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For the year ended 31 December 2015

Annual Report and Financial Statements

St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors Inc.


AnnualAnnual ReportReport & Financial & Financial Statements Statements – For –the Foryear the ended year ended 31 December 31 December 20152015

Table of Contents Chairman’s Report

1

Rector’s Report

2

Whole School Achievement Outcomes

9

Statement of Responsibility

11

Audit Report

12

Financial Statements

13

– Trend Statistics

15

– Statement of Comprehensive Revenue and Expense

17

– Statement of Financial Position

18

– Statement of Cash Flows

19

– Notes to the Financial Statements

20

Statement of Resources

22

The Board of Governors

23

Board Committees

23

Review of NCEA 2015

24

Public Benefit Report 2015

26


1

Chairman’s Report For the year ended 31 December 2015

The Board of Governors is pleased to report strong financial, operational and academic results for the 2015 year. On behalf of all connected to St Andrew’s, we congratulate the Rector, Mrs Christine Leighton, and her Executive team, for their outstanding effort in delivering the results that reinforce the College’s reputation. The Board remains fully committed to providing world-class facilities and resourcing the academic and operational staff to ensure a culture of continuous improvement. This year we report a record operating surplus brought about by the generosity of our wider community. Over $1.45 million was received in donations and we have now reached the half way point of the $6 million goal to fund the $11 million new Centennial Chapel. The full roll afforded the Board the luxury of approving significant unbudgeted expenditure during the year for increased investment in teachers, information technology improvements, and enhancing the co-curricular programme. The result was that the net operating surplus for 2015 was $1.49 million, close to budget. We invested $14 million in new capital development throughout the year, without any need to revert to the bank. We have been able to pass on the benefits of prudent financial management and the record roll, by keeping fee increases modest. In effect each and every St Andrew’s College student has received a healthy scholarship for the last three years as our fee structure trails the secondary school market average by a material margin. On the academic front, I’m pleased to report St Andrew’s achieved a record number of Excellence endorsements at all levels in the 2015 NCEA exams. This is a credit to our committed and passionate teaching staff that encourage our students to strive to do and be their very best. Construction of the new Gymnasium, Askin Pipe Band Centre, Maintenance Complex, Fitness Centre, Dance Studio and the Music Suite upgrade were effectively all completed by the end of the year. There was good progress on the new Centennial Chapel throughout the year and the community excitement is building. The stunning design is receiving acclaim in architectural and engineering circles and we remain on track for completion by the end of 2016. We intend to take on manageable debt in 2016 in order to complete the Chapel and landscaping including a new main driveway, and remain committed to a strategy of long-term affordability.

The Board has approved the 2016 budget on the basis that the College will break even after all costs. These costs include significant new investment in student centred initiatives. The Board wishes to thank Mr Mark Stewart, who retired from his role as Chairman of the St Andrew’s College Foundation at the end of the year. In addition to Mark’s extremely generous donation to the new Chapel, he brought flair, innovation and enthusiasm to the Step Into Our Future fundraising campaign, charged with raising the additional $6 million needed to complete the Chapel. The Stewart family are longstanding generous and enthusiastic supporters of the College, for which we will be forever grateful. We thank Mr Richard Smith for assuming the role of Acting Chair of the Foundation, and each of the other Trustees for their ongoing support. The Board appointed former head student and President of the Old Collegians Association, Mr Nick Letham, and a current parent, Mr Rodger Finlay, as Trustees of the St Andrew’s College Foundation. We welcome them. It is with a vote of sincerest thanks that we acknowledge the retirement from the Board of Mr Spencer Smith at the upcoming AGM in 2016. Spencer joined the Board in 2009 and has given outstanding service to the College. He chaired the Audit Committee and has been a member of the Finance Committee (the last two years as Chair) throughout his tenure. I wish to thank him personally for his help, support and sage counsel. St Andrew’s starts the 2016 academic year with a capacity Secondary School roll and the Preparatory School roll is at record levels. We are poised to commence the Centenary celebrations, with a well-earned reputation for excellent academic and co-curricular achievement. Long may this continue.

Garry Moore Chairman St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors Inc.


2

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Rector’s Report For the year ended 31 December 2015

2015 will stand out as an exceptional year for St Andrew’s College in a number of ways. Once again a sound financial result was achieved through a robust budgeting process which kept a close eye on expenditures and building expenses. A number of new initiatives resulted in extra investment in staff – particular to support key co-curricular activities in both the performing arts and sport. This extra investment was well rewarded with exceptional results in co-curricular activities – a record number of national and South Island titles across a variety of activities. By the end of the year the school roll numbered 959 in the Secondary School and 443 in the Preparatory School with a total of 1404 students. The beginning of 2015 saw 15 new teaching staff join the College (three in the Preparatory School and 12 in the Secondary School). One of these was Mr John Ruge who joined the St Andrew’s staff as a new Assistant Head of Secondary with responsibility as Head of the Senior College. The significant event at the end of the academic year is our College Prizegiving – this year the 99th for St Andrew’s College. This event was a spectacular celebration of academic achievement, with reference made to sporting and cultural events throughout the year. Some exceptional musical talent was also displayed from our choirs, barbershop, Pipe Band, Preparatory School kapa haka, orchestra, jazz band and soloists. Mr Hamish Faulls was presented with the annual Marily Scanlon prize for Teacher Excellence and a tribute was made to Alister Newton retiring after 44 years of service to St Andrew’s College. Also remembered at Prizegiving was James Patterson-Gardner who was tragically killed in a helicopter accident in February. James (a leaver of 2014), will be remembered each year with the presentation of the cup for the ‘Spirit of Boarding’ dedicated to his memory.

NEW ZEALAND SECONDARY SCHOOLS MIXED TENNIS CHAMPIONS.

CHRISTINE LEIGHTON WITH CHAPEL ARCHITECT PATRICK CLIFFORD AT THE LAYING OF THE FOUNDATION STONE CEREMONY.

Significant achievements in 2015 included: ACADEMIC Outstanding academic results in NCEA and Scholarship at the end of 2015 (results from January 2016); NCEA Results Level 1 – 99.5%

Level 2 – 100%

Level 3 – 95%

Excellence Endorsements Level 1 – 63

Level 2 – 55

Level 3 – 49

This is a total of 167 Excellence endorsements (33 more than the previous year). The majority of St Andrew’s students achieved their NCEA certification at all levels with an endorsement: Level 1 – 79.2%

Level 2 – 67.7%

Level 3 – 59.9%

This compares very favourably with other independent and decile ten schools. The increase in endorsements over the last six years has been significant. Scholarship In the Scholarship examinations there were 36 Scholarships gained by 26 students (this represents 19.5% of the cohort compared with the national average of 3%).


3

BOTH THE YEAR 9 AND YEAR 10 TEAMS WON THE CANTAMATH TROPHIES.

Other academic awards throughout the year included both the Years 9 and 10 Cantamaths teams winning the coveted Mathematics trophies, the Robotics team winning a CPIT Design award at the Regional finals, a Business Studies team winning the regional Innovation Award for Young Enterprise and Henry McCullum (Year 12) being named in the New Zealand Geography Olympiad team.

• overseas trips – 145 of our students experienced trips to Cambodia, cricket to Australia, History to Gallipoli and Europe, a Japanese trip, the Pipe Band to Scotland, basketball trip to the USA and the inaugural World Challenge trip to Thailand and Laos. Several of our musicians enjoyed an international music trip to Singapore and Malaysia;

Hannah Hudson (Year 11) came second in the New Zealand Future Problem Solving Competition and at the end of the year there were 45 tertiary scholarships awarded to St Andrews’ students.

• Duke of Edinburgh – 300 students benefited from participating in the Hillary Award – Duke of Edinburgh programme. Student awards – 161 students received their bronze, 17 their silver and six their gold award;

In the Preparatory School, Toby Harvie (Year 6) gained the New Zealand Medal for first place in ICAS writing. The Kids Lit Quiz and Tournament of the Minds team competed at the national finals in Wellington and the Year 6 spelling team won the Otago Daily Times Spelling Quiz.

CULTURE It was a very busy year of cultural activities. Approximately 217 students learned a musical instrument at the College. These students and others made up a 57 strong orchestra, which included students from Years 4–13. Sixty-four students sang in the three College choirs: 26 in Preparatory School, 18 in Stacchorus, 20 in Staccorro. The Senior dance group had approximately 40 students who participated in an impressive College Dance Revue. The Ballet Academy includes students from Years 1–9 with almost 100 dancers. The ballet production of ‘Hansel and Gretel’ was a wonderful showcase for dancers at the end of the year.

• the St Andrew’s College Pipe Band once again travelled to Glasgow to compete on the world stage after proving their supremacy as the premiere Pipe Band in New Zealand winning the coveted Grade 2 title at the national competition. Their placing in Glasgow as fifth Juvenile Band in the world and top band outside of Scotland was a most creditable result. Pipe Band enthusiasts were once again treated to a stunning StAC Attack concert in October; • three exceptional musical productions were staged by our Drama and Music Departments. The Senior production ‘Urinetown’ was an outstanding success as was the Years 9 and 10 production ‘Anything Goes’. The Preparatory School production ‘If we win’ was once again written entirely by the students with music written by Old Collegian, Isaac Shatford (2014); • the popular Film Fest was again held featuring the best 10 student-made films with the award for Best Film going to ‘Shade Thrown’, directed by Grace Dephoff; • senior jazz band won gold at Southern Jam, four students gained a place in the New Zealand Secondary Schools orchestra and a chamber group won a national bronze award;


4

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

THE FIRST XV BEAT CAMBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL TO DEFEND THE MOASCAR CUP AND WON THE NATIONAL SECONDARY CO-EDUCATIONAL SCHOOLS’ TITLE AND THE BARBARIAN’S CUP.

• the junior and senior jazz band continued to dominate at competition level delighting audiences throughout the year with their repertoire. The jazz club evening at ‘The Gym’ at the Christchurch Arts Centre was a popular event much appreciated by these who attended; • at the regional Sheilah Winn Shakespeare festival awards were received for Best Characterisation, Outstanding Stylistic Choreography and Vision, and Creative Use of Staging; • a strong year for debating with five senior teams entered into Canterbury Schools debating competition, with one team making the semi-finals. There was also a strong representation in junior debating with students gaining valuable experience; • a record number of seven bands entered in the Smokefree Rockquest. Neil MacLeod progressed to the Canterbury finals as did Hunter Paull with the Sock Monkeys. Neil MacLeod received the best lyrics for his original song ‘Foolish’; • the College’s community service programme engaged students at all levels throughout the school. The Senior College students (Years 12 and 13) completed 8793 hours for 2015, and raised an accumulative offering of $27,993.

Five StAC teams or individuals were winners at the Canterbury Zonta Awards and 33 students were awarded their New Zealand representative badges in 2015. Many other individuals have had spectacular success across a variety of sports – notably swimming, triathlon and athletics. Other significant extra events throughout the year included (other than the usual fixtures): • guest speaker Rob Hamill presentation to a highly engaged audience; • installation of the Science/Mathematics visual display in the Spiro Centre; • installation and opening of the earthquake display upstairs in Strowan House; • presentation to the College community by Chapel architect – Patrick Clifford; • St Andrew’s College trip to commemorate New Zealand contribution to WWI visiting sites in Gallipoli, The Somme, Passchendaele and Brockenhurst; • PTA event ‘Style at StAC’;

SPORTS In 2015 six national titles were won by StAC teams in mixed tennis, co-ed schools rugby, U16 four and U18 pairs rowing, Junior futsal and Junior Boys’ hockey. The outstanding First XI hockey team came second at Rankin Cup. There were also five New Zealand titles in Secondary Schools athletics. South Island titles were won in trapshooting, orienteering, polo, rowing, athletics, multisport, mixed snowboarding, and our Senior A netball team were third at the strongly contested South Island competition. This was the College’s highest finish in history.

• special ceremony – Laying of the Foundation Stone for the new Centennial Chapel on Founders’ Day (March) and creation of video about the Memorial and Centennial Chapels; • staff Strowan Ball (end of Term 2); • hosting of the Mussoorie International School for Girls from India. These are but some of the special moments and initiatives of 2015, not to mention the myriad of annual events and fixtures that are part of the regular life at StAC.


5

STAFF (TEACHING AND SUPPORT)

Returned from maternity leave

The outstanding dedication and support of all staff must not go unnoticed. Teachers go above and beyond expectations as professionals with responsibilities not only in the areas of teaching and learning but as tutors, sports and cultural coaches. Several staff were recognised in 2015 as outstanding educators and some are leading the way in the digital technologies space, ably supported by our Director of ICT, Sam McNeill and his IT team.

Kirsty Carline

Teacher Science (Secondary School)

Kate Taylor (Term 4)

Teacher (Preparatory School)

On maternity leave Anneke Kamo

Teacher (Preparatory School)

Bridget Preston

Teacher (Preparatory School)

Jane Egden

Teacher (Preparatory School)

Senior staff in both the Preparatory and Secondary Schools, and those leading teams of support staff in the areas of Communications, Development, Maintenance and IT continue to give outstanding leadership in their respective areas.

Rebecca McPhail

Teacher (Preparatory School)

Kate Taylor (Terms 2&3)

Teacher (Preparatory School)

The Marily Scanlon Award for Teacher Excellence was awarded to Hamish Faulls.

Elizabeth Ashton

Telephone Ambassador

Kelsey Williams

Development Co-ordinator

Philip Stewart

Farm Assistant

Pamela Haythorne

Accounts Receivable Officer

Dominica Urmson

Teacher Social Studies

Jacqui Anderson

Development Administrator

Other teachers who were recognised for outstanding achievement in 2015 were: AHISA Scholarship: Duncan Ferguson Apple Distinguished Educator: Duncan Ferguson Microsoft Innovative Educators: Ben Hilliam

Anais Lerosier-Hucke

Tamara Yuill Proctor

Wilj Dekkers

Appointments during 2015

Resignations during the year Dianne Claridge

Accounts Clerk/Creditors

Naomi Wilde

Community Relations and Development Officer

STAFF 2015

Ngaire Wilkinson

Senior College Reception

New staff

Mary McNulty

GATE Teacher

John Ruge

Head of Senior College

Catherine Boyer

Development

Jamie Clark

Learning Support

Hannah Jamieson

Farm Assistant

Annamaree Asare

English

Kristian Giles

Mathematics

Tom Adams

eLearning Integrator

Fariya Naseem

Physics

Margaret Smeaton

Science

Susie Stewart

Science/Agriculture

Susan Poulter (Gillespie) Geography

Permanent staff role changes Kelsey Williams

from Telephone Ambassador to Development Co-ordinator

Helaina Coote

from HOD English to Assistant Principal (Secondary)

Angela Marshall

French

Tamara Yuill Proctor

from Assistant HOD English to HOD English

Ellen Hampson

Transition/Travel and Tourism

Annamaree Asare

promoted to Assistant HOD English

Trish Bevin

Commerce

Cynthia Parker

Student Support

Brett Clark

promoted to Head of Learning Support

Marianne Delaney

Co-coach Netball A Team and High Performance Athlete Support (Girls)

Melanie Sinclair Lori Haisty

from Marketing Co-ordinator to Assistant to the Principal, Preparatory School from Teacher Aide and After-school Care Supervisor to Fixed Term Teacher

Carolyn Cairns

Ballet (Secondary School)

Brodie Dickinson

ICT Helpdesk Administration

Michelle Oosthuizen

Rector’s Executive Assistant

Jean Thomson

Assistant House Manager MacGibbon

Rosalind Emeleus

Music (Preparatory School)

Leavers at the end of 2015

Nikohl Jemison

Fixed Term Teacher

Sophie Ainsley

After-school Care

Rachael Hoddinott

Year 7 Teacher

Alexander Kelley

Preparatory Teacher/Head of Sport

Briony Marks

Relief Teacher/Preparatory School Teacher

Alice Eddington

Student Support (Boarding)

Rose Townsend

Library Assistant (Preparatory School)

Chris Goldsbury

Student Support (Boarding)

Angela Hawkins

Marketing Co-ordinator

Alister Newton

Head of Operations/Deputy Head of Secondary School

Brendan Burrows

Kitchen Assistant

Anais Lerosier-Hucke

Teacher Mathematics

Linda Bougen

Nurse (long-term relieving)

Jo Ashton-Martyn

Teacher English


6

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

THE SENIOR COLLEGE PRODUCTION OF ‘URINETOWN’ WAS SOLD OUT.


7

COLLEGE GOALS

TEACHING AND LEARNING

This year, 23 goals were identified as part of the College business plan. Each goal was supported by an action plan and resourcing needs were identified. The following is a summary of outcomes under each of the four dimensions from the St Andrew’s College Strategic Plan.

There was further development in the use of data to inform best practice. Improvements were made to student and parent access to achievement information. New analytical technology next year will further improve use of achievement data to inform decision making.

VALUES AND CULTURE Local and global relationships were strengthened through collaborative initiatives. St Andrew’s College was an active participant in the Burnside Learning Cluster and hosted the Cluster Conference in July where over 200 teachers came together to share professional learning. Guest speakers to the College included; lawyer and Old Collegian Julian Maze (1969), adventurer Rob Hamill, lawyer and Old Collegian John Strowger (1980), rugby coach Todd Blackadder, and Old Collegian and aid-worker Jemma Simon-Stewart (2003).

The Morningside Programme was introduced into Learning Support at Years 9 and 10 and initiatives were discussed across Preparatory and Secondary programmes. Students’ learning needs were clearly identified and classroom teachers differentiated classroom programmes. Support was offered to students at risk of not achieving in their NCEA years and there were pleasing results from this extra support.

Nineteen students had the opportunity to experience student exchanges with five other countries.

A focus on Science was developed across Years 1–13 with increased connection and planning between teachers in Years 7–10. Several groups from the Pre-school and Junior School (Years 1–3) made use of the Secondary School science labs and Year 9 students took the opportunity to mentor the younger students.

There have also been overseas trips to Singapore and Malaysia (Music), Cambodia (service), Australia (cricket), Europe and England (History), Japan (language), Scotland (Pipe Band), Thailand (World Challenge).

A change in assessment practice at Years 9 and 10 to using curriculum levels, has ensured greater continuity at transition periods especially from Years 8–9. Student reports at this level have also changed to report progress against curriculum levels.

There was extra resource allocated to key sports areas and it was an exceptional year for College sporting success. A new Rugby Director and Manager of Netball oversaw significant development in these sports with a New Zealand co-ed title and winning of the Moascar Cup in rugby and third place in the South Island for netball being highlights. Rowing and tennis earned national titles as did junior hockey and futsal. There were also five gold medals, one silver and two bronze at Secondary Schools Athletics Nationals. South Island titles were won in trapshooting, orienteering, polo, rowing, athletics, multisport and mixed snowboarding.

e-learning has continued to be a focus at all year levels with many teachers using technology in innovative ways to enhance learning experiences in the classroom. Digital safety was reviewed and a Creative Commons licence introduced. Many staff took the opportunity to develop in the area of ICT and five staff over the last two years have been recognised as Apple Distinguished Educators or Microsoft Expert Educators.

The Pastoral Care system was strengthened with clearer expectations introduced around the role of the tutor. Parent/Student/ Tutor conferences were introduced twice a year strengthening the partnership between home and school. This was further enhanced by the introduction of fortnightly notes, regularly reporting on student engagement. The Te Waka programme entered its second year and was overseen by Rod McIntosh and Ann Price. Te Waka tutors grew in their understanding of their role and new initiatives were introduced. The key events and final ceremony were very successful and there was a high level of student engagement. A comprehensive review of boarding was completed with a final report that was shared with the boarding community. The boarding house was reported as a well-run, safe nurturing environment with some minor suggestions for future development.

140 120 NUMBER OF STUDENTS

A High Performance Sports option was planned for 2016 and the Senior High Performance programme was reviewed with new initiatives ready to be introduced in 2016.

Thinking and collaboration continued to take focus in the classroom with SOLO being promoted as a tool to extend students’ development of thinking strategies. All classrooms promoted collaborative practice and students understood the value and learned the skills of working in teams.

100 80 60 40 20 0 University

Other Tertiary

Working

Travel

Don’t Know

FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS WE HAVE MADE A COMMITMENT TO TRACKING OUR LEAVERS’ DATA. AT THE TIME OF PUBLICATION OUR DATA REFLECTS OUR 2014 LEAVERS’ DESTINATIONS.


8

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

LEADERSHIP AND GOVERNANCE Staff worked in Professional Learning Groups to model best practice in collaboration and research in action. St Andrew’s active participation in the Burnside Learning Cluster was strongly valued and StAC hosted a Cluster Conference during the July holidays, with several St Andrew’s staff sharing their professional practice. StAC staff were actively involved in regional and national subject associations and international partnerships were fostered through the student exchange programme. StAC staff continued to be visible as presenters or speakers at conference and four teachers visited the Tuahiwi Marae at the end of the year. Eighteen staff across the Preparatory and Secondary Schools participated in the StAC Innovation and Research Group – a group that focuses on how teaching and learning might change and adapt in our changing world. A Pre-school review was completed and some changes implemented for 2016.

RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT In the area of communication, the College launched a very successful ‘Life is Co-Ed’ marketing campaign. A new prospectus was designed and published and significant progress made in designing a new website. New social media platforms were prepared with implementation ready for the start of 2016. New communications included a past parent e-newsletter, and communications kept the College community regularly informed of Chapel progress. A great deal of planning went into the College Centenary. Major stakeholder groups were engaged and consulted – the centennial book was commissioned and started, and the Museum earthquake exhibition was completed and opened. Gym 2 was completed, ready for the start of 2016 and the new sports offices and landscaping was designed, ready for work to begin in 2016. A significant focus was Health and Safety policy and practice across all areas of the College, in line with the new Health and Safety @ Work Act to be in effect from 4 April 2016. The Step Into Our Future campaign was a major focus. There was pleasing support from both the parent and Old Collegian community whose generosity is greatly appreciated as the College makes a commitment to providing outstanding facilities for present and future students. A total of $1.9 million was donated to the Step Into Our Future fundraising campaign during 2015, with $613,000 pledged and the remaining $1,287,000 gifted.

CONCLUSION In 2015 every person, staff member, student coach, tutor, Board member or parent has contributed and been a valued part of our College community. Individual endeavour and success is important but so too is our collective experience, our culture of inclusion and our celebration of diversity. Amongst our celebrations, are the disappointments, challenges and failures that we all experience. These too will ultimately make us stronger, enabling us to build upon what has been in 2015 as we head into another year.

Christine Leighton Rector


9

Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2015 DIMENSION

TARGET

Teaching and Learning

SECONDARY SCHOOL

Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning Teaching and Learning

OUTCOME

That 63 of Level 1 candidates gain Level 1 certificates with Excellence endorsement > 35%.

63 – Achieved

That 50 of Level 2 candidates gain Level 2 certificates with Excellence endorsement > 25%.

53 – Achieved

That 30 of Level 3 candidates gain Level 3 certificates with Excellence endorsement > 15%.

51 – Achieved

That percentage of Year 11 students gaining NCEA Level 1 be > 97%.

99.5% – Achieved

That percentage of Year 12 students gaining NCEA Level 2 be > 98%.

99.5% – Achieved

That percentage of Year 13 students gaining NCEA Level 3 be > 94%.

94% – Achieved

The Scholarships gained > 20.

36 – Achieved (including one Outstanding)

PREPARATORY SCHOOL

‘Within’ or ‘Above’ expectation are the predominant ratings for 90% of students in the Term 4 Key Competencies School Report.

92% – Achieved

All teachers are able to provide evidence of the measures taken to address each student’s beginning-of-year next steps.

Achieved

Individual written formative comment is evident in all classrooms.

Achieved

All classroom teachers will meet or exceed the national ‘expected shift and mean shift’ in reading, writing and mathematics.

Achieved

Teaching an d Learning

All Years 4–8 classroom teachers will be placed above the national norm for their year level in the end-of-year ‘Me and My School Survey’.

Achieved

Values and Culture

That student participation in sport and cultural activities for the College be > 95%.

96% – Achieved

Values and Culture

That the Pipe Band be successful at New Zealand Championships and win Grade 2.

Achieved

Teaching and Learning

Teaching and Learning

That other top teams in target sports reach the goals set by their coaches and management: • Athletics Top co-educational school at Canterbury Championships.

Achieved

• Cricket

Win either the one or two-day competition.

Achieved

• Rowing

NZSSRC Maadi Cup 10A finals three podiums.

Achieved

Make the Top 6 in The Press Cup. Make the final of the South Island Co-educational Schools First XV Competition.

Achieved

• Rugby

(Continued over page)


10

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Whole School Achievement Target Outcomes for 2015 DIMENSION

TARGET

Values and Culture (continued)

• Tennis

Win the South Island Championship in Timaru. Make the semi-final of the National Secondary Schools mixed competition.

Achieved

• Touch

Qualify for the National Secondary Schools Tournament in the mixed grade.

Achieved

• Hockey

That the boys’ hockey First XI be in the Top 8 in New Zealand.

Achieved

• Netball

That the girls’ netball A make the Top 8 SISS Netball Tournament, Top 4 Canterbury Supernet Competition and maintain position in Premier 2 Grade in the Christchurch Netball Saturday Competition.

Achieved

Resources and Environment

OUTCOME

That the Secondary School roll average be > 950 for 2015.

Achieved

Preparatory School roll average is be > 425 for 2015.

Achieved

That international enrolments for 2015 > 10.5 Secondary and 5 Preparatory = Total 15.5.

Achieved – 14 Secondary and 6 Preparatory. Total = 20

That the budgeted Operating Surplus before EQ of $1,510,782 be achieved.

Net surplus = $1,489,373 (Capital donations excluded)

That the budgeted Net Surplus before Depreciation (cash surplus) of $4,451,331 be achieved.

Cash surplus = $4,562,312 (Capital donations excluded)

PREPARATORY SCHOOL PRODUCTION – IF WE WIN


11

Statement of Responsibility For the year ended 31 December 2015

The Board of Governors (‘the Board’) of St Andrew’s College (‘the College’) accepts responsibility for the preparation of the annual financial statements and the judgements used in these statements. The Board’s management accepts responsibility for establishing and maintaining a system of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance as to the integrity and reliability of the College’s financial reporting. In the opinion of the Board, the annual financial statements for the financial year reflect the position and operation of the College. The College’s 2015 financial statements are authorised for issue by the Board resolution dated 26 May 2016.

Garry Moore

Bryan Pearson

Chairman

Deputy Chairman

26 May 2016

26 May 2016


12

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Audit Report To the members of St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors Inc.

We have audited the summary financial report of St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors (Incorporated) for the year ended 31 December 2015 as set out on pages 17 to 21. Responsibilities of the Board of Governors and Auditor The Board of Governors is responsible for the preparation of a summary financial report in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand. It is our responsibility to express to you an independent opinion on the summary financial report presented by the Board. Basis of Opinion Our audit was conducted in accordance with New Zealand Auditing Standards and involved carrying out procedures to ensure the summary financial report is consistent with the full financial report on which the summary financial report is based. We also evaluated the overall adequacy of the presentation of information in the summary financial report against the requirements of Financial Reporting Standard 43: Summary Financial Reports (FRS-43). Other than in our capacity as auditor we have no relationship with, or interests in, the College. Unqualified Opinion In our opinion, the information reported in the summary financial report complies with FRS-43: Summary Financial Reports and is consistent with the full financial report from which it is derived and upon which we expressed an unqualified audit opinion in our report to the members dated 26 May 2016. We completed our work for the purposes of this report on 21 June 2016.

BDO Christchurch Auditors


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Financial Statements St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors Inc.

The net operating surplus from College Operations (page17), excluding the Farm and Earthquake Related Receipts and Expenses was $2,943,280 (2014: $2,281,205). The net operating surplus includes donation income, the majority of which was diverted to the Chapel rebuild. The net operating surplus after removing capital (Chapel) donations was $1.49 million compared to the budget of $1.51 million. During the year the Board approved unbudgeted expenditure for increased investment in teaching resources and improving the co-curricular programme. The growth in roll numbers (1395 full time equivalent students in 2015 vs 1362 in 2014) offset the additional expenditure. Overall expenses increased by 9% compared to last year. Employee benefits expense has increased by 6.5% from 2014 which reflects the Board’s desire to improve services in teaching and co-curricular. The 9.5% increase in property and equipment related costs reflects the increased standard of maintenance and the continued focus on IT capability, while the 6% increase in depreciation is a result of our building programme. During the year $13.9 million was spent on completing capital projects. This includes almost completing the new Gym 2, and significant progress on the new Chapel. It also includes other capital projects such as the purchase of a further property in Normans Road for future development, completion of the Dance Studio, and conversion of the Preparatory School air conditioning system from water sourced to air sourced, (following damage in the earthquakes). The St Andrew’s College Foundation has enjoyed strong community support over the past few years and the Foundation made a grant of $250,000 for the new Chapel. The net assets of the Foundation reduced by $0.3 million (inclusive of donations) to $8.6 million at year end as a result of returning $1.35 million of Chapel rebuild donations to the College.


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Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Financial Statements EFFECTS OF THE CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKES IN 2011 The earthquakes that occurred in 2010 and 2011 have materially affected the Annual Financial Statements up until 2015, which are required to include all known insurance expenses and receipts in accordance with New Zealand International Financial Reporting Standards. From 2016 any remaining costs are being classified as ‘business as usual’ costs and have been budgeted for as such. SUMMARY OF EARTHQUAKE RELATED REVENUES AND EXPENSES

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

17,359

346,961

Canterbury Earthquake Related Receipts Impairment of Assets – Canterbury Earthquake (not including charges to the revaluation reserve) Canterbury Earthquake Related Expenses

519,145

309,752

813,578

309,752

1,332,723

292,393

(985,762)

NET IMPACT OF CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKE ON TOTAL INCOME FOR THE YEAR

RECEIPTS

IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS

The above receipts are from EQC in relation to the College’s residential properties and are shown as income in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The Board has obtained a valuation of the College’s land and buildings at 31 December 2014. This exercise will be repeated again for the 2016 report.

The College is using these funds to support the College building programme.

Where buildings have been demolished, the amount written off has been taken first against the building revaluations carried in the revaluation reserve. The balance of the write off of the buildings is recognised as a loss in the Statement of Comprehensive Income.

EXPENDITURE All known expenditure incurred to date relating to the costs of remediating the damage caused by the earthquakes, has been recognised as an expense, measured in the Statement of Comprehensive Income and disclosed in the notes.

THE INSURERS The College’s earthquake insurance claims with ANSVAR, which changed its name to ACS in 2012, were settled by way of a satisfactory full and final unconditional bulk settlement.

BASIS OF PREPARATION The College policy is to prepare financial statements in accordance with New Zealand Generally Accepted Accounting Practice (‘NZ GAAP’). They comply with Public Benefit Entity International Public Sector Accounting Standards (‘PBE IPSAS’) and other applicable Financial Reporting Standards, as appropriate for Tier 1 not-for-profit public benefit entities. The College has ‘early adopted’ the Tier 1 reporting being introduced as a requirement of the Charities Services. This new standard has been applied to the 2014 comparative figures which means that some figures have changed from the 2014 Annual Report, however the net results are the same.

The audited accounts were prepared on the basis of consolidating the Farm and Foundation and revaluing certain fixed and biological assets. In the interest of greater transparency, the Board has restated the result on an unconsolidated basis with disclosure by way of notes where appropriate. The following Abridged Financial Statements of the St Andrew’s Presbyterian College Board of Governors (Incorporated), for the year ended 31 December 2015, have been adapted from the audited Financial Statements approved by the Board on 26 May 2016. The full accounts may be viewed at www.charities.govt.nz, registered charity number CC22462.


15

Trend Statistics For the year ended 31 December 2015

STUDENT ROLL AS AT 1 JULY MOE RETURN 800

NUMBER OF STUDENTS

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

est 2016

YEAR MALES

270

278

275

274

275

277

261

255

255

248

238

FEMALES

135

148

151

155

152

137

147

153

165

182

193

PREPARATORY

405

426

426

429

427

414

408

408

420

430

431

MALES

611

608

604

598

589

585

601

619

639

645

651

FEMALES

301

311

322

329

340

323

311

321

303

317

343

SECONDARY

912

919

926

927

929

908

912

940

942

962

994

1317

1345

1352

1356

1356

1322

1320

1348

1362

1392

1425

TOTAL ROLL

SURPLUS TO INTEREST BEARING DEBT 10 9 8

$ MILLION

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

YEAR OPERATING SURPLUS

1.067

1.541

2.135

2.590

2.409

1.649

2.752

2.658

2.280

2.944

INTEREST BEARING DEBT

4.182

3.119

2.270

4.182

9.184

5.771

9.544

0.392

0.288

0.221


16

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

$ PER STUDENT 34,000 32,000 30,000 28,000 26,000 24,000 22,000

$ DOLLARS

20,000 18,000 16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 – -2000 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

est 2016

YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

1,001

1,013

2,052

4,595

7,001

6,266

15,636

2,652

4,733

9,966

9,627

OPERATING COSTS

12,082

12,389

12,574

13,714

15,045

15,558

16,123

17,024

17,601

18,626

19,384

GOVERNMENT GRANT

-1,360

-1,351

-1,278

-1,282

-1,631

-1,773

-1,627

-1,598

- 1,670

- 1,650

-1,613

% PERCENTAGE

SOURCE OF REVENUE (LHS)/OPERATING SURPLUS AS % OF TOTAL INCOME (RHS) 90%

18%

80%

16%

70%

14%

60%

12%

50%

10%

40%

8%

30%

6%

20%

4%

10%

2% 0%

0% 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

YEAR FEES

80.9

81.1

82.5

83.4

82.0

83.4

85.3

84.8

83.0

78.0

GOVERNMENT GRANT

10.4

9.9

8.9

8.2

10.7

11.2

9.6

9.2

9.4

8.5

OTHER

8.7

9.0

8.6

8.3

7.2

5.4

5.1

6.0

7.7

13.4

SURPLUS / INCOME (RHS)

6.2

8.4

10.9

12.2

10.6

7.4

11.4

10.4

8.7

10.2


17

Statement of Comprehensive Revenue and Expense For the year ended 31 December 2015

(excludes Foundation Income)

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

23,842,803

22,817,891

2,455,731

2,466,157

Donations – Capital (Chapel)

1,453,907

Other Grants and Donations

388,444

217,677

Other Income

1,568,187

1,144,977

Interest Income

499,910

693,052

30,208,982

27,339,753

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Audit of the Financial Statements (BDO)

43,911

36,301

Bad debts

25,548

42,016

Increase/(decrease) in allowance for impairment of receivables

Employee benefits expense

16,475,205

15,471,770

Property and equipment related costs

2,254,828

2,059,126

Depreciation

3,072,939

2,896,556

Boarding, curriculum, and scholarship costs

3,093,226

2,563,553

Interest costs

16,886

18,635

Administration and other expenses

2,283,159

1,970,591

27,265,702

25,058,548

2,943,280

2,281,205

NOTES

REVENUE Fees

4

Grants – MOE

Total Revenue NOTES EXPENDITURE

Total Expenditure NET OPERATING SURPLUS FROM THE COLLEGE St Andrew’s College Burnett Valley Farm

1

(82,428)

280,243

NET SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR

Canterbury Earthquake Related Revenue Canterbury Earthquake Related Expense

2,860,852

17,359

346,960

(309,752)

(1,332,722)

NET COSTS PERTAINING TO EARTHQUAKES

(292,393)

(985,762)

Total Income for the Year

2,568,459

1,575,686

Gain (Loss) on revaluation of property, plant and equipment

8,569,013

Total Other Comprehensive Revenue and Expense

8,569,013

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE REVENUE AND EXPENSE FOR THE YEAR

2,568,459

10,144,699

2,561,447


18

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Statement of Financial Position For the year ended 31 December 2015

(excludes Foundation Balance Sheet – see Note 7)

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Cash and Cash Equivalents

7,690,315

15,830,848

Receivables and Pre-payments

906,556

985,160

Inventories

512,757

559,080

650,036

671,435

9,759,664

18,046,523

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

134,672

134,672

CURRENT ASSETS

NOTES

1

Biological Assets (Livestock) Total Current Assets NON-CURRENT ASSETS

NOTES

Investments Loan – Burnett Valley Trust

6

33,000

Biological Assets (Forestry)

1

272,246

272,246

Property, Plant and Equipment

2

143,198,866

132,429,071

143,605,784

132,868,989

153,365,448

150,915,512

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Payables and Accruals

2,902,721

2,785,710

Advances from Related Parties

624,494

1,011,155

Deferred Revenue

713,802

584,848

Finance Leases

10,892

10,892

Borrowings

90,000

4,341,909

4,392,605

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Total Non-current Assets TOTAL ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES

NOTES

Total Current Liabilities NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

NOTES

Borrowings Finance Leases

90,000

9,077

19,969

9,077

109,969

Total Non-current Liabilities TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS/EQUITY

4,350,985 NOTES

4,502,574

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Balance at 1 January

146,412,938

Cafeteria Opening Balance (now included)

33,066

2,516,898

1,582,263

51,561

8,562,436

Balance at 31 December

149,014,463

146,412,938

TOTAL NET ASSETS/EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

153,365,448

150,915,512

Total Comprehensive Revenue and Expense for year Revaluation Surplus

136,268,239


19

Statement of Cash Flows For the year ended 31 December 2015

(excludes Foundation Cash Flow)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Cash provided from:

Net Fees Received

22,541,011

21,773,024

Donations – Capital (Chapel)

1,453,907

Grants, Sundry Donations and Bequests

2,779,863

2,683,805

Other Income

3,719,196

5,388,336

30,493,977

29,845,165

Cash applied to:

(16,618,061)

(15,568,641)

(7,487,457)

(6,947,037)

Payments to Employees Payments to Suppliers

(891,378)

Other Payments

239,013

(24,996,895)

Net cash inflow/(outflow) from operating activities

5,497,082

2015 ($)

(22,276,665)

OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH FLOWS FROM EARTHQUAKE ACTIVITIES

7,568,500

2 2014 ($)

Cash provided from:

Canterbury Earthquake Related Receipts

17,359

346,960

Canterbury Earthquake Related Payments

(309,752)

(813,577)

Net cash inflow/(outflow) from earthquake activities

(292,393)

(466,617)

5,204,689 2

Cash applied to:

NET CASH INFLOW/(OUTFLOW) FROM OPERATING AND EARTHQUAKE ACTIVITIES

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

7,101,883

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Cash provided from:

Proceeds from Loan Repayments

33,000

40,000

Other Proceeds

64,812

229,507

Cash applied to:

Purchase of Property, Plant and Equipment

(13,873,263)

(6,447,074)

Other Payments

(497)

NET CASH INFLOW/(OUTFLOW) FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

(13,775,451)

(6,178,064)

2015 ($)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

2014 ($)

Cash provided from:

Interest received (external)

441,547

632,496

Interest paid (external)

(426)

(833)

Proceeds from draw down of loans Cash applied to:

Repayment of loan and finance lease principal

(10,892)

(10,892)

430,229

620,771

(8,140,533)

1,544,590

15,830,848

14,286,258

7,690,315

15,830,848

NET CASH INFLOW/(OUTFLOW) FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year CASH/CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF YEAR


20

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Notes to the Financial Statements For the year ended 31 December 2015

1. ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE BURNETT VALLEY FARM

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Investment:

Balance at 1 January

$

$

1,315,189

1,137,505

Net (deficit)/surplus for the year

(133,989)

286,821

Revaluation of Livestock

51,561

58,641

Revaluation of Forestry

(65,219)

Recognised (Loss)/Profit for the Year

(82,428)

280,243

67,998

(102,559)

1,300,760

1,315,189

Funding from St Andrew’s College

1,002,048

934,050

Net Equity in Farm at 31 December

298,712

381,139

Increase (Decrease) in Funding Investment in Farm at 31 December Comprising:

The assets and liabilities of the Farm are now consolidated with the College. The seasonal nature of farming can cause material fluctuations in accounting profit due to the timing of the sale of livestock near the College’s 31 December balance date.

2. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Land

Buildings

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

29,600,000

28,580,000

97,167,862

96,734,947

Sports and Music Equipment

387,890

261,915

Plant and Machinery

630,871

710,977

Motor Vehicles

152,918

137,229

Furniture and Fittings

975,646

1,163,513

Computers and ICT Assets Under Construction As at 31 December

181,979

218,184

14,101,700

4,622,306

143,198,866

132,429,071

Land and buildings were revalued by Colliers International as at 31 December 2014 to comply with NZ IFRS. Additions are at cost. Valuations will be reviewed again at 31 December 2016. Land has been valued using the discounted cashflow method on the basis of a theoretical residential subdivision. Buildings have been valued at depreciated replacement cost. 3. CONTINGENT LIABILITIES There is a potential disputed liability with respect to the Mainzeal receivership and the incomplete boarding house. Our legal and quantity surveyor’s advice is that we have nil to pay, and there is still ongoing correspondence regarding this matter. (2014: the same dispute applied.) 4. MINISTRY OF EDUCATION GRANT Included in the grants in 2015 is $28,107 paid to the College under the KiwiSport initiative. The KiwiSport funding was applied to developing coaches’ skills (2014: $27,095). 2016 ($)

5. CONTRACTED COMMITMENTS

2015 ($)

Nil

As at 31 December

6,624,979

6,624,979


21

6. RELATED PARTIES The College paid $55,740 to the OCA being 50% of acceptance fees to secure life membership of the OCA for all new students (2014: $33,912). The College has advanced a loan to Burnett Valley Trust of $33,000 and received interest of nil (2014: $2,598). This has since been repaid in full.

The Foundation holds investments valued at $276,250 in Ryman Healthcare Limited. A trustee of the Foundation is the Managing Director of Ryman Healthcare Limited (2014: $242,820). The Foundation holds investments valued at $38,250 in NZ Oil and Gas Limited. A trustee of the Foundation is the Chairman of NZ Oil and Gas Limited.

The College paid farm rentals to Burnett Valley Trust of $51,440 (2014: $51,440). The College received grants from the Foundation of $275,000 during the year (2014: $201,500) and further scholarship funding totalling $36,750 (2014: $18,350). 7. ST ANDREW’S COLLEGE FOUNDATION The financial performance and financial position of the Foundation are excluded from the College’s financial performance other than the payment of Foundation grants and donations to the College. STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE REVENUE AND EXPENSE INVESTING ACTIVITIES

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Interest and dividends received

396,624

389,684

Realised and unrealised gain/(loss) on investments

236,839

553,491

(less) Investing costs

-59,631

-58,421

NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

573,832

884,754

FUNDING ACTIVITIES

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Donations received (via College) – Chapel

666,367

477,365

204,062

140,289

– Other

Debt forgiveness Total funding received Grants to St Andrew’s College Transfers to St Andrew’s College – Chapel donations

– Other

300,000

870,429

917,654

275,000

201,500

1,356,340

80,815

36,750

18,350

Total funding payments

1,748,905

219,850

NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) FROM FUNDING ACTIVITIES

(878,476)

697,804

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE REVENUE AND EXPENSE FOR THE YEAR

(304,644)

1,582,558

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

2015 ($)

2014 ($)

Cash and cash equivalents

602,537

1,224,113

Receivables

430,595

586,906

Investments

8,626,458

7,749,715

TOTAL ASSETS

9,659,590

9,560,734

Hight scholarships to students

Payables

5,000

201,500

Borrowings

1,085,000

485,000

TOTAL LIABILITIES

1,090,000

686,500

Balance at 1 January

8,874,234

7,291,676

Total comprehensive revenue and expense for the year

(304,644)

1,582,558

TOTAL NET ASSETS/EQUITY

8,569,590

8,874,234

TOTAL NET ASSETS/EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

9,659,590

9,560,734


22

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Statement of Resources For the year ended 31 December 2015

4. STAFFING LEVELS

1. SCHOOL ROLL The average roll for the year was 1395 students (Pre-school excluded).

The College employed 278 staff amounting to a total FTE count of 203 made up as follows:

The number of students in year groups: Years Years

1–6 7–8

Years 9–11 Years 12–13 Totals

TOTAL

GIRLS

BOYS

230 204 434

115 70 185

115 134 249

582 379 961

194 123 317

388 256 644

1395

502

893

2. PHYSICAL RESOURCES The ownership of the land and buildings, and other assets, is vested in the Board of Governors. The land and buildings were revalued in 2014. Significant projects were completed in 2015: • Gym 2 was almost completed; • the Preparatory School water sourced heating and cooling system, which was earthquake damaged, was converted to air sourced and the air conditioning was commissioned; • the new Askin Pipe Band Centre and Maintenance buildings, the Music Suite enhancements and the new Dance Studio were all completed. The audited book value of College Property, Plant and Equipment assets, after providing for depreciation, was $143 million as at 31 December 2015.

Direct Teaching FTEs

2015

2014

Pre-school Preparatory School Secondary School

4.7 29.0 80.7

4.4 30.3 82.8

Totals

114.4

117.5

Student/Teacher ratio Direct Teaching

2015

2014

Pre-school Preparatory School Secondary School

8.5 15.0 11.9

9.1 13.9 11.4

Indirect Teaching FTEs

2015

2014

Pre-school Preparatory School Secondary School

0.0 6.4 30.9

0.0 5.2 28.6

Totals

37.3

33.8

2015

2014

Pre-school Preparatory School Secondary School

8.5 12.3 8.6

9.1 11.8 8.5

Student/Teacher ratio

Direct and Indirect Teaching

Staffing Level FTEs

2015

2014

The majority of College assets are situated at the 11.5 hectare Papanui Road campus and include five residential properties in Normans Road. The Alistair Sidey Mountain Lodge is built on leased Department of Conservation land and the College owns a residential property in Castle Hill Village.

Office staff Property staff ICT staff Other Boarding and Kitchen

21.4 8.0 6.0 4.1 12.1

21.0 7.7 6.0 5.3 13.8

The Farm assets comprise livestock, forestry, plant and improvements to the 904 hectare leased farm at Burnett Valley, Cave, in South Canterbury.

Totals

51.6

53.8

Total FTE

203.3

205.1

3. HUMAN RESOURCES The Board draws attention to the most valuable resource available to the College being its skilled and committed staff. This value is not quantified in the financial statements. In addition, the Board acknowledges the invaluable support provided to all aspects of the College’s operation by parents, caregivers, and other valuable members of the wider St Andrew’s community.


23

The Board of Governors For the year ended 31 December 2015

BOARD MEMBERS Parent nominee Garry Moore, Chairman, Financial Consultant Board appointed Spencer Smith, Partner – Accounting Firm Parent nominees Donna Bridgman, Business Group Manager Rob Hall, General Manager Richard Holyoake, Business Director Christchurch Presbytery nominee Reverend Sandra Wright-Taylor, Presbyterian Minister Rector Christine Leighton, Rector Old Collegians’ nominee Bryan Pearson, Deputy Chairman, Company Director and Consultant Strategist Staff nominee Chris Janett, Professional Practice Supervisor

BOARD SECRETARY David Evans, General Manager

FOUNDATION TRUSTEES Chair

(Retired 10/9/15)

Richard Smith

BOARD COMMITTEE DIRECTORY AUDIT Chair Member

Spencer Smith Garry Moore

CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT Chair Donna Bridgman Members Christine Leighton Garry Moore FINANCE Chair Members

Spencer Smith Christine Leighton Garry Moore Deidre Ryley

REMUNERATION AND NOMINATIONS Chair Rob Hall Members Richard Holyoake Chris Janett

Mark Stewart

Trustees

(Acting Chairman)

Andrew Bascand David Boyd Simon Challies Rodger Finlay (Joined 26/11/15)

Matthew Lancaster Nick Letham

(Joined 26/11/15)

Bryan Pearson Margaret Turley


24

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Review of NCEA and Scholarship 2015 Our 2015 NCEA results included a total of 165 Excellence endorsements as well as 36 New Zealand Scholarships, one of which was an Outstanding Scholarship. At Level 1, 63 Excellence endorsements were gained. At Level 2, 52 Excellence endorsements were gained. At Level 3, 50 Excellence endorsements were gained. This compares outstandingly well with 2008, the first year ‘proper’ of awarding NCEA with Excellence endorsement. In that year, just 39 such endorsements were gained across the three NCEA levels (Level 1 – 22, Level 2 – 9, Level 3 – 8). St Andrew’s College has effective processes for ensuring that students reach their potential, such as individual student monitoring and mentoring programmes and tracking of student achievement. Explicit learning values support students from the time they enter the College to the time they graduate. High academic achievement is celebrated with students striving to achieve Excellence endorsements and many being recognised in national and international competitions. Level 1 In 2015 the College’s Level 1 pass rate was 99.5%, up 1.8% on the 2014 figure and 7% higher than the national decile 8–10 band. 47.2% gained a Merit endorsement and 32% gained Excellence. The overall pass rate in externally-assessed Standards was 4.2% higher than the national decile 8–10 average. Level 2 At Level 2, the pass rate was 99.5%, up 1% on the 2014 figure and 6.7% better than the national decile 8–10 band. 44.7% of students gained a Merit endorsement and 27.7% gained Excellence. Once again the Excellence endorsement outcomes exceeded the target established at the beginning of the year of 50. The pass rate in externally-assessed Standards was 2.5% higher than the national decile 8–10 average. Level 3 At Level 3 the pass rate was 94%, down 2.2% (= 1 student fewer) on the 2014 figure and 5.7% better than the national decile 8–10 band. 30.8% of these students gained a Merit endorsement and 29.1% gained an Excellence endorsement. Once again, the Excellence endorsement outcomes exceeded the target that was established of 30. The pass rate in externally-assessed Standards was 3.5% lower than the national decile 8–10 average. University Entrance 83.6% of our students gained University Entrance compared with 76% in the decile 8–10 band. Scholarships We achieved 36 Scholarship passes in this premier exam, including one Outstanding award in Agriculture/Horticulture. Focusing on External Assessment Results for 2011–2015 from externally-assessed Achievement Standards at each NCEA level are depicted in the following graphs. At each NCEA level, the overall Achievement, Merit and Excellence grades are combined and Merit and Excellence grades are shown separately.


25

ACHIEVEMENT MERIT EXCELLENCE

NCEA Level 1 – Externally-assessed results compared to the national decile 8 to 10 average

100

MERIT

90

EXCELLENCE

80 % PERCENT

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

STAC

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2011

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2012

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2013

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2014

DECILE 8–10 2015

ACHIEVEMENT MERIT EXCELLENCE

NCEA Level 2 – Externally-assessed results compared to the national decile 8 to 10 average

100

MERIT

90

EXCELLENCE

80 % PERCENT

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

STAC

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2011

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2012

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2013

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2014

DECILE 8–10 2015

ACHIEVEMENT MERIT EXCELLENCE

NCEA Level 3 – Externally-assessed results compared to the national decile 8 to 10 average

100

MERIT

90

EXCELLENCE

80 % PERCENT

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

STAC

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2011

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2012

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2013

DECILE 8–10

STAC

2014

DECILE 8–10 2015

University Entrance results compared to the national decile 8 to 10 average

STAC DECILE 8–10

100 90 80 % PERCENT

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

STAC

DECILE 8–10 2011

STAC

DECILE 8–10 2012

STAC

DECILE 8–10 2013

STAC

DECILE 8–10 2014

STAC

DECILE 8–10 2015


26

Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

Public Benefit Report (2015) “Our commitment is to partner with families, seek opportunities and strategic alliances to provide St Andrew’s students with a holistic learning experience to enable each to be the very best they can be. At St Andrew’s we are proud of the values and strong sense of community that has developed over nearly 100 years. As we head towards our Centenary in 2017, we are committed to growing and adapting as the world changes, not only to sustain our strengths, but also to ensure that our students have the skills they need to be future leaders”. St Andrew’s College Strategic Plan (2014–2018)

The purpose of this Public Benefit Report is to show how St Andrew’s College engages with the wider community and encourages access to its education to the fullest extent of its resources. This report, read in conjunction with the Annual Report, adds information about activities of a non-financial nature. The College is a registered charity (CC22462) and the charitable objectives relevant to this report include: • to provide a school or schools with facilities and atmosphere to promote sound learning and foster the development of life and character on the basis of the Presbyterian tradition; • to accept contributions, collections, donations, legacies, devises, gifts, grants and subsidies. The beneficiaries of the College’s constitution include students, parents, staff, Old Collegians and such other charitable purpose as the Presbytery of Christchurch shall direct. St Andrew’s College is also supported through financial grants from the St Andrew’s College Foundation from time to time. The College is committed to providing access to its educational programme and encourages applications from all sectors of the community. A range of scholarships and bursaries are available from the College including academic, music, sporting and cultural and boarding scholarships. Aspire Scholarships are available from the Ministry of Education, providing assistance to low income families towards the cost of independent secondary schooling. The George Feilding Hight Scholarship and other bursaries are also available for students who, in the opinion of the Rector of St Andrew’s College, would be precluded from attending the College because of financial constraints.


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STRATEGIC PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE The College is committed to a sustainable future and has invested in both short and long term planning. A new Strategic Plan has been developed for 2014–2018. This Strategic Plan articulates the College goals, objectives and desired outcomes that will guide the College to and beyond the Centenary in 2017. The Strategic Plan states: “The strategic directions that we put in place will inform the directions our students take once they leave us. We will continuously rethink and innovate, and teach our students the importance of curiosity, resilience, courage and compassion. We will keep building on our traditions and values, celebrate our school spirit and support our students in their development of character and sense of community. We have taken into consideration data on demographic, social, economic and technological trends. We have reviewed leading edge research of 21st century trends in education. We have engaged extensively with the St Andrew’s community through dialogue, events and surveys with our student, staff, parent and Old Collegian community”. THE CASTLE HILL WASP CONTROL PROJECT.

COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMME The Strategic Plan clearly states that the College will: • create purposeful local and global partnerships that allow unique opportunities for learning and foster civic engagement and social responsibility; • develop long-term global, national and local partnerships that provide academic and service opportunities, provide co-operative learning opportunities and involve international, deeper relationships with community service and non-profit organisations. The College has comprehensive programmes in place to support these objectives. Part of the Senior College philosophy is ‘developing social responsibility’. Every student in the Senior College completes 30 hours of community service to receive their Senior College diploma. In 2015 Senior College students performed 8793 hours of community service and contributed $27,993 to various causes. Community service leaders ran student mufti-days to raise over $4000 for Child Cancer, Nepal Red Cross and Prostate Cancer Foundation of New Zealand. Offerings from College chapel services helped to raise $7320 to support Big Brothers Big Sisters in Christchurch and Cambodia, Christchurch City Mission, Hagar in Cambodia, Salvation Army, Red Cross Refugee Support Programme and Christian World Service. Preparatory School students raised $1200 through Jump Rope for Heart for the New Zealand Heart Foundation, and they raised $1800 for earthquake relief in Nepal. At Christmas students from across all years donated gifts to the Christchurch City Mission.

Working in partnership with World Vision is a key part of the Community Service programme. In 2015 students raised more than $14,000 for World Vision 40 Hour Famine with funds raised going towards education and resources for children in Bangladesh. Students received a gold award and a leadership scholarship. All students contributed to events raising funds for community service trips such as to Cambodia and Thailand. Students also donated books, clothing and toys for pre-school and primary school children in Vanuatu. Students and staff raised more than $10,000 for disaster relief for Vanuatu following the devastation of Cyclone Winston with funds going to Onesua Presbyterian College. The College supported community initiatives such as working with the Canterbury District Health Board collating BYTE packs (toothpaste and brushes) for distribution, and providing facilities throughout the year for volunteers working for non-profit organisation Days for Girls. The Castle Hill Outdoor Education programme continues to work on many conservation projects throughout the Craigieburn Basin with St Andrew’s College students being directly involved. Years 7 and 8 students maintained, cleared and rebaited approximately 60 stoat traps (which were originally installed by Year 7 students in 2006). Over 270 hours was spent manually removing wilding pines by Year 9 students.


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Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

The College supports the Waimakariri Recreational and Environmental Trust, financially, with meeting venues and staff volunteer time. This area has been used by the College for more than 50 years and the College is committed to helping maintain the area through assisting on various projects; such as Year 12 students building floating grebe nesting platforms for Lake Lyndon and building a fence around the lake to protect the endangered plants. The wasp control project, now in its third year is showing fantastic results with wasp stings down to only a few per year. This has been of great benefit to many other schools, mountain bikers and trampers who use the area. The Outdoor Education programme has made their radio system available to community groups to improve safety and organisation of their activities.

EYES ON THE WORLD – CREATING GLOBAL CONNECTIONS The College has a strong Student Exchange programme that provides students with opportunities to explore different cultures and languages. The College also welcomes students from around the globe as part of the exchange programme. Every year students visit the College from Australia, Scotland, South Africa and South America. In 2015 St Andrew’s hosted a number of Christchurch England Sister City meetings and included students from Burnside and Hornby High Schools in the three week European trip. Three staff volunteered their time to organise the trip and chaperone students. Students donated £1500 to St Nicholas Church in Brockenhurst , England, for their new stained glass window commemorating the New Zealand Hospital in Brockenhurst during WWI. In keeping with the College’s ethos of developing a culture of philanthropy students are offered the opportunity to take part in service trips. In 2015 students travelled to Cambodia as part of a Community Service trip where the College has partnerships with several organisations, such as the Hagar Organisation and Partnership Cambodia. Students did community work and $6000 was raised to support charities. In 2015 students also travelled to Singapore and Malaysia as part of a music trip, Thailand as part of the World Challenge and Japan on a language trip. Students often take part in community service initiatives while on these trips. Students hosted visiting cultural groups from Taiwan, South Korea and India in their homes, adding to an authentic Kiwi experience and expanding students’ cultural views. Over the past seven years the College has worked with Molton Media, St Vincent de Paul and other organisations to donate spare computers, projectors and screens to places such as Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.


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STUDENTS REACHING THEIR POTENTIAL The College is committed to be known as a place that offers unique and innovative learning opportunities for staff, parents and students. This includes providing opportunities for students with special educational needs.

STUDENTS ON THE COMMEMORATIVE TOUR OF FIRST WORLD WAR SITES.

SHARING OF FACILITIES St Andrew’s College has a large campus with excellent sporting and educational facilities. Groups from the wider Canterbury community make use of the facilities; for example, the Christchurch Schools Music Festival regularly hires facilities at the College, which brings together music students from all over Canterbury. In 2015 a number of groups used the College facilities either for free or at a significantly reduced rate. These included: Canterbury Hockey, Avon Hockey Juniors, Harewood Hockey and Fetch and Avon Hockey Juniors. The College hosts Canterbury Schools basketball and SuperNet competitions in the two gymnasiums. A number of sports teams such as the Canterbury Magicians and the Crusader Knights also train on the sports grounds and the College hosts U15–17–19 representative sides. There are a number of sports exchanges with schools around the South Island, such as Timaru Boys’ High School, Craighead Diocesan School, John McGlashan College and Columba College. Students travel to St Andrew’s to compete in sports such as rugby, football, basketball, hockey and netball. The College is building a new Chapel to replace the Memorial Chapel, which was badly damaged in the earthquakes. The College will be sharing the facility with The Village Presbyterian Church for their Sunday services. St Giles’ and St Stephen’s parishes have joined to form The Village as both of their churches were damaged in the earthquakes. The facility will also be available for use by the wider community, particularly as a musical venue. The Centennial Chapel will open in October 2016.

The team in the Learning Support Department assist students to reach their academic potential by supporting them with any learning difficulties they face. They work closely with parents, deans and subject teachers to identify and assess students with learning difficulties and provide the appropriate support. Students can be referred to outside agencies for specialist educational diagnosis in order to identify the most appropriate learning support. Features of the support programme include: small group support, touch typing and spelling support, organisation and co-ordination of reader-writers and special assessment conditions, structured literacy programme in the options timetable for Years 9 and 10. The College works closely with parents and caregivers to ensure that the student can reach their potential. A number of staff also provide support in this area to non-StAC families who may have a need or require help or information, including getting literacy help for their child, high needs funding applications and psychologists’ assessments. This includes reading the information and reports and explaining what it means to parents and what should happen next. Non-StAC students have been able to join the Morningside Programme with staff providing support to parents.

STAFF SHARING KNOWLEDGE As well as providing the highest education within the school, St Andrew’s College staff regularly share their expertise beyond the school. Every year a number of staff are markers for NCEA in various subjects. St Andrew’s College staff regularly contribute as speakers to conferences and many share their specialist knowledge with education publications, such as ‘New Zealand Science Teacher’ and the ‘Education Gazette’. In 2015 three staff were selected as Microsoft Expert Educators and as part of this programme they will work with other likeminded teachers to build a global network around developing technology innovation in modern learning environments. One staff member was selected as an Apple Distinguished Educator and will have the opportunity to share knowledge from programmes developed at St Andrew’s with other educators around the globe. The e-Learning blog (http://eblog.stac.school.nz) that shares e-Learning stories and best practice has continued to gain momentum. It is now being shared as an online resource for teachers and students around New Zealand with a number of requests for St Andrew’s College staff to share e-Learning strategies.


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Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015

The College welcomes trainee teachers and hosts them for a six or seven week teaching placement, which forms an integral part of their teacher training programme. Staff act as Associate Teachers and support trainees’ teaching practice experience in classrooms throughout the course of the teaching placement. Teachers observe, both informally and formally, trainee teachers’ and provide detailed and constructive written feedback throughout the placement. Trainee teachers are as fully integrated as possible into the College ‘teaching staff’ and are also provided with opportunities to participate in co-curricular involvement (e.g. coaching) where these opportunities arise. Many staff are volunteers in their local communities for organisations like the Salvation Army and Ronald McDonald House. A number of staff are involved with coaching sports or cultural groups outside of school hours. Staff sit on committees such as NZATE and CETE and share their expert knowledge and contribute to the local and national education landscape.

SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT The College’s pastoral care objective is to offer a programme that celebrates the unique talents and personality of individuals, and develops resilience and emotional intelligence in all students. The Pastoral Care programme is based on the College’s guiding values of Truth, Excellence and Faith. Our aim is to ensure every student feels comfortable, confident and connected to their College, so that their time here is as rewarding as possible. As part of the pastoral care programme the College is committed to celebrating diversity and to ensuring that the College is reflective of New Zealand’s changing society. The strategic plan states that the College will “recognise and celebrate the unique New Zealand culture and language, equipping our students to contribute to our bicultural heritage in their life beyond school”. Both the Preparatory School and Secondary School have a strong Kapa Haka programme. In 2015 the College again hosted the Tuhono Kapa Haka Festival. This event brought together students from Hillview Christian School, Middleton Grange and Rangi Ruru Girls’ School in an evening that celebrated Maori culture. Students also enjoyed performing for the wider community at special events such as prizegiving and assemblies. As part of the Life Skills programme Te Waka Year 10 students participate in community events (such as City to Surf) and work with a mentor in the community. Senior students who travelled to Europe as part of a Sister Cities trip donated 12 photographs [taken by students] to the new Christchurch RSA with the help of the Sister Cities Committee and these are now on public display. The Pipe Band performed at the 2015 Hororata Highland Games – an annual festival celebrating Scottish heritage that more than 10,000 people attend. They also performed concerts at retirement homes across the city and played at ANZAC services at local RSA clubs.


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STUDENTS IN CAMBODIA ON A COMMUNITY SERVICE TRIP.

Year 9 students and staff worked closely with Kids Konnect, a charity that helps students from Christchurch schools partner up and support those school communities in need. Year 9 students partnered with Akaroa High School to gather resources and raise money for families as part of their Community Service programme. Students collectively raised $7000 for Aranui Primary School, which went towards student camps, Chromebooks and a mini-van. There was also a focus on donating unwanted sports gear for the school and a large amount of sports equipment was donated along with sports mats and gear from the St Andrew’s College Fitness Centre. Students from St Andrew’s and Akaroa High School travelled to Aranui Primary School to meet the children they had raised support and funds for. Students were welcomed with a haka and powhiri; they then learnt about the process involved in cooking an umu and a hangi and joined together for lunch. They were entertained by a Pasifika performance and Year 9 members of the Pipe Band put on a display in return. Students enjoyed this great opportunity to connect.

COMMUNICATION WITH OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY The College’s website has readily accessible information that informs any member of the public about the activities undertaken at the school. The Annual Report is available online as is the annual Philanthropy Report, which reports on the philanthropic and volunteering efforts of staff, students and parents in the

St Andrew’s community. The College’s magazine ‘Regulus’ is also available online, which covers latest news from the College with regard campus development, alumni news and student successes. Any matters important to the local community are communicated on the website and, when relevant, neighbours will receive communications from the College.

EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMY The College is one of the larger employers in Canterbury employing 278 staff. See page 22 for a detailed breakdown of human resources. The College generally supports the local economy by purchasing the majority of its goods and services in the Canterbury region.

GOVERNANCE AND MANAGEMENT STRUCTURE The College’s governance structure is outlined on page 23 of this report and is also detailed on the website. Both management and the Board of Governors have access to extensive professional development opportunities, including the annual Independent School New Zealand conference. The local community has the opportunity to attend the Board Annual General Meeting if they wish. From time to time, community consultation meetings will be held where any member of the public can attend. To read more about what is happening at the College please visit the College website at www.stac.school.nz.


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Annual Report & Financial Statements – For the year ended 31 December 2015


347 Papanui Road, Christchurch 8052, New Zealand P +64 3 940-2000 F +64 3 940-2060 W stac.school.nz

Annual Report 2015  

This is the 2015 Annual Report for St Andrew's College, Christchurch, New Zealand.

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