 2 English and/or Media Studies and working with production technology will enjoy this course. It provides a perfect mix of academic challenge and creative opportunity. For further information, see Miss Silverman.

Students need to be highly motivated self-starters and strong independent learners in order to benefit from the range of transferrable skills, such as critical analysis, presenting, working with others, and problem solving taught in this subject. For further information, see Miss Silverman.

MUSIC (13MUSP) 9 Internals (= 52 credits) 2 Externals (= 8 credits)

Exploration of sounds and technologies for creating, interpreting and representing music ideas. The Year 13 Music course is based around Project Based Learning. Students are encouraged to choose a project in their area of interest (such as recording an album, performance, making music videos, composing for Film/TV, music management, producing, research, etc.), which will form the basis of their learning and assessment for the year. Students work with Mr Ferguson to develop a course based around their project that enables them to achieve NCEA credits. In the past some high achieving students have gained 40+ credits at Excellence level through their project work. This is because they are actively involved with performance, composing and recording as part of our co-curricular programme. The following Standards are offered: • • • • • • • • •

solo performance (8 credits); group performance (4 credits); solo performance on a second instrument (4 credits); composition and analysis (12 credits); aural (4 credits); SOND 3 (advanced recording and mixing – 6 credits); ‘MUSTEC’ 23730 (sequencing and notation – 8 credits); music research (6 credits); songwriting and analysis (12 credits).

Students wishing to attempt Music Scholarship should be

MEDIA BROADCAST PRODUCTION (13MEBR) 4 Internals (= 16 credits) 1 Optional External (= 4 credits) This course is for students who would like to build on skills developed in Years 9 and 10 Performing Arts and the Year 12 Media Production course, and who have a passion for broadcast television. They will have a strong interest in the media and a desire to learn more about our rapidly changing and complex technological world. A large component of the course will involve planning, writing, and producing a polished television production using our professional media equipment and multi-camera TV studio to develop technical, production, and management skills.

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sure to choose studies of music works as well as the theory and harmony Standard. Significant prior knowledge of music theory and analysis, in addition to exemplary performance or composition skills, are required before entry is approved for the Music Scholarship examination.

Course costs: Students who require an accompanist for NCEA solo performance assessments should expect to pay $20.00*–$50.00* per term. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Ferguson.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION (NCEA) (13PHED) 5 Internals (= 19 credits) How Hauora impacts upon our own lives, the lives of others, and society - examined through biophysical and sociocultural contexts. This course suits students with interest in Physical

Course costs: $60.00* for external providers/facilities, such as Lawn Bowls (linked to two Achievement Standards). * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Eves or Mrs Stirling.

Education and the related fields of sport, Outdoor Education, coaching, leadership, exercise or well-being. Prior experience within Level 1 and/or Level 2 NCEA Physical Education courses is preferable. The course focuses on developing skills/knowledge that illuminate the transition from secondary school to higher education, within a practical and theoretical framework. An interest in exercise and sport is important, as is the ability to apply the theory of the course to practical settings. There is an emphasis on learning through critical evaluation, therefore cross-curricular literacy is helpful.

Modules of work include: • evaluate physical activity experiences to devise strategies for lifelong well-being; • analyse a physical skill performed by self or others; • evaluate the effectiveness of a performance improvement programme; • demonstrate quality performance of a physical activity in an applied setting; • examine a current physical activity event, trend, or issue and its impact on society. Students who are seeking a subject that contains a practical component, relates to their current/future well-being, and provides sporting and academic pathways, would benefit from this course.

Course costs: $60.00* for external providers/facilities, such as Lawn Bowls (linked to two Achievement Standards). * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Eves.

PHYSICS (13PHYS) 3 Internals (= 10 credits) 3 Externals (= 16 credits) Students will be given the opportunity to enter for a combination of the credits above based on their intended pathways in future years.

Investigating, understanding and explaining a wide range of physical phenomena, including motion, forces, light waves, and electricity. This course builds on the foundation of the ideas, methods and skills of Physics established in previous years. The aim is to extend understanding and competencies in the subject and to give students the background needed for further tertiary study in a variety of areas. Students wishing to enter for Scholarship in this subject are supported in their preparation. The areas of study are mechanical systems, wave systems and electrical systems. Students who did not achieve with Merit at least two external Physics papers will find this course difficult.

Course costs: A number of workbooks will need to be purchased, together with an end-of-year revision book that will help with revision for the end-of-year examinations. A $20.00* Education Perfect subscription will be charged to students. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Cummack.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND LEADERSHIP (NCEA) (13PHLE) 4 Internals (= 16 credits)

PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY EXTENSION (13PHSC)

The well-being of students, other people and society through

Entry to subject by selection.

learning in movement and health-related contexts. A genuine interest in sport and physical activity is an advantage for this course, although advanced physical ability is not a requirement. The course is fully internally assessed, with ongoing practical and theoretical assessments throughout the year. This runs concurrent to the 13PHED programme, offering increased time allowances to complete fewer assessments.

4 Internals (= 14 credits)

Investigating, understanding matter, and explaining a wide range of physical phenomena. This course is for those students who have completed Year 13 Chemistry and Year 13 Physics in the previous year. By doing two lessons of Chemistry per week and two of Physics the aim of this course is to enrich the knowledge of the students taking it as well as bridge the gap between Level 3 NCEA subjects and Stage One university. Students will be given the opportunity to further their interests outside of the normal NCEA examination. 93


Year 13 Academic Curriculum and Options

Students will be expected to enter for Scholarship Physics and Chemistry at the end of this course, and support will be given to do so. This course is by invitation only and will be based on work from the previous years in Chemistry and Physics.

Course costs: A revision book for both Scholarship Physics and Chemistry will need to be purchased.

The topics viewed throughout the year will be covered in greater depth, such as: economic situations, or social and cultural aspects of a Spanish speaking country compared to New Zealand. Students further develop the skills to use the language to contrast, either in a verbal or written form. They will be able to review, revise and understand material, which may include authentic texts, as well as undertake discussions and debates on current events. Students will continue to develop in the four skill areas through increased exposure to a variety of texts and resources.

For further information, see Mr Cummack.

Course costs: $50.00* Education Perfect subscription. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Evlampieff.

SCIENCE (13SCIE) 5 Internals (= 18 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Investigating, understanding and explaining our natural, physical world and the wider universe. This course targets those students who are looking for a Science subject in their final year which counts as a University Entrance subject. Some Science in Year 12 is helpful but not vital. This course contains Standards from Biology, Chemistry and Physics with an aim to extend students’ knowledge in all three disciplines. The Standards in this course will be negotiated with the class but will follow the format outlined below: • an experimental or analytical Standard; • a research Standard; • a Standard linking knowledge to the modern world; • a Standard that targets scientific literacy; • a Standard that extends students’ scientific knowledge. A subject endorsement is able to be gained from this course, as well as being used to count towards UE. Although this subject can be studied along with another Science subject, this needs to be at the discretion of Head of Science. For further information, see Dr McIlroy.

SPANISH (13SPAN)

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TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY (13CLTX) 2 Internals (= 12 credits) 1 External (= 4 credits)

Within the context of Textile Technology students will design and produce product using complex skills. Students undertaking this course will be challenged and encouraged to unleash their creativity and take risks while learning to problem-solve as they design and make textile products. They will apply the design process to produce a technological outcome using available resources to meet the given need or opportunity. The student will negotiate a design brief and specifications to meet a need or opportunity they identify. This may be in partnership with stakeholder/s in the wider community.

The focus will be on developing skills and knowledge about: • • • • • • • • •

developing an issue within a given context; creating designs to meet their design brief; refining design ideas; drawing skills to communicate ideas; showing creativity and advanced skills in textiles; trialling ideas to make informed decisions; using emerging technologies with textiles, e.g. use of Adobe Illustrator, laser cutter; pattern construction and manipulation; applying complex construction skills to make high quality textile products; using material knowledge to select and evaluate appropriate material for the designs; using stakeholder feedback to help make decisions about designs and outcomes.

3 Internals (= 14 credits) 2 Externals (= 10 credits)

The use of language to express, justify, support and challenge ideas.

The Level 3 course will focus on developing those skills acquired by students in previous years. Communication functions, language structures, vocabulary and socio-cultural aspects will be consistent with Levels up to and including Level 8 of the Spanish Curriculum.

Scholarship is an option for interested students. This course provides a pathway towards a range of tertiary programmes in design. This may include for example: Fashion Design, Textile Design, Project Management, Interior Design,


Product Design, Exhibition Design and Spatial Design. Students can work towards producing material suitable for a design portfolio to submit for entry into tertiary study courses.

Course costs: A disbursement is made for any school supplied materials, pattern drafting and photocopy costs.

Participation in Outdoor Education activities, though optional, is encouraged for the development of character, peer and personal leadership, and interpersonal skills. There is the flexibility within this programme in that an Individual Learning Plan can be developed for students, which can result in work placements and/or offsite industry training.

For further information, see Mrs Thomson or Mrs Duncan.

New for 2021 is the possibility of work placements and/or offsite industry training for Year 12 students who meet the entry criteria. Our Careers Counsellor, Mr Webster, will be involved in the selection of industry training opportunities provided.

TRAVEL AND TOURISM (13THTR)

Unit Standards are selected from the subjects below, including a range of specific vocational pathways, in consultation with students and their parents.

Internals (= 24 credits) Does not count for course endorsement but contributes to NCE A Level 3.

A focus on the New Zealand travel and tourism industry. This unit standards-based programme is designed for students looking to improve their global and New Zealand knowledge. The focus is on communications and customer service skills. It is an excellent introduction to tertiary study in this area. No prerequisites. It consists of the following unit Standards: • • • • •

destination New Zealand; New Zealand regions; communication and customer service skills; knowledge of the tourism industry; promotion and marketing of New Zealand destinations;

• itineraries for world travel.

Course costs: $570* for a 3–4 day field trip to Queenstown. * Estimated disbursed course costs

For further information, see Mr Morrison.

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING (13VETR) Entry to subject primarily by selection. Students can indicate their preference for entry via discussion with their Dean, our Careers Counsellor, Mr Webster, and Ms Hampson.

Unit Standard assessment is drawn from: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

core generic skills: self-management; financial capability; social and cooperative skills; work and study skills; service sector skills. communication skills; legal studies; industry – e.g. aviation, social and community industries, business operations and development; Health and Safety; Outdoor Education mountain biking; surf kayaking, Okains Bay; alpine expedition, Craigieburn Range/Castle Hill. career planning includes CV development via the collating of a Skills Portfolio.

Achievement Standard assessment is drawn from Education for Sustainability and Science Domain, and includes: • evaluation of an action that results in a sustainable future; • development of a strategy for an organisation that results in a sustainable future; • evaluation of measures taken to improve a biophysical environment; • OPTIONAL: policies and their impact on a sustainable future (the policies are selected from areas of student interest).

unit Standards = 35+ credits Achievement Standards = 15 credits Possible to gain course endorsement

Course costs: $800* for Outdoor Education trips.

Learning skills required to successfully enter the working world.

For further information, see Ms Hampson.

* Estimated disbursed course costs

The purpose of Year 13 Vocational Education and Training is to provide two distinct study options: • a university entrance programme focused on vocational skill development and knowledge accrual; • a vocational pathways programme.

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347 Papanui Road, Christchurch 8052, New Zealand P +64 3 940 2000 98

W stac.school.nz

Profile for StAndrewsCollegeNZ

St Andrew's College Curriculum 2021  

The Curriculum Book is designed to help you plan your courses for next year and beyond. At St Andrew’s College we have a flexible curriculum...

St Andrew's College Curriculum 2021  

The Curriculum Book is designed to help you plan your courses for next year and beyond. At St Andrew’s College we have a flexible curriculum...

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