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Annual Report For the year ended 31 December 2017


TABLE OF CONTENTS Board Chair Report ..................................

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Board Committees ..................................

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Rector’s Report .......................................

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Whole School Achievement Outcomes ... 15 Student Roll ............................................ 18 Review of NCEA and Scholarship 2017 ... 21 Public Benefit Report .............................. 24 Financials ................................................ 32 Foundation Report .................................. 36

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E


BOARD CHAIR REPORT For the year ended 31 December 2017

The Board of Governors is pleased to report a continuation of strong financial, operational and student performance outcomes in the 2017 Centenary Year. There is no doubt that the College is performing very well. The roll is strong, achievement right across the academic and co-curriculum spectrum is continuously improving and reaching new heights, and our reputation is prospering. This has resulted in demand for student places at the College reaching unprecedented levels. The net operating surplus from the College for 2017 of $62,000 is slightly better than the break-even budget and generated an operating cash flow surplus of $3.9 million. The financial statements have been audited by BDO, endorsed by the Board Finance Sub-Committee, and subsequently approved by the full Board on Thursday 24 May 2018. The Board appreciates the BDO commendation of the College’s financial management and reporting, and acknowledges the efforts of Financial Controller, Mr Richard Boon, in this regard. The ongoing development of the campus remains a priority for the Board to provide facilities and resources which are befitting of a leading New Zealand independent school. Over the past ten years, over $90 million has been invested in new and refurbished facilities. The new $7.8 million Stewart Junior Centre and Pre-school is the latest significant development project which was constructed throughout 2017, and officially opened in Term 1 2018. The Centenary Gates, main driveway and Turley Bridge were also completed during 2017 and together with Strowan House and the Centennial Chapel, form an impressive, welcoming and connected campus front door. Development over the last ten years has been funded from cash flow, the generosity of our community, and the earthquake insurance settlement, however with the latter now fully reinvested, future development will require some degree of debt funding. In 2017 the Board resolved a Treasury Policy to ensure any debt funding is directed in a prudent and risk-based manner. While this is expected to slow the pace of further major development, financial sustainability of the College is paramount. In mid-2017, the Board commenced a review of the College’s Strategic Plan. This has involved extensive stakeholder consultation as we seek to develop a common understanding of our current position and discover future opportunities. The outcomes of this process will inform a refreshed strategic direction to be published in the second half of 2018. It was a very special Centenary year for the College made possible by the collective talents, contributions and efforts of so many people. The Board is grateful for each and every person who plays their part, making a difference to the lives of students, and the prosperity and reputation of the College.

Bryan Pearson Board Chair St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors Inc.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

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Boa rd Chair Re port

THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS

BOARD COMMITTEES

BOARD MEMBERS

FINANCE and AUDIT (FAC)

Parent nominee Gary Moore Chair (to 6/4/17)

Financial Consultant

Board appointed Rob Hall Co-Deputy Chair (from 29/6/17) Richard Holyoake

CEO Business Director

Parent nominees Malcolm Johns Co-Deputy Chair (from 29/6/17) CEO Felicity Odlin Company Accountant Rob Woodgate CFO Christchurch Presbytery nominee Rev. Sandra Wright-Taylor

Presbyterian Minister

Rector Christine Leighton

Rector

Old Collegians’ nominee Bryan Pearson Deputy Chair (to 6/4/17)

Company Director and Consultant Strategist

Chair (from 6/4/17)

Staff nominee Chris Janett

Chair Members

Rob Woodgate Christine Leighton Felicity Odlin Bryan Pearson Deidre Ryley

Board Rector Board Board Chair Independent

REMUNERATION AND NOMINATIONS (RNC) Chair Members

Rob Hall Richard Holyoake Chris Janett

Board Board Board

CAPITAL WORKS (CWC) Chair

TBA Richard Holyoake Malcolm Johns Christine Leighton Bryan Pearson

Board Board Board Rector Board Chair

COLLEGE DISCIPLINARY (CDC) Professional Practice Supervisor

Christine Leighton Bryan Pearson

Rector Board Chair

Plus two other Board Members appointed by the Board at the time

HEALTH and SAFETY (HSC) Chair Member

BOARD SECRETARY David Evans

Richard Holyoake Sandra Wright-Taylor

Board Board

Bryan Pearson

Board Chair

College General Manager

OTHER

STEP CAMPAIGN Chair

PTA PRESIDENT Anastassia McIntyre

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RECTOR’S REPORT For the year ended 31 December 2017

The St Andrew’s College centennial year was a time of celebration for the College – across all aspects of school life. Old Collegians came from near and far to celebrate this milestone and students stepped up with some remarkable achievements. It was as if there truly was magic in the air! The main celebrations for the year focused on the Centenary Gala Weekend, 17–19 March. A varied programme of events over the weekend offered something for everyone and began with a spectacular Founders’ Day Assembly, featuring the Centenary Overture composed by Old Collegian Chris Adams and played by the College orchestra. Jim Hudson once again performed the Address to the Haggis. The Strowan Scholars were announced (Year 12 students Amy Wells and Louis Newman), and the Centenary Cake was cut by our oldest Old Collegian, Naylor Hillary, and his great grandson, Henry Bissland (Year 2). Special guests included previous Rectors Dr John Rentoul, Nigel Fairburn, Barry Maister and previous Acting Rector, Tim Oughton. The afternoon’s programme featured the annual Highland Games which entertained around 400 guests, plus the burial of the Time Capsule, a project created by a Year 8 class, which contained a variety of StAC memorabilia. We wondered what the StAC students of 2117 might think when they look at these items reflecting life at the College 100 years earlier. A total of 2400 Old Collegians registered for the Centenary Gala Weekend, with over 3250 people involved with one or more events. Over 1600 Old Collegians returned to the College on the beautiful balmy Friday evening to share memories and renew acquaintances at the Cocktail event. Saturday’s programme began with the Boarders’ Breakfast – hosted by Mark Mulholland and the Boarders from the Old Collegians Association. Stories of boarding days were shared, including some by Old Collegians whose memories dated back to the 1940s and 50s. As the boarders enjoyed their breakfast, numerous volunteers were out on the front field, setting up the stalls and entertainment for the College Fête. Modelled upon the St Andrew’s College Fête of the 1970s, there was something for everyone including ‘Dunk the Teacher’, crazy bikes, old fashioned races, Highland dancing, and a massed Pipe Band performance. Saturday concluded with the spectacular Gala Dinner event with 1575 dinner guests treated to an evening of celebration. A stunning opening by the Pipe Band and Highland dancers was followed by Jim Hudson’s Address to the Haggis, and a warm welcome from MC Nick Letham. A short speech from Rector Christine Leighton and Board Chair Garry Moore, a toast to the College from Bryan Pearson and grace by Brydie Connell was followed by a spectacular meal. The highlight of the evening was the cabaret-style performance of Encore, a variety of song and dance numbers St Andrew’s had showcased over the years in its various productions. Sunday dawned another beautiful day which began with a chapel service in the Centennial Chapel. The music provided by the choir, complemented the moving service delivered by Chaplain Paul Morrow, which was enjoyed by over 700 people. After the chapel service it was time to relax and watch a cricket game – the College First XI versus a team of Old Collegians. A large crowd enjoyed a real nail-biter, which was won by the Old Collegians in the last over. The final event of the weekend was the Old Collegians’ concert with many Old Cols returning to take part in a variety of musical items.

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Rector ’s Report

The Centenary Gala Weekend was also well supported by a number of creations by staff, students and Old Collegians, including the StAC100 photo, the Centenary StAC100 magazine, edition of Thistledown, signage, digital platforms, Centenary StAC100 Timeline, and a history book and short film, both titled The Spirit of St Andrew’s. The second highlight of Term 1 was the incredible success of the St Andrew’s U18 Four winning the Springbok Shield at the Secondary Schools’ Maadi Cup at Karapiro, followed by the winning of the prestigious Maadi Cup by the Boys’ Eight crew. This was a first Maadi Cup win for St Andrew’s and the second time the College has won the Springbok Shield. Both these successes brought enormous pride to the College, and a special haka and ceremony to welcome back the victorious rowers was an emotional moment for the students. The end of Term 1 saw the retirement of the Head of Secondary School, Roland Burrows, after 40 years at St Andrew’s College. Roland’s long outstanding service was recognised by the College community and Evert van Florenstein took up the position as the new Head of Secondary School at the start of Term 2. At the Board AGM in June, Garry Moore stood down as Board Chair after 11 years in this position and 13 years on the Board. Garry steered the College through the challenging years of earthquakes and rebuild and ensured that the College remained on a sound financial footing throughout. This plus the negotiated earthquake insurance payout, and some generous donations, have enabled the College to invest $90 million in the College campus during the last 10 years. During the Term 1 holiday break, the College held the first ANZAC Service in the Centennial Chapel. This was well attended by around 650 guests with a focus was on the Roll of Honour of those Old Collegians and staff who lost their lives in service to their country. These fallen servicemen were also remembered in the WWII Remembrance Tour to England and Europe in January, which saw 26 present students and staff travel to the places where 61 Old Collegians fell and were laid to rest. Also, during the April break St Andrew’s College hosted the 29th Presbyterian Schools’ Rugby Quad, which saw some excellent rugby played and friendships renewed and formed. Early in Term 2, the special centenary production Encore delighted packed audiences in the school Theatre and brought back to life production numbers which have been performed at St Andrew’s over the last 70 years. During Term 3, another Centenary event hosted by the College was 100 Years of Rugby, which was well attended by First XV players over the years. There were stories and memories shared, but the highlight was a decisive win of 19–10 over Christ’s College, much to the delight of several hundred Old Collegians who witnessed the victory.

101st PRIZEGIVING CEREMONY The College’s 101st Prizegiving was another showcase event and a wonderful way to conclude the Centenary year. It was a spectacular celebration of academic achievement with reference made to sporting and cultural events throughout the year. The Prizegiving began with a powerful haka and waiata from the Kapa Haka Group, followed by a rousing medley from the Pipe Band, showcasing StAC’s Highland dancers and an impressive solo from Pipe Major Louis Newman (Year 12).

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Items throughout the programme included Staccoro singing In My Life; Stacchorus and Cantore singing Happy accompanied by the Jazz orchestra. The Jazz Band also played Georgia and the orchestra entertained with the William Tell Overture. The Ballet Academy gave a stunning performance of Snowflakes from the season of The Nutcracker and the ceremony concluded with a wonderful interpretation of Somewhere performed by the Encore cast and Staccoro, accompanied by the orchestra. Mr Brent Cummack was presented with the annual Marily Scanlon Prize for Teacher Excellence. Bryan Pearson presented his first Prizegiving address as Board Chair and Head Prefects, Lizzie Stevenson and Angus Syme, delivered passionate valedictories which encompassed so much of the St Andrew’s spirit.

ACADEMIC Outstanding academic results in NCEA and Scholarships at the end of 2017 (results January 2018): 100% at Level 1, 98.4% at Level 2 and 93.9% at Level 3. Excellence Endorsements: 96 at Level 1, 59 at Level 2, and 57 at Level 3. This is a total of 212 Excellence Endorsements (seven more than the previous year). In the end of the year Scholarship examinations there were 23 Scholarships awarded. University Scholarships – 64 awarded; ICAS three top medal winners – Year 5 English, Year 7 Digital Technologies and Year 9 Mathematics; Mathematics – Year 10 Cantamath winners, Biennial Year 12 Mathematics Challenge winners and 13 High Distinctions for Australian Mathematics competitions; Geography – National Year 11 Interschool Geography competition – top Canterbury team and second nationally; Future Problem Solving in Wisconsin – Year 8–9 International Team and Year 10 Individual; Debating – Canterbury Schools’ Junior Debating runners-up; Poetry – 2017 International Institute of Modern Letters National Schools Poetry Award finalist; Tournament of the Minds – Preparatory School national finalist.

NCEA RESULTS Once again, we are very pleased with our results released mid-January and for our students who have achieved their goals. Many students achieved outstanding success with 212 Excellence endorsements across Levels 1, 2 and 3 (2016 – 205 Excellence endorsements: 2015 – 167 Excellence endorsements).

NCEA Results Level 1 – 100%

Level 2 – 98.4%

Level 3 – 93.9%

Excellence Endorsements Level 1 – 96

Level 2 – 59

Level 3 – 57

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SPORTS Outstanding sporting wins for the year were rowing winning the Maadi Cup and Springbok Shield and bringing home eight medals from the Maadi regatta – two gold, three silver and three bronze; Senior A netball winning the Canterbury SuperNet Competition and coming second at the South Island tournament; Year 9A netball winning the South Island tournament; tennis winning the New Zealand Secondary School Mixed Team competition; rugby winning the First XV South Island Co-ed Tournament and finishing third at the National Co-ed tournament; football winning the Canterbury Premier First XI (boys) and finishing runners up in the Canterbury Premier First XI (girls); hockey Girls’ First XI winning the Audrey Timlin Tournament winner and Hockey Boys’ First XI finishing runners up in the Canterbury Schools SPL; cricket Canterbury Sports Premier winners, First XI two-day competition winners, Second XI two-day competition winners; ice Hockey third place in the South Island Championships; orienteering winners of the New Zealand School Championship; skiing winning Co-ed team and fastest overall team at the ISSA Ski Championships; athletics South Island Championships – top school with 13 gold, eight silver and four bronze medals; athletics Nationals, four gold, one silver and two bronze medals; swimming first Co-ed team and second overall boys’ team at the New Zealand Schools Swimming Championships where the team won 30 medals (12 gold, 12 silver, 6 bronze); 25 New Zealand Sport representatives.

CULTURE and MUSIC In cultural events the following were highlights: Jazz Bands Southern Jam Overall Festival winners, Ara Jazzquest Gold Award winners and Ara Jazzquest Soul Band Best Ensemble; TheatreFest Nationals Best Youth Production, Best New Director and Best Emerging Artist; Christchurch Schools’ Film Festival winners and runners-up; Ballet NZAMD Scholarships awarded, four NZAMD ‘Honours and Distinction’; Pipe Band winners of New Zealand Championships Juvenile and winners of New Zealand Champions Grade 2; Tūhono Kapa Haka Festival winners of Action Song (Junior) and Waiata (Senior); Duke of Edinburgh Hillary Award, 12 gold and 33 silver awards; six New Zealand Cultural representatives; Major school events – Dance Revue, Filmfest, Style at StAC, Tūhono Kapa Haka Festival, and productions – Encore, F.A.W.E. Elements, Lucky Duck and The Nutcracker ballet.

CAMPUS DEVELOPMENTS At the beginning of the year, the magnificent landscaping outside Strowan House and the ceremonial driveway from Papanui Road was completed. The Memorial Chapel poem written by the St Andrew’s College Founder and Chaplain Rev. A T Thompson was etched into the driveway and made a poignant connection with the beautifully crafted Centennial Gates and Oamaru Stone pillars at the entranceway off Papanui Road. The Muir family donated a beautiful sculpture (right), titled The Cross He Never Knew, which was designed by Old Collegian Angus Muir (OC 2006). Later in the year the Turley Bridge was completed and opened with great ceremony, thus completing the Chapel project. The Rod Donald Memorial Sculpture was also completed and dedicated to Old Collegian Rod Donald. The Stewart Junior Centre and Pre-school was built ready for opening at the beginning of the 2018 school year, and work began on The Green Library and Innovation Centre.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

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Rector ’s Report

ANNUAL PLAN REVIEW

All goals have been additions to ‘business as usual’, and staff in charge have been committed to delivering improved outcomes for the StAC community. Some of the goals were related to 2017 being the College’s Centenary Year. This event and related communication took a great deal of focus, but the result was outstanding. Other goals such as High Performance Sport, Well-being, The Green Library and Innovation Centre, Community Links, Pastoral Care, Visible Learning, use of Power BI and Data, Staff Professional Learning and Appraisal, Health and Safety, Internationalism, Future Planning (Campus and Development), have all had significant development throughout 2017.

DIMENSION 1:

Values and Culture A focus on excellence and co-curricular activity saw a focus on Years 7–10 sport, with input from High Performance staff Rod McIntosh, Matt Jansen, Alex Kelley and Alice Eddington. This programme started with Year 7 students and will be extended to Year 8 in 2018. Pre-season training, conditioning and High Performance programmes were put in place for top Secondary School teams. Sport staff worked with Hugh Galvan to establish a StAC sport vision, which is based upon ‘to become the best we can be’ and make this relevant to all students through their co-curricular involvement. The Sports Department placed strong emphasis on securing the best coaches and developing networks to enable this. A second focus was on developing a Well-being, Positive Education programme across the College. Kerry Larby, Head of Well-being and Positive Education, led this initiative beginning with a focus on staff understanding the scientific knowledge which underpins well-being and using a staff Well-being committee to plan the way forward. An audit of Health / PE / RE / Te Waka has identified where and how well-being is already an aspect of the curriculum. The PERMA-V model has been introduced as a well-being framework for students and staff. There have been a number of professional development opportunities for staff with a focus on staff understanding of well-being and its role in learning. Kerry has communicated with parents through a blog, data has been collected through student surveys, and a staff survey was conducted. Many parents have expressed their support for this initiative, which will remain an ongoing priority in coming years. A third focus was a comprehensive Pastoral Care review, which was completed by consultant Denis Pyatt. A final report outlined findings and recommendations which were developed into a comprehensive action plan. The main themes included better documentation and storage of information, greater clarity around the role of tutors and deans, greater accountability around the Pastoral Care committee, timely review of relevant College policies, and an emphasis on cybersafety. There were significant successes by the end of the year including:

• •

appointment of two part‑time counsellor positions (1 FTE); use of Power BI, recognising student effort, tutor expectations and accountabilities, professional learning for staff.

Three other significant goals with positive outcomes were the review of the College Diploma (Senior College), a review of the International Student programme, and the use of student data to effectively monitor students’ progress and identify those at risk of not achieving.

DIMENSION 2:

Teaching and Learning Recognising the value of contextual learning and the opportunities arising from community relationships led to a goal focused on making community connections. There were particular successes in Year 13 Business Studies with mentors and internships, Year 10 Economics’ ongoing engagement in community projects, Business Links for the Agribusiness course, exploring Scholarship links with the University of Canterbury, and links with Vodafone and Microsoft around the development of the new Green Library and Innovation Centre.

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A whole school focus on Visible Learning saw teachers explore the ‘skill, will and thrill’ of learning and examine their practice as agents of change. ‘Student voice’ was gathered through interviews with senior managers to ascertain to what extent visible learning was already evident in student learning. Learning intentions, success criteria, learning values and Years 7–10 curriculum and assessment alignment were all recognised as important aspects of visible learning. The new Green Library and Innovation Centre was designed after research into modern learning spaces. The traditional role of the ‘library’ was redesigned to suit 21st century learning, and models of modern learning environments were examined to see how spaces may be used to remodel networking and collaborative work flows. Programmes such as Digital Literacy and Minecraft Education, Robotics, Code Club and IOT were developed in conjunction with the building design plan. Old Collegian Bryn Lewis (OC 1984) has continued to work with Year 10 students.

DIMENSION 3:

Leadership and Governance Two staff, Kerry Larby and Duncan Ferguson, Head of Music, were recipients of ISNZ Honours Awards for 2017. Senior leadership focused on improving systems to provide reliable data to inform decision making. Progress was made on reporting enrolment information with further developments in online enrolment, medical information, and electronic forms. The visibility of teacher performance was enhanced with a focus on the new Code of Responsibility and Standards, and further modelling and guidance on the effective use of Appraisal Connector. All teachers were required to be part of a Professional Learning Group, and effective monitoring of this was introduced. Student voice reflections were encouraged as part of teacher evidence. Staff leadership development was supported. Fourteen staff led PLG inquiry groups and were given advice and guidance for this role. The Innovation and Research Group continued with 16 regular attendees. Staff facilitators stepped up and led the sessions. The Code of Professional Responsibility and Professional Standards for the teaching profession were discussed and explored at staff meetings throughout the year.

DIMENSION 4:

Resources and Environment Health and Safety policies and procedures were a focus in all aspects of school operation. Regular Health and Safety committee meetings, monthly reporting and analysis of accident data, an asbestos management plan, Health and Safety induction for staff, EOTC procedure review, and external audits of Castle Hill were aspects of the improved practice. The College Centenary celebrations took centre stage in 2017 with over 3250 people attending one or more events over the Centenary Gala Weekend. Old Collegians registered numbered 2400. A number of other events included Rugby Quad, Angus Muir sculpture, Board AGM, StAC Attack, Encore Centenary production, opening of the Turley Bridge, Centenary rugby event, Old Collegians annual dinner, StAC100 photograph, Rod Donald Memorial Sculpture, creation and publication of the StAC100 Centenary magazine, ‘Thistledown’ newsletter, signage, digital platforms, StAC100 Timeline, The Spirit of St Andrew’s history book and short film. A focus on philanthropy and fundraising continued throughout the year, although with the focus on Centenary planning and execution, time available for this was significantly reduced. Significant donations continued to support projects including the Endeavour Scholarship, Robert Burns Scholarship, The Green Library and Innovation Centre, and Chapel bricks. The front of Strowan House landscaping was completed along with the Centennial Gates and ceremonial front driveway. The Stewart Junior Centre and Pre-school was completed, and work began on The Green Library and Innovation Centre. Consultation and initial planning was well underway for the new Theatre development, and provision was made for long-term campus planning, as part of the next strategic planning process.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

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Rector ’s Report

PHOTO

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SCHOOL ROLL By the end of the school year, the roll numbered 1000 in the Secondary School and 452 in the Preparatory School, with a total of 1452 students. The beginning of 2017 saw 17 new teaching staff join the College, (four in the Preparatory School and 13 in the Secondary School).

CONCLUSION The centennial year, 2017, was an outstanding year for St Andrew’s College. A strong roll, exceptional achievements in academic and co‑curricular pursuits, and the variety of centennial celebrations which were embraced by our College community, engendered a great sense of pride and positivity. One couldn’t imagine the College being in a better shape to launch into our second century, ready to step up to the new challenges and opportunities ahead.

Christine Leighton Rector

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Rector ’s Report

STAFFING NEW STAFF 2017 Executive Dave Hart

Head of e-Learning and ICT Services

Teaching Staff Conrad Wing Santhia Hamburg Esther Liong Sarah Bishop Jacqueline Gilbert Treena Ruwhiu Jonathan Hoh Ben Hughes Linda Garden Anna Hood Michael Reid Samuel Stokes Tom Matthews Greta Henley Helen King Sarah Lynch Alice Eddington

Mathematics Teacher Science Teacher Science / Agriculture Teacher Science Teacher Head of English Assistant Head of English Commerce Teacher Religious Education Teacher English Teacher Science Teacher English Teacher Social Sciences Teacher Head of Guidance Counselling Year 1 Teacher Year 2 Teacher Year 4 Teacher Mathematics and Literacy Teacher

Support Staff Eva Morgan Bruce Dove Brian Creswell

Office Assistant Hard Materials Technician Senior Outdoor Education Instructor

APPOINTMENTS DURING 2017

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Executive Evert van Florenstein

Head of Secondary School and Deputy for Rector

Teaching Staff Nicky Vincent Emma Forbes Dave Clark

Preparatory Year 2 Teacher – maternity leave cover Pre-school Teacher Agriculture Teacher

Support Staff Suse O’Meagher / Kay Shaw Rohan Simon David Murray Robinston (Robin) Sylvin Kagan King Ronelle van Dongen Dhara Barot Bex Connell Kate Scott Simi Desor Stephanie Bateman Tracey Hull Zoe Findlay Sean Jolliffe Liesel Seybold

Head of Communications Database Developer Fitness Centre Instructor Helpdesk Administrator ICT Helpdesk Administrator ICT Netball and High Performance Athlete Support Development Officer Office Assistant (Preparatory School) Student Counsellor Student Counsellor Receptionist (Preparatory School) Library Manager (Preparatory School) Media Studies Teacher Outdoor Education Instructor Barista (Preparatory School)


RESIGNATIONS DURING THE YEAR

ON MATERNITY LEAVE Bridget Preston Anneke Kamo Rebecca McPhail Helen King Fariya Naseem Kate Grinter Natasha Cloughley-Nortje Anna Hood

Year 8 Teacher Year 4 Teacher Year 7 Teacher Year 2 Teacher Physics Teacher Social Studies Teacher Agriculture Teacher Science Teacher

STAFF ROLE CHANGES Wilj Dekkers

Head of Innovation and Information Service (new position)

Christina Fitzgerald Year 8 and Science Teacher (returning from leave) Phil Adams

Computing and Mathematics Teacher (returning from a year in the UK)

Rebecca Ball

English Teacher (returning from maternity leave)

Alex Kelley

Head of Preparatory Sport – full-time position

Sarah Payton

Strowan House Receptionist to Library Assistant (Preparatory School)

Joshua Harrison

Helpdesk Administrator ICT appointed to Systems Administrator ICT

Lisa Laughlin

Middle School Secretary appointed to Assistant House Manager of MacGibbon

Paul Morrow

Locally ordained

Teaching Staff Lisa Quane Nick Ryan

Pre-school Teacher Mathematics Teacher

Support Staff Georgia Harvey Alex Callaghan Brodie Dickinson Jean Thomson Suse O’Meagher Eilish Moran Emma Trott Anna Galvan Richard Guise Ruth Larsen Jenny Neill

Temporary Marketing Co-ordinator Archivist / Curator / Museum Helpdesk Administrator ICT Assistant House Manager of MacGibbon Head of Communications Library Manager (Preparatory School) Gym Instructor Development Manager Gardener Kitchen Assistant Office Assistant (Preparatory School)

LEAVERS AT THE END OF 2017 (Permanent Staff) Teaching Staff Nicky Clark Bradley Shaw Esther Liong Phoebe Wright Ben Hilliam Cameron Pickering Andy McIntosh Joe Gallagher

Year 5 Teacher Year 8 Teacher Agriculture Teacher English Teacher Assistant Head of Mathematics Geography, Religious Education and Social Studies Teacher, and MacGibbon House Tutor Media Studies Teacher Mathematics Teacher

Support Staff Peter Besant Brian Creswell Melanie Sinclair John Brouwer Sue Strez

Grounds and Maintenance Senior Outdoor Education Instructor Assistant to Preparatory School Principal Technology Technician Food and Fabric Technician

RETIREMENT Roland Burrows

Head of Secondary School and Deputy for Rector

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Rector ’s Report

2017

full roll $40.6

$300k Scholarship Fund donations received by the Foundation

BREAK

EVEN

OUR OPERATIONAL FINANCIAL RESULT WITH $32M OF INCOME AND $32M OF EXPENSES

1014 Secondary School 438 Preparatory School 40 Pre-school

1452 STUDENTS Paid to St Andrew’s by our Parent / Caregiver community (includes GST)

$31m

Includes $3.9m of depreciation

Building and other donations received by the College

only ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE IS THE ONLY INDEPENDENT SCHOOL WHICH OFFERS BOARDING FOR BOYS AND GIRLS IN THE SOUTH ISLAND

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million

INJECTED INTO THE LOCAL ECONOMY BY THE COLLEGE (includes gst)

$160m THIS IS 93% OF THE $171M OF TOTAL ASSETS. EQUITY INCLUDES AN $89M REVALUATION RESERVE.

EQUITY Economies of

2400

$500k

HIGHLIGHTS

$

Old Collegians registered for the Centenary Gala Weekend

95m capital

expenditure in TEN YEARS Between 2008 and 2017 we have invested $95m in replacing and upgrading the College buildings, grounds, and facilities.

Scale S t A n d re w ’s C o l le g e is the largest independent school in the South Island

A ratio of

7.0

students per staff FTE

TOTAL STAFF 212 FTE


Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2017 DIMENSION

TARGET

Preparatory School

Secondary School

Teaching and Learning

OUTCOME

That 70 Level 1 candidates gain Level 1 certificates with Excellence endorsement.

Exceeded – 96 (47.3%)

That 55 Level 2 candidates gain Level 2 certificate with Excellence endorsement.

Exceeded – 59 (29.3%)

That 50 Level 3 candidates gain Level 3 certificate with Excellence endorsement.

Exceeded – 57 (24%)

That percentage of Year 11 students gaining NCEA Level 1 be > 98%.

Achieved – 99.5%

That percentage of Year 12 students gaining NCEA Level 2 be > 98%.

Achieved – 99%

That percentage of Year 13 students gaining NCEA Level 3 be > 94%.

Achieved – 95.6%

That the MidYIS Value added overall (Measuring the progress against a national expected progress from Year 9 to 10) be above 0.1 value added.

Achieved (0.125)

That core subjects (English / Mathematics / Social Studies / Science) achieve an average increase of at least two Curriculum Levels for students from Years 9 –10 (EOY results).

English 5B – 5A achieved Mathematics 5B – 5A achieved Science didn’t have a common examination in 2017. Social Science 4A – 5P achieved

That Scholarships gained > 30.

23 Scholarships gained

‘Shows Excellence and Demonstrates Consistency’ are the predominant ratings for 90% of students in the T4 Key Competencies School Report.

Achieved – 94%

All teachers are able to provide evidence of the measures taken to address each student’s beginning of year next steps.

Achieved Included in Term 1 Goal Setting School Reports

In Years 1–8 90% of students are ‘at’ or ‘above’ national averages for reading, writing and mathematics.

Achieved – Reading 94%, Mathematics 95%, Writing 95%.

Individual written formative comment is evident in all classrooms.

Observed as part of team leaders’ observations and appraisal discussions.

All classroom teachers will meet or exceed the national ‘expected shift and mean shift’ in reading, writing and mathematics.

Achieved

All Year 4–8 classroom teachers will be placed above the national norm for their year level in the end-of-year ‘Me and My School Survey’.

Achieved in all but one case.

All staff will show evidence of using ‘Student Voice’ to reflect on teaching practice, delivery of learning programmes and learning environment.

Achieved on Appraisal Connector. Team leaders discussed as part of appraisals.

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Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2017 DIMENSION Resources and Environment

Values and Culture

TARGET

OUTCOME

That the Secondary School roll average be > 1020 for 2017.

Average 1010

That the Preparatory School roll average be > 438 average for 2017.

Achieved – Average was 440.6

That international enrolments for 2017 > 18 18 Secondary + 2 Preparatory = Total 20

Achieved 18 FTEs

That the budgeted Operating Surplus (excluding capital donations) of $3,744,003 be achieved.

Surplus $3.66m

That all key budget holders operate below, or not more than $2000 above, budgeted Cost Centre net expenditure.

4 / 72 budget holders exceeded budget

That all key budget holders fully disperse Student Costs to within $2000 of Student Cost account (unless costs are for the following year).

Achieved

That student participation in sport and cultural activities for the College be > 86%.

Not achieved – There is a trend internationally of a reduced participation in organised sport. Our participation was 84% (30 % above the national average).

That the Pipe Band be successful at New Zealand Championships and win Grade 2.

Achieved Won New Zealand Championship Grade 2 (fourth year in a row) and Juvenile Grade. B Band runner-up in Grade 4A.

That other top teams in target sports reach the goals set by their coaches and management: Athletics

Basketball

Cricket

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Have 30 athletes qualify to represent the College at the South Island Athletics Championships.

Achieved – 38 athletes represented the College at this Championships.

Offer high quality coaching opportunities in all events throughout 2017.

Achieved – Quality coaching provided in all disciplines.

Boys’ Senior A place in the top 10 at the South Island Secondary Schools’ Tournament.

Not achieved – The team placed 17th at the South Island Secondary Schools’ Tournament.

Girls’ Senior A place in the top five of the Premier Girls’ Competition.

Achieved – The Girls’ Senior A team placed fifth and qualified to compete at the National Secondary Schools’ Championships.

First XI to win the two-day competition.

Achieved – Outstanding achievement in Centenary Year to win the Premier Cricket Trophy. Runners-up in the Canterbury one-day competition and New Zealand Schools.

Five players represent Senior regional teams or above.

Achieved – Six players represented Provincial U19 teams.

To qualify for the New Zealand Schools’ Cup regional final.

Achieved

Second XI to win the grade to achieve promotion.

Achieved – Second XI won both the one-day and two-day competitions.

Year 9A team place in the top three in the Year 9 one-day competition.

Achieved – Year 9A team won the Christchurch Schools’ one-day competition.


Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2017 DIMENSION Values and Culture continued

Football

Hockey

Netball

Rowing

Rugby

Tennis

TARGET

OUTCOME

To be recognised as having a leading co-educational football programme within the country.

Achieved – Both the Boys’ and Girls’ First XIs reached the top national tournament.

First XI Boys’ and Girls’ team qualify and compete in the top tier national tournament.

Achieved – The boys won the Premier Christchurch First XI Competition and the girls made the final.

To grow participation levels in football through the Preparatory and Secondary School.

Achieved – Increased number of male players from 104 to 112 players in the Secondary School = 7% increase.

To develop the potential for future All Whites or Football Ferns.

Achieved – The College has three New Zealand football representatives in 2017 and seven Canterbury United Youth representatives.

The Boys’ First XI hockey be in the top eight in New Zealand.

Achieved – The Boys’ First XI placed seventh at the National Secondary Schools Rankin Cup Tournament.

The Girls’ First XI to place top two at the Audrey Timlin Tournament to ensure qualification for the top tier tournament in 2018.

Achieved – The Girls’ First XI won the Audrey Timlin Tournament to ensure qualification to the top tier tournament in 2018.

Girls’ First XI to place in the top five in the local Premier competition.

Achieved – The Girls’ First XI placed fourth in the local Premier competition – the College’s highest ever finish.

To place in the top six in the Premier SuperNet competition.

Achieved – Extremely pleasing to win the Premier SuperNet Competition in 2017.

To place in the top five at the South Island Secondary Schools’ Netball Tournament.

Achieved – The Girls’ Senior A finished second in the South Island Secondary Schools’ Tournament.

SISS 20 A finals, eight podiums including four gold.

Achieved – Very pleasing results at the South Island Championships.

NZSS Maadi Cup 10 A finals, four podiums including one gold – win the Springbok shield in rowing.

Achieved – A real highlight winning the Springbok four and then also winning the Boys’ eight – Maadi Cup.

Make the top six in The University Cup.

Achieved – Finished fifth in the Christchurch Schools’ First XV competition.

Make the final of the South Island Co-educational Schools’ First XV competition.

Achieved – Won the final of the South Island Co-educational Schools’ First XV competition.

Build depth with playing numbers at St Andrew’s College.

Achieved – Evidenced by teams competing well in good sections.

Recruit the best-qualified coaches possible for each age group.

Achieved – The College provides very good coaching across the grades.

Win the South Island Championship in Timaru. Make the semi-final of the National Secondary Schools’ Mixed Competition.

Achieved – Won both the South Island and New Zealand Secondary Schools Mixed title.

Increase playing numbers and the number of teams in sport.

Achieved – More teams on the Girls’ side.

Utilise the new courts and demonstrate with the top teams training and coaching methods.

Achieved

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

17


S ta tement of Resources

ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE STUDENT ROLL

Student roll numbers as at 1 July 2017, MOE Returns.

For the year ended 31 December 2017

Student Numbers

Total Boys Secondary Boys

1600 1400

Preparatory Boys

1200 Total Girls

1000

Secondary Girls Preparatory Girls

800 600

Total Students

400

Secondary Total Preparatory Total

PREPARATORY

200

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

275 152

277 137

261 147

255 153

255 165

248 182

240 196

222 216

49%

427 414 408 408 420 430 436 438 BOYS 589 585 601 619 639 645 650 658 GIRLS 340 323 311 321 303 317 341 356

35%

929 908 912 940 942 962 991 1014 BOYS 864 862 862 874 894 893 890 880 GIRLS 492 460 458 474 468 499 537 572

39%

BOYS GIRLS

51%

TOTAL

SECONDARY

65%

TOTAL

WHOLE COLLEGE

TOTAL

18

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E

1356

1322

1320

1348

1362

1392

1427

1452

61%


14

Student Staff Ratio

12 10 8 6 Pre-school

4

Preparatory School

2

Secondary School Total College

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

PRE-SCHOOL RATIO

8.0

8.0

8.4

10.2

9.1

8.5

8.9

8.3

PREPARATORY RATIO

12.6

12.7

13.0

11.6

11.8

12.1

12.7

11.8

SECONDARY RATIO

9.0

8.8

8.8

9.0

8.5

8.6

8.7

8.5

TOTAL COLLEGE RATIO

7.4

7.2

7.2

7.4

6.8

7.0

7.2

7.1

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

OTHER STAFF

5.1 34.0 103.2 45.6

4.3 32.5 103.5 47.6

4.1 31.4 103.6 47.9

4.0 35.1 104.2 44.2

4.4 35.5 111.4 53.8

4.7 35.4 111.6 51.8

4.4 34.2 114.5 50.8

5.2 30.0 120.0 48.2

TOTAL STAFF (FTE’S)

187.9

187.9

187.0

187.5

205.1

203.5

203.9

210.4

250

Staff FTE

200

150

100

Pre-school Staff Preparatory School Staff Secondary School Staff

50

Other Staff Total Staff

PRE-SCHOOL STAFF PREPARATORY STAFF SECONDARY STAFF

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

19


Aca d em ic Result s

20

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E


REVIEW OF NCEA AND SCHOLARSHIP 2017

Our 2017 NCEA results included a total of 212 Excellence endorsements as well as 23 New Zealand Scholarships, three of which were Outstanding Scholarships. At Level 1, 96 Excellence endorsements were gained. At Level 2, 59 Excellence endorsements were gained. At Level 3, 57 Excellence endorsements were gained. This compares outstandingly well with 2008, the first year ‘proper’ of awarding NCEA with Excellence endorsement. In that year, just 39 such endorsements were gained across the three NCEA levels (Level 1 – 22, Level 2 – 9, Level 3 – 8). St Andrew’s College has effective processes for ensuring that students reach their potential, such as individual student monitoring and mentoring programmes and tracking of student achievement. Explicit learning values support students from the time they enter the College to the time they graduate. High academic achievement is celebrated with students striving to achieve Excellence endorsements and many being recognised in national and international competitions.

Level 1 In 2017 the College’s Level 1 pass rate was 100%, up 2.5% on the 2016 figure and 9.5% better than the national decile 8–10 band. 35.6% of students gained a Merit endorsement (3.2% lower than decile 8–10 schools) and 47.5% gained Excellence (19.3% higher than decile 8–10 schools). The Excellence endorsement outcome was 21 ahead of the very challenging target established at the beginning of the year of 75.

Level 2

NCEA Pass Rates

100%

LEVEL 1

98.4%

At Level 2, the pass rate was 98.4%, down 0.6% on the 2016 figure and 5.1% better than the national decile 8–10 band. 45.7% of students gained a Merit endorsement (12.4% higher than decile 8–10 schools) and 27.4% gained Excellence (4.1% higher than decile 8–10 schools). The Excellence endorsement outcome was one short of the target established at the beginning of the year of 60.

Level 3 At Level 3 the pass rate was 93.9%, down 3.8% on the 2016 figure and 4.8% better than the national decile 8–10 band. 38.4% of these students gained a Merit endorsement (5.2% higher than decile 8–10 schools) and 23.2% gained an Excellence endorsement (3% higher than decile 8–10 schools). The Excellence endorsement outcome was seven higher than the target of 50.

LEVEL 2

93.9%

LEVEL 3

University Entrance 84.3% of our students gained University Entrance compared with 76.5% in the decile 8–10 band.

Scholarships Our students achieved 23 Scholarship passes in this premier assessment, including three Outstanding awards in Calculus, Geography and Photography.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

21


Aca d em ic Result s

The Achieved percentages below show the overall pass rates of students participating in the NCEA and University Entrance programmes.

Please note NZQA has not yet provided 2017 results for the decile 8-10 grouping, so we have included those at the 2016 levels. This grouping covers New Zealand as a whole, while the ‘Canterbury’ grouping covers all Canterbury schools in the NCEA programme.

Percentages of students who achieved ‘Endorsed’ NCEA qualifications (Merit and Excellence combined), and ‘Excellence’ as a standalone achievement, are also represented. This is the standard format provided by NZQA for reporting results.

StAC

Achieved

StAC

% Endorsed

StAC

Decile 8–10

Achieved

Decile 8–10

% Endorsed

Decile 8–10 % Excellence

Decile 8–10 % UE

Canterbury

Achieved

Canterbury

% Endorsed

Canterbury % Excellence

Canterbury % UE

100

100

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

0

0 2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2012

% Excellence

2013

NCEA LEVEL 1

100

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

0

0 2013

2014

2015

NCEA LEVEL 3

22

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E

2015

% UE

2016

2017

2016

2017

NCEA LEVEL 2

100

2012

2014

StAC

2016

2017

2012

2013

2014

2015

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE


NCEA Level 1 % Achieved and ratio of Endorsements

University Entrance

2014

2015

2016

2017

Achieved Achieved Achieved

98.0 87.5 83.5

96.3 89.3 87.2

97.9 90.2 87.9

99.5 92.1 88.7

97.5 92.2 89.3

100.0 92.2 88.4

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

% Endorsed % Endorsed % Endorsed

77.6 63.5 53.7

73.3 64.5 54.7

72.7 66.2 56.3

79.2 68.2 55.8

86.2 69.2 58.9

83.1 69.0 58.6

StAC % Excellence Decile 8–10 % Excellence Canterbury % Excellence

21.9 21.9 16.2

24.4 24.0 18.5

25.1 25.0 19.1

33.0 27.5 19.8

43.1 28.5 22.1

47.5 28.2 22.5

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

Achieved Achieved Achieved

100.0 89.4 86.4

99.5 90.4 88.2

98.5 91.7 91.0

99.5 92.9 90.7

99.0 93.7 90.9

98.4 93.7 90.8

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

% Endorsed % Endorsed % Endorsed

67.5 50.2 41.4

70.2 52.1 44.3

68.9 52.9 44.6

72.4 55.6 46.3

71.7 57.1 47.1

73.1 56.6 45.7

StAC % Excellence Decile 8–10 % Excellence Canterbury % Excellence

25.1 17.1 13.6

22.7 18.7 14.3

26.9 19.6 15.4

27.7 21.8 16.7

31.7 23.3 18.3

27.4 23.3 17.4

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

NCEA Level 3 % Achieved and ratio of Endorsements

2013

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

NCEA Level 2 % Achieved and ratio of Endorsements

2012

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

Achieved Achieved Achieved

88.3 81.4 77.0

94.3 84.5 81.5

96.2 86.1 82.6

94.5 88.5 84.2

97.7 89.2 83.9

93.9 89.2 83.8

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

% Endorsed % Endorsed % Endorsed

43.4 41.5 32.8

57.9 49.0 42.0

56.8 50.9 44.8

59.5 52.0 45.2

62.4 53.3 46.9

61.6 53.4 44.5

StAC % Excellence Decile 8–10 % Excellence Canterbury % Excellence

14.0 11.1 8.6

17.5 14.5 11.2

19.7 16.1 13.6

28.9 17.6 15.4

25.3 19.0 15.8

23.2 20.2 16.4

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

85.2 76.7 68.5

90.3 80.3 73.8

89.7 73.9 65.9

84.2 76.5 66.2

89.1 77.3 66.4

84.3 77.3 64.0

StAC Decile 8–10 Canterbury

Achieved Achieved Achieved

% Achieved

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

23


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

PUBLIC BENEFIT REPORT For the year ended 31 December 2017

“Our commitment is to partner with families, seek opportunities and strategic alliances to provide St Andrew’s College students with a holistic learning experience to enable each to be the very best they can be. At St Andrew’s we are proud of the values and strong sense of community that has developed over nearly 100 years. As we head towards our Centenary in 2017, we are committed to growing and adapting as the world changes, not only to sustain our strengths, but also to ensure that our students have the skills they need to be future leaders”. St Andrew’s College Strategic Plan (2014–2018)

The purpose of this Public Benefit Report is to show how St Andrew’s College engages with the wider community and encourages access to its education to the fullest extent of its resources. This report, read in conjunction with the Annual Report, adds information about activities of a non-financial nature. The College is a registered charity (CC22462) and the charitable objectives relevant to this report include:

• •

to provide a school or schools with facilities and atmosphere to promote sound learning and foster the development of life and character on the basis of the Presbyterian tradition; to accept contributions, collections, donations, legacies, devises, gifts, grants and subsidies.

The beneficiaries of the College’s constitution include students, parents, staff, Old Collegians and such other charitable purpose as the Presbytery of Christchurch shall direct. St Andrew’s College is also supported through financial grants from the St Andrew’s College Foundation from time to time. The College is committed to providing access to its educational programme and encourages applications from all sectors of the community. A range of scholarships and bursaries are available from the College, including academic, music, sporting and cultural, and boarding scholarships. St Andrew’s College accepts Aspire scholarship students (currently nine in 2017) and contributes towards their tuition and or boarding fees. The George Feilding Hight Scholarship, Endeavour Scholarships and other bursaries are also available for students who, in the opinion of the Rector of St Andrew’s College, would be precluded from attending the College because of financial constraints.

STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE The College is committed to a sustainable future and has invested in both short and long-term planning. A strategic plan has been developed for 2014–2018. This strategic plan articulates the College goals, objectives and desired outcomes that will guide the College to 2018. An extensive College review and introduction of a new strategic plan will be completed by the end of 2018. The present strategic plan states:

“The strategic directions that we put in place will inform the directions our students take once they leave us. We will continuously rethink and innovate, and teach our students the importance of curiosity, resilience, courage and compassion. We will keep building on our traditions and values, celebrate our school spirit and support our students in their development of character and sense of community.

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We have taken into consideration data on demographic, social, economic and technological trends. We have reviewed leading edge research of 21st century trends in education. We have engaged extensively with the St Andrew’s community through dialogue, events and surveys with our student, staff, parent and Old Collegian community.”

COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMMES AND STUDENTS HELPING OTHERS The strategic plan clearly states that the College will:

• •

create purposeful local and global partnerships that allow unique opportunities for learning and foster civic engagement and social responsibility; develop long term global, national and local partnerships that provide academic and service opportunities, provide co-operative learning opportunities and involve international, deeper relationships with community service and non-profit organisations.

The College has comprehensive programmes in place to support these objectives. Part of the Senior College philosophy is “developing social responsibility”. Every student in the Senior College completes 30 hours of community service to receive their Senior College diploma. In 2017 Senior College students performed approximately 6582 hours of community service. Community Service Leaders ran student mufti-days to raise just under $17,000 for the Chalky Carr Trust, Department of Conservation, National Heart Foundation Annual Appeal Canterbury, and Rowley Avenue School. Offerings from College chapel services helped to raise $10,388 to support Big Brothers Big Sisters in Christchurch and Cambodia, Camp Quality and Christchurch City Mission. Preparatory School students raised $1000 for the Christian World Service. At Christmas, staff and students from across all years donated gifts to the Christchurch City Mission.

Castle Hill Outdoor Centre The Castle Hill Outdoor Education programme continues to work on many conservation projects throughout the Craigieburn Basin, with St Andrew’s College students being directly involved. Year 7–8 students maintained, cleared and rebaited approximately 60 stoat traps over 100 student hours. These traps were originally installed by Year 7 students in 2006 around the Alistair Sidey Mountain Lodge. The aim is to one day reintroduce kiwi to the area. Year 9 students also gave a total of 500 hours manually removing wilding pines in the Cragieburn basin. The College supports the Waimakariri Recreational and Environmental Trust, financially, with meeting venues and staff volunteer time. This area has been used by the College for more than 50 years and the College is committed to helping maintain the area through assisting on various projects. The wasp control project, now in its fifth year is showing amazing results. This has been of great benefit to many other schools, mountain bikers and trampers who use the area.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

25


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

Chalky Carr Foundation In early November, the StAC community showed incredible generosity, raising over $9000 from a mufti day for the Chalky Carr Foundation to support Isla Lunn, a young girl whose single parent, Kellie Lunn, died of breast cancer last year. Joel Parry and Flynn McGuinness (now Year 11) did a wonderful job of promoting the mufti day to all the students, who got behind this worthwhile cause.

Easter Egg Initiative A group of boarders from Thompson House were delighted to win the national New Zealand Boarding Schools’ Association Community Service Award, after collecting Easter eggs for Christchurch children with incarcerated parents. The boarders worked closely with the Pillars charitable organisation, which distributed the donated Easter eggs on their behalf. They sold chocolate eggs in the school cafeteria, raising $100 to purchase more eggs for Pillars. They also encouraged the rest of the boarding and wider community at St Andrew’s College to donate eggs and ended up with so much chocolate they we were able to donate Easter eggs to additional charities in Christchurch, including Ronald McDonald House, the City Mission, and Nurse Maude.

Fundraising Year 12 students Ben Campbell, Jack Calvert, Yonni Kepes, Ewan Lawson, Lily Bray, Yassmin Kharoubi and Penny Burridge volunteered to collect for Parkinson’s disease. The students stood outside New World Fendalton in freezing conditions and raised over $1250 during the seven hours they were on duty.

Latimer Square Community Service For the past six years, students in Years 10 and 11 have provided Sunday lunch during term time for those less fortunate. Working with Latimer Square’s St Paul’s Trinity Pacific Presbyterian Church, students prepare meals at home to serve in Latimer Square. Students are encouraged to make genuine conversation with those they serve in an effort to help them see the world from another perspective.

Music Fundraiser Several StAC music groups including Staccoro, the Chamber Choir, chamber groups and several soloists provided an hour of entertainment at the Hamlin Fistula High Tea fundraiser event at the Transitional Cathedral, where over $12,000 was raised to support healthcare workers in Ethopia.

Student Volunteer Army’s UCan Programme Volunteers Four Year 12 students, Ewan Lawson, Lachlan Wells, Laurence Arundell and Hannah Jenman took part in the University of Canterbury Student Volunteer Army’s UCan programme, coming to the aid of Prebbleton Plunket alongside SVA members and other local Year 12s. The students transformed the grounds as part of the UCan programme – clearing 400kg of waste from the site, painting, gardening, trimming hedges and spreading bark at the clinic. The students also assisted the Christchurch City Mission with its Brown Bag Appeal, attending a two-hour talk with United Nations Messenger of Peace, Dr Jane Goodall, where they had the opportunity to meet with her to discuss their initiatives.

26

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Sustainability Council Kiribati Project Zivana Hammond (Year 13), Quinton Hurley (Year 12) and Ellen Hampson, teacher in charge of the Sustainability Council, led an initiative on behalf of the Sustainability Council to raise awareness of the devastating effects of climate change on Kiribati. Sea level rise will eventually claim the tiny Pacific nation, which is already planning how it can start to migrate its population of around 110,000 people before they are displaced. In December, the Sustainability Council hosted Honorary Consul for Kiribati, Ben Otang (OC 1973), along with filmmakers Sam Wall and Michael Roberts of Raw Cinematics (who made Thirty Million, a UN funded documentary exploring the threat sea-level rise poses to 30 million Bangladeshis) at a special dinner, where they discussed development of The Kiribati Project, a documentary which will raise awareness of Kiribati’s plight.

Tree Planting with Mt Vernon Trust In early November, 19 Year 10 students helped the Mt Vernon Trust in their tree-planting initiative on the Port Hills. Using saws and loppers, students worked tirelessly for three hours, with their help hugely appreciated by the Trust and the Department of Conservation.

Untouched World Waterwise Scholarships Head of the Sustainability Council, Zivana Hammond (Year 13), and Aimee Coey (Year 13) were awarded Untouched World Waterwise Scholarships. The scholarship programme, which is part of the UNESCO Global Action Programme, saw the girls spend six days exploring water use, availability, quality and sustainability at Lake Ellesmere and around the Selwyn district.

Wacky Tie Wednesday On Wacky Tie Wednesday, students wore their uniforms with a little more flair than usual, sporting an array of wacky ties, raising $717.70 for the Westpac Helicopter Trust.

World Vision Youth Ambassador 2018 Maeve Burns (Year 13), a student co-leader of Community Service at St Andrew’s was elected as one of the Youth Ambassadors for World Vision for 2018. Maeve’s work will include engaging with schools, meeting with and guiding student leaders, and sharing her story to inspire youth to act and participate in the 40 Hour Famine. Maeve is also hoping to be given the opportunity to travel to Jordan next year to learn about World Vision’s work with Syrian refugees.

World Vision Award St Andrew’s College was presented with an Excellence Award at World Vision’s 40hr Famine Awards Night. The College placed third in the South Island for the amount of money raised for the appeal. In 2017 we raised $22,911 for the 40 Hour Famine, the most we have ever raised for this appeal. Over the lifetime relationship with World Vision, we have supported children all over the world with over $239,000. Through these efforts, St Andrew’s College was offered a Scholarship for a current Year 12 student, placing him or her in World Vision’s leadership programme.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

27


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

EYES ON THE WORLD – CREATING GLOBAL CONNECTIONS The College has a strong Student Exchange programme which provides students with opportunities to explore different cultures and languages. College also welcomes students from around the globe as part of the exchange programme. In 2017 we welcomed students to the College from Australia, Scotland and South Africa. In keeping with the College’s ethos of developing a culture of philanthropy students are offered the opportunity to take part in service trips. In 2017 students travelled to Cambodia as part of a community service trip where the College has partnerships with several organisations, such as the Hagar Organisation and Partnership Cambodia. Students did community work and $5000 was raised to support charities. In 2017 students also travelled to Greece as part of a Classics trip, Costa Rica as part of the World Challenge and Japan on a language trip. Individual students also spent time in Spain and Switzerland. Students often take part in community service initiatives while on these trips. Students hosted visiting cultural groups from Japan in their homes, adding to an authentic Kiwi experience and expanding students’ cultural views.

STUDENTS REACHING THEIR POTENTIAL The College is committed to be known as a place which offers unique and innovative learning opportunities for staff, parents and students. This includes providing opportunities for students with special educational needs. The team in the Learning Support Department assist students to reach their academic potential by supporting them with any learning difficulties they face. They work closely with parents, deans and subject teachers to identify and assess students with learning difficulties and provide the appropriate support. Students can be referred to outside agencies for specialist educational diagnosis in order to identify the most appropriate learning support. Features of the support programme include: small group support, touch typing and spelling support, organisation and co‑ordination of reader-writers and special assessment conditions, structured literacy programme in the options timetable for Years 9 and 10. The College works closely with parents and caregivers to ensure that the student can reach their potential. A number of staff also provide support in this area to non-StAC families who may have a need or require help or information, including getting literacy help for their child, high needs funding applications and psychologists’ assessments. This includes reading the information and reports and explaining what it means to parents and what should happen next. Non-StAC students have been able to join the Morningside programme with staff providing support to parents.

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SHARING OF FACILITIES St Andrew’s College has a large campus with excellent sporting and educational facilities. Groups from the wider Canterbury community make use of the facilities; for example, the Christchurch Schools Music Festival regularly hires facilities at the College, which brings together music students from all over Canterbury. There are a number of sports exchanges with schools around the South Island, such as Timaru Boys’ High School, Craighead Diocesan School, John McGlashan College and Columba College. Students travel to St Andrew’s to compete in sports including both summer and winter sports. Also, numerous New Zealand and Australian school and sports’ teams stayed in the boarding houses during the school holidays, whilst taking part in local tournaments. The College continues to provide use of the Centennial Chapel to the Village Presbyterian Church for their Sunday services.

In 2017, the following community groups and organisations made use of the school buildings and amenities:

Sporting Groups: Pioneer Volleyball; Elmwood Sporting Club; Canterbury Volleyball; Canterbury Rugby; Canterbury Crusader Knights’ Development; New Zealand Women’s Volleyball.

Cultural Groups: The Jubilate Singers; the Artist Doctors; the Royal New Zealand Pipe Band Association’s Summer Camp; the Highland Piping Society; the Canterbury Philharmonia; the Christchurch Liedertafel Male Voice Choir; Dame Malvina Major Foundation; Helen O’Grady Drama Academy; Christchurch Civic Music Council; Christchurch Arts Forum; NZIA Festival of Architecture; New Zealand Theatre Federation’s Theatrefest.

Conferences, Seminars and Symposiums: 2017 Convention of Alcoholics Anonymous; Collaborative Trust for Research and Training in Youth Health and Development – National Youth Wellbeing Conference; National Bird Show; Special Education UnConference; 2017 National Quilting Symposium; Cancer Society; the Business Marketing Group; Burnside Learning Community Cluster Conference.

Other: Bubs, Bumps and Belong Market.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

29


Pub l i c Be nefit Re port

STAFF SHARING KNOWLEDGE As well as providing the highest education within the school, St Andrew’s College staff regularly share their expertise beyond the school. Every year a number of staff are markers for NCEA in various subjects. St Andrew’s College staff regularly contribute as speakers to conferences and many share their specialist knowledge with education publications, such as New Zealand Science Teacher and the Education Gazette. Many staff contribute to the wider teaching community through a leadership role in their regional or national subject associations: Christine Leighton

Deputy Chair AHIS (Association of Heads of Independent Schools) and on ISNZ Board Advisory Board, Initial Teacher Education University of Canterbury

Helaina Coote

Vice President of the National Association for the Teaching of English (NZATE) Executive committee member for the Canterbury English Teachers Association (CETA)

Kristian Giles

Secretary for the Canterbury Mathematical Association

Ben Hilliam

Executive committee member of the Canterbury Mathematical Association

Erin Swarbrick

Executive committee member of the Canterbury Mathematical Association

Tom Adams

Treasurer of Canterbury Geography Teachers’ Association

Beka Roest

Canterbury representative for the New Zealand Association for Classics Teachers (NZACT) January to July 2017

Alastair McGowan

Treasurer of the New Zealand Graphics and Technology Teachers Association (NZGATTA)

Donna Jones

Executive committee member for the Canterbury English Teachers Association (CETA)

Jacq Gilbert

Executive committee member for the Canterbury English Teachers Association (CETA)

Ian Morrison

New Zealand Tourism Industry Association Education Advisory Group

Pete Feary Liz Hill Taiaroa

Committee member of Canterbury Careers

Cantamath committee member, Ngai Tahu representative on policy development board at University of Canterbury

In addition, staff presented at the following conferences: Canterbury English Teachers’ Association Big Day Out, Burnside Cluster conference, New Zealand Association for the Teaching of English national conference, New Zealand Institute of Physics conference, Apple Distinguished Educators programme: Melbourne; Australian Heads of Independent Schools’ Conference. The College welcomes trainee teachers and hosts them for a six or seven-week teaching placement, which forms an integral part of their teacher training programme. Staff act as Associate Teachers and support trainees’ teaching practice experience in classrooms throughout the course of the teaching placement. Teachers observe, both informally and formally, trainee teachers’ and provide detailed and constructive written feedback throughout the placement. Trainee teachers are as fully integrated as possible into the College ‘teaching staff’ and are also provided with opportunities to participate in co-curricular involvement (e.g. coaching) where these opportunities arise. Staff sit on committees such as NZATE and CETE and share their expert knowledge and contribute to the local and national education landscape. Many staff are volunteers in their local communities for organisations like the Salvation Army and Ronald McDonald House. A number of staff are also involved with coaching sports or cultural groups outside of school hours. Staff also give generously to causes championed by the student community. In 2017, in keeping with tradition, staff ended the year by donating presents to the City Mission. Staff generously donated these presents and put them round the Christmas tree in Strowan House, until the week before Christmas, when they were delivered to the City Mission for distribution.

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT The College’s pastoral care objective is to offer a programme which celebrates the unique talents and personality of individuals and develops resilience and emotional intelligence in all students. The Pastoral Care programme is based on the College’s guiding values of Truth, Excellence and Faith. Our aim is to ensure every student feels comfortable, confident and connected to their College, so that their time here is as rewarding as possible.

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As part of the pastoral care programme the College is committed to celebrating diversity and to ensuring that the College is reflective of New Zealand’s changing society. The strategic plan states that the College will “recognise and celebrate the unique New Zealand culture and language, equipping our students to contribute to our bicultural heritage in their live beyond school”. Both the Preparatory School and Secondary School have a strong Kapa Haka programme. In 2017 the College again hosted the Tūhono Kapa Haka Festival. This event brought together students from Hillview Christian School, Middleton Grange and Rangi Ruru Girls’ School in an evening that celebrated Māori culture. Students also enjoyed performing for the wider community at special events such as prizegiving and assemblies. As part of the life skills programme Te Waka Year 10 students participate in community events (such as City to Surf) and work with a mentor in the community. The Pipe Band performed at the 2017 Hororata Highland Games – an annual festival celebrating Scottish heritage that more than 10,000 people attend. They also performed concerts at retirement homes across the city and played at ANZAC services at local RSA clubs.

COMMUNICATION WITH OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY The College’s website and Facebook page has readily accessible information which informs any member of the public about the activities undertaken at the school. The Annual Report is available online, as is the annual Philanthropy Report, which reports on the philanthropic and volunteering efforts of staff, students and parents in the St Andrew’s community. The College’s magazine Regulus is also available online, which covers latest news from the College with regard campus development, alumni news and student successes. Any matters important to the local community are communicated on the website and, when relevant, neighbours will receive communications from the College.

EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMY The College is one of the larger employers in Canterbury, employing 275 staff. The College generally supports the local economy by purchasing the majority of its goods and services in the Canterbury region.

Governance and Management Structure The College’s governance structure is outlined on page 2 of this report and is also detailed on the website. Both management and the Board of Governors have access to extensive professional development opportunities, including the annual Independent School New Zealand conference. The local community has the opportunity to attend the Board Annual General Meeting if they wish. From time to time, community consultation meetings will be held where any member of the public can attend. To read more about what is happening at the College or to read the Philanthropy Report, please visit the College website at stac.school.nz.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

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F i na nci als

ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE FINANCIALS For the year ended 31 December 2017

St Andrew’s College includes our Secondary and Preparatory Schools, our Boarding facility, and our Pre-school. 2017 was financially a ‘break-even’ year, where the total revenues were matched by total costs. The funds available to help pay for our building programme came from $3.88m of depreciation (non-cash expense) and $0.5m of Capital Development, and operational donations. St Andrew’s has also taken on debt to help fund this programme. The College continues to rely on a cash surplus and donations to future-proof the campus. The complete Tier 1 Financial Report can be found on the Charities Services website www.charities.govt.nz, registered charity number CC22462 for the St Andrew’s College and Group, and CC25213 for the Tier 2 St Andrew’s College Foundation Report. These reports have been prepared in line with the External Reporting Board (XRB) standards, as required by Charities Services. They are audited by BDO, independent accountants, and both received clean reports.

College Income and Expenses HOW EACH $1.00 OF INCOME IS SPENT

$0.21 Other costs

2017

$0.10 Property and ICT

Income $0.12 Depreciation $0.57 Staff cost

INCOME

32

2017 $m

2016 $m

EXPENSES

2017 $m

2016 $m

Fees

26.56

25.37

Employee Benefits

18.14

17.76

83.5%

81.2%

57.1%

56.9%

Grants

2.73

2.65

Depreciation

3.88

3.50

8.6%

8.5%

12.2%

11.2%

Donations

0.51

1.30

Property and ICT

3.01

2.98

1.6%

4.2%

9.5%

9.5%

Other

1.99

1.91

Other

6.71

5.79

6.3%

6.1%

21.1%

18.5%

TOTAL

31.79

31.23

TOTAL

31.73

30.03

ST AN DREW’S C OL L E G E

NET SURPLUS

0.06

1.20

0.2%

3.8%


College Assets and Equity ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE

$3.9m

CASH SURPLUS

i.e. the net surplus before deductingthe non-cash cost of depreciation.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE FIXED ASSETS (NBV) FA NET OF REVALUATIONS EQUITY EQUITY NET OF REVALUATIONS CASH SURPLUSES

2013

2014 6,315

13,790

12,930

9,893

132,238

142,955

161,906

167,917

49,662

52,834

63,551

72,979

78,990

136,268

146,032

148,665

159,390

159,453

65,062

66,628

69,261

70,463

70,526

5,311

5,177

5,998

4,705

3,944

12,000

12,000

10,000

10,000

8,000

8,000

6,000

6,000

4,000

4,000

2,000

2,000

2016

$000’s

Cash Surpluses 14,000

2015

2017

3,575

14,000

2014

2016

120,868

Capital Expenditure

2013

2015

2017

The assets of the College (largely the land and buildings) have been funded mostly by past and current students / families, as well as from generous donations received from the community. These are maintained to a high standard and are continually being kept fit for purpose for, current and future students. Prior to the 2010 / 2011 earthquakes, the College had embarked on a ten-year building programme to steadily upgrade our buildings to be fit for purpose and meet the needs of future students. The earthquakes forced us to re-prioritise which buildings needed to be worked on and when. Once our insurance claim was settled, we were able to embark on an even larger-scale building programme. Many buildings needed to be replaced, with others requiring some strengthening or remedial work. The result was an ambitious building programme, which has delivered high quality facilities which are befitting of St Andrew’s standing as a leading New Zealand independent school. This building programme was funded by a combination of the insurance payout, cash surpluses earned by the College each year, and by generous donations received from the St Andrew’s College community.

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

The College is run by the Rector and the Executive team, and is closely governed by the Board of Governors, while the Foundation is run and governed by the Board of Trustees. The College is an Incorporated Society with the ‘business’ owned by the Board of Governors on behalf of past, present, and future students, parents, and the St Andrew’s College community (i.e. there are no ‘owners’ as such). The College is a Not-for-Profit organisation, with the operating costs incurred each year mostly paid by fees collected from the families of current students.

The latest building projects include the Stewart Junior Centre and Pre‑school (completed at the end of 2017) and the Green Library and Innovation Centre (a major refurbishment of the Secondary School library area) being completed in the first half of 2018. During the construction of these two projects, the College went from being mostly debt free to using our debt facility with the BNZ.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

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F i na nci als

Fixed Assets (NBV)

Equity

Net Book Value

180,000

180,000

160,000

160,000

140,000

140,000

120,000

120,000

100,000

100,000

80,000

80,000

60,000

60,000

40,000

40,000

20,000

20,000

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2013

2015

Fixed Assets (NBV)

Equity

Net of Revaluations

Net of Revaluations

80,000

80,000

70,000

70,000

60,000

60,000

50,000

50,000

40,000

40,000

30,000

30,000

20,000

20,000

10,000

10,000

2013

2014

2014

2015

2016

2017

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2016

2017

There will always be more projects on the horizon as we continue to future-proof our facilities and meet the changing needs and expectations of our community. Now that we are using debt to help the timing of our capital expenditure, we need to be even more circumspect as to the sorts of projects we undertake and their timing. The Board’s treasury policy allows us to take on debt only to a limited multiple of cash surpluses earned, and even with that guideline, there is a reluctance to take on significant debt. The monies borrowed obviousy have an interest cost attached, and also have to be repaid from cash surpluses and donations, the same pool of funds the building programme utilises. Once sufficient funding is in place, the next building project will be the major refurbishment and upgrade of the theatre. Another upcoming project in the future may be a Central Learning Hub, to provide more learning spaces in a modern environment.

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$10m

TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

This includes most of the Stewart Junior Centre and Pre-school and the completion of the driveway, netball / tennis courts, and the Chapel bridge projects.

$95m

IN 10 YEARS

From 2008 to 2017 we have invested $95m in replacing and upgrading the College buildings, grounds, and facilities.


BURNETT VALLEY FARM

St Andrew’s College leases the Burnett Valley Farm from the Burnett Valley Trust. The College is now the sole beneficiary of this trust. The farm is situated near Cave in South Canterbury. The farm operation is managed by our Farm Manger with the help of a Farm Consultant. It raises and fattens both sheep and Angus beef. In the official financial report, the College figures include the Farm Operation, however they are not included in this report.

Annual Report for the year ended 31 December 2017

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F i na nci als

ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE FOUNDATION For the year ended 31 December 2017

Our Foundation receives and invests donations to enable it to support the College. This support includes helping to fund scholarships. The Foundation is run and governed by the Board of Trustees who employ Forsyth Barr to manage the investment fund. The Foundation has committed to substantially increase the support to the College by way of a Foundation Scholarships grant on top of the George Hight Scholarships already funded by the Foundation. This will be introduced in 2018.

, Q Y H V W P H Q W $ G Y L F H

2017 FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES Chair Members

Rodger Finlay Andrew Bascand David Boyd Simon Challies Matt Lancaster Nick Letham Richard Smith Margaret Turley

FOUNDATION – 2017 Equity @ 1st January Interest and Dividends 348,265 Realised Gains 141,860 Unrealised Gains (1) 1,135,476 Investment costs -60,018 Net Investment Income New Donations received Grants / Scholarships Equity @ 31 December

9,054,184

1,565,583 306,928 -78,792 10,847,903

(1) ‘Unrealised Gains’ is the increase in value of the investments held (i.e. from the stock market valuations). These gains are not locked in until an investment is sold, so all or part of the gains could be lost in future movements of stock valuations, and / or more gains could be achieved. 2017 was an unusually good year for this investment gain.

The $10.8m Equity value is

two times that at the end of 2010

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347 Papanui Road, Christchurch 8052, New Zealand P +64 3 940 2000 W stac.school.nz

Annual Report 2017  

This is the 2017 Annual Report for St Andrew's College, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Annual Report 2017  

This is the 2017 Annual Report for St Andrew's College, Christchurch, New Zealand.