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Parent and Student Handbook 2018/2019 Table of Contents HEADMASTER'S WELCOME ....................................................................................................6 A CONTRACT WITH STUDENTS AND PARENTS ....................................................................7 RE: PARTICIPATION IN ATHLETICS/SPORTS ........................................................................8 (STUDENTS UNDER 18 YEARS)...............................................................................................8 MISSION STATEMENT ..............................................................................................................9 FOUNDATIONAL PILLARS OF ST. ANDREW’S COLLEGE.....................................................9 MOTTO .......................................................................................................................................9 HYMN .........................................................................................................................................9 GRACE .....................................................................................................................................10 SCHOOL CHEER .....................................................................................................................10 ENVIRONMENTAL CREED .....................................................................................................10 BOARD OF GOVERNORS .......................................................................................................11 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY .........................................................................................12 LEADERSHIP TEAM ..................................................................................................................12 HOUSEMASTERS ......................................................................................................................13 HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS ........................................................................................................14 FACULTY – MIDDLE SCHOOL AND UPPER SCHOOL .....................................................................15 AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY ......................................................................................................19 ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF ...........................................................................................................20 SAC PARENTS GUILD EXECUTIVE ............................................................................................22 TELEPHONE DIRECTORY ..........................................................................................................23 EMAIL ADDRESSES ..................................................................................................................23 ADVANCEMENT ......................................................................................................................24 MISSION STATEMENT FOR ADVANCEMENT.................................................................................24 SAC PARENT ANNUAL FUND ....................................................................................................24 PARENT RELATIONS.................................................................................................................24 COMMUNICATIONS ...................................................................................................................24 1


OLD BOYS...............................................................................................................................24 UPPER SCHOOL .....................................................................................................................25 SAC ACADEMIC VISION............................................................................................................25 ACADEMIC OVERVIEW ..............................................................................................................25 ACADEMIC HONOURS ...............................................................................................................26 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY ..............................................................................................................26 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION ................................................................................................29 ADVANCED PLACEMENT ...........................................................................................................32 EVALUATIONS AND REPORTS....................................................................................................33 EXTRA HELP ...........................................................................................................................34 LEARNING SKILLS AND WORK HABITS CHECKLIST ......................................................................34 CENTRE FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING: A COMPREHENSIVE ACADEMIC SUPPORT SYSTEM .........38 INDIVIDUALIZED LEARNING PROTOCOL ......................................................................................40 LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION ....................................................................................................41 LIBRARY..................................................................................................................................42 SUMMER SCHOOL CREDITS ......................................................................................................42 POLICY AND PROCEDURE FOR W ITHDRAWAL FROM GRADE 11 OR 12 COURSE: COURSE ADD & DROP DATES...........................................................................................................................43 TEXTBOOKS ............................................................................................................................43 ACADEMIC SCHEDULE FOR UPPER SCHOOL ..............................................................................44 ACTIVITIES ..............................................................................................................................45 LAPTOP AND NETWORK POLICIES ......................................................................................46 COMPUTER AND NETWORK CODE OF CONDUCT ........................................................................46 WIRELESS LAPTOP/TABLET PROGRAM ......................................................................................46 COMPUTER STRIKE POLICY ......................................................................................................48 LAPTOP CARE AND CONTROL POLICY .......................................................................................49 COMPUTER USER POLICY ........................................................................................................52 RESIDENTIAL COMPUTER POLICY .............................................................................................53 NETWORK USAGE POLICY ........................................................................................................55 INTERNET USAGE POLICY ........................................................................................................55 EMAIL AND EDSBY USAGE POLICY ............................................................................................56 ATHLETICS ..............................................................................................................................57 ATHLETIC VISION, PHILOSOPHY AND OBJECTIVES ......................................................................57 TERMINOLOGY.........................................................................................................................58 EXPECTATIONS OF ATHLETES ...................................................................................................58 ELIGIBILITY ..............................................................................................................................59 TRANSFER ELIGIBILITY .............................................................................................................60 AGE CLASSIFICATION ...............................................................................................................60 DISCIPLINE REVIEW COMMITTEE/DISQUALIFICATIONS ................................................................60 UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT .....................................................................................................61 MANAGERS .............................................................................................................................61 TEAM SELECTION, PRACTICES, AND SCHEDULES .......................................................................61 TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................................................................62 EARLY DISMISSAL ....................................................................................................................62 ADDITIONAL FEES ....................................................................................................................62 FITNESS CENTRE.....................................................................................................................63 HEALTH CARE AND ATHLETIC THERAPY ....................................................................................63 CODE OF SPORTSMANSHIP ......................................................................................................63 CODE OF BEHAVIOUR FOR STUDENT AND PARENT SPECTATORS ................................................63 2


SPORTS OFFERED ...................................................................................................................64 ANDREAN W ELLNESS PROGRAM ..............................................................................................64 SCHOOL PRINCIPLES & POLICES ........................................................................................65 CODE OF HONOUR – HONESTY, INTEGRITY, RESPECT ...............................................................65 CODE OF CONDUCT – RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES ...............................................................65 MUTUAL RESPECT POLICY – DISCRIMINATION, HARASSMENT AND CONFIDENTIALITY ...................66 SCHOOL RULES – DRUGS, ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, NICOTINE PRODUCTS, VAPORIZERS, ECIGARETTES, AWOL, UNSAFE PRACTICES, THEFT ....................................................................66 COMMUNITY STANDARDS AND EXPECTATIONS – RESPONSIBILITIES, ESSENTIAL BEHAVIOURS, ATTENDANCE, MOBILE/SMART PHONES, COMMUNITY RELATIONS, DAMAGE AND VANDALISM, DRESS CODE, ENVIRONMENT, COLE HALL, GUM, MEALS, QUADRANGLE.....................................70 DISCIPLINE PROCESS & CONSEQUENCES .........................................................................76 SAC PHILOSOPHY OF DISCIPLINE .............................................................................................76 MUTUAL RESPECT – PROCESS AND CONSEQUENCES ................................................................76 CONSEQUENCES RELATED TO SCHOOL RULES – EXPULSION, DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE, SUSPENSION/EXPULSION OFFENCES ........................................................................................79 CONSEQUENCES FOR VIOLATIONS OF COMMUNITY STANDARDS – DEMERIT SYSTEM, GATING SYSTEM, ATTENDANCE CONSEQUENCES ..................................................................................81 STUDENT SERVICES ..............................................................................................................84 BUSINESS OFFICE ...................................................................................................................84 CAMPUS SHOP ........................................................................................................................84 COUNSELLING .........................................................................................................................84 MAIL .......................................................................................................................................84 OFFICE HOURS .......................................................................................................................84 UNIVERSITY COUNSELLING AND APPLICATIONS .........................................................................85 WEATHER ...............................................................................................................................85 STUDENT SAFETY AND SECURITY ......................................................................................85 FIRE HAZARDS ........................................................................................................................85 BICYCLES, LONGBOARDS, ROLLER BLADES, SCOOTERS, AND SKATEBOARDS..............................85 CRISIS POLICY ........................................................................................................................86 FIRE AND FIRE DRILLS .............................................................................................................86 GUESTS ..................................................................................................................................86 KEYS ......................................................................................................................................86 LOST AND FOUND ....................................................................................................................86 OUT-OF-BOUNDS AREAS..........................................................................................................87 SECURITY ...............................................................................................................................87 2018-19 VEHICLE PRIVILEGES FOR BOARDING STUDENTS..............................................88 BOARDERS ..........................................................................................................................88 PLEASE PRINT AND RETURN THIS FORM TO THE COLLEGE ..........................................90 ACTIVITIES ..............................................................................................................................91 DUKE OF EDINBURGH’S AWARD – YOUNG CANADIANS' CHALLENGE ............................................94 THE COMPLETE W EEKEND PROGRAM .......................................................................................94 CHAPEL ..................................................................................................................................94 CLAN SYSTEM .........................................................................................................................95 COMMUNITY SERVICE ..............................................................................................................95 STUDENT LEADERSHIP .............................................................................................................95 3


RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY STANDARDS AND POLICIES ..................................................97 BACKGROUND INFORMATION ON RESIDENCES AT SAC ..............................................................98 RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY STANDARDS AND POLICIES ...............................................................99 DAILY ROUTINES ...................................................................................................................101 HOUSE LEAVE .......................................................................................................................103 MISCELLANEOUS ...................................................................................................................106 HOUSEMASTER CELL NUMBERS: ............................................................................................108 SCHOOL POLICIES .................................................................................................................108 MIDDLE SCHOOL ..................................................................................................................109 DIRECTOR'S W ELCOME ..........................................................................................................109 MIDDLE SCHOOL VISION .....................................................................................................110 PARENT COMMUNICATION ......................................................................................................110 ADVISORY PROGRAM .............................................................................................................110 ACADEMIC PROGRAM .........................................................................................................111 ACADEMIC HONOURS .............................................................................................................111 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY ............................................................................................................111 EVENING STUDY AND HOMEWORK ..........................................................................................114 REPORTING ...........................................................................................................................114 CENTRE FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING ......................................................................... 115 THE GUIDED LEARNING CENTRE.............................................................................................115 CONSEQUENCES FOR NOT ATTENDING THE GLC ....................................................................117 “GOOD STANDING” STUDENTS ................................................................................................117 EXTENSIONS .........................................................................................................................117 GLC PLUS ............................................................................................................................117 OPEN CLASSROOM ................................................................................................................118 THE W RITING CENTRE ...........................................................................................................118 ESL PLUS .............................................................................................................................118 MATH CENTRE ......................................................................................................................118 LEARNING RESOURCE SERVICES ............................................................................................118 TUTORING .............................................................................................................................118 STANDING COMMITTEE FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AND LEARNING.....................................119 ST. ANDREW’S COLLEGE INDIVIDUALIZED LEARNING PROTOCOL .............................. 119 ELIGIBLE STUDENTS ..............................................................................................................119 ACCOMMODATIONS ................................................................................................................119 COMMUNICATION ...................................................................................................................120 EXTRA TIME (EXAMS) ............................................................................................................120 EXTRA TIME (TESTS) .............................................................................................................120 ONTARIO STUDENT RECORD ..................................................................................................120 DAILY ROUTINE INFORMATION ..........................................................................................121 MOBILE PHONES AND PERSONAL ENTERTAINMENT DEVICES ....................................................121 CO-CURRICULAR PROGRAM ...................................................................................................121 ARTS PROGRAM ....................................................................................................................121 ATHLETICS PROGRAM ............................................................................................................121 CLAN SYSTEM .......................................................................................................................122 COMMUNITY SERVICE ............................................................................................................122 4


LEADERSHIP IN TRAINING - #142 HIGHLAND CADET CORPS ......................................................122 OPTIONAL PROGRAMMING (FRIDAYS) .......................................ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED. DAILY PROGRAM ...................................................................................................................124 DEMERIT SYSTEM ..................................................................................................................125 DRESS CODE ........................................................................................................................125 LAPTOP POLICIES ..................................................................................................................126 LEAVE POLICY .......................................................................................................................127 LOCKERS ..............................................................................................................................127 LOST AND FOUND ..................................................................................................................127 RECESS PROGRAM ................................................................................................................127 STUDENTS WILL BE NOTIFIED WHEN THEY SHOULD RETURN TO ROGERS HALL IF THEY WISH TO ATTEND OPEN CLASSROOM. THERE ARE THREE FACULTY MEMBERS AND MIDDLE SCHOOL HOUSE CAPTAINS TO SUPERVISE THE RECESS PROGRAM......................................................................................127 MORNING ARRIVAL ................................................................................................................128 MUSIC ..................................................................................................................................128 STUDENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAM...........................................................................................128 WEEKEND AND EVENING COMMITMENTS .................................................................................129 HOLIDAYS AND MAJOR DATES, 2018-2019 ....................................................................... 130 STAYING CURRENT: ............................................................................................................132

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HEADMASTER'S WELCOME Whether you are new to St. Andrew’s College or a returning student, welcome to the 2018-2019 school year—the School’s 119th. I am very confident this will be another outstanding one at the College. We will undoubtedly share many successes together in the multitude of activities planned for the coming year. In the coming weeks, I encourage you to take some family time to sit down and read this important publication, the Parent and Student Handbook. It contains pertinent information regarding school life. On occasion, I will refer to various rules and regulations contained in this publication, as will your son’s teachers, advisor, and Housemaster. While all the information is relevant, the sections entitled, School Principles and Policies, Discipline Process and Consequences, and Residential Community Standards and Policies are vitally important. Since verbal messages concerning school rules are often not heard, we have compiled most of the information you need to know for 2018-2019 into this document. Every year, we request that new parents and their sons sign a contract which stipulates that they have read the Handbook and agree to abide by the rules and regulations contained therein. St. Andrew’s College is “Not an Ordinary Place.” This is a special environment that provides abundant opportunities for boys to mature and excel. Students are strongly encouraged to become actively involved in all this great school has to offer. I look forward to seeing you in September and sharing in another exciting year of student successes. Sincerely,

Kevin R. McHenry Headmaster

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One of the keystones of independent education is the free choice made by parents and students to become part of a particular school. St. Andrew’s College assumes that students and families have chosen this school, at least in part, because of the values the School holds to be intrinsic to quality education. Teaching students to live and learn with others in a purposeful, orderly, and caring community is not a matter of expedience at SAC–it is a central goal. Whatever the personal or cultural values of families or of students, the registration of a student at St. Andrew’s College signifies their agreement and obligation to comply with the rules and disciplinary procedures as published in the most recent edition of the Parent and Student Handbook. Please read over the entire Handbook with your son, in particular, the sections entitled: School Principles and Policies, Discipline Process and Consequences, and Residential Community Standards and Policies.

A CONTRACT WITH STUDENTS AND PARENTS If you are a new student joining St. Andrew’s College in September 2018, please complete the online form before September 2 - A Contract with Students and Parents. Click here. ** STUDENTS WILL NOT BE ALLOWED TO ATTEND CLASSES IF THE SCHOOL HAS NOT RECEIVED THIS CONTRACT PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES.

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RE: PARTICIPATION IN ATHLETICS/SPORTS (STUDENTS UNDER 18 YEARS) New and returning students please complete the online form before September 2 -SAC Acknowledgement and Assumption of Risk Re: Participation in Athletics/Sports. Click here. **THIS DOCUMENT MUST BE RECEIVED FROM EVERY STUDENT IN THE SCHOOL PRIOR TO PLAYING A COMPETITIVE OR INTRAMURAL SPORT.

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MISSION STATEMENT “Dedicated to the development of the complete man, the well-rounded citizen.”

FOUNDATIONAL PILLARS OF ST. ANDREW’S COLLEGE Boys Boarding Brotherhood Tradition

MOTTO Greek Motto: "AN∆PIZEΣΘE KPATAIOΥΣΘE" English Translation: "Quit ye like men, be strong." The source of the motto is the Bible, First Corinthians, 16:13-14, King James Version. “Watch ye, stand fast in the faith, Quit ye like men, be strong. Let all your deeds be done with charity.”

HYMN Lift up your heads, ye gates of brass, Ye bars of iron yield, And let the King of Glory pass, The Cross is in the field. That banner, brighter than the star, That leads the train of night, Shines on their march and guides from far, His servants to the fight. Then fear not, faint not, halt not now, Quit ye like men, be strong, To Christ shall all the nations bow, And sing the triumph song. Uplifted are the gates of brass, The bars of iron yield, Behold the King of Glory Pass, The Cross hath won the field.

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GRACE Latin Grace Pro his et omnibus Tuis Beneficiis Nos miseri egeni Tibi deus omnipotens Pater caelestis Gratias reverenter agimis Per Jesum Christum Dominum nostrum Amen. Verbatim English Translation For these and all Your blessings We poor sinners To you, God Almighty, Heavenly Father Reverently give thanks Through Jesus Christ Our Lord, Amen.

SCHOOL CHEER Who’s going to win today? We are! And who says so? Everybody! And who is everybody? Gangwa, Gangwa, Gangwa, wa Saints, Saints, Rah Rah Rah, Maple Leaf, Thistle Leaf, Cross on White, Saints, Saints, Fight, Fight, Fight.

ENVIRONMENTAL CREED One of the first steps in the process to develop this Environmental Plan was to come up with a statement of belief that spoke to the School’s goal to instill an environmental ethic in all members of the School community. After a process of consultation with students, faculty, and staff, SAC finalized the following Environmental Creed: We believe that all Andreans should cultivate ecological citizenship, and thereby inspire positive environmental change for sustainable living within our school community and beyond.

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BOARD OF GOVERNORS Dan G. Stock ’79, B.Comm., Chair James C. MacPherson, BA, LL.B., LL.M., Vice-Chair Tejus, Ajmera ’00, BA Peter W. Anderson, B.BA Victoria Calverley, CPA, MBA Scott R. Cole ’80, P.Eng., B.A.Sc. P. Andrew Dalton, ’78. BA John M. Dunlap ’88, B.Comm., MBA Mark K. Etherington ’92, BA William D.L. Graham ’53 Terri MacLean, BA, LL.B. Kevin R. McHenry, B.BA(Hons.), B.Ed., M.Ed., Headmaster Beth A. McKay, BA, CPA, Secretary to the Board Ian Michael ’92, LLP C.A.F. Sandy Munro ’70, BA Melissa Ramon, BA(Hons.), B.Ed Donald M. Rogers ’59 John F. Rook ’64, BA, LL.B., Chair, SAC Foundation Sarah Smith, President Parents Guild Julie I. Symmes, R.N. Robert C. Williams ’64

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ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY

Leadership Team Headmaster Kevin R. McHenry, B.BA(Hons.)(Laurier), B.Ed.(Western), M.Ed.(Toronto) Assistant Headmaster, Academics Michael Paluch, BA(Hons.), B.Ed., MA(Western) Assistant Headmaster, Upper School, Strategic Development Courtenay Shrimpton, BA, B.Ed.(McGill), MA(Royal Roads) Chief Financial Officer Beth A. Carter, BA(Queen’s), CPA Director of Admission, Marketing and Business Development Michael Roy ’85, BA(Mount Allison) Director of Information Technology Steven Rush, BA(Hons.)(Western) Director of the Middle School Sabrina D’Angelo, BA(Wilfrid Laurier), B.Ed.(Toronto), M.Ed.(Nippissing) Director of Residential Life David Galajda, B.Sc.(Hons.)(McMaster), B.Ed.(Brock), M.Ed.(Toronto) Executive Director of Advancement and President SAC Foundation Gregory Reid, BA, B.P.H.E.(Hons.), B.Ed.(Queen’s), M.Ed.(OISE), C.A.A., C.D. Executive Assistant to the Headmaster Wendy Muratoff, OSO (Seneca)

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Housemasters Boarding Houses Flavelle House: Jamie MacPherson ’99, Housemaster Mark Burton, Assistant Housemaster Kevan Quinn, Assistant Housemaster Macdonald House: David Galajda, Director of Residential Life Kyle Fraser-Shoemaker – Assistant Housemaster Jeffrey LaForge, Assistant Housemaster Paul Totera, Assistant Housemaster Memorial House: Michael Carroll, Housemaster Kevin Gate, Assistant Housemaster Emilia Macdonald, Assistant Housemaster Sifton House: Keith Ramon, Housemaster Matthew Jaekel, Assistant Housemaster Chris St-Cyr, Assistant Housemaster

Day Houses Laidlaw House: Chris Papalia, Housemaster Perrier House Anthony Gilroy, Housemaster Ramsey House: Claudio Numa, Housemaster Smith House: Len Gurr, Housemaster

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Heads of Departments Business Studies: Sean Ludwig, B.Com.(Hons.)(Laurentian), MA(Windsor), B.Ed.(Brock) Computer Science: Steven Rush, BA(Hons.)(Western) Drama: William Scoular, BA, MA(Oxford) English: Matthew Trevisan, BA(Hons.)(Queen’s), B.Ed. (UofT) Geography: David Joiner, M.Sc.(Queen's), B.Ed.(Toronto), PhD.(Queen's) Health and Physical Education: Joseph Foote, PHE(Hons.)(Laurier), B.Ed.(Western) History and Social Science: Len Gurr, BA(Hons.), MA, B.Ed.(Western) Mathematics: Michael Chadsey, BA(Simon Fraser), Hons.Spec.Math, (OISE), M.Ed.(UofT) Modern Languages: Nicholas Day, BA(Hons.)(U. King’s College), B.Ed. (Ottawa) Music: Sandi Chasson, B.Mus.(UofT), B.Ed.(Hons.)(Toronto), ARCT Science: Marke Jones, B.Sc.(McMaster), B.Ed.(Queen's) University Counselling: Teri Groves, Bus. Admin. (Shaw) Visual Arts: Stephen Kimmerer, BA, B.Ed.(Alberta)

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Faculty – Middle School and Upper School Paul Bedard ’79, BA(Bishops) Randi Berman, O.C.A. Trevor Biasi, BA(Hons.)(Wilfrid Laurier), B.Ed.(Western), M.Ed.(Nipissing) Carolyn Bilton, BA(Hons)(Waterloo), B.Ed.(Brock) Geoff Brennagh ’94, B.Sc.(Guelph), B.Ed.(Windsor) Jon Butcher, B.Sc.(Waterloo), B.Ed.(Hons.)(Toronto) Michael Carroll, B.Sc., BBA(St.Francis Xavier), B.Ed.(Queen’s) Michael Chadsey, BA(Simon Fraser), Hons.Spec.Math, (OISE), M.Ed.(UofT) Sandi Chasson, B.Mus., B.Ed.(Hons.)(UofT) Joseph Commisso, BA(Hons)(McMaster), B.Ed.(OISE) Deanna Concessi Harris, B.Sc(Hons), B.Ed.(Brock) Fraser Cowell, BA(Hons)(St. Mary's), B.Ed.(UofT) Sabrina D’Angelo, BA(Wilfrid Laurier), B.Ed.(UofT), M.Ed.(Nipissing) Nicholas Day, BA(Hons.)(U. King’s College), B.Ed. (Ottawa), M.Ed. (Nipissing) Lawrence DeMello, B.Math(Waterloo), B.Ed.(Queen’s), M.A.(York) Michele Derwin, B.Kin.(Acadia), B.Ed.(Nipissing) Colby Dockerty, BA(Hons)(Guelph), MA(D’Youville) Whitney Elliott, BA(Hons.)(Guelph), B.Ed.(UofT) Joseph Foote, PHE(Hons.)(Laurier), B.Ed.(Queen’s) Kyle Fraser-Shoemaker, BPE(Hons), B.Ed.(Brock) David Galajda, B.Sc.(Hons.)(McMaster), B.Ed.(Brock), M.Ed.(UofT) Kevin Gate, B.SC.(Hons)(Brock), Anthony Gilroy, BA(Hons.), B.Ed.(OISE) Teri Groves, Bus. Admin. (Shaw) Len Gurr, BA(Hons.), MA, B.Ed.(Western) 15


Stephen Holmes, B.Sc.(Hons.) (Guelph), B.Ed.(OISE) Jamie Inglis ’91, B.Sc.(Hons.) M.Sc.(McMaster), B.Ed.(York), CD Matthew Jaekel, BMOS, B.Ed.(Western) David Joiner, M.Sc.(Queen's), B.Ed.(UofT), PhD.(Queen's) Marke Jones, B.Sc.(McMaster), B.Ed.(Queen's) Taylor Johnston, BA(Hons)(Carleton), B.Ed.(OISE) Dennis Jumaquio, B.Math(Hons.)(Waterloo), B.Ed.(Queen’s) Chetan Kaloti, B.Com.(Ryerson), B.Ed.(OISE) Kristen Kang, B.Com.(Hons.)(Ryerson), Dip. in Educ.(Macquarie Univ) Stephen Kimmerer, BA, B.Ed.(Alberta) Ben Kitagawa, BA(Brock), AIT Dip.(ITI), B.Ed.(York) Adam Kowaltschuk, B.E.S.(Waterloo), B.Ed.(Lakehead) David Kyle, B.F.A.(Hons.)(York), B.Ed.(UofT) Jeffrey LaForge, BA(Hons)(UofT), B.Ed(OISE) Scott Lewis, BA(Queen’s), LL.B.(Osgoode), B.Ed.(Western) Sean Ludwig, B.Com.(Hons.)(Laurentian), MA(Windsor), B.Ed.(Brock) James MacPherson ’99, BA(Acadia), G.D.E.(New Zealand) Emilia Macdonald B.Eng.(StateUniv.ofNY), B.Ed.(OISE) Lucas Madill, B.Ed., M.Sc.(UofNB) David Manning, BA(Colby), B.Ed.(Memorial) Brian McCue, B.Mus.(Hons.)(Western), M.Mus.(McGill), CD James McGillivray, BA(Hons.)(Laurier) Eric McMillan, BMus(Hons.)(Western), B.Ed.(Western) Natalie McNair, B.A., M.Ed.(Victoria) Joel Morrissey, B.Sc.(Hons.)(Ottawa), B.Ed.(Trent) John Murray, BA(Hons), M.Sc.(Western) 16


Nicole Nascimento, BA(Hons), MA(UofT), IMBA(York) Claudio Numa, BA(McGill), Teach. Cert.(Montreal) Robyn O’Hare, B.Sc.(Hons.)(Queen’s), B.Ed.(UofT) Michael Paluch, BA(Hons.), MA, B.Ed.(Western) Chris Papalia, BA(Macalester), B.Ed.(OISE) Emma Porter, BA(Guelph), B.Ed.(Medaille) Terry Prezens, B.Sc., B.Ed.(UofT) Kevan Quinn, B.SC., (Randolph-Macon), B.Ed. (Brock) Keith Ramon, BA(Hons)(Trent), B.Ed.(Queen's) Melissa Ramon, BA(Hons.), B.Ed.(Trent) John Richardson, B.Mus., B.Ed.(UofT) Claudia Rose-Donahoe, BA(Hons.)(Queen’s), B.Ed.(Western) Steven Rush, BA(Hons.)(Western) Samantha Scheepers, BA(Hons)(U of T), MT(OISE) William Scoular, BA, MA(Oxford) Courtenay Shrimpton, BA, B.Ed.(McGill), MA(Royal Roads) Christopher St-Cyr, B.Ed(McGill) David Stewart, BA(Hons.), B.Ed.(Queen’s) Katie Still, BA(Hons.)(Queen’s), B.Ed.(Lakehead) Melissa Tackaberry, BA, B.Ed.(Windsor) Amanda Thorne, B.Sc.(Hons)(Waterloo), B.Ed.(Queen’s), M.Ed.(Nipissing) Paul Totera, B.Sc.(Victoria), B.Ed.(Lakehead) Matthew Trevisan, BA(Hons.)(Queen’s), B.Ed. (UofT) Nick Tsioros ’88, B.Sc., M.Ed.(Boston) Tanya Weedon, BA(Mount Allison) Emily Whitton, B.Sc.(Hons)(Trent), B.Ed.(Queen’s) 17


Matthew Wyatt, BFA(Hons.)(Lakehead), MFA(Transart Institute) Jessica Zhou, B.Sc.(Hons)(Queen’s), B.Ed.(UofOttawa)

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Areas of Responsibility The following is a list of people who have responsibility for specific areas of school life. Headmaster (Kevin McHenry): The Headmaster is responsible for the overall administration of the School. He consults with the Board of Governors, faculty, parents, alumni, students, the School’s Leadership Team, and many others in making decisions on what is best for the School. Assistant Headmaster, Director of Academics (Michael Paluch): He is responsible for the formation, articulation, and interpretation of the School’s academic policy. Assistant Headmaster, Director of Upper School and Strategic Development (Courtenay Shrimpton): He is responsible for the effective operation of the Upper School as well as the vision, development, and support of the School's strategic development through the Strategic Plan. Chief Financial Officer (Beth McKay): She is the Advisor to the Headmaster on all financial matters. Commanding Officer - Cadet Corps (Maj. Brian McCue): He is responsible for the training, staffing, and administration of all activities related to #142 St. Andrew’s College Highland Cadet Corps. Chapel (David Stewart): He is responsible for overseeing the regular Chapel morning services, ensuring that the curriculum is consistent with the School’s mission, with particular emphasis on values based education and pastoral care. The School’s Chaplain, Rev. Bruce Roffey, will continue to conduct special services. In addition, the Chapel coordinator provides a pastoral presence for the students, parents, faculty, and staff. Director of Admission, Marketing and Business Development (Michael Roy ’85): Questions about admission can be answered by Michael Roy or his associates. Director of Athletics (Mr. Paul Bedard ’79): He is responsible for all aspects of the Athletic Program. Director of Information Technology (Mr. Steve Rush): He is responsible for the computer facilities and integration into the curriculum. Director of the Middle School (Mrs. Sabrina D’Angelo): She is responsible for grades 5 to 8. Director of Residential Life (Mr. David Galajda): He is responsible for all matters pertaining to residential life and the implementation of the Residential Life Curriculum. Executive Director of Advancement (Mr. Greg Reid): The Advancement Team is dedicated to advancing the mission of St. Andrew’s College by fostering an increased awareness and appreciation of SAC through volunteer engagement and through philanthropic support. Food Services Manager (Mrs. Grace Wyvill): She oversees the planning and preparation of meals. Special food requests should be directed to her. Health and Wellness Centre (Mrs. Margaret Kirkby): The Health and Wellness Centre is located in Macdonald House. All medical care of students is done through this facility. 19


Housemasters: Each residential student and Upper School day student is assigned to a House, supervised by a Housemaster. Housemasters are teachers and coaches with responsibility for looking after the students’ well-being, discipline, and whereabouts. Most permissions are obtained from the Housemaster. Upper School School Life Team Members: Mr. Jamie Inglis, Mr. Dave Stewart & Ms. Amanda Thorne will act as members of a team to support both the pastoral, advisory, and academics needs of the College as overseen by Mr. Mike Paluch and Mr. Courtenay Shrimpton. University Counselling (Mrs. Teri Groves): She is the Head of University Counselling.

Administrative Staff Administration Offices Administration Associate, Upper School Administrative Assistant, Middle School Administrative Assistant, Upper School

Barbara Cain Rebecca Williams Tara Barbeito

Admission Office Director of International Recruitment and Advancement Associate Director of Admission Associate Director of Admission Associate Director of Admission Admission Associate

Michael Choi Bruce Keyes Natascia Stewart Jarryd Stock Wendy Coates

Advancement Office Old Boy Officer Parent Relations and Events Coordinator Archivist Annual Giving Officer Stewardship and Planned Giving Officer

Nicholas Weedon ’02 Sharen Turner Lori Lu Ryan Bryce ’05 Julie Wilson

Athletic Therapy Athletic Therapist Athletic Therapist

Heather Tugnett Drew Eidt

Business Office Controller Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable

Janice Hollett Shelly Wong Barbara Chambers

Campus Shop Manager Assistant Assistant

Joanne Stock Michele Baker Tushee Fusco

Communications Director of Communications Communications Officer, Publications Digital Marketing Specialist

Nicolette Fleming Julie Caspersen Sean Maillet 20


Facilities Coordinator

Jane Bedard

Food Services Assistant Manager

Nancy McMurray

Network Services Network Systems Administrator Webmaster & IT Support Specialist IT Services Coordinator Middle School Helpdesk Specialist

Brendan Bellaire Ramesh Ari Chun-Chow Chang Ravinit Dhaliwal

Health and Wellness Centre Nurse Nurse Administrative Assistant

Lori-Anne Hastings Carolyn Wint Samantha Muratoff

Human Resources Director of Human Resources Payroll and Benefits Coordinator

Sherrill Knight Cindy Conroy

Library Librarian Library Services Coordinator

Melissa Ramon Lori Lu

Property & Facilities Director of Property & Facilities Assistant to the Director of Property & Facilities Administrative Assistant

Klaus Griese Paul Hodgson Dawn Chagas

Reception Receptionist Receptionist Receptionist

Wendy Marshall Tara Barbeito Samantha Muratoff

University Counselling Head of University Counselling Associate Head Administrative Assistant

Teri Groves Tanya Weedon Amy Hewson

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SAC Parents Guild Executive President Vice-President Recording Secretary Treasurer Gala Chairs Gala Vice-Chair Homecoming Chair Homecoming Vice-Chair Interguild & Community Outreach Chair Alternate Revenue Chair Alternate Revenue Vice-Chair Social and Welcome Chair Social and Welcome Vice-Chair Family Mentor Chair Family Mentor Vice-Chair Volunteer Chair Residential Life Chair Communications Chair Class Ambassador Chair Member at Large Past President Honorary President

Sarah Smith Martine Kolm Christine Fullerton Karen Leung Martine Kolm & Liz Ritchie Belinda Long Katie Henderson Deanna Todd Sheri Deo Andra Nirenberski Kristen Nichols Dawn Beswick Cailey Stollery Susana Su Chen Debra Wilson Wendy MacEachern Michele Crowder Ning Li Sharon Ashton Maggie Hu Lenore Collis Bianca Harris

Invited Guests Honorary Member Parent Relations & Event Coordinator

Karan McHenry Sharen Turner

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Telephone Directory The switchboard is open from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., Monday to Friday, and 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. when school is not in session. (Exceptions are July, August and September long-weekends when the switchboard closes at noon). School School Fax Health Centre

905.727.3178 905.841.6911 905.727.9843

Macdonald House David Galajda, Director of Residential Life David Galajda, Cell Phone Jeff LaForge, Asst. Housemaster Paul Totera, Asst. Housemaster

905.727.1219 905.717.8769 905.751.8719 905.751.9743

Flavelle House Jamie MacPherson, Housemaster Jamie MacPherson, Cell Phone Mark Burton, Asst. Housemaster

905.727.3821 905.751.9742 905.751.9741

Memorial House Michael Carroll, Housemaster Emilia MacDonald, Asst. Housemaster

905.751.9732 905.717.8765

Sifton House Keith Ramon, Housemaster Keith Ramon, Cell Phone Matthew Jaekel, Asst. Housemaster

905.727.2456 905.717.8763 905.751.9738

Email Addresses Email addresses for faculty and staff members begin with the first name, followed by a period, and then the last name and @sac.on.ca. Email addresses can be found on our website by following this link. click here

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ADVANCEMENT Mission Statement for Advancement The Advancement Team is dedicated to advancing the mission of St. Andrew’s College by fostering an increased awareness and appreciation of SAC through volunteer engagement and through philanthropic support.

SAC Parent Annual Fund Philanthropy has been an important and impactful tradition at St. Andrew’s College since the School’s inception in 1899. The SAC Parent Fund was established as a way for our current parents to support the School with an annual donation. Each year, we ask every family for a voluntary gift of $1,500, which directly benefits our students, programs, and traditions. We are very grateful to our parents who provide a tremendous amount of support on a year-to-year to basis. To facilitate your donation each year, the School places a $500 voluntary gift on your son’s billing account in three instalments throughout the fall term. A tax receipt is issued for all donations and your gift will be recognized in our Annual Report. Your contact for the SAC Parent Annual Fund is Ryan Bryce ’05.

Parent Relations The Parents Guild of St. Andrew’s College is an effective and enthusiastic group of volunteers. They provide opportunities within the School for parents to meet each other and to become involved in the life of the School. The Advancement Office is the primary contact within the School for this group. A Look Ahead, the weekly e-newsletter publication with news of current activities at the School is also prepared for you by this office. The Parent Relations Liaison, Sharen Turner, may be contacted at sharen.turner@sac.on.ca.

Communications St. Andrew's uses a number of different vehicles to communicate with the parents of our students. The SAC website is the main resource for daily schedules, calendar items, athletic scores and schedules, upcoming events, directory and news stories. We encourage parents to check the website frequently for updates. It is also mobile compatible and can be viewed on your iPhone, BlackBerry and Smartphone. A weekly e-newsletter is emailed to parents every Friday with news about the coming week. The School's alumni magazine, The Andrean, is published twice a year and features stories about Old Boys, Andrean history, academic and athletic successes, and current faculty and students. This publication is mailed to all parents and is available in an online electronic version . St. Andrew's also posts stories and updates to its Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Instagram pages, which can be accessed directly through the homepage.

Old Boys The Old Boy Officer is responsible for maintaining strong connections and relationships with Old Boys of St. Andrew's. Old Boys are important to the history and tradition of the School. There are numerous activities and events held throughout the year for Old Boys, including: the Annual Golf Tournament, Speaker Series, Receptions, Pub Nights, Mentorship Events, Homecoming, Sports and Family Day, and many more. Mentorship events are particularly important in the life 24


of the School as our Old Boys return to share their expertise with our students. The relationship with St. Andrew's does not end on Prize Day, but rather, continues to grow and be mutually beneficial. Your contact for Old Boys events and information is Nicholas Weedon ’02.

UPPER SCHOOL SAC Academic Vision Academic Vision Statement: We are committed to pioneering the future of education. Academic Value Statements: We empower boys to be physically, emotionally, and spiritually healthy. We develop the capacity to innovate and adapt to our ever-changing world. We cultivate critical-thinking skills so decisions are based on a broad range of criteria. We inspire engaged, caring, and reflective global citizens. We promote integrity, resiliency, and leadership. We implement technology wisely to enhance learning. We nurture the creative process and celebrate excellence in performance. We encourage curiosity in a boy-friendly, collaborative, and supportive environment. We champion eloquence and the art of communication.

Academic Overview Please refer to www.sac.on.ca – Upper School – Academics, and the SAC Course Calendar for a complete listing of all courses and other relevant academic information. St. Andrew’s College is a university preparatory school with courses designed to earn students entry to undergraduate programs in North America and abroad. Students must understand that the primary reason for joining the Andrean community is to achieve this goal. The wealth of subject choices in conjunction with increasingly complex university prerequisites make planning and discussion a necessity for all students. Students must be careful to select their courses sensibly in consultation with their Advisor, Guidance personnel, and Mr. Paluch. Members of the faculty are always ready to assist with various academic difficulties. If you are having problems, then you should proceed as follows:

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Teacher: Immediate discussion with your teachers is the most direct and useful manner by which to resolve an academic concern. Advisor: The Advisor program has a dual purpose. Its first role is to support the cognitive growth of an advisee and support him through the rigours of the academic program and to lend assistance in any way he/she can in supporting the advisee through coursework obstacles and dealings with teachers. The second role involves guiding the student’s growth through an educational program that focuses on the effective growth of the student in areas outside the academic stream. This educational focus is developed and coordinated by the Upper School Student Life Team. Assistant Headmaster, Director of Academics: When a matter cannot be resolved through discussion with a teacher or Advisor, then it should be referred to Mr. Paluch for students in grades 9 through 12.

Academic Honours The Academic Merit Pin is awarded each term to students who have achieved an overall learning skills average of 80% or greater. These students are recognized at the November and March Academic Assemblies and on Prize Day in June. A Scholar’s Tie is awarded to students who have achieved an overall grade average of 80% or greater. These students are recognized at the March Academic Assembly and on Prize Day in June (grade 12) and September (grades 9-11). On Prize Day, students who achieved an overall academic average of 80% or greater receive a Bronze Scholar’s Medal. A Silver Scholar’s Medal is awarded to the student in each grade who has the second highest overall grade average. The Gold Scholar’s Medal is awarded to the student in each grade who has the highest overall grade average. The Headmaster’s Honour Roll tie is awarded to those students who have achieved an average that places them amongst the top ten in their respective grade. These students are recognized at the March Academic Assembly and on Prize Day in June (grade 12) and September (grades 9-11).

Academic Integrity We believe that the faculty at St. Andrew’s College has a responsibility to: teach its students to function with academic integrity; embed strategies in the curriculum that will enable our students to operate with academic integrity; offer an academic integrity policy that can be enforced in a consistent and measured manner, taking into consideration the unique nature of each situation; ensure students’ understanding of academic integrity is enduring and prepares them for future academic success; create assignments that preclude the possibility of cheating; and, ensure our New Boys are abreast of the expectations and skills required at the grade level they are entering.

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We believe that our students: must demonstrate honesty in all academic endeavours and approach academic endeavours as Andreans; must take an active role in the learning process; and, have a responsibility to understand all academic integrity policies outlined in the Parent Student Handbook. The “spirit” of the law will always supersede the “letter” of the law in these matters. Definitions Plagiarism consists of (but is not necessarily limited to): • • • • •

misrepresenting someone else’s work as one’s own: e.g. copying another student’s paper or an article from a journal or website; buying an essay from a term-paper mill; patchwriting: writing a paper by simply patching together blocks of text, perhaps with slight modification, taken from one or more sources; paraphrasing or summarizing information from a source without citation; quoting material without the proper use of quotation marks (even if otherwise cited correctly); or, translating a work from one language to another without citation.

Cheating consists of (but is not necessarily limited to): • • • • • • • • •

using unauthorized notes or other aids in a test or exam, or copying from or being influenced by another student’s work during an evaluation or assessment; giving unauthorized aid to another student; allowing another student to copy or use one’s test, exam, paper, or homework; receiving excessive assistance with homework or take-home tests from a tutor, parent, or fellow student; using translating software or translations of texts studied in class without the permission of the teacher; submitting the same work for credit to more than one teacher, unless both teachers give their permission; misuse of technology, including, but not limited to, cell phones, calculators, laptops; using the intellectual property of another individual without acknowledging the source; file sharing without the teacher’s permission; or, the intentional manipulation of teacher/student feedback notes within any OneNote ‘shared’ file.

Process Throughout the students’ academic career, the student is responsible for adhering to the Academic Integrity Policy. Those found guilty of plagiarism/cheating or other violations of the Academic Integrity Policy will be subject to the following range of disciplinary action: Academic Warning: If a student is referred to the Director of Academics as a result of a concern that the Academic Integrity Policy has been breached, the matter will be reviewed carefully. If no definitive conclusion can be reached, yet the student has behaved, whether advertently or inadvertently, 27


in a manner where there may be the perception of academic indiscretion, then the Director of Academics reserves the right to assign the student an Academic Warning. The assignment of an Academic Warning is meant to trigger a dialogue between the student, parent(s), teacher(s) and administration on the topic of academic integrity. The student will be required to review the Academic Integrity Policy carefully with the Director of Academics and/or the Assistant Headmaster. Parents will be apprised of the situation. In the case of a First Offence, the: • • • • • • •

Advisor will be involved in the process as soon as possible; student will meet with the Director of Academics; student will be ineligible to receive recognition at the subsequent end-of-term Academic Assembly, including Prize Day; student will receive a zero for the work but will be afforded an opportunity to redo an assignment and receive up to 50% of the value of the assignment; student will lose his Good Standing Status for a period of three months; students’ current teachers and Housemaster will be informed; and, students’ parents will be informed.

In the case of a Second Offence, the: • • • • • • • • •

Advisor will be involved in the process as soon as possible; student will meet with the Director of Academics; student will be ineligible to receive recognition at the subsequent end-of-term Academic Assembly, including Prize Day; student will be required to attend a remediation session in the GLC and will be required to provide a statement of enduring learning following the session; student will lose his Good Standing Status for a period of six months; student will receive a zero for the work with no opportunity to make up the work; students’ current teachers and Housemaster will be informed; students’ parents will be informed, and the Director of Academics will confirm receipt of the message; and, student will receive a Tier 2 Gating.

In the case of a Third Offence, the: • •

student will be expelled from the College; school will disclose the breach in matters such as university recommendation letters and applicable reference documentation.

Note: Offences are cumulative in nature and will remain a part of the student’s file until graduation. A Final Note In the same way that the “spirit” of the law outweighs the “rule” of law in all cases where the academic integrity of a given work is called into question, the Headmaster reserves the right to pardon, modify a response to, or dismiss a student at his discretion.

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Advisors The Advisor program at St. Andrew’s functions “to strengthen and support young Andreans and allow them to more fully realize their potential to become ‘the complete man, the well-rounded citizen,’ where success is measured equally by personal growth in the areas of a healthy Mind, Heart, Spirit and Body.” In the Upper School, a student is assigned an Advisor in grade 9 and keeps that Advisor until he graduates. Formal Advisor periods take place on Tuesday mornings 10:00 to 10:35 a.m. and informally at the mutual convenience of both the Advisor and Advisee. Boarding students have the additional advantage of seeing their Advisors in the boarding houses. Students may request a switch of Advisor at the conclusion of the academic year by speaking with Mr. Inglis, Coordinator of Student Life. We ask all parents to establish a working email address, provide it to the School, and check it regularly in order to facilitate communication between the Advisor and parents.

Assessment and Evaluation Boys’ Learning & Growing Success Underlying Beliefs Underlying Assumptions: As educators, we are called upon by the Ministry of Education to adhere to the policies identified in the 2010 publication entitled Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting in Ontario Schools. In short, the document follows up on a decade of research and practice pertaining to the use of Bloom’s Taxonomy through the Achievement Charts, the effective use of assessment for, as, and of learning, and a renewed focus on and refinement of ‘learning skills and work habits’. In addition to our adherence to the Ministry of Education’s Growing Success policy, we have also undertaken to develop best practices in assessment and evaluation internally, through our professional development endeavours. The following reflects our current thinking on how to motivate students to learn through assessment. The School uses the Achievement Charts and criterion-referenced feedback to move students along the continuum of learning. Departments develop the most appropriate approach to the Ministry’s Achievement Chart and grading expectations. In every case, students and parents should be able to identify the relationship between their grade and the Ministry expectations. The Learning Skills represent an equally important aspect of student achievement. St. Andrew’s College believes that strong work habits serve students best in the long term. We evaluate students in the areas of responsibility, organization, independent work, collaboration, initiative, and self-regulation. This is intentional in the sense that courses are designed in such a manner that these skills are practiced regularly and inform instructional choices. As a school, we are committed to providing fair, equitable, and transparent feedback practices and policies. Perhaps the most important aspect of this is our expectation that teachers provide ongoing and varied assessment that is clear, specific, meaningful and timely. Students are also required to reflect on their own work and the work of their peers. Self-advocacy becomes increasingly important as our students move through the senior grades.

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Teachers determine both grades and learning skills through observation, conversations, and products. In every instance, teachers view planning through the lens of our professional development themes of boy-friendly learning, critical thinking, the development of a growth mindset, and collaboration. Our classrooms must reflect our commitment to strategies that best serve the current culture of the school.

Guidelines for Upper School Faculty • • • • • • •

Faculty will include assessments for, as, and of learning; assessments of learning (evaluations) will form the basis of the student’s grade in a given course; faculty will ensure that grade calendars are balanced and that there will be no more than two rich evaluations per day; the US Grade Coordinators will be responsible for managing the grade calendars; the Ministry has suggested that assessments of learning (evaluations) must be preceded by assessments for and/or as learning; as such, it is recommended that the ratio of assessments for and as learning to assessments of learning be at least 2:1; students must have an awareness of the success criteria of a required task; additionally, the Ministry has suggested that a course should have in the range of 8-10 assessments of learning (evaluations) per annum; while the Ministry does not endorse the inclusion of assessments for and as learning in a student’s final grade, faculty may, at their discretion, designate up to 10% of a student’s final mark to his performance in these areas; faculty are asked to be consistent and judicious in their application of this policy; and, faculty will communicate by email with parents or guardians when a student scores less than 60% on a major evaluation.

Examination and Major Assignment Policy: Students at St. Andrew's College, at the discretion of the teacher, typically take a final examination at the end of the academic year which is predicated on the entire curriculum for a given course. These examinations are considered, in the context of Growing Success (2010) as assessment of learning and are assigned a value between 10% and 20% of the final grade. These exams compliment the summative activities which St. Andrew's identifies as 'Major Assignments'. The total percentage value of a Major Assignment and examination in any given course will not exceed or be less than 30%. Major Assignment Period: In accordance with Ministry expectations, faculty require students to complete summative tasks in later parts of the course. To that end, and with an eye toward accommodating traditional activities such as Cadets, we have designed a Major Assignment Period. The policy for such follows: • • • • • •

Teachers must ensure that 30% of the value of any course must take place in third term. Course leaders must identify that they wish to host a major assignment during the 6week major assignment period. Grade Coordinators will actively schedule ‘Major Assignments’ into the ‘Major Assignment’ period. Whenever possible, class time should be used to complete ‘Major Assignments.’ Students can appeal to Grade Coordinators for extensions when they have: more than two evaluations in a day (one of which can be a final due date for a ‘Major Assignment’), and/or 30


• • •

• •

when they have more than two ‘Major Assignments’ due in one week. Tests and quizzes may take place during the ‘Major Assignment’ period. The students will be reminded that they must provide their grade coordinator with 48 hours notice if there is a conflict with their evaluations. Labs and performance evaluations may take place any time prior to the May Long Weekend. It is recommended that these be completed prior to Cadet Inspection, but this is not always possible. These include lab tests, oral exams, visual/media art projects, and musical performances. No tests, quizzes, performance evaluations, or assignments will be given in any course following the May Long Weekend--the exception to this is any AP course that had a final examination scheduled at the end of April. The last day to refer a student to the GLC will be the last Wednesday following the May Long Weekend--this will ensure that all overdue assignments are cleared from the GLC prior to the start of the exam period.

Recording Grades: Assessment is based on both formative and summative evaluations. Teachers use a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies including: peer and selfassessments, tests, essays, independent study or group projects, oral presentations, portfolios, skills checklists, labs, and examinations. Seventy percent of the grade is based on assessment and evaluation conducted throughout the course, and 30% of the grade is based on a final summative evaluation aimed at determining achievement of course expectations. The final evaluation includes a required formal written examination and optional evaluations in the form of a performance, essay, oral presentation, or other evaluations suitable to the course. Attendance at evaluation sessions is compulsory. Students should not make any other plans during the formal evaluation schedule from April to June. Students who miss a final evaluation will receive zero for the evaluation unless the absence is verified and legitimate. In order for the absence to be considered legitimate, the student must have visited his family doctor, the hospital emergency ward, or the SAC Health Centre, and provide the Director of Academics with a medical certificate stating the exact date(s) the student was seen for treatment. For any other absence to be considered legitimate approval of the exceptional circumstance must be given by the Director of Academics or his designate. When the evaluation is deemed to be required to be completed, it must be done in an expedient manner. Re-evaluation Policy: In an effort to afford students the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of course content and to compensate for the possibility that a student may not achieve at his best on a given day, the following practice, which mirrors our Writing Centre policy, will be set into place: • Faculty have the authority to prescribe a re-test or re-submission of an evaluation if s/he deems that the student has demonstrated outstanding Learning Skills and Work Habits and they have taken advantage of all available academic supports, including such supports as Open Classroom, Math Centre, and ESL Plus. A student does not have the right to expect this accommodation, and faculty are asked to be judicious in their application of this prescriptive opportunity; • students who have been afforded this accommodation may augment their original grade up to 10%; • this accommodation may be afforded to a given student no more than three times in an academic year. Appealing an Evaluation: Requests by a student for teacher review of a standing on a test, assignment, or other academic work should be made to the teacher outside of class time. No 31


challenges to academic standing will be considered during class time. The teacher may ask the student to prepare his request in writing in a memorandum not to exceed one page in length. This memorandum should detail the exact nature of the concern and must be accompanied by the original assignment as marked. Irreconcilable concerns remaining at the conclusion of the meeting by either the student or the teacher should be referred to the Head of the Department for adjudication. The adjudication may take the form of a re-assessment of the assignment. In this case, the student is awarded the higher of the two marks. If a student formally challenges marks on three occasions, the Director of Academics will schedule a meeting among the student, the teacher, and the Head of Department. Should the Head of Department be the teacher in question, the Head will pass the work to a colleague in the department who is deemed by the Head to be competent in that subject area, and that teacher’s ruling or re-assessment will stand. The student’s Advisor must be informed of the final result of these deliberations but is not an integral part of the appeal process.

Advanced Placement At St. Andrew’s College, we offer our boys the opportunity to challenge themselves through the College Board’s Advanced Placement program. Students who take an Advanced Placement course are provided the opportunity to take a university-level examination predicated on an enriched and accelerated curriculum. An AP course is a credit course incorporating enough elements of a first-year university course to allow students to bypass the equivalent course upon entering university. Being enrolled in an AP course allows students to specialize and challenge themselves with university-level material that suits their strengths and interests. At the conclusion of the course, students write the internationally recognized AP Exam, with scores following a five-point scale: 5 (extremely qualified) 4 (well qualified) 3 (qualified) 2 (possibly qualified) 1 (no recommendation) Students who take AP courses at St. Andrew’s are evaluated on the basis of Ministry Expectations; the additional AP-driven components are assessed, and students are afforded a strong sense of how they will perform on the AP exam. St. Andrew’s College offers a variety of courses that follow the AP guidelines and which culminate with students writing the corresponding AP Exam. Additionally, teachers in non-AP courses offer extra instruction and guidance for those motivated students wishing to write an AP exam. Departments offering AP courses have developed pre-AP skills and knowledge in courses taken by all students in earlier grades. St. Andrew’s College is fully accredited by the College Board to offer AP courses at the School. AP Course Guidelines • All AP courses have been approved via successful completion of the AP Course Audit; • students are evaluated on the basis of Ministry of Education expectations for a given course; course expectations that are specific to the AP program are assessed; 32


• teachers use the month of April to prepare for the course final exam; this exam is

designed to mimic the AP exam, and includes both Ministry and AP expectations; the exam may be worth up to 20% of the value of the course; but this value can only reflect Ministry expectations; AP curriculum is only to be assessed. students complete course summatives or extension/enrichment projects in the weeks following the AP exam which may, at the discretion of the teacher, be submitted during the regular exam period;

AP Exam Policies and Procedures • Students not taking an AP course may order an exam by registering in February; • exams are ordered through the AP Coordinator and not online. AP classes will be checked and guides made available in February; • there will be pre-exam registrations in April; • exams carry a nominal fee; • AP scores are available in July; • since AP work is considered post-secondary, students in these courses who receive a grade of 3 or higher may receive a tax credit for the year the exam is written; • students may release AP scores to universities to receive a transfer credit once they enrol. This is optional for all colleges / universities, except McGill; and, • Advanced Placement may be used either for transfer credit or to ease the transition during the first year of university by essentially repeating the coursework. Evaluations and Reports Assessment is based on both formative and summative evaluation. Teachers use a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies including: peer and self-assessments, tests, essays, independent study or group projects, oral presentations, portfolios, skills checklists, labs, and examinations. Seventy percent of the grade is based on assessment and evaluation conducted throughout the course, and 30% of the grade is based on a final summative evaluation aimed at determining achievement of course expectations. The final evaluation includes a required formal written examination and optional evaluations in the form of a performance, essay, oral presentation, or other evaluations suitable to the course. Attendance at evaluation sessions is compulsory. Students should not make any other plans during the formal evaluation schedule from April to June. Students who miss a final evaluation will receive zero for the evaluation unless the absence is verified and legitimate. In order for the absence to be considered legitimate, the student must have visited his family doctor, the hospital emergency ward, or the SAC Health Centre, and provide the Director of Academics with a medical certificate stating the exact date(s) the student was seen for treatment. For any other absence to be considered legitimate, approval of the exceptional circumstance must be given by the Director of Academics or his designate. When the evaluation is deemed to be required to be completed, it must be done in an expedient manner. Report cards are mailed home in November, March, and June. The November, March, and June reports are evaluative in nature and contain percentage grades. These reports also include an assessment of learning skills. Formal written examinations occur in June for classes from grade 8 to grade 12. The grade 8 examinations are less formal in nature and are intended as a teaching tool to encourage good 33


examinations skills. Additionally, students in grades 9 through 12 prepare summative projects in April and May. Percentage grades on report cards are cumulative and represent the student’s achievement to date overall in a given course. Copies of student reports are kept on file at the School as part of the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR). Questions regarding evaluations should first be directed to the subject teacher and the student’s Advisor. The Assistant Headmaster, Academics, works toward balance in evaluation and compliance with Ministry of Education guidelines.

Extra Help Teachers are committed to providing extra help to boys in their classes. In the Upper School, extra help time is embedded in the weekly schedule on Monday, Tuesday and Friday following classes for 15 minutes. Students may also seek extra help by arranging an appointment outside of class time with their teacher, or on Wednesday morning if the teacher is not required at a meeting. If extensive assistance is required, the services of a tutor may be obtained.

Learning Skills and Work Habits Checklist

Responsibility

Needs Improvement 1

Satisfactory 2

Good 3

Excellent 4

∗ rarely fulfils responsibilities and commitments within the learning environment ∗ makes little effort to complete and submit class work, homework, and assignments according to agreed-upon timelines ∗ takes little responsibility for and poorly manages own behaviour

∗ occasionally fulfils responsibilities and commitments within the learning environment ∗ makes some effort to complete and submit class work, homework, and assignments according to agreed-upon timelines ∗ takes some responsibility for and manages own behaviour

∗ usually fulfils responsibilities and commitments within the learning environment ∗ makes regular effort to complete and submit class work, homework, and assignments according to agreed-upon timelines ∗ takes responsibility for and manages own behaviour most of the time

∗ always fulfils responsibilities and commitments within the learning environment ∗ makes consistent efforts to complete and submit class work, homework, and assignments according to agreed-upon timelines ∗ consistently takes responsibility for and manages own behavior

∗ has trouble devising and

∗ usually devises and follows a

∗ regularly devises and

∗ always devises and follows a

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Organization

Independent Work

following a plan and process for completing work and tasks ∗ rarely establishes priorities or manages time to complete tasks and achieve goals ∗ has difficulty identifying, gathering, evaluating, and using information, technology, and resources to complete tasks

plan and process for completing work and tasks ∗ often establishes priorities and manages time to complete tasks and achieve goals ∗ with help, can identify, gather, evaluate, and use information, technology, and resources to complete tasks

follows a plan and process for completing work and tasks ∗ frequently establishes priorities and manages time to complete tasks and achieve goals ∗ is usually able to identify, gather, evaluate, and use information, technology, and resources to complete tasks

plan and process for completing work and tasks ∗ routinely establishes priorities and manages time to complete tasks and achieve goals ∗ effectively identifies, gathers, evaluates, and uses information, technology, and resources to complete tasks

∗ rarely monitors, assesses, and revises plans independently to complete tasks ∗ rarely meets goals ∗ rarely uses class time appropriately to complete tasks

∗ sometimes monitors, assesses, and revises plans independently to complete tasks ∗ occasionally meets goals ∗ occasionally uses class time appropriately to complete tasks ∗ follows instructions with supervision

∗ usually monitors, assesses, and revises plans independently to complete tasks ∗ meets goals most of the time ∗ usually uses class time appropriately to complete tasks

∗ independently monitors, assesses, and revises plans to complete tasks ∗ always meets goals ∗ always uses class time appropriately to complete tasks ∗ follows instructions with minimal supervision

∗ accepts various roles and an equitable share of work in a group some of the time ∗ generally responds positively to the ideas, opinions, values, and traditions of others

∗ usually accepts various roles and an equitable share of work in a group ∗ usually responds positively to the ideas, opinions, values, and traditions of others ∗ often builds healthy peer-to-

∗ follows instructions with constant supervision

Collaboration

∗ rarely accepts various roles and avoids an equitable share of work in a group ∗ rarely responds positively to the ideas, opinions, values, and traditions of others ∗ rarely builds healthy peer-to-

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∗ follows instructions with some supervision

∗ always accepts various roles and an equitable share of work in a group ∗ responds positively to the ideas, opinions, values, and traditions of others ∗ always builds healthy peer-to-


Initiative

peer relationships through personal and mediaassisted interactions ∗ avoids working with others to resolve conflicts and build consensus to achieve group goals ∗ rarely shares information, resources, and expertise and little attempt to use critical thinking to solve problems and make decisions

∗ tries to build healthy peer-topeer relationships through personal and mediaassisted interactions ∗ often willing to work with others to resolve conflicts and build consensus to achieve group goals ∗ generally shares information, resources, and expertise and sometimes promotes critical thinking to solve problems and make decisions

peer relationships through personal and media-assisted interactions ∗ usually works with others to resolve conflicts and build consensus to achieve group goals ∗ usually shares information, resources, and expertise and usually promotes critical thinking to solve problems and make decisions

peer relationships through personal and media-assisted interactions ∗ routinely works with others to resolve conflicts and build consensus to achieve group goals ∗ routinely shares information, resources, and expertise and promotes critical thinking to solve problems and make decisions

∗ rarely looks for and acts on new ideas and opportunities for learning ∗ lacks the capacity for innovation and a willingness to take risks ∗ demonstrates little curiosity and interest in learning ∗ seldom approaches new tasks with a positive attitude

∗ occasionally looks for and acts on new ideas and opportunities for learning ∗ displays some of the capacity for innovation and a willingness to take risks ∗ demonstrates some curiosity and interest in learning ∗ generally approaches new tasks with a positive attitude ∗ makes some effort to recognize and advocate appropriately for the rights of self and others

∗ usually looks for and acts on new ideas and opportunities for learning ∗ appropriately demonstrates the capacity for innovation and a willingness to take risks ∗ usually demonstrates curiosity and interest in learning

∗ always looks for and acts on new ideas and opportunities for learning ∗ constantly demonstrates the capacity for innovation and a willingness to take risks ∗ always demonstrates curiosity and interest in learning

∗ frequently approaches new tasks with a positive attitude ∗ typically recognizes and advocates appropriately for the rights of self and others

∗ always approaches new tasks with a positive attitude ∗ actively recognizes and advocates appropriately for the rights of self and others

∗ rarely recognizes and advocates appropriately for the rights of self and others

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Selfregulation

∗ rarely sets own individual goals and monitors progress towards achieving them ∗ fails to seeks clarification or assistance when needed ∗ seldom assesses and reflects critically on own strengths, needs, and interests ∗ seldom identifies learning opportunities, choices, and strategies to meet personal needs and achieve goals ∗ fails to persevere and makes little effort when responding to challenges

∗ sometimes sets own individual goals and monitors progress towards achieving them ∗ occasionally seeks clarification or assistance when needed ∗ occasionally assesses and reflects critically on own strengths, needs, and interests ∗ occasionally identifies learning opportunities, choices, and strategies to meet personal needs and achieve goals ∗ sometimes perseveres and makes an effort when responding to challenges

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∗ generally sets own individual goals and monitors progress towards achieving them ∗ seeks clarification or assistance comfortably when needed ∗ usually assesses and reflects critically on own strengths, needs, and interests ∗ often identifies learning opportunities, choices, and strategies to meet personal needs and achieve goals ∗ mostly perseveres and makes an effort when responding to challenges

∗ routinely sets own individual goals and monitors progress towards achieving them ∗ always seeks clarification or assistance when needed ∗ actively assesses and reflects critically on own strengths, needs, and interests ∗ routinely identifies learning opportunities, choices, and strategies to meet personal needs and achieve goals ∗ consistently perseveres and makes an effort when responding to challenges


Centre for Learning and Teaching: A Comprehensive Academic Support System The Centre for Learning and Teaching (CLT) at St. Andrew’s College provides a variety of programs and resources designed to promote student learning and to improve instruction. Guided Learning Centre The Guided Learning Centre (GLC), located on the upper level of Towers Library, is unique to St. Andrew’s College. We require students who have not finished major assignments on time to attend the GLC after school where they are given additional support and time to complete their work. The GLC also provides teachers with support for students who may miss assessment and evaluation opportunities because of other school commitments. Procedure • • •

Students can be mandated to attend the GLC for any assignment that has been posted to the subject teacher’s daybook at least seven days in advance of the due date; Failure to submit an assignment by the prescribed due date results in the subject teacher emailing the student’s name to the GLC email account. The student, parent(s), advisor and coach, are then informed of the GLC referral; The assignment must be submitted to the GLC supervisor and the referring teacher (via email or Turnitin.com) by 5:30 p.m. on the 7th day following the referral. Assignments that cannot be submitted electronically (e.g. artwork, physical models) must be submitted to the GLC supervisor. Fifteen percent (15%) is deducted from the assignment; and, If the student is “not in good standing” (e.g., has an academic average <80% in the previous term), he is withdrawn from his co-curricular commitments and must physically attend the GLC until his missing assignment is complete or the GLC deadline has passed. Students are ineligible to participate in any co-curricular activity if work is outstanding. Students must clear their name from this list prior to the start time of the cocurricular commitment.

“Good Standing” Students Many students are able to manage both their academic and co-curricular commitments effectively without additional support. A student who is achieving an overall grade of 80% or higher in a particular course is considered to be in "good standing” (GS) in that course. While GS students are subject to the same seven-day deadline and 15% penalty for missing due dates, they do not have to physically attend assigned GLC sessions. If a GS student with GS privileges does not submit an assignment by the end of the seven-day period, he will lose his GS privilege and will be required to physically attend any future GLC sessions for that term. Additionally, any student referred to the GLC three times in a single term may lose his GS privilege at the discretion of the Director of Academics. Extensions Occasionally, students will require assignment extensions for extenuating circumstances. Students must apply to their subject teacher for extensions at least 48 hours before the due date.

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Consequences for Not Attending the GLC The GLC is an extension of the classroom. Students who choose not to attend will be subject to a Tier One gating. GLC Plus A similar program to the GLC, the GLC Plus identifies students who neglect assignments or other school work on a regular basis. The GLC Plus differs from the GLC in that instead of pulling students from co-curricular activities permanently, which can be detrimental to the St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience, students must attend a weekly two-hour GLC session. At these weekly sessions, the supervising teachers work with students, helping them to manage their academic portfolio more effectively. Assigned students must attend GLC Plus one day a week for the entire term. Failure to do so will result in a Tier One gating for each session missed without prior approval. The Learning Resource Specialist will work with the identified student to improve his academic standing by formulating a written remedial plan for him to complete. Referral Process and Protocol The Director of Academics, in conjunction with the Learning Resource Specialist, Grade Coordinators, advisors, and parents, will assign at-risk students to the GLC Plus following the term one and term two report cards. Automatic referral to the GLC will be applied to â&#x20AC;&#x153;at-riskâ&#x20AC;? students, defined as those boys who have an academic average of less than 60% or three or more courses below 60%. The Director of Academics retains the right to use his discretion in recommending other students to the GLC Plus program. The Writing Centre The Writing Centre is a division of the library that helps students develop effective writing and research skills by offering individual consultations, classes, tutorials, and workshops. Additionally, the Writing Centre actively promotes literacy across the curriculum and encourages excellence in writing by producing the student newspaper and the student literary magazine. Math Centre Mathematics is important to many university disciplines; therefore, it is essential that we provide students with a strong mathematical foundation. The Math Centre helps, through individual and small-group tutorial sessions, those students who struggle with mathematics. The program is facilitated by a current University of Waterloo co-operative education math student who is supervised by the staff of the CLT. Missed Test Policy Students who miss an assessment for a legitimate reason may complete the assessment in the GLC upon their return. It is incumbent upon the student to complete the assessment within 2 academic days of his return to classes.

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Learning Resource Services Learning Resource Services maintains the records of students with learning exceptionalities, certifies eligibility for services, determines reasonable accommodations, and develops plans for the provision of accommodations for students. For more information regarding the accommodations currently offered to students with learning exceptionalities, please contact the school’s Coordinator of Academic Support, Ms. Amanda Thorne (amanda.thorne@sac.on.ca). Extra Help Students can seek extra help at the end of the academic day on Monday, Tuesday, and Friday from 3:30 – 3:45 p.m. Students should notify their teachers in advance if they are attending the extra help sessions. Tutoring Students who require additional assistance in an academic subject, or who would benefit from an “academic coach,” may request a school-approved tutor engaged from outside the school community. There is an additional fee of $55/hour (charged to the student’s account) for subject-specific tutoring and $65/hour for academic coaching; all sessions must take place in Towers Library. Requests for tutoring are made through Ms. Amanda Thorne (amanda.thorne@sac.on.ca). Students must provide their tutors with 24-hours’ notice for cancelled appointments; please note that students will be charged the full tutoring fee for any missed sessions that do not meet the requirements of the cancellation policy. For security purposes, the School does not allow students to meet with non-SAC tutors at any time on campus. Standing Committee for Excellence in Teaching and Learning In addition to a comprehensive academic support program, the CLT is the locus of a faculty professional development committee called SCETL (Standing Committee for Excellence in Teaching and Learning). The committee ensures that our policies, procedures, and programs are in line with our Academic Vision Statement.

Individualized Learning Protocol Eligible Students As St. Andrew's College is a university-preparatory school, policies to support the learning of “identified” students must be consistent with the policies and guidelines of Canadian universities. There are two ways in which a student can be identified as requiring individualized academic support. If there is a Ministry of Education Individual Education Plan (IEP) already in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR) when he starts at St. Andrew’s; or, a formal Education Assessment is completed by a licensed psychologist. In keeping with Ministry and university policies, St. Andrew’s College reserves the right to request an updated version of the IEP or Education Assessment in the event that the original is more than five years old.

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Accommodations The term “accommodations” is used to refer to the special teaching and assessment strategies, human supports, and/or individualized equipment required to enable a student to learn and to demonstrate learning. Accommodations do not alter the provincial curriculum expectations for the grade. At St. Andrew’s, students who have been identified as exceptional may receive the following accommodations: • • • •

extra time on tests and exams (up to time and a half); the opportunity to write examinations in a separate, quiet room; the opportunity to use a laptop for extended written responses in tests and exams; the use of a formula sheet for math and science if it is specifically noted on the IEP or educational assessment. Requests must be made to the Learning Resource Specialist at least 48 hours in advance, and the teacher must approve the sheet before it can be used. This formula sheet must be no larger than one 8.5” x 11” sheet of paper (doublesided), 12-point font or handwritten. It may include formulas and the basic steps to solving problems, but no worked examples.

While these are the only formal accommodations offered at St. Andrew’s, subject teachers make every effort to ensure that they are using “best practices” in the classroom and are supported in these endeavours by the School administration, faculty, and, in cases where students have been identified as exceptional, by the School’s Learning Resource Specialist. Communication The School’s Learning Resource Specialist is responsible for communicating in writing the specific recommendations listed on the IEP/Education Assessment to each subject teacher before the end of September. Subject teachers will receive this information in the form of a Student Support Plan (SSP), which will outline significant background information, necessary accommodations, and suggested “best practices” for the student in question. All formal documentation pertaining to IEP/Education Assessments will be kept in confidence in the student’s OSR. Extra Time (Exams) If the IEP/Education Assessment recommends that the student be given extra time for exams, he will have the option of taking additional time to complete the evaluation. In this case, the student must write his exam in the “extra time” room. The Learning Resource Specialist will be responsible for making the necessary arrangements in conjunction with both the student and the School’s administration. Extra Time (Tests) If the IEP/Education Assessment recommends extra time for tests, the student will make the necessary arrangements with his teacher. If the student requires more time, he will be accompanied to the Towers Library to complete the test.

Language of Instruction The language of instruction at the School is English, which must be spoken in all classroom situations, Cole Hall, travelling from class to class, and in all other scheduled activities, such as 41


sports, except for those classes in which a foreign language is being taught. During free time in the evenings, any language is acceptable. There have been occasions when students have been denied a place at university due to poor language test results, despite having the necessary marks for admission. Adherence to the above will help to minimize the chances of this happening.

Library The Towers Library is named to honour Graham Towers, Class of 1913, the first Governor of The Bank of Canada and a long-time member of the Board of Governors of the School. In the summer of 1999, the Towers Library was beautifully renovated and refurbished. Library Hours Monday to Thursday: Friday: Sunday:

8:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Ms. Lori Lu, the Library Services Coordinator, and Ms. Melissa Ramon, Teacher-Librarian, are available to assist students by answering research questions, locating library materials or signing out library resources. General Guidelines For more specific guidelines, consult the SAC library web page: Patrons should keep the following general guidelines in mind: • • • • • • • • •

library use during the academic day requires academic dress; leave library study areas in good order before leaving; an academic tone must be maintained when in the library; misuse or removal of ANY MATERIALS from the library without signing them out is a serious breach of discipline. In general, books are loaned for a two-week period; please do not re-shelve returned materials. Put them in the book return bin or give them to one of the library staff; a fee is charged for overdue books; the playing of computer games or use of cell phones/Blackberries is not permitted in the library; headphones must be worn while listening to audio files; and, students are not permitted to watch video files or DVDs in the library.

Summer School Credits Given the quality of our faculty and the rigour of our academic program, compulsory and prerequisite courses must be completed in full-year courses at St. Andrew’s. Whenever possible, reach-ahead courses should be taken at St. Andrew’s, other CIS schools, or publicly-funded schools, all of which offer Ministry of Education approved summer school credits. In order to ensure that students have access to courses that mirror the same level of excellence as the full-year courses taught at St. Andrew’s, a limited summer school program, taught by highly qualified faculty, is available.

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We support any enrichment opportunities where students are able to learn in other campusbased environments, be they local or international; however, the credits earned in these environments must be elective in nature. Please note: it is our experience that universities reserve the right not to recognize, for entrance purposes, credits earned in non-campus based summer programs. St. Andrew's may support online or correspondence courses earned from accredited institutions requiring students to write in-house, supervised final examinations completed prior to the start of the subsequent academic year. Permission to pursue an “outside” credit must be granted by the Director of Academics; one reach-ahead credit per high school year will be accepted. All English credits must be taken at St. Andrew‘s from September to June.

Policy and Procedure for Withdrawal from Grade 11 or 12 Course: Course Add & Drop Dates Students may request to withdraw from a course at any point during the academic year. The last day on which a student may add a course to his timetable is the last day of classes prior to the Thanksgiving break. The last day to drop a course is the last day of classes prior to the December Break. Full Disclosure Policy: All grade 11 and 12 courses are subject to the Ministry of Education’s Full Disclosure Policy. All courses in which a student is registered five days after the December Break will be recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript (OST) whether the course has been successfully completed or not. A withdrawal is recorded on the OST by entering a “W” in the “Credit” column. The student’s percentage grade at the time of the withdrawal is recorded in the “Percentage Grade” column. Students, who repeat a grade 11 or 12 course that they have previously completed, earn only one credit for the course. However, each attempt as well as the percentage grade obtained is recorded on the OST, and an “R” is entered in the “Credit” column for the course(s) with the lower percentage grade.

Textbooks Textbooks are provided to students through our Campus Shop. No action is necessary for parents with respect to procuring texts. Each fall, students will be provided with consumable (workbooks) and non-consumable (conventional textbooks) which will be charged to the student's sundry account. At the end of the year, non-consumable texts will be returned to the Campus Shop, and a portion of the textbook cost will be refunded to parents. Online texts will be provided to students via the teacher. Students will receive all required textbooks and resources once their schedule has been established. For more information, please contact the Campus Shop.

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Academic Schedule for Upper School Monday, Tuesday, Friday Period 1 Break Period 2 Activity * Lunch Period 3 Break Period 4

75 35 75 30 45 75 15 75

8:45 – 10:00 10:00 – 10:15 10:15 – 11:30 11:30 – 12:00 12:00 – 12:45 12:45 – 2:00 2:00 – 2:15 2:15 – 3:30

Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Lunch Period 4

60 60 60 45 60

9:30 – 10:30 10:30 – 11:30 11:30 – 12:30 12:30 – 1:15 1:15 – 2:15

Period 1 Period 2 Activity Period 3 Lunch Activity Break Period 4

60 60 45 60 30 60 15 60

8:45 – 9:45 9:45 – 10:45 10:45 – 11:15 11:15 – 12:15 12:15 – 12:45 1:15 – 2:15 2:15 – 2:30 2:30 – 3:30

Wednesdays

Thursday

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Activities Monday

11:30 – 12:00 3:30 3:45 Tuesday 8:15 – 8:45 11:30 – 12:00 3:30 3:45 Wednesday 2:30 Thursday 10:45 – 11:15 10:45 – 11:15 12:45 – 2:15 12:45 – 2:15 3:45 – 5:00 5:00 – 6:15 Friday 11:30 – 12:00 3:30 3:45

Full US Assembly Extra Help Sports Grade 9-10 Chapel Leadership Groups & Informal Clubs Extra Help Sports Sports Grade 9–10 Gathering in Wirth Grade 11-12 Chapel Grade 9-12 Leadership/Music Programs Grades 11-12 Other Programming Arts and Co-curriculars Plus Block 1 Arts and Co-curriculars Plus Block 2 Advisory Extra Help Sports

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LAPTOP AND NETWORK POLICIES Computer and Network Code of Conduct The School’s Code of Honour and Code of Conduct embody the guiding principles for all conduct at the School including student laptop, tablet, desktop, smartphone, eReader, network, and Internet usage. Laptop computers are leased by the School and rented to each student on an annual basis. The network access made available to students on these convertible tablet computers and on any other personal network device is provided for legal, positive, constructive, educational, and leisure usage. Students are expected to conduct themselves with integrity while using any electronic device, whether it is owned by the School or is a student’s personal device. This applies to any usage or behaviour that impacts the School community, whether it is conducted on school grounds or offsite through an online service.

Wireless Laptop/Tablet Program New Upper School Students: New Upper School students receive their convertible tablets on the New Boy Orientation day during the first week of school. New Middle School Students: New Middle School students receive their convertible tablets on the New Boy Orientation day during the first week of school. Laptop Refresh: Laptops are leased by the School on a three-year term. End of Lease: At the end of the three-year lease, all laptops are returned to the supplier. No buyouts are possible. Laptop Rental Period: Students rent their laptops for an academic year, from the first day of classes until 24 hours after their last exam is written. Returning students will be permitted to keep their laptops over the summer months and on other school holidays; however, this is at the discretion of the School as there may be behavioural, technical, or financial reasons to rescind this decision. Laptop Rental Costs: The annual fee, paid by all students, is $1,990 per year. Help Desks: Two Help Desks are available for student and faculty use. One serves the Upper School and the other serves the Middle School. Hours of operation are typically Monday to Friday from 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., though these hours may vary over the course of the year. Changes will be posted at each Help Desk. Laptop Repairs: The School maintains a float of replacement parts and does all repairs onsite. The Help Desk repairs most laptops in a timely manner, usually within a day. Loaner Pool: The School maintains a pool of loaner laptops for student use. At the discretion of the Help Desk, a loaner will be provided when a student’s computer is kept at the Help Desk overnight or over a weekend. Battery Exchange: Students are expected to come to school with a fully charged battery. In the event that a student’s battery is running low, he may take advantage of the battery exchange at either Help Desk in order to keep his laptop powered-up for the day. 46


Academic Data Backups: A backup utility called Second Copy is installed on all laptops. The purpose of the utility is to backup student academic data to the School’s network, where each student is allocated 1 GB of storage space. OneNote notebooks are also automatically backedup to the network for sharing purposes. Students are encouraged to also backup data to other devices such as external hard drives, USB keys, or a cloud service. •

• •

Students will rely heavily on OneNote for all their note-taking. OneNote shares are stored on the network and viewable by teachers. As a result, there is always a backup of student notebooks stored on the network. If students notice that their shared course OneNote notebooks are not synchronizing with the network, they should visit the Help Desk for repair. Students are strongly encouraged to backup their personal photographs and video projects to their own external drives. Network storage cannot be used for these large files. A quick way to backup a small document such as an essay or other assignment, is to attach it to a FirstClass email to yourself and then do not send it. This way, a copy of your project is made available on the email server. Student storage on our email server is limited to 250MB so this kind of quick backup is limited to small documents, not multimedia files.

Getting Connected: St. Andrew’s College is a completely networked facility. Fibre optic cabling runs between all buildings on the campus. All buildings also have wireless connectivity available to students in their classrooms, residential rooms, and common areas. The School has a 1024 Mbit (1Gbit) connection off campus to the Internet. All student computers are equipped with wireless and wired connectivity. So, whether a student is in the classroom, in his residential room, in the gallery, or library, he will have a means of connecting to the Internet. Shared OneNote Notebooks: Students must be aware that ALL faculty have access to ALL student shared OneNote notebooks. Course teachers will frequently access the notes of students enrolled in their courses. Teachers may access these shared notebooks at any time in order to provide appropriate assessment and feedback on homework, projects, and/or assignments as they deem necessary. Student Edsby Access: At St. Andrew’s College, all courses are managed through a webbased learning management system called Edsby. In Edsby, students will gain access to course daybooks where they can check their daily homework, assignment details, and important due dates. Each course also contains a student’s gradebook, course handouts, attendance records, and a class discussion area. Students are expected to communicate on Edsby with classmates, housemates, teammates, and various group members in a constructive, polite, and positive manner. Failure to do so will result in computer misconduct strikes being assigned and other possible school disciplinary action. Parent Edsby Access: Parents also have access to Edsby, where they can see their son’s homework, grades, and attendance. Edsby should be used by parents to update their contact information with the School. Edsby Messaging: Edsby messaging is limited and will not be used as a primary communication tool. All important school communication will continue to be sent by email or telephone, to ensure a timely response.

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TurnItIn.com: At St. Andrew’s College, academic integrity is taught and cultivated such that students learn to conduct themselves like young scholars. TurnItIn.com is a valuable service to assist teachers in identifying when students have copied work off the Internet, from another text, from a classmate, or from a previous years’ student. Most electronic work is submitted to TurnItIn.com to check for plagiarism. Any breach of academic trust is taken seriously by our teachers and the School’s administration. Laptop Image: All student computers are provided with an operating system, standard applications, and course specific software. The process of installing this customized collection of software is called IMAGING or GHOSTING. When student computers encounter software problems, the best solution is to reimage the laptop. Laptop Software: Our computing platform is MS Windows 10 Professional 64 bit and MS Office 365 along with MS OneNote 2016, FirstClass Email, Adobe Creative Cloud Suite, Adobe Acrobat Pro, PDF Annotator, Adobe Photoshop Elements 9, Adobe Premier Elements 9, Movie Maker, Photo Story, Skype, Symantec Anti-Virus, Windows Defender, Laptop Tracking Software, and Second Copy. Academic Software: There are over thirty pieces of subject-specific software available to students in specific courses; these include: Sage 50 Accounting 2018, JCreator Java, Solid Works 2018, Android Studio, MIT AppInventor, Arduino, ArcGIS, SmartMusic, Logger Pro Science, Comic Life, Fathom Math, and Geometers Sketch Pad Math. Online Site Licenses: Students have access to a wealth of paid subscriptions to online web services such as Edsby, Turnitin.com, Rosetta Stone, BrainPOP, Mathletics, Parlay, ArcGIS Online, MathSpace, and Breezin’ Thru Music Theory. Online Library Resources: Our librarian curates a wealth of paid resources for students to be successful in a wide range of courses and grade levels such as Questia Online Books, Gale Periodical Search, Britannica, World Book, LibGuides, Follet eBooks, ProQuest Periodicals, Rosenteen Health, Northern Blue History of Canada. Virus & Malware Protection: Each laptop is imaged with Windows Professional, Windows Firewall, Symantec Anti-Virus, and Windows Defender. Students must make every effort not to infect computers or the network system with a virus, or other type of malware. Students must not disable any of this protective software and should ensure their virus definitions are up to date. Student Owned Laptops: Student owned computers (laptop or desktop) are NOT allowed on campus. Students are permitted to bring eReaders, iPads, Android tablets, and smartphones to school and the residences. Faculty and staff reserve the right to monitor and control student use of any and all electronic devices to ensure a healthy and productive educational environment is maintained. Students must ensure these devices do not disrupt the campus network.

Computer Strike Policy Computer Misconduct Strikes: Students who violate any Computer and Network Policy will be given Computer Misconduct Strikes at the discretion of the faculty and staff of the School. •

Misconduct Strike 1: Faculty or staff report student laptop misuse to the Help Desk. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster are notified. 48


Misconduct Strike 2: Faculty or staff report second incident of student laptop misuse to the Help Desk. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster are notified.

Misconduct Strike 3: Faculty or staff report third incident of student laptop misuse to the Help Desk. Parent, Advisor, and Housemaster are notified. The Advisor ensures the student takes his laptop to the Help Desk. Student loses Administrator access to machine and becomes a restricted user for 90 days. Laptop is reimaged and/or games, movies, images, and chat programs are uninstalled. This is at the discretion of the Help Desk staff given the situation. - Student becomes a 90 Day User - Student will serve a Tier 1 gating - Strikes are set back to zero

Laptop Care and Control Policy Care and Control: Once a student is assigned a laptop, its care and control are his responsibility. Laptops must either be with the student or locked in a secure place such as a school locker or a residence room. Approved Padded Laptop Bag: A Projekt laptop bag provided by the School is considered part of the School uniform. Students must carry their laptops to class, activities, and home in the provided padded computer bag to ensure their laptops are protected from the accidental harm that comes from a crash into a locker, a collision into a door, a smash onto the floor, a fall on the stairs, a drop on a desk, or a bang in a car. Students are not permitted to use other brands of laptop bags. Returning Students: All returning students are expected to return to school with their Projekt bag in good working condition. Returning students receive a new Projekt bag if theirs gets damaged. New Students: All new students will be issued a NEW Projekt computer bag during the laptop rollout. Middle School Student Hard Carrying Cases: All Middle School students are required to use the provided hard carrying case to transport their laptop from class to class. Backpacks are not allowed in classrooms. Accidental Damage (AD) Strikes: Using a laptop every period of every day puts the machine through a lot of hard usage. Accidents will happen and the School strives to minimize the disruption these incidents cause to parents and students. To avoid the high costs of repairs, the School has enrolled in an accidental damage insurance policy. While this covers the cost of most repairs, students will still be held accountable for their lack of care. Any damage to the laptop that is not a warranty failure will result in an AD strike and could include a deductible fine. AD strikes can be applied because of damage to either a student’s own laptop or another student’s laptop. The Help Desk staff will determine the cause of damage and assess a strike for each incident of accidental damage. Wilful damage will be dealt with more severely. A student who wilfully damages their own or another student’s laptop will be fined the full cost of replacement parts and may face other disciplinary responses from the School.

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Broken Screens – Immediate $100 fine and Tier 1 gating. The fine needs to be paid through the Business Office via debit or a credit card. The laptop will not be returned to the student until the fine is paid. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster will be notified.

Normal Accidental Damages • • •

AD Strike 1: The Help Desk will assess the cause of damage and assign AD strikes if the student is found to be at fault for the damage. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster will be notified. AD Strike 2: The student, parent, Advisor, and Housemaster are notified by email that the student is again at fault for laptop damage. AD Strike 3: The student, parent, Advisor, and Housemaster are notified that a third strike is being given. - Student will serve a Tier 1 gating - Student is fined $50 payable at the Business Office - AD strikes are set back to zero Note: Computer failure will not excuse a student from any academic deadline. It is the responsibility of each student to ensure their academic work is backed up by checking that Second Copy is running without errors and their OneNote shares are synching with the network.

Peripherals Theft: Students must not steal parts from other students. Students may lend or borrow batteries, styluses, AC Adapters, etc., but they must ensure these peripherals are returned to the students they belong to. Any parts found lying around should be brought to the Help Desk. The replacement cost of lost or stolen peripherals will be charged to the student. Students found to be selling any of these parts will be found to be in breach of the School’s Honour Code. Stickers: Stickers are not allowed on laptops. Not an iPod: Students are not allowed to walk around campus with their laptop playing music. This applies whether students are using headphones or not. Hardware Problems: Students should not try to repair laptop hardware problems on their own. Students should never open up the laptop casing or remove any screws. Instead, they should go to the Help Desk for assistance. Laptop Free Zones: Laptops are not permitted in Laptop Free Zones. This includes the Chapel, Cole Hall, Ketchum Auditorium Wirth Theatre, Walden Pool, the weight room, sport locker rooms, and gyms. Members of the faculty or staff who find laptops in these areas are obliged to bring them to a Help Desk. These laptops will be considered orphaned and students will be given an Orphaned Laptop Strike. Faculty or staff may give students permission to bring laptops to these areas for special purposes. Laptop Theft: If a laptop is reported stolen or missing the student will pay a $500 deductible. Parents will be contacted and the theft will be reported to the police. Once the deductible is paid by cheque or a credit card to the Business Office, a loaner laptop will be made available from the Help Desk. Laptop-tracking software is used to aid the police in tracking stolen laptops. If a 50


laptop is subsequently found and returned to the School, the $500 deductible will be reimbursed. The most common reasons for ‘stolen’ laptops are students leaving them in a taxi, at a restaurant, or in a hotel room while on vacation. Please be careful when travelling with your school laptop. Hallway Laptops: Laptops are never to be left unattended around campus. Any laptop found in a hallway, behind a door, or in an unlocked locker will be picked up by a member of the faculty or staff and brought to a Help Desk. These laptops will be considered orphaned and students will be given a Strike. Orphaned Laptop Strikes: Every effort must be made to keep laptops safe from theft. Laptops left unattended around the School will be picked up by faculty and staff and delivered to a Help Desk for safekeeping. Laptops have been stolen from Cole Hall, Bedard Athletics Centre, residential rooms, and team locker rooms. If students find a laptop unattended, they should bring this to the attention of a teacher or staff member. Leaving a laptop unattended is considered a serious issue, and students will be inconvenienced in getting it back. •

Orphaned Laptop Strike 1: To reclaim laptops, students must arrange for their Advisor to accompany them to the Help Desk. If the Advisor is away from school, the Director of IT can be asked to accompany the student. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster will be notified. Orphaned Laptop Strike 2: If a student needs to reclaim a laptop a second time, he must arrange for his Advisor, along with his parent, guardian or Housemaster to accompany him to the Help Desk. Again, the Director of IT can stand in for one of the two adults required. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster will be notified. Orphaned Laptop Strike 3: If a student needs to reclaim a laptop a third time, he will be fined $100. This must be paid before the laptop is returned. This is a penalty for a student’s lack of care and control of his laptop. We encourage parents to make their son pay them back. - Student will serve a Tier 1 gating - $100 fine must be paid before laptop is returned - Orphaned Laptop Strikes are set back to zero

Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster will be notified. Payment can be made with cash, cheque, or a credit card through the Business Office. Once the fee is paid, the Business Office will notify the Help Desk. The student must then arrange for his Advisor, along with his parent, guardian, or Housemaster to accompany him to the Help Desk. Again, the Director of IT can stand in for one of the two adults required. Parents, Advisor, and Housemaster will be notified.

Classrooms: If a student leaves a classroom for any reason the laptop must be taken with him. A teacher may allow students to leave laptops in a locked classroom at special times throughout the school year. Library: If a student leaves the library or for any reason would lose sight of his laptop, then it must be taken with him. Take It Home: Lockers are not to be used to store laptops overnight, on weekends, or holidays. If it becomes known that laptops are being left in lockers during unsupervised times this creates a security/theft issue. 51


Sports Travel: Laptops can be taken on sporting trips at the discretion of the coach. Students will be informed whether the car, van, or bus will be a secure environment to leave the laptop in while they are involved in competitions. School Travel: Laptops can be taken on academic and co-curricular trips at the discretion of the teacher organizing the trip. Students will be informed as to how they can reduce the risk of loss or theft while travelling.

Computer User Policy Academic Use First: Academic use of the laptops must always take priority over recreational use. Each student is given an Administrator equivalent user account on their laptops. Students can lose this privilege after three Computer Misconduct Strikes, or at the discretion of the School or parents. Electronic Gaming, Movies, and TV Shows: Gaming includes computer games, smartphone games, play stations, and any other form of electronic gaming: • • •

No gaming is permitted during the academic day, study times, or after lights out; Classrooms, Chapel, Ketchum Auditorium, Wirth Theatre, and Cole Hall are game-free zones at all times, no exceptions; and, Gaming on athletic bus trips is at the discretion of the coach. The School recommends that at least the same amount of time be spent on school work as gaming or watching videos.

Movies: •

Movie watching on athletic trips is at the discretion of the coach. The School recommends that at least the same amount of time be spent on school work as watching movies or gaming.

Content Restrictions: Students are not allowed to have installed on their computers or to share or distribute files which offend community standards, break laws, compromise the School’s computer security, or violate academic policies. Files may be in executable, text, sound, images, photographic, or video format. Here is a list of content that students should not have on their computers: • • • • •

Copyrighted Software and Digital Media: Students should only be playing games, using software, listening to music, and watching videos, movies, and TV shows for which they have a legal right to do so. Pornography in the form of images, videos, or cartoons. Music which offends community standards on issues such as swearing, promotion of drug use, treatment of women, racism, etc. Hacking utilities which may be used to compromise our network security such as port scanners, key loggers, password crackers, decompilers, network administration tools, sniffers, tracers, protocol analyzers, Proxies, VPNs, etc. Photographing/Video Taping Tests or Exams – students are not permitted to take photographs or videos of any tests or exams without the permission of the teacher. Students who receive electronic copies of tests or exams from other students should delete these files from all electronic devices and inform their teacher. 52


Software Conflicts: Students share the responsibility of ensuring their laptops are functional for academic use, especially in the classroom. • •

• • •

If student-installed software causes the laptop to malfunction, students are expected to uninstall the software. Peer-to-peer software sharing is strongly discouraged as this “free” software is one of the major sources of virus infection on student laptops. It is highly recommended that peer-to-peer sharing software be removed from student laptops. Students are encouraged to buy their music, movies and TV shows at an online store. Help Desk personnel will not help with the installation of any software not purchased by the School. The Help Desk can re-image a laptop that continues to malfunction for any reason. Students are expected to keep their anti-virus software running and up to date.

Password Privacy: Laptop passwords must be kept private. Here are some password guidelines and etiquette to follow: • • • • • • • •

No effort should ever be made to obtain another user’s password. No effort should be made to watch another user enter a password. When another user is logging in, you should look away until they have finished typing and are successfully logged in. No effort should be made to guess another user’s password. Software should never be installed on a computer for the purposes of capturing another user’s password. Students should never work on a computer logged in under another user’s account, unless they have expressly asked to do so and they are in the presence of the other student. No effort should ever be made to read another user’s private email without their permission. Efforts to obtain administrator and teacher passwords will be dealt with severely. This includes suspension and expulsion. Students who hear of any breach of user or network security are expected to inform the IT staff.

Desktop Backgrounds: Desktop backgrounds are a public space and viewable by many people. Students are permitted to customize their laptop desktops but are expected to use good judgment in their choices and be consistent with community standards. Plagiarism: Students must not plagiarize from any online source. Information from electronic sources is to be treated like any printed material and must be properly cited. Personal File Sharing: Students are responsible for any files they make available to others. Methods of sharing include, but are not limited to: memory keys, external drives, and cloud services such as DropBox, iCloud, Google Drive, etc. Students must ensure they are not violating the Content Restriction guidelines when they share files.

Residential Computer Policy Academic Environment: The main purpose of the network is to support an academic environment for learning. All other uses are a privilege allowed as long as students do not 53


compromise the academic use of the network. Any activity which hinders the academic use of the network may be restricted or shut down completely at the discretion of the Director of IT. Study Times: During study, laptops are to be used for academic purposes only. Students are reminded that during supervised study they should not be playing games on their computers, watching movies, chatting, logging onto Facebook, SnapChat, Instagram, Twitter or any other social networks, etc. On occasion, Teachers may include the use of social media in their courses. Students should request permission from their Housemaster or duty master if they need to access social media for a class project during study. Extra Computers: Extra computers are not allowed in the residences. Students who bring an extra laptop, desktop, or MacBook computer will be asked to take it home. Housemasters or the Director of IT will confiscate any extra laptop until the first opportunity for a student to take it home. Extra Devices: Smartphones, iPads, Kindles, and other eReaders are all highly encouraged as they can significantly add to a student’s educational experience. The School maintains the discretion to manage the use of these devices while they are on campus in accordance with all Computer and Network Policies. WiFi Access Points: Students are not allowed to bring wireless APs into the residences. Lights Out: After Lights Out, computers are not to be used for any reason and should be secured in the residential laptop lockers of for grade 12 students - turned off. Failure to adhere to these policies may result in the laptop being confiscated after Lights Out. In extreme cases, the student may be made a user only of his laptop for a specified period of time. If a student is caught on any electronic device (e.g., phone, IPad, computer, etc.) after Lights Out the device will be confiscated (at the discretion of the Housemaster) for:

• • • •

1st offence – 7 days 2nd offence – 30 days 3rd offence – 90 days 4th offence – the year

Computer Gaming: Students are permitted to play computer games in their residence rooms after classes and before study from Monday to Thursday. This means that students in all residences are not permitted to use their computers for gaming purposes from Monday through Thursday once supervised study begins. This encourages students to participate in the wealth of activities offered in our residential program after study. On Friday evenings and weekends, students are allowed to play no more than three hours of computer games per day. Any amount of time over three hours is considered unhealthy and Housemasters or advisors may intervene at their discretion. Failure to adhere to these policies may result in the laptop being monitored or confiscated in extreme cases, the student may be made a user only of his laptop for a specified period of time. If a student is found to be gaming excessively (e.g., phone, iPad, computer, etc.) or during study, the item will be confiscated (at the discretion of the Housemaster) for: • •

1st offence – 7 days 2nd offence – 30 days 54


• •

3rd offence – 90 days 4th offence – the year

Hours of Operation: Each house has its network access on a schedule. The network is usually shutoff at lights-out until early the next morning. This is generally from 11:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Screens Visible: During study hours, laptop screens must be positioned facing the door so that a Duty Master can view what students are doing as he/she walks into the room. Wireless Internet Sticks: Students are not allowed to use external Internet providers to connect their laptops to the Internet while in residence or anywhere on campus. USB sticks will be confiscated.

Network Usage Policy Network Policies: Students are using a School-leased computer on a School network. Student laptops are being managed, tracked, and monitored on the network. Students must not interfere in this process. • • •

Students cannot disable Domain Administrator access to the laptop; Students cannot remove the machine from the School’s domain; and, Students cannot disable any computer “services.”

Hot Spots: students are not allowed to setup Hot Spots on campus to circumvent our network, computer, and residential usage policies. Chatting Online, Social Networking, and Online Gaming: Students are expected to be focused on their studies and academic concerns during school hours and study times. In an effort to limit distractions, the School makes an effort to block various online services. Restricted Times 8:00 a.m. to lunch, Monday to Friday After lunch to 3:30 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday Macdonald House 8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday Upper School Houses 8:30 to 10:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday Network Storage: Private network storage space is provided for email and course material. Students will be held accountable for the content of this material. Print Tracking: Print tracking is employed by the IT Department to control printer usage. Generally, students will have enough room on their accounts to fulfil all their academic printing needs. When students abuse this service, their printing will be restricted. Printers, not Copiers: Students should not use school printers as photocopiers. When making less than four copies of a small document fewer than five pages long, a printer can be used. Longer documents should be copied on a photocopier. Students should ask a teacher for assistance with photocopiers.

Internet Usage Policy Community Standards: Do not visit sites which our school’s standards regard as unacceptable. The Internet is largely a communications medium with new forms available 55


monthly. Students must make every effort not to embarrass the School, their parents or themselves in their online conduct. Web Filtering: While on campus, our Internet firewall performs website filtering that restricts the sites students can visit on the World Wide Web. Web filtering is used to restrict student access to pornographic, gambling, hate, racist, weaponry sites, etc. While useful, this software will not block all browsing of offensive material. While off campus, there is no website filtering built into laptops. At their discretion, parents may want to do some form of website filtering at home. Laptop Use at Home: The School recommends that because there is no built-in website filtering while off campus, students do their homework and use their computers in areas with casual supervision. This will be the main family areas of the house including the kitchen, dining room, living room, and family room. There is little or no reason for students to use their computers in their bedrooms. Qustodio: Qustodio is individual computer-based content filtering software installed on all Middle School studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; laptops. For all other students this will be installed on an as-needed basis. Requests for this installation can be made by parents, Advisors, Housemasters, or school directors. Once installed, it can be used to restrict peer-to-peer file sharing, Internet access times, social networking, gaming, online chatting, social media, etc. URL Unblocking Procedure: Students who wish to have a site unblocked for valid educational or recreational reasons must get a Housemaster, Advisor, or faculty member to view the site and, upon approval, send an email request to Network Services stating that they take responsibility for the removal of the site from the blocked list. Bandwidth Management: Firewall technology has been installed to monitor and control the flow of traffic on our Internet connection. This technology ensures the bulk of our Internet traffic is devoted to academic use. It does this by limiting the amount of bandwidth consumed by online gaming and peer-to-peer file sharing. Students should make no effort to circumvent this technology. Internet Connection Termination: If a student is found to be subverting our safeguards and to be using large amounts of bandwidth, their Internet connection can be terminated or restricted without notice. To restore their Internet privileges, students will need to seek out a member of the network services team and explain their conduct. Internal Network Security: A computer firewall sits between our network and the Internet to protect our computers from outside hackers. Students should in no way try to subvert this security or provide others with a means of attacking our network.

Email and Edsby Usage Policy Email and Edsby Account Life: School provided email accounts are made available to students during their career at St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College. Once students leave the School their FirstClass and Edsby accounts are deleted. Students should have a separate outside email account for use in registering for personal online services. Netiquette: Students should obey the rules of net and email etiquette at all times. Failure to do so could result in the restriction of public conference and private email privileges. 56


Cyber Bullying: Online bullying happens and the School is prepared to take steps to deal with it. Do not send abusive messages to anyone. This applies to people in our school, other schools, or anywhere in the world. Any online behaviour that negatively impacts the School community will be investigated by the Administration. Our Domain: Students must be conscious that all communication from the School includes the St. Andrew’s College Internet domain name of sac.on.ca.— thus they are involving the School in all their communication. Conferences and Groups: Be aware that community standards apply to conference, group and class messages as well. Do not let the tone of al conference or group get out of hand. Most conferences and groups are moderatedd by students and teachers. Responsibility: Students are responsible for messages sent using their account, whether or not they wrote the messages. Cheating: Do not use email to obtain copies of other students’ work for the purposes of plagiarism or cheating. Suspensions: If a student’s email is suspended, they are not allowed to use another user’s account. Attachments: Do not send games, hacking utilities, pornography, or any unacceptable material via email (executable, text, sound, image, or video). Large Attachments: Avoid sending large files as this may fill up your and other users’ email storage quotas. Academic & Personal Use Only: Your email account is provided for your academic and private use. You should not use your account for any commercial or illegal activities.

ATHLETICS Athletic Vision, Philosophy and Objectives The Vision of Athletics at SAC has remained much the same for over 100 years. The School’s second Headmaster, Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald, did not want students in the stands; he wanted students on the playing fields! This philosophy remains a central focus of the School’s approach today. There are approximately 650 students and 65 interschool teams, along with numerous intramural options. St. Andrew’s Athletic Program has much to offer. The Philosophy of the Athletic Program supports the Mission of St. Andrew's College: “The Development of the complete man, the well-rounded citizen. The SAC Athletic Program provides students with important life skills whether they play on competitive or intramural teams. Team and Individual sports play a vital role in developing one’s physical, intellectual, social and emotional well-being. The Objective of the St. Andrew’s College Athletic Program is to provide our student athletes with the opportunity to further develop the following: 57


• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sportsmanship Leadership Empathy Humility Cooperation Team play Discipline Commitment Time management Friendship Confidence Integrity Respect Excellence Pride Tolerance Knowledge Skill development School spirit

The main objectives of our coaches are to provide a safe and non-threatening environment for practice and games. Despite our best efforts in this regard, there is a possibility of injury. St. Andrew’s College and its staff will take all reasonable precautions in this regard, including proper practice and game warm up.

Terminology CISAA OFSAA AD

Conference of Independent Schools’ Athletic Association Ontario Federation of Schools Athletic Associations Director of Athletics

Expectations of Athletes There are many different opportunities for athletic participation requiring varying levels of ability. Students active on interschool teams must understand that they are making a commitment to achieve the highest possible academic standard while continuing to participate fully on their sports teams. This requires a conscious effort to effectively manage their time so that all academic work is completed to the best of their ability within the set time constraints. This includes projects, term papers, and tests. This should NOT be done at the expense of the school team. Players are required to commit themselves to all team practices, games, and tournaments. Should a serious problem arise that would affect a student’s participation on his team, consultation with the coach, in advance, is very important. All students capable of playing for a St. Andrew’s team are expected to do so. Our policy concerning the playing of games states that a student may play for both St. Andrew’s College and a community team provided that: • •

the School team is at all times given first priority; and, the student’s academic performance does not suffer.

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Note: Due to the extensive practice, game, and travel schedule, students playing for the 1st Hockey team are not permitted to play for an outside team during the winter sports term. Note: Due to the commitment level required, students playing on the JV Varsity B Hockey team are not permitted to play for a ‘junior’ or midget hockey team (OPHJL, etc.) during the winter sports term. Students who do not work satisfactorily within the limits of their ability because of a poor attitude or lack of effort may be suspended from sports. They will be reinstated at such time as their academic performance and attitude are deemed satisfactory. A student who consistently misses class/classes without legitimate reasons will face disciplinary measures, which may include not being permitted to play for his team that day, or being removed from his co-curricular involvement, game or season. All Upper School students are required to participate in Athletics for a minimum of two of the three terms on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and scheduled Saturdays. Exceptions to this must be approved by the Director of Athletics. Middle School requirements are referenced in the Middle School section of this handbook. All new students in the Upper School are strongly encouraged to play a fall term sport in order to meet new friends and to quickly become immersed in the Andrean community. In addition, grade 9 students are encouraged to participate in athletics all three terms. All students will receive a report card comment regarding their athletic participation in each term. SAC athletes are required to abide by the CISAA Code of Sportsmanship. Athletes must remember that participation on a school team is a privilege, not a right. Playing on a team is contingent on consistent attendance and effort in all subjects, respect for a teacher/coach and peers, as well as demonstrating good sportsmanship and exemplary behaviour. Unsportsmanlike behaviour will not be tolerated nor condoned by the coach, Director of Athletics or Headmaster. This includes criticism of officials, confrontations with other athletes and the use of profanity during practice and games. Athletes who do not represent SAC in a positive manner will not be allowed to continue to participate on school teams.

Eligibility In order to be eligible to participate on an athletic team, an SAC student must: • be eligible under CISAA or OFSAA guidelines (see www.cisaa.ca and www.ofsaa.on.ca);and, • have an academic and attendance record that satisfies the coach, the subject teachers and administration. As a general rule, students should play at their age group; however, based upon the decision of the coaching staff, in consultation with the Director of Athletics, students will be allowed to play above their age group where their talent and ability warrant. These decisions will be based on what the coaching staff and Director of Athletics feel is best for the student athlete and the program, on a case-by-case basis. No student is allowed to play below his age group. Any student may play two games or match(s) at a higher age level without penalty, if required, due to a temporary shortage of players. Any player who plays in more than two games at a higher age level must then remain at that higher age level for the remainder of the season. A student must have competed for SAC in a minimum of 50% of the league games and in a minimum of two regular season games to be eligible to compete in championship play, or as per 59


specific sport playing guidelines, whichever is the greater requirement. A student must compete in only one classification in championship competition and inter-zone play-offs, in the same season in any sport.

Transfer Eligibility If a student is in grade 10 or higher and is new to the School, a transfer eligibility form must be completed, submitted, and approved by the CISAA/ OFSAA Transfer Committee prior to the student competing. The Transfer Eligibility Application Form is sent to all new students in grade 10 or higher with their summer mailing. The student is then required to submit the form to the office of the Director of Athletics during the first week of school. Please contact the AD with any questions.

Age Classification CISAA For teams with age limits, eligibility is based on a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s age as of midnight on December 31 of the current school year. Students are not eligible to play below their age category. The CISAA age categories are Senior (U20), Junior (U16), Midget (U15), U14, U13, U12 and U11. Therefore, if a student wishes to play at the Midget level, he must be 14 years old or younger as of December 31 of the current school year. Not all sports are offered at all age levels. OFSAA The following age categories apply to OFSAA play. Open:

Under 19 as of December 31

Separate Age Divisions: Senior Junior Midget

Under 19 as of December 31 Under 16 as of December 31 Under 15 as of December 31

NOTE: Students may only participate for five consecutive years after the date of entry into grade 9. There may also be additional eligibility requirements listed under each respective sport playing guidelines, which can be accessed on the CISAA and OFSAA websites at www.cisaa.ca and www.ofsaa.on.ca.

Discipline Review Committee/Disqualifications Any ejection or disqualification of a player must be brought to the attention of the Director of Athletics immediately. Any issues involving eligibility or play conduct that cannot be resolved by the coach(s) and the Director of Athletics will be referred to a Discipline Review Committee hearing. A Disqualification Report must be filled out for any athlete who has been ejected from any CISAA/OFSAA competition. Any athlete ejected or disqualified from a competition, tournament or exhibition game may be required to appear before a Discipline Review Committee and face sanctions.

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Uniforms and Equipment For the majority of our school teams, students are issued/loaned a team uniform to be used and returned at the end of each season. Uniforms which are issued/loaned are signed out to each athlete through the Athletic Department, once the team has been finalized and a team list submitted by the coach. Athletes are responsible for their uniform for the duration of the season and are expected to treat them with care. Uniforms are collected by the Athletic Department at the end of the season. The cost of damage or loss will be charged to the athlete. Due to the nature of some sports, students are required to purchase next to skin clothing as well as their own uniform for some teams (e.g., Badminton, Cricket, Cross-Country, Golf, Rugby, Squash, Swimming, Track, Triathlon, and Tennis). Uniforms that are purchased and next to skin uniform items (e.g., socks, under-garments, swim suits etc.), along with other personal equipment, are available through the athletic department or at the Campus Shop. While travelling to and from athletic competitions, students must wear either #1 Dress or the School/team athletic uniform or track suit. Nothing else is acceptable. All students must purchase and have a school track suit. As well, all students enrolled in Health and Physical Education must purchase P.E. t-shirts and shorts and wear them for all P.E. classes. All athletic wear including track suits and P.E. wear are available for purchase at the Campus Shop. Some of the School’s “1st” teams (e.g., soccer, hockey, and lacrosse) may order and wear a sport or climate specific team warm-up suit. In such cases, students will be provided with these items and billed accordingly. For health reasons, each member of a team must have his own water bottle, clearly marked with his name. Water bottles may be purchased from the Campus Shop. Dressing rooms must be kept clean. Students must turn off the showers when they are finished. They must not wear soccer, football or rugby cleats inside any building – except in the halls of the Bedard Athletic Centre.

Managers In special circumstances, some students may fulfill their athletic obligation by taking on the role of team Manager. The coach is given responsibility for selecting a manager if they so choose, as well as designating their responsibilities.

Team Selection, Practices, and Schedules Coaches will hold tryouts for all school teams during the following general time periods: • • •

Fall Term Winter Term Spring Term

during the first two weeks of September during the first three weeks of November during the last week of March and the first two weeks of April

Note: Tryouts for 1st teams may be held earlier each term and will be announced/posted. Students should check the email ‘News’ conferences and Edsby for specific dates and times. Coaches will select teams as appropriate in consultation with the AD and inform students as to who is selected. Coaches will endeavour to speak personally with any students who are not selected to their team. Coaches’ decisions on which boys are selected to a team are final. Students and their parents are expected to accept such decisions. 61


Students and parents will be provided with a schedule of practices and games as far ahead as possible in order to accommodate their work/study schedules. Game and practice schedules are posted on Edsby. A schedule of games will also be posted on the SAC website at www.sac.on.ca/page/athletics. The website schedule of games and results will be updated daily during playing season. Every Thursday has been designated as a non-sports day at SAC. This means that, with few exceptions, no practices or games will be held on Thursdays. This day is reserved for Arts and other non-sports activities. All players are expected to attend all practices and games, and must be in appropriate SAC athletic attire (see Uniforms). Coaches are encouraged to keep attendance records of athletes at practices. Students must abide by the posted rules of the gym. If an athlete is unable to attend a practice or game, he should notify the coach as early as possible so adjustments can be made. Students are reminded that no equipment can be given out until the coach is present, and that spectators are not encouraged at practices.

Transportation All buses and school vans load at the main entrance to the School (Reception). Hockey teams are generally picked up and dropped off at the La Brier Family Arena. Travel times are listed on the weekly sports spreadsheet, which is posted to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Newsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; conference as well as on Edsby. Students are encouraged to bring homework with them on long bus trips. Students are not permitted to use their own vehicles when a bus is provided, unless they have special permission from their parents and coach. The School does not insure these vehicles; therefore, they are used at the risk of the student and his parents. Passengers of students must also have parental permission. Use of private vehicles is strongly discouraged as it makes supervision difficult for the coaches.

Early Dismissal As a rule, students are dismissed from class 15 minutes before the bus departure time. Students must go to their respective classes even if it is only for 10 or 15 minutes. Students should be aware that playing on a school team is something they do in addition to their academic studies and are urged to see teachers before an absence to get the work they will be missing. Students are responsible for informing their teachers if they will miss any evaluations, and must make arrangements to do such evaluations prior to their absence or immediately following, at the discretion of the teacher.

Additional Fees Students may be required to pay additional fees for some teams or events. Players will incur a yearly fee for equipment rental, maintenance and repair, and/or ice time costs for the following sports - curling, football, fencing, hockey, and lacrosse. Skiing (equipment rental, lift or trail fees), triathlon (bike rental and entry fees) and golf (greens fees) are also sports that will incur additional fees. All sports may incur fees for events that are beyond the scope of the regular season. In the case of tournaments, exhibition games or tours, additional fees may be a result of hotel, transportation, tournament, entry fee, and/or food costs. In such cases, the costs will be paid for by the students who take part in the trip.

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Fitness Centre Located in the La Brier Family Arena, the Fitness Centre is equipped with a wide variety of weight training equipment, treadmills, and exercise bicycles. Hours of operation are posted online. The Fitness Centre is supervised by our Strength and Conditioning Coach or equivalent, in scheduled sessions, before study. Students are not permitted to use the Fitness Centre unless there is a faculty member supervising.

Health Care and Athletic Therapy The SAC Athletic Injuries Clinic is located on the main floor of the Bedard Athletic Centre. Students participating in SAC athletics are able to access pre-game taping and athletic therapy services while at St. Andrew's. Students who are injured in SAC games or practices will be assessed and treated. If the student requires post-injury care, he is required to see the School doctor or his family doctor to determine if a referral for athletic therapy is appropriate. In all cases, every attempt will be made to inform parents of the need for follow-up care. Students are not required to use the services of SAC’s athletic therapy staff and are welcome to seek followup care elsewhere. Any injuries that were not reported/treated during competition should be assessed by the School medical staff immediately following home games or upon return to the campus in the case of away games. In the case of serious injury the School Health Centre must be notified immediately. Generally, when an injury occurs at an away event, the hosting school will be able to provide adequate health care.

Code of Sportsmanship The Conference of Independent Schools' Athletic Association (CISAA) is the governing body of sport for school teams. A Code of Sportsmanship states that the following code will be upheld by all players and spectators: • • • • • • • •

The rules of any game must be regarded as mutual agreements, the spirit or letter of which no one should try to evade or break. No advantages are to be sought over others, except the advantage of superior skill. Officials and opponents must be regarded and treated as honest in intention. Decisions of officials, no matter how unfair they may seem, must be accepted absolutely by players and coaches. Visiting teams and spectators are honoured guests and should be treated as such. They should also behave as such. To win is always desirable, but to win at any cost utterly defeats the purpose of the game. Every team must learn that losing can be a triumph when their best has been given. Coaches, players or spectators who do not fully support this code have no place in our representative matches.

Code of Behaviour for Student and Parent Spectators Athletic events are tests of skill, fitness, teamwork, and training. They provide challenging encounters for athletes and exciting entertainment for fans. Being a spectator at school events is a privilege, not a right, which may be withdrawn for inappropriate behaviour.

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Spectators are expected to: • Treat the premises, students, staff, players of the participating schools, and the officials, with respect and courtesy. • Abide by the decisions of the officials, whether or not they are in favour of your team. • Respond politely to the requests of the officials. • Remain in the areas designated for spectators and leave the playing surface clear at all times. • Be polite and courteous and use only appropriate language. • Refrain from behaviour that might distract the athletes or interfere with the progress of the game. • Applaud good plays and never make derogatory remarks about the officials, players or coaches of the opposing teams. Good athletes compete fiercely to the best of their ability and limits of their training. Good spectators respect the commitment of the athletes enough to cheer every good play and appreciate the effort, time, and dedication by members of both competing teams.

Sports Offered The following is a list of the sports likely to be offered each term: (IS) refers to interschool competitive teams, (Rec) refers to Upper School recreational programs, and (MS) refers to Middle School intramurals. Fall Football (IS) Soccer (IS) Volleyball (IS) Cross-Country (IS) FitnessTraining (Rec) Racquets 4 (Rec) Swimming (Rec) 3-on-3 Basketball (Rec) Multi-sport (MS)

Winter Hockey (IS) Basketball (IS) Swimming (IS) Alpine Skiing (IS) Nordic Skiing (IS) Squash (IS) Curling (IS) Fencing (IS) FitnessTraining (Rec) Table Tennis (Rec) Multi-sport (MS)

Spring Rugby (IS) Track & Field (IS) Badminton (IS) Tennis (IS) Lacrosse (IS) Baseball (IS) Golf (IS) Slow Pitch (IS) Cricket (IS) Triathlon (IS) Fitness Training (Rec) Squash (Rec) 3 on 3 Basketball (MS) Table Tennis (Rec)

Andrean Wellness Program Through its most recent strategic planning process, the Andrean Wellness program (AWP) at SAC has emerged. The full development of the Andrean Wellness program supports Holistic Wellness by providing the larger student, faculty and staff populations with multiple avenues of exploration in fitness, wellness, and mindfulness that will complement and augment community members passions and interests, short term and long term. The AWP integrates approaches for relief of anxiety, stress management, and crisis into greater opportunities for mindfulness and exercise as an outlet.

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SCHOOL PRINCIPLES & POLICES The following principles are the basic foundations upon which we make choices in our daily lives at St. Andrew’s College. All members of the community are expected to live up to high standards of behaviour in the areas of personal integrity, as outlined in the Code of Honour, and of respect for others and for community standards, as outlined in the Code of Conduct. A serious violation of either of these basic principles is grounds for dismissal.

Code of Honour – Honesty, Integrity, Respect In all our actions at SAC, we encourage students toward a life governed by the values of personal integrity. All members of the Andrean community must pledge to uphold our Code of Honour: • • •

Personal Honesty and Truthfulness Academic Integrity Respect for Others and the Property of Others

Violations of the Code of Honour may be reviewed by the Discipline Committee. St. Andrew’s College maintains the right to expel a student where the continued attendance of that student would not be in the best interests of the student or the School. The School also maintains the right to expel a student where his behaviour seriously jeopardizes the ability of the School to guarantee the dignity or safety of its students, or interferes with learning. Discretion rests with the School in all matters.

Code of Conduct – Rights and Responsibilities A Code of Conduct defines the expected conduct for students, staff, and parents so that all who share in the School environment can do so in safety and with the confidence that they will be treated as valued individuals. This Code of Conduct is intended to benefit parents, students, and staff members. It is essential that parents know what behaviour the School expects so that this behaviour can be reinforced at home. Students need to understand the Code of Conduct as it establishes the ground rules for their daily interaction with other students and with staff members. Students have the Right: • to be treated fairly, consistently, and with respect by the students and the staff of our School; • to be safe from verbal and physical abuse, or actions and behaviours which are detrimental to the positive learning environment at our School; • to expect that their property will be respected; • to expect a positive learning environment in which their feelings and opinions will be respected; and • to expect that others in the School will exercise self-control. Students have the Responsibility: • to treat others with compassion and with respect, accepting different points of view, different heritages, and different racial or national origins as valuable and adding to the richness of the School environment; 65


• • • •

to accept the authority of the staff of the School; to refrain from verbal and/or physical abuse of others in our School; to respect the property of the School and others within our School; to contribute to a positive learning atmosphere in their classes and to respect the feelings and opinions of others in our School; and • to exercise self-control in our School and on its grounds. The School will employ a range of consequences and strategies in response to discipline problems. Sensitivity and mutual respect are basic values of the St. Andrew’s College community. Specifically, SAC prohibits, in all its programs, discrimination against or harassment of any individual or group based upon factors such as age, gender, race, colour, sexual orientation, national origin or religion.

Mutual Respect Policy – Discrimination, Harassment and Confidentiality St. Andrew’s College recognizes that to achieve its vision, the environment it provides must be one which demonstrates respect, dignity, equity, and safety for all members of the St. Andrew’s College community. St. Andrew’s College promotes responsibility, respect, civility, and academic excellence in a safe learning and teaching environment. To access the complete policy please click here.

School Rules – Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, Nicotine Products, Vaporizers, ECigarettes, AWOL, Unsafe practices, Theft School rules arise out of the need to maintain the health, safety, and legal responsibilities of the members of the St. Andrew's College community. These basic expectations must be present in our lives in order to ensure the proper environment for study and healthy social interaction. It is a privilege to be part of this School and we expect all students to observe the basic rules for maintaining order and decorum while they are enrolled. We hope that such adherence to the rules of citizenship at SAC will encourage good citizenship throughout their lives. Violations of any of the following major School rules are typically adjudicated by the Discipline Committee. Drug Policy (Purchase, Possession, Distribution, or Use of Illicit* or Controlled Drugs or Drug Paraphernalia) It is the position of SAC that drug use by students has no place in the School community. The School aspires to be a drug-free community in this regard. The use of illicit or controlled drugs, or abuse of prescription drugs by students in connection with life at SAC is inconsistent with the goals and objectives of the School; can place students, faculty, and the School at risk; and, is illegal. Any purchase, possession, distribution, use of or being under the influence of illicit or controlled or prescription drugs, or drug paraphernalia, or abuse of any other chemical substance is prohibited by the School and may result in suspension or in expulsion. If there is reason to believe that a student has violated the Drug Policy, he will be tested. *Illicit drugs include any or all drugs that are illegal in Ontario and Canada. ‘Controlled drugs’ are substances whose manufacture, possession, or use is regulated by a government (this includes, but is not limited to, cannabis and alcohol). 66


Note: Drug testing can aid us in both disciplinary and counselling situations. In a disciplinary confrontation, a test can confirm or deny suspicions of drug or alcohol use. When a student is put on an “Abstinence Contract” and is subjected to random testing, an administrative response has been made to assist the student in preventing further drug or alcohol use. The contract is viewed as a counselling tool to support the student’s general health and safety, as well as to help the student live within the rules of the School. It is important to note that voluntary self-referral to the Health Centre will result in medical support. Any attempt to circumvent the drug testing process will result in expulsion. Scope of Prohibition Regarding Drugs The foregoing prohibition of drugs in relation to students and student life includes the following: 1. Requirements of Students on the St. Andrew’s College Campus: The purchase, possession, distribution, use of or being under the influence of illicit, controlled, or prescription drugs, or drug paraphernalia, or abuse of any other chemical substance is strictly prohibited at all times while anywhere on the College campus. 2. Requirements of Students off the St. Andrew’s College Campus: The purchase, possession, distribution, use of or being under the influence of illicit, controlled, or prescription drugs, or drug paraphernalia, or abuse of any other chemical substance is strictly prohibited in connection with all SAC-sponsored or SAC-related activities, regardless of whether these occur on SAC premises or other premises. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, this prohibition includes the following: all social functions, dances, sports events, field trips, Complete Weekend, School-sponsored travel, conferences, student competitions, etc. Alcohol Policy (Prohibition of Possession, Consumption, Distribution, and Under the Influence) It is the position of SAC that alcohol use by students has no place in the School community. The use of alcohol by students in connection with life at SAC is inconsistent with the goals and objectives of the School; can place students, faculty, and the School at risk; and, can be illegal. If there is reason to believe that a student has violated the Alcohol Policy, he will be tested. Scope of Prohibition Regarding Alcohol The foregoing prohibition of alcohol in relation to students and student life includes the following: 1. Requirements of Students on the St. Andrew’s College Campus: The possession, consumption, distribution, use of or being under the influence of alcohol is strictly prohibited at all times while anywhere on the College campus. 2. Requirements of Students off the St. Andrew’s College Campus: The possession, consumption, distribution, use of or being under the influence of alcohol is strictly prohibited in connection with all SAC-sponsored or SAC-related activities, regardless of whether these occur on SAC premises or other premises. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, this prohibition includes the following: all social functions, dances, sports events, field trips, Complete Weekend, School-sponsored travel, conferences, student competitions, etc.

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In summary, this prohibition includes any and all School-related or School-sponsored activities, regardless of their location or venue.

Tobacco, Nicotine Products, Vaporizer and E-Cigarette Policy (Purchase, Possession, Distribution, or Use of Tobacco, Nicotine Products, Vaporizers, ECigarettes or Vaping Paraphernalia) It is the position of SAC that tobacco, nicotine products, vaporizer, or e-cigarette use by students has no place in the School community. St. Andrew’s College complies fully with the Smoke Free Ontario Act. Research has demonstrated the serious health hazards of tobacco, vaporizer, and e-cigarette use, particularly during adolescence. The policy for dealing with such use is meant to demonstrate a standard of ‘excellence of care’ for the students, their family, and all representatives of St. Andrew’s College. It is intended to set guidelines that initiate a caring response while emphasizing the responsibility students must take for their own action(s). Scope of Prohibition Regarding Tobacco, Nicotine Products, Vaporizers, and ECigarettes The foregoing prohibition of tobacco, nicotine products, vaporizer, and e-cigarettes in relation to students and student life includes the following: 1. Requirements of Students on the St. Andrew’s College Campus: The purchase, possession, distribution, or use of tobacco, nicotine products, vaporizers, ecigarettes, or smoking/vaping paraphernalia is strictly prohibited at all times anywhere on the College campus. 2. Requirements of Students off the St. Andrew’s College Campus: The purchase, possession, distribution, or use of tobacco, nicotine products , vaporizers, ecigarettes, or smoking/vaping paraphernalia is strictly prohibited in connection with all SACsponsored or SAC-related activities, regardless of whether these occur on SAC premises or other premises. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, this prohibition includes the following: all social functions, dances, sports events, field trips,Complete Weekend trips, School-sponsored travel, conferences, student competitions, etc. In summary, this prohibition includes any and all school-related or school-sponsored activities, regardless of their location or venue. Note: It is the position of SAC that because vaporizers can be used to consume cannabisrelated products, students who are determined to have been using a vaporizer will be subject to drug testing and be required to adhere to an “Abstinence Contract.” As well, given the dangers of fire and explosion from vaporizers and e-cigarettes, the use of such devices within school buildings is in violation of our Fire Hazard Police and deemed to fall under the category of “Unsafe Practices” as “Reckless Endangerment,” and may result in expulsion. AWOL - Absence from Campus Without Permission and Curfew Violations The traditional military term AWOL stands for Absence Without Leave and refers to being off campus without permission. Students are liable to suspension if they leave campus without authorization and, in doing so, place themselves at risk and/or cause the adults in the community to go to some lengths to locate and secure them. 68


Boarding students: It is critical that all boarding students obtain permission (as per House policy) from their Housemasters when leaving campus at any time. All boarding students must ensure that their Housemaster is aware of their whereabouts at all times when off campus and that they have provided accurate and truthful contact information. Violation of the respective boarding house curfew by more than one hour is a serious breach of a major School Rule as is misrepresenting weekend or leave plans. Day students: Require communication from their parents (i.e., note/email/phone), which they will present to Reception before signing out to leave school if they are missing classes. Day students must also sign out with Reception if leaving campus during the academic day, during spares or lunch. Day students may not be in a residence after 11 p.m. without prior permission from the Housemaster concerned. Unsafe Practices or Possessions The School values the health and well-being of our students, thus they are forbidden to place themselves or others at risk by their actions or their possessions. The following are examples of guidelines concerning personal and community safety: Fires: A student may not light a fire on the campus without specific permission. Lighting a flame in or on a school building is prohibited, as is any evidence of fire violations in a student room, such as burned matches, candles, etc. This includes smoking or using a vaporizer e-cigarette within school buildings. Intentionally setting and/or lighting a fire on campus without permission is grounds for expulsion. Fireworks: Use or possession of fireworks on campus is forbidden. Weapons: Use or possession of ammunition, guns or knives is forbidden. “Airsoft” or compressed air powered guns, BB/pellet guns, paint marker guns, sling-shots, or other such items are also forbidden since they might constitute a danger to others. Weapons as Props: Toy guns and other toy weapons are forbidden for use in skits, class videos, and dramatic productions unless authorized by a member of staff. Keys: Unauthorized use or possession of any St. Andrew’s keys, other than keys which have been officially issued to the student, is forbidden. Reckless Endangerment: Students may not engage in dangerous pranks or other activities that pose threats to personal safety. Reckless or Careless Driving: Students must refrain from driving carelessly or recklessly on campus, such as exceeding the posted speed limit; driving on grassed areas; driving in a manner that poses a threat to the personal safety of others, etc. Theft All students, and particularly those in a residential setting, must respect the property rights of other members of the community. Any person who takes or “borrows” another’s property without permission is in violation of the Honour Code. Outside Authorities 69


Use of drugs and alcohol, unsafe practices and theft may be in violation of provincial and/or federal law. Where such incidents occur, the matter may be subject to police investigation and prosecution.

Community Standards and Expectations – Responsibilities, Essential Behaviours, Attendance, Mobile/Smart Phones, Community Relations, Damage and Vandalism, Dress Code, Environment, Cole Hall, Gum, Meals, Quadrangle Responsibility for Meeting Community Standards Student Responsibility: All student members of the SAC community are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the terms of these policies. Any conduct that deviates from the requirements of these policies will result in appropriate corrective action, up to and including expulsion. Parent Responsibility: It is an expectation that parents will work cooperatively with the School, by demonstrating agreement with and support of, the School’s rules and regulations. It is the responsibility of the student and his parents to inform the School about planned absences. The School must also be informed by parents or guardians as soon as possible of absences that result from unforeseen circumstances. St. Andrew’s College believes that a constructive and positive working relationship between the College, the student, and the parent(s) or guardian(s) is essential to the fulfilment of the College’s mission. Therefore, the College reserves the right to discontinue enrolment or refuse to re-enrol any student if the College concludes that the actions of the student and/or the parent(s) or guardian(s) interferes with the constructive and positive relationship or with the College’s ability to accomplish its educational goals. Faculty/Staff Responsibility: The administration and faculty are committed to upholding the requirements of these policies in connection with all SAC activities or SAC-related or sponsored activities regardless of location. Essential Behaviours for SAC Students Essential Behaviours: Deportment Students are expected to uphold the values inherent in the School’s motto: “Quit ye like men, be strong.” Students are responsible for: 1. Attending class in proper dress. 2. Being cleanly shaven at the start of each academic day. 3. Arriving to class in a punctual manner with the necessary supplies. 4. Showing respect for school property. 5. Attending all assemblies and mandatory school functions. 6. Behaving well on all school trips. All buses are to be left clean at the end of a trip. Essential Behaviours: Academic Integrity Students are to demonstrate the highest level of integrity in all their academic pursuits. Students are responsible for: 70


1. Ensuring that all personal gear will be stowed away from the area where the test/quiz is taking place. 2. Ensuring that all their work is their own; outside sources must be properly referenced. 3. Ensuring that their work cannot be viewed by another student during a test or quiz; students must not share assignments with one another. 4. Submitting assignments to turnitin.com as per their teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s instructions. Essential Behaviours: IT (Information Technology) St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College integrates wireless computer tablet technology into its academic curriculum to prepare students for productive work, rewarding opportunities, challenging experiences, and meaningful relationships in the technology driven 21st century. Faculty members are responsible for encouraging positive computer usage, monitoring that usage, challenging deficiencies and reporting persistent transgressions to the Help Desk. Students will receive a computer strike when a teacher reports an incident to the Help Desk. Students are responsible for: 1. Carrying their laptops in a school-issued tablet carrying case/backpack. 2. Ensuring tablets are in good physical condition. 3. Removing any stickers on their laptops. 4. Ensuring that their desktop background does not offend community standards; i.e., no promotion of drug or alcohol use, no objectification of women, etc. 5. Using their computers for academic purposes while in class and study. Unless required by the teacher, students should not be using their computers to game, chat, video, email, social network, etc. during the academic day. 6. Using tablets in appropriate spaces; i.e., not lying on the floor in a hallway. 7. Being in possession of their tablet at all times. 8. Using proper email etiquette in communicating to faculty and on class conferences. Emails need to be titled, spellchecked, polite, etc. Essential Behaviours: Cell Phones Cell phones are to be turned off and kept out of sight in Memorial Chapel, Towers Library, the Rogers Hall Resource Room, Cole Hall, all classrooms, washrooms, and change rooms. Cell phones may not be used during study or after lights out. Teachers have been asked to collect cell phones at the start of every class to ensure that learning is always the priority. Cell phones may be used in classrooms at specific times when approved by the teacher as a tool for use in the lesson. Attendance Policy Good attendance is vital to the learning process and is an essential component of every course and activity. Students are expected to attend all classes, advisory sessions, and activities regularly and punctually. It is the responsibility of the student and his family to inform the School about planned absences. The School must also be informed by parents or guardians as soon as possible of absences that result from unforeseen circumstances. Parents or guardians of day students must telephone or email (attendance@sac.on.ca) the School and inform the Receptionist of absences. Parents or guardians of boarding students must inform their Housemasters of any absences. Boarding students, while on campus, must go to see a staff member of our Health & Wellness Centre, prior to any period, if they are too ill to attend. 71


Students who know that they will be absent from School for a reason approved by their parent(s)/guardian and the School, should see their teachers in advance of the absence to make arrangements regarding missed assignments and tests. Students must check teacher daybooks for details of the material covered in missed classes. A student who misses a class or activity without a valid reason will be counted as an "unexplained absence." The consequences for unexplained absences are outlined in the Consequences Related to Community Standards section on page 79. If a teacher is late or is absent, or for any reason unable to attend a scheduled class, students are expected to remain in the classroom and work quietly at their desks unless otherwise directed. If no relief teacher arrives after ten minutes, a member of the class should report the situation to Mrs. Rebecca Williams in the Middle School and Ms. Barb Cain in the Upper School. Assembly Attendance Our Academic and Athletic Assemblies bring the entire school together to celebrate and honour accomplishments by members of our community. As a result of their importance, an unexplained absence from these assemblies will result in a student being required to serve a Tier 1 gating. Chapel Attendance Chapel attendance is compulsory and absence will result in the assignment of an â&#x20AC;&#x153;unexplained absenceâ&#x20AC;? (UA). Compulsory Attendance In addition to regular attendance for classes and co-curricular activities, attendance is compulsory at the following events: Homecoming Andrean Christmas Friday Evening MacPherson Tournament Game Cadet Church Parade Headmasterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cadet Parade Cadet Inspection Prize Day (Middle School and Grade 12) Unauthorized early leave before breaks or extended leave after breaks is not permitted. The School has given considerable attention to planning breaks that accommodate the needs of families, even taking into account boys who are travelling great distances to be at the School. Parents are discouraged from taking their sons out of School for holidays, as holiday times are already generous. Punctuality and Preparedness Arriving for classes and other School activities prepared and on time shows a positive commitment to learning. Students must be punctual. Students are expected to bring the necessary materials/equipment to every class or activity. Day boys who arrive late for School must sign in with the Receptionist in Rogers Hall. 72


Cell Phone Policy Cell phones may be used on campus with the following exceptions: Cell phones will not be used and/or accessed in Memorial Chapel, The Donald Davis Theatre, Towers Library, Cole Hall, Ketchum Auditorium, Wirth Theatre, all classrooms, washrooms, and change rooms. Cell phones may not be used during study or after lights out. Use of a cell phone in one of these cell-phone-free areas will result in the phone being confiscated until such a time as a conversation around appropriate use is able to be facilitated by a school administrator. The use of a cell phone on campus is a privilege and frequent violations of the policy will result in a loss of said privilege. Cell phones must never be used to photograph or videotape members of faculty/staff or other students unless permission is granted by the subject individual. Cell phones may be used in classrooms at specific times when approved by the teacher as a tool for use in the lesson. Community Relations Policy St. Andrew's College is a part of the larger community of Aurora/Newmarket. Just as students have neighbours at home, they also have neighbours on campus. The School has an expectation that students will respect the rights and property of its neighbours. Noise, litter, and disruptive or destructive behaviour have an impact on how neighbours view the School. Common sense and consideration are expected. Damage and Vandalism Policy Any student found responsible for incidents of damage or abuse of School property or the property of others will be subject to payment of the cost of repairs and/or restitution. If the damage is determined to be wilful, the matter will be referred to the Discipline Committee for disciplinary action. Dress Code Policy St. Andrew's College has a clear and well-defined Dress Code. The School expects that a student will be in a neat and clean state of dress at all times; that clothing is to be in good repair, and appropriate to the activity or occasion. • • • • • •

Hair must be off the collar and extremes in hairstyles and colour are not permitted. Hair must be neatly groomed. Hats are not to be worn as part of #1 or #2 Dress, or inside any buildings. Beards, moustaches, and sideburns below the earlobe are not permitted. Boys with whiskers are expected to shave daily. Earrings or other body piercings; i.e., eyebrows, are not permitted during the academic day, on School-related trips, or during athletic activities. Earrings must be removed, not just covered, during the academic day.

The Dress Code is considered to be in effect from the beginning of classes in the morning to the completion of classes at the end of the academic day. A free period is not considered to be an 73


adequate reason for not meeting the requirements of the Dress Code. #1 or #2 Dress shall be worn during these times. Boarding or day students dressed inappropriately will be sent to their rooms or the Campus Shop respectfully in order to change into, or purchase, the appropriate dress clothing. #1 Dress • Navy blue blazer with School crest. • Grey flannel dress trousers or Gordon tartan kilt. • Black polished dress shoes that one would wear to a formal occasion - boots are not permitted. • White dress shirt. • Black belt. • One of the following four SAC school ties must be worn: SAC, Headmaster’s, Scholar's, or Prefect. • SAC pullover: this is optional, depending on the weather, and is the only sweater that may be worn with #1 Dress. • Plain dark dress socks that cover the ankle. #2 Dress • Sports jacket with conservative pattern, school blazer, or suit jacket. • Dress pants or kilt. Jeans, work pants, khakis, and cargo pants, and anything which will not take a crease are not permitted. • Dress shoes in good repair (not athletic footwear, boots, hiking shoes or sandals). Dress shirt—white, solid colours, fine stripes or fine patterns are permitted. • Belt. • Any SAC school tie. • SAC pullover: this is optional, depending on the weather and is the only sweater which may be worn with #2 Dress. • Dress socks that cover the ankle. Athletic socks are not permitted with #2 Dress. • Pants are to have a tailored pant leg, to be of an appropriate length, and are to be worn around the waist, as in business attire. #3 Dress/Warm Weather Dress • Warm weather dress begins the Monday after Cadet Inspection. The dress shirt is replaced by a white or red student SAC golf shirt, along with proper dress pants. SAC golf shirts may be purchased at the Campus Shop. • Dress socks that cover the ankle with proper dress shoes in good repair. • Number 3 Dress is a privilege. Any student who consistently abuses the dress code may be returned to first or second dress. Casual Dress • Shirts with sleeves (no tank tops), pants, socks, shoes or running shoes, sweater or windbreaker or School jacket. Jeans, corduroys, work pants, and sandals may be worn as part of Casual Dress as long as they are clean and in good repair. Clean, respectable shorts may be worn as part of Casual Dress in Cole Hall. Appropriate Dress a) Cole Hall – unless otherwise stated: • Breakfast: #1, #2 minus jacket and tie, or Casual dress with the exceptions as noted above. • Lunch: #1, #2 Monday through Friday 74


Dinner: Casual dress is permitted with the exceptions noted above. Students who arrive for dinner after 6:15 p.m. and are coming from a sports commitment are expected to wear a clean shirt and sweat pants. b) Formal Occasions as announced (includes travelling with School teams): #1 Dress or Kilted #1 Dress. c) Travelling to Athletic Competitions – On any School trip, students must wear either #1 Dress or the School/Team uniform or tracksuit. Number 3 Dress is acceptable during warm weather dress periods. Nothing else is acceptable. Other Dress Concerns Clothing should be clean and in good repair, and shoes should be in good repair and polished. a) When a tie is worn, the shirt collar must be buttoned and the tie pulled up. Students must only wear ties for which they are eligible. b) Sports clothing must be neat and clean. Only School P.E. dress is to be worn for physical education classes. c) No caps, hats or toques of any description are to be worn in a school building at any time during the school day, with the exception of Casual Dress days. d) If a T-shirt is worn under a dress shirt with #1 or #2 Dress, or warm weather dress, its logo should not be visible through the dress shirt. Environmental Stewardship Policy SAC Environmental Creed: We believe that all Andreans should cultivate ecological citizenship, and thereby inspire positive environmental change for sustainable living within our school community and beyond. We ALL want to work toward reducing the School's eco-footprint. Therefore, all Andreans are expected to respect the environment and demonstrate their commitment to environmental stewardship with the following essential behaviours: • to recycle responsibly and use recycling and garbage bins correctly; • to reduce food waste and use the compost/recycling centre in Cole Hall correctly; • to help the School conserve energy by turning off lights and projectors when leaving the classrooms; • to turn off leaky taps and not run water for long periods of time; • to save paper by printing only when necessary; • to respect the environment and not litter anywhere on campus; • to respect the College's water-bottle-free status and use only refillable water bottles. Parents are asked to respect the School’s Idle-Free Zones and turn off car engines while waiting to pick up students. Parents are also asked to consider car-pooling as an option for their son and his friends. Cole Hall Policy •

Members of the kitchen staff are to be treated with courtesy and respect. If you have a concern about anything involving Cole Hall, speak to Mrs. D’Angelo, Mr. Paluch, Mr. Shrimpton, Mrs. Wyvill, or a school Prefect.

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• • • • •

Students are not to remove any food, cutlery or dishes from Cole Hall at any time without permission. Boarders should equip themselves with their own cutlery and a cup for use in the house. Everything taken to dining room tables must be removed, tables cleaned, chairs pushed in, plates scraped, and placed in the appropriate bins. Any mess caused by a student must be cleaned up. Tilting back the chairs results in damage to the chairs. For a formal sit-down meal, no item on any table is to be touched until each person is seated following the saying of the School’s Latin grace Cell phone usage is prohibited in Cole Dining Hall at all times.

Gum Policy Students are not allowed to chew gum in any part of the School, on the synthetic turf field, track or outdoor courts. Students are also not to chew gum during any athletic practice or competition. Meal Policy Attendance at all meals is expected for boarding students. Meal times are listed in the Daily Routine Section. Dress for meals is covered in the Dress Code section. Quadrangle The Quadrangle is the area of grass bordered by the Upper School Residences, Dunlap Hall and the Chapel. Students should walk around the Quad rather than cutting across the grass. At certain times of the year, students will be asked to keep off the Quadrangle in preparation for key school events.

DISCIPLINE PROCESS & CONSEQUENCES SAC Philosophy of Discipline • • • •

The purpose of discipline is to help students modify unacceptable behaviour and to maintain our School’s positive learning atmosphere. The School will encourage students to develop self-discipline. Each student will be treated as an individual and the unique aspects of each situation will be considered within the overall framework of consequences and consistency of expectations, as outlined in the Code of Conduct. Rights and responsibilities always complement each other.

Mutual Respect – Process and Consequences What can you do? If you are a victim, know someone who is a victim or see behaviour which you feel may be discriminatory or harassing: • if it is safe to do so, tell the person to stop;

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write down what happened; include names, how often it has happened, time, date, location, any witnesses, names of anyone else you have told, and if you know of anyone else who may have experienced similar conduct; and if you are a student, speak to a St. Andrew’s College Facilitator to determine the appropriate next step.

If you are unsure if what you witnessed and/or experienced is considered to be discrimination, harassment, violence, bullying or abuse, or if you are not comfortable telling the person to stop, speak to a St. Andrew’s College Facilitator. All reports are taken very seriously and will be handled in a timely and respectful way for everyone involved. If for any reason, you do not wish to go to a designated St. Andrew’s College Facilitator, please report the incident to an adult you trust, either at home or at the School. You may also file a complaint directly with the Ontario Human Rights Commission. Students have access to the following trained Facilitators: Faculty Facilitators for Mutual Respect Complaints Middle School Upper School

Mr. Scott Lewis Mr. Claudio Numa, and Mr. Michael Carroll

The Role of a St. Andrew’s College Facilitator A Facilitator will: • explain the options available to you; • provide support and help you talk with the person involved, if you wish to do so; • arrange for a mediated discussion to resolve the issue; • help you make a formal complaint; • provide access to counselling and/or other support as needed; and • advise students of their right to inform parent(s)/guardian, legal counsel, and/or the Ontario Human Rights Commission. What happens when you talk to a Facilitator? The Facilitator will listen to your concerns to determine with you what the appropriate next steps should be. Where necessary, steps can be taken to ensure the safety and protection of yourself and others. You may decide you wish to talk to the individual(s) involved on your own; or if all parties agree, the Facilitator can arrange to mediate a discussion with you and the individual(s) involved, in order to find a reasonable resolution. The Facilitator is responsible for keeping confidential documentation of discussions held, and of any agreements made. Should informal resolution not be possible, you can make a formal complaint through the Facilitator. In cases of alleged harassment or discrimination between an employee and student, a formal investigation will be undertaken. What happens with a formal harassment/discrimination complaint? Upon the filing of a written complaint with a Facilitator, a formal investigation will be undertaken. • The complaint will be discussed with the respondent. • The respondent will have the opportunity to provide a response, which will be provided to the complainant. 77


• • •

At least two investigators will be assigned to review the facts, conduct interviews, and other appropriate means of investigation. The complainant, respondent, and witnesses may each have a support person of their choosing (who is not involved in the complaint or investigation) present during any interviews. Results of the investigation, including recommendations, will be documented and a copy will be provided to all parties involved. Facilitators have the option of consulting with a member of the Mutual Respect team during the investigation. The Headmaster or his designate will prepare a written decision outlining the findings and disciplinary or other actions to be taken.

Consequences of Mutual Respect Violations The intent of discipline is to teach and to guide. Consequences will vary according to the individual and the circumstances. Consequences may include, but are not limited to: • formal warning and communication with parents; • removal from a school activity or program; • removal from classes for a period of time; • formal suspension from school for one or more days; and/or • expulsion from school. In these instances, conditions to return to school will be discussed with parents and students in accordance with School policy. Timelines All complaints must be reported within six months of the most recent alleged harassing behaviour. Permission to proceed with an issue outside this timeline may be obtained in consultation with the Headmaster. Frivolous or Vexatious Complaints St. Andrew’s College does not condone frivolous or vexatious complaints. If it is determined as a result of an investigation that a complaint was made maliciously with intent to harm or made in bad faith, formal disciplinary action will be taken against the complainant. Confidentiality and Notification of Parents for Mutual Respect Policy Violations Facilitators will, at the informal stage, treat information in confidence. Please see the SAC Policy on Confidentiality. At the mediated discussion stage, both parties to the complaint are aware of the information. Information is confidential subject to the School’s need to protect parties involved and to ensure a full and thorough investigation. Where the School deems it appropriate, parent(s) of students will be notified as soon as possible via email. At the formal investigation stage, individuals, other than the parties involved, may need to be interviewed. Again, information is confidential subject to the School’s need to protect parties involved and ensure a full and thorough investigation. Parent(s) of students involved as subjects of the investigation will be notified as soon as possible and prior to the completion of the investigation. Such notification will occur via email.

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Incidents of violence, bullying, and abuse will be investigated by the Headmaster or his designate, according to St. Andrew’s College’s procedures. In cases of serious violence and/or abuse, the law requires that we report to appropriate external authorities who will conduct an investigation and guide the appropriate actions. In such cases, the Facilitator, Headmaster and/or his designate will co-operate fully with the authorities.

Consequences Related to School Rules – Expulsion, Discipline Committee, Suspension/Expulsion Offences With regard to the adherence of School Rules, ‘campus’ refers to all SAC property, as well as the Towns of Aurora and Newmarket. In addition, School Rules and Policies apply to all students at any time that they are on school property, in school buildings or vehicles, at other CIS or CAIS schools, on School sanctioned trips or representing the School in any capacity, regardless of location, date or time. Continuing Association St. Andrew’s College believes that a constructive and positive working relationship between the College, the student, and the parent(s) or guardian(s) is essential to the fulfillment of the College’s mission. Therefore, the College reserves the right to discontinue enrolment or to refuse to re-enrol any student if the College concludes that the actions of the student and/or the parent(s) or guardian(s) interfere with the constructive and positive relationship or with the College’s ability to accomplish its educational goals. Expulsion of a Student St. Andrew’s College maintains the right to expel a student where the continued attendance of that student would not be in the best interests of the student or the School. The School also maintains the right to expel a student where his behaviour seriously jeopardizes the ability of the School to guarantee the dignity or safety of its students, or interferes with learning. Discipline Committee Any student who commits a serious breach or is guilty of repeated infractions of School Rules which may result in expulsion or suspension, will appear before the Discipline Committee, unless otherwise stated in the Parent and Student Handbook. The Committee typically consists of the student's Housemaster and Advisor, two Prefects, a member of the student's grade, an Assistant Headmaster, or designate, and any additional faculty members as applicable to the situation. In cases involving potential suspension or expulsion, parents will be notified, where possible, prior to a Disciplinary Committee hearing taking place. In such hearings, student(s) will be represented by their Advisor and/or their Housemaster, and are not permitted to have outside independent representation present as part of this internal process. The Committee Chair will ask the student(s) involved to recount the details of the incident and answer questions from the Committee. After information gathering has been completed, the student will leave while the members of the Committee consider the incident. At the end of discussions, the Committee will take an advisory vote, which they will present to the Headmaster. The Headmaster makes the final decision, choosing whether to accept, revise or reject the recommendations of the Discipline Committee. 79


The Headmaster (or his designate) may waive a Discipline Committee hearing if the student threatens the stability of the community, if there are constraints of a personal or confidential nature, or at the Headmaster's (or his designateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) discretion. In these circumstances, members of the Andrean community may be asked to advise the Headmaster (or his designate). The Discipline Committee will make recommendations to the Headmaster that might include, but are not limited to, any one or more of the following: Disciplinary Warning (Level 1) This is the School's initial formal warning that a student's behaviour is unacceptable. A student will be placed on Disciplinary Warning by the Headmaster or his delegate on the recommendation of Housemasters, other members of the faculty or the Discipline Committee. Students remain on Disciplinary Warning for one full calendar year from the date of the offence. If there is not suitable improvement (for example, a second offence), the student may immediately be moved to Disciplinary Probation or face further and more serious consequences. If a student is placed on Disciplinary Warning, communication outlining the infraction(s) and response required will be sent to the Housemaster, Advisor, and parents. Disciplinary Probation (Level 2) This is the School's clearest warning that a student's behaviour is unacceptable. A student will be placed on Disciplinary Probation by the Headmaster or his designate on the recommendation of Housemasters, other members of the faculty or the Discipline Committee. Students remain on Disciplinary Probation for one full calendar year from the date of the offence. If there is not suitable improvement (for example, a second offence), the student may immediately lose his place in the School. At the discretion of the Headmaster, a boy may not be allowed to return to School for the next year. If a student is placed on Disciplinary Probation, communication outlining the infraction(s) and response required will be sent to the Housemaster, Advisor, and parents. Miscellaneous Sanctions: Various sanctions will be applied to suit the infraction(s). Such sanctions might include, but are not limited to: letter(s) of apology, reparations as applicable, gating, removal of privileges, abstinence contract, and/or random drug testing. Suspension: The student will be suspended from attending school and school events for whatever length of time the Headmaster deems to be appropriate. The student is responsible for all assignments and tests missed during this time. Expulsion: The student is removed from the School permanently and the offence is recorded on the student's records. At the Headmaster's discretion, a student may be allowed to withdraw from the School and the offence will not be noted on the student's records. A student who has been asked to withdraw from the School may be permitted to apply to be re-admitted in the following year. Suspension/Expulsion Level Offences: The following are forbidden and are grounds for suspension or expulsion: 1. Sale and/or Distribution of illicit or Controlled Drugs or Alcohol 2. Purchase, Possession, Distribution or Use of Illicit Drugs 3. Unsafe Practices or Possessions 80


4. Theft Suspension Level Offences: The following are forbidden and are grounds for suspension. Any student on disciplinary probation will likely be expelled if he commits a suspension level offence during the period of probation: 1. Purchase, Possession, Distribution or Use of Alcohol or Controlled Drugs 2. Purchase, Posession, Distribution, or Use of Tobacco, Nicotine Products, Vaporizers, E-Cigarettes, or Smoking/Vaping Paraphernalia 3. AWOL 4. Other violations of the Codes of Honour or Conduct Use of Tobacco Products, Nicotine Products, Vaporizers, or E-Cigarettes Any student caught in possession, selling, or using tobacco, vaporizers, E-Cigarettes, or related nicotine products on school property will be reported to the School administration, and their parents will be notified. All such students will be offered enrolment in a Cessation program and will face disciplinary consequences as follows: First offence – Tier 2 gating, email as per above, meeting with administration. Second offence – Three-day suspension, email as per above, meeting with administration. Third and subsequent offences – Further disciplinary action at the Headmaster’s discretion. Any student caught smoking, vaping, or using tobacco products on school property will also be subject to a fine by the York Region Public Health Department (Smoke Free Ontario Act; Electronic Cigarettes Act). Current fines include: (i) $305 fine for smoking/vaping on school property; (ii) $365 fine for selling tobacco or vaping paraphernalia to youth; and (iii) $365 fine for supplying tobacco or vaping paraphernalia to youth. Given the dangers of fire and explosion from tobacco, vaporizers, and e-cigarettes, the use of such devices within school buildings is in violation of the school Fire Hazard Policy and falls under the category of “Unsafe Practices” and “Reckless Endangerment”. Actions such as these will result in more significant consequences, including an appearance before the School’s Discipline Committee, a suspension, or expulsion.

Consequences for Violations of Community Standards – Demerit System, Gating System, Attendance Consequences Demerit System – Upper School Day and boarding students at St. Andrew’s College have many daily ‘compulsory’ commitments that they must meet in order to be in good standing within each of their houses and within the School community. Some of the common commitments and duties that both boarding and day students are required to attend or fulfil include: being punctual for Chapel; house meetings; school assemblies; arriving to classes properly dressed and cleanly shaven; maintaining this standard of dress throughout the school day. Boarding students have additional commitments which include breakfast attendance, evening study, and being on time for bed and other residential functions. In order to ensure that all students meet their commitments, a demerit system has been implemented 81


that will be monitored by the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housemaster. Each time a student does not meet one of the commitments listed above; he will be given a demerit. A day student who accumulates 6 demerits will be given a Tier1 gating by his Housemaster; a boarding student who accumulates 12 demerits during this time will be given a Tier1 gating by his Housemaster. Students will be notified by Friday, via email, that they have a gating. Once a student serves his gating, his demerit count is reduced. Demerits will be reviewed by Housemasters on a regular basis and are cumulative. While on campus, a student who is ill cannot excuse himself from classes or Chapel; he must report to our Health & Wellness Centre for assessment. An Unexplained Absence (UA) will be assigned to a student who misses Chapel without a valid reason or demerits may be assigned if he is late to Chapel. We encourage parents to contact their sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Housemaster on a regular basis if they have any questions on daily school commitments, demerits or gatings. Gating System Tier 1 Gating: Upper School day students who accumulate 6 demerits and Middle School day students who accumulate 8 demerits, or boarding students who accumulate 12 demerits, or those who seriously breach community standards on the recommendation of faculty will be given a Tier 1 gating or a Core gating (for grades 5 & 6 students). Tier 1 gatings are served in Cole Hall (unless otherwise posted on the News Conference on First Class) from 12:45 p.m. until 5:15 p.m. on Saturday or Sunday. Tier 1 gatings can be deferred for up to one weekend, provided that the parents of the student communicate via email with Housemaster in advance of the gating. Students must sign in with the School Duty Master upon arrival at their gating. Students must arrive on time and work in a constructive manner. Computers are permitted in the gating room under the discretion of the Duty Master provided the student is using his computer in a constructive manner (e.g., no gaming, no social networking, no movies, no downloading music, etc.). Computer screens must face the Duty Master. Students must bring all their required homework materials beforehand and bring a book to read after they have completed their homework. If assigned to a gating room, students cannot leave for outside commitments (e.g., tutoring, appointments, etc.). NO FOOD or DRINK is permitted in the gating room. Upon completing their gating at 5:15 p.m., students will sign out with the School Duty Master. Any student who does not fulfil his obligations with regard to properly serving a Tier 1 gating, or who does not show up to serve his Tier 1 gating, will be reported to the School Administration and will be required to serve a Tier 2 gating the following week. Tier 2 Gating: Any student who seriously breaches community standards or did not fulfil the requirements of a Tier 1 gating or an Academic Detention, will be required to serve a Tier 2 gating the following weekend. Tier 2 gatings cannot be deferred and must be served on the date assigned â&#x20AC;&#x201C; there are no exceptions. Tier 2 gatings are served in the gating room on Saturday and Sunday from 12:45 p.m. until 5:15 p.m. The student will be required to be on time and sign in with the School Duty Master each day. Students must arrive on time and work in a constructive manner. Computers are permitted in the gating room under the discretion of the Duty Master, provided the student is using his computer in a constructive manner (e.g., no gaming, no social networking, no movies, no downloading of music etc.). Computer screens must face the Duty Master. Students must bring all their required homework materials beforehand and bring a book to read after they have completed their homework. If assigned to a gating room, students cannot leave for outside commitments (e.g., tutoring, appointments, etc.). NO FOOD or DRINK is permitted in the gating room). Upon completing their gating at 5:15 p.m., students will sign out with the school Duty Master. Any student who has been given a Tier 2 gating will not be permitted to take part in any co-curricular activities on 82


Saturday or Sunday from 12:45 - 5:15 p.m. In addition, any boarding student who has been given a Tier 2 gating is not permitted to leave campus at any time on Saturday evening unless permission has been granted by their Housemaster. Any student who does not fulfil his obligations with regard to properly serving a Tier 2 gating or who does not show up to serve his Tier 2 gating will be reported to the School Administration and will serve a suspension and be placed on disciplinary warning or probation as applicable. Any student who accumulates four gatings will be required to meet with their Housemaster, their advisor, and a School Administrator. Together they will put together an action plan to assist the student in ensuring compliance with community standards. Any student who accumulates a total of five gatings may be required to serve a suspension and be placed on disciplinary warning or probation as applicable. It the student accumulates a total of six or more gatings they will be subject to disciplinary action at the Headmaster’s discretion. Consequences for Unexplained Absences Any student who misses a class, Chapel, or an advisory group meeting, without a valid reason will be counted as an “Unexplained Absence” (UA). The consequences for unexplained absences are outlined below: 1st Unexplained Absence: Email notification to student, parents, advisor, and meeting with Housemaster 2nd Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; meeting with Housemaster 3rd Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; Tier 1 gating, meeting with Housemaster 4th Unexplained Absence: Email notification to student, parents, advisor, and administrator; meeting with Housemaster 5th Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; Tier 1 gating; meeting with Housemaster 6th Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; meeting with an administrator 7th Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; Tier 2 gating; meeting with HM and an administrator 8th Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; meeting with Housemaster and an Administrator 9th Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above; Tier 2 gating; meeting with Headmaster and an administrator 10th Unexplained Absence: Email notification as above, 3-day suspension; disciplinary warning; meeting with an administrator 11th Unexplained Absence: Action is at the Headmaster’s discretion Note: "Absence" means all absences that occur on a calendar day

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STUDENT SERVICES Business Office The Business Office, located on the second floor of Dunlap Hall, looks after student billing accounts, passports, booking airport shuttle services, and provides access to a debit card machine. It is open to students during the week from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and from 1 to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The Business Office is not open on Saturday or Sunday. Students are encouraged to obtain bank debit cards and may access spending money through the Business Office using their debit card during regular business hours.

Campus Shop School supplies such as stationery, computer supplies, stamps, school uniforms, and various items of clothing may be purchased at the Campus Shop located in the Staunton Gallery. Hours of operation are 8:00 to 11:30 a.m. and from 12:30 to 4:00 p.m., Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; and 8:00 to 11:30 a.m. and 12:30 – 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday. (When school is in session) CLOSED June 21 to Aug. 21, 2018 Summer hours are: Aug. 22 and 23: 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Closed Friday, Aug. 24 Aug. 27 to 30: 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Closed Friday, Aug. 31 Monday, Sept. 3: 9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. for new families only Tuesday, Sept. 4: 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. (closed at 3 p.m. for reception at Headmaster’s House) Wednesday, Sept. 5: 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. (closed at 3 p.m. for reception at Headmaster’s House) Thursday, Sept. 6: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.; regular business hours

Counselling There are times when a student may require the services of a professional counsellor to help solve personal difficulties. Counselling is available to all students and can be obtained through consultation with any faculty member, an Advisor, Mr. Courtenay Shrimpton, Mr. Dave Stewart, or the Health Centre. Counsellors subscribe to a policy of confidentiality in their dealings with anyone who may come to them for help. Confidentiality must yield to safety, however, when danger to the individual or the community arises.

Mail Incoming mail is delivered to reception. Students are informed via email to collect parcels. Mail remains at reception until it is picked up by students.

Office Hours The School Administration Office is open daily, Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. when school is in session. It is located on the main floor of Dunlap Hall. 84


University Counselling and Applications Mrs. Teri Groves oversees the University Counselling Program, assisted by Mrs. Tanya Weedon. Through individual interviews, students in grades 10 to 12 are guided through their current course selections and the application process for universities in Canada and abroad. Students in grades 11 and 12 attend presentations by representatives from Canadian and U.S. universities and travel to a variety of campuses in Ontario during the fall “Campus Visits” Program. Assistance is also provided for those wishing to visit universities and colleges further afield. Members of the University Counselling team help with all aspects of documentation for applications including transcripts, letters of reference, personal information profiles, essays, and standardized test requirements such as PSAT, SAT, and TOEFL. Information is available in the University Counselling Office concerning SAT preparation courses offered each year. They also provide information on scholarships and assist the students with the preparation of their scholarship applications and supplementary forms. St. Andrew's College is an official SAT and ACT Test Centre, and is open for the October, November, December, January, May, and June administrations this year. The office coordinates the ordering and administration of AP exams. Details of summer enrichment programs and courses are also available. Members of the University Counselling Department welcome questions from students of any grade and their parents concerning any aspect of preparation for post-secondary studies.

Weather As a boarding school, we are never officially closed, but parents should use their best judgment based on road conditions in their area as to whether their son(s) attend class. In the event of inclement weather an announcement will be announced on the SAC website.

STUDENT SAFETY AND SECURITY Fire Hazards Fire of any kind, including smoking, is a serious hazard. Fires are not permitted in the residence or any school building. Any student who violates the stated Fire Hazard Policy, or tampers with fire detection systems such as smoke or heat detectors, is in serious breach of school rules and subject to suspension, expulsion, or an appearance before the School’s Discipline Committee.

Bicycles, Longboards, Roller Blades, Scooters, and Skateboards Bicycles are permitted on campus. The use of helmets is compulsory. Students who ride bicycles must operate them in a safe manner, mindful that they are subject to the regulations of the Provincial Highway Act. Bicycles must be stored in the house in the area designated by the Housemaster. Bicycle locks are compulsory. Skateboards, longboards, scooters, and roller blades may not be used inside any building or on the tennis courts. Their use outside is restricted to the roads west of Cole Hall. They are not permitted 85


on the main school road or the sidewalk leading from Macdonald House to Yonge Street. Helmets and appropriate safety equipment must be worn.

Crisis Policy St. Andrew's has a comprehensive Crisis Policy for handling emergencies. This information is available at various locations throughout the School for use by all faculty and staff.

Fire and Fire Drills Special fire orders are posted on the bulletin boards of each house, each classroom, and in each room of the boarding houses. Please remember that it is against the law to misuse ANY fire-fighting equipment, be it the alarms, hoses, smoke detectors or extinguishers. This also applies to any misuse of the 911 telephone service. The School is prepared to prosecute any students who violate these regulations. The School is required by law to conduct fire drills. The following procedures must be followed any time an alarm is sounded: a) CLASSROOM BUILDINGS AND COLE HALL: Students must exit the building in an orderly fashion via the nearest exit and collect as a group outside the building, a minimum of 60 metres from the building. Once outside, students are required to check in with their classroom teacher. Students will remain outside the building until the "ALL CLEAR" is sounded. b) RESIDENTIAL HOUSES: Housemasters, or their designates, must ensure that students and staff leave the house in an orderly fashion as per the posted policy in each residence. Everyone is to remain outside the house until the designated monitor checks the house and the alarm is turned off.

Guests Given the busy nature of the average day, visits to the School are not encouraged. Guests may only use the common rooms of the houses, and must be introduced to the Duty Master or Housemaster. BOARDERS' ROOMS ARE OUT OF BOUNDS TO ALL VISITORS UNLESS THEY ARE PARENTS OR ARE ACCOMPANIED BY PARENTS. Students are responsible for the conduct of their guests at all times.

Keys Unauthorized possession of keys to any school building, other than the student's room, is a serious breach of regulations.

Lost and Found The School is aware of the problem concerning the loss of a student's clothing and personal items. This causes a great deal of inconvenience and undue expense to parents. Most lost items are the result of carelessness on the part of students and the burden of responsibility for recovering these items belongs to the student.

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Any lost items must be placed in the Lost and Found Box in the basement of Dunlap Hall or in the Lost and Found located in the Bedard Athletic Complex. Items such as eye glasses, watches, keys, calculators, phones, etc. are turned in to Reception.

Out-of-Bounds Areas The following are restricted for reasons of safety or risk of damage. It is a serious breach of school regulations to be found in an ‘out-of-bounds’ area without permission.

• • • • • • • • • •

All administrative offices Housemaster’s residence All roofs Cole Hall, except for meals and any other scheduled events Maintenance Offices Grounds Keepers shed Classroom or school buildings after 10:45 p.m. Property behind the Headmaster’s residence Swimming pool (unless supervised) Staff Room and photocopier areas

Security SAC SALTO Access Bracelets: In order to access school buildings, residences, gymnasiums, and squash courts, students will be assigned their unique SALTO access card. Students should refresh their card at a ‘hot spot’ (these are located at the main door of Rogers Hall, Rogers Hall east door or any residence door) within five days in order to maintain the validity of the card and allow them access into the School during off hours. The main door to Rogers Hall will be locked after morning rush hour on a daily basis, while other doors around the School will be locked at all times. If a student loses his Salto card it is his responsibility to report the loss (either in person during school hours or via email addressed to CAMPUS SECURITY. Replacement cards cost $5. It is critical that students report lost cards immediately in order to maintain the security of the SAC campus. Cards are not transferable. It is a violation of the School Honour Code if a student takes or uses another student’s card in order to gain entry into a school or residential building. If a student finds a SALTO card they should drop it off at reception. Student’s Possessions The School relies on the good will of the community and cannot guarantee the security of any personal belongings. Students are discouraged from bringing valuable items on campus. All portable items should be marked with the student's name. Items of clothing should be marked with an indelible laundry pen or with name tags. THE SCHOOL IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR A STUDENT’S POSSESSIONS. APPROPRIATE PERSONAL INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR EXPENSIVE ITEMS (CAMERAS, PHONES, COMPUTERS, ETC.), SHOULD BE ARRANGED BY PARENTS.

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2018-19 VEHICLE PRIVILEGES FOR BOARDING STUDENTS BOARDERS Bringing a vehicle on the St. Andrew's College campus and/or being a passenger in another student's vehicle is a privilege granted to a student by the College in concert with the student's parents or guardians - it is NOT a right. The College includes automobiles, trucks, and motorcycles under the definition of vehicle. The form below must be completed and submitted to the College BEFORE vehicle privileges are granted to a student. This form must be submitted on an annual basis. This secures permission for a student to bring a vehicle on campus. Both student and parents/guardians must accept the following restrictions as laid out in this document. These regulations are in effect from the time a student leaves home until he returns home. These regulations are not waived at any time and are always in effect. Students and parents should read this document carefully before signing it. Failure to abide by these regulations will mean a loss of vehicle privileges for a period to be determined by the Headmaster or his delegate - no warnings will be issued. Students are expected to abide by these regulations and not to treat them as some sort of game, constantly looking for loopholes. Should a student lose his vehicle privileges the College requires that the student refrain from operating a vehicle on campus at any time. REGULATIONS 1. The vehicle is to be used MAINLY to transport the student to the College upon returning from leave and from the College when proceeding on leave. Use of the vehicle for other than the purposes stated above requires the permission of the student's Housemaster, the Headmaster, or the Assistant Headmaster. Violation of this regulation is a serious breach of the rules. No student is authorized to give this permission. Housemasters are constantly being asked by students for permission to use their vehicles for the most trivial reasons. This is a waste of the Housemasters' time and it is not consistent with the stated policy. Housemasters will establish what is acceptable. In short, "park it and leave it" sums up our expectations. 2. The vehicle must be parked immediately after coming on campus The parking area is to be kept clean. 3. Other than assigned parking, and the roads of the College which lead to and from the student parking spots while in transit, the rest of the campus is OUT OF BOUNDS to all student vehicles. 4. Housemasters will define policy with respect to how and where vehicle keys will be stored. 5. No Boarder may bring a vehicle on campus during the period 11:00 p.m. - 7:00 a.m. without the permission of his Housemaster. 6. All vehicles must be kept locked when parked. They are not to be used as "common roomsâ&#x20AC;? while parked on campus. 88


7. Alcoholic beverages, opened or unopened, are not to be brought on campus in any vehicle. 8. The vehicle may not be loaned to any other student. 9. The student is not to exceed the posted on-campus speed limit and all vehicles must be driven with care and courtesy at all times. Any breach of common sense with regards to the use of the vehicle will be regarded as a breach of these regulations. Complaints concerning this are most commonly lodged by those who have much more driving experience than that of the student and this fact weighs heavily in any adjudication. 10. The College will assume NO responsibility for damage to the vehicle or its contents. 11. Vehicles equipped with special sound systems can be a major annoyance.,no loud music is to be played while on campus with the vehicle windows open or at a level such that the presence of the car can be heard or felt before it is seen! 12. Vehicles are subject to search while on campus in the same manner as rooms are in order to ensure the security and safety of the School community. 13. It is understood that the signature of a parent or guardian indicates that all legal requirements set by the Province of Ontario for driving the vehicle have been met. The provisions of the graduated licensing program apply where appropriate.

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PLEASE PRINT AND RETURN THIS FORM TO THE COLLEGE NAME: ____________________________________ GRADE: _____

HOUSE: __________________________

ADVISOR: ________________________________

PART 1: VEHICLE INFORMATION Please supply the following information for ALL motorized vehicles which will be brought on campus. Any change in information must be reported immediately. 1. Vehicle Make________________________________________ 2. Type_______________________________________________(SUV, truck, car, etc.) 3. Colour______________________________________________ 4. License plate number__________________________________

PART 2: GRANTING OF VEHICLE PRIVILEGES I have read the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicle regulations and restrictions and I agree to my son/ward being given on campus vehicle privileges as per the regulations and restrictions listed in the Parent and Student Handbook: DATE:___________________PARENT/GUARDIAN:___________________________________

PART 3: DRIVER AND PASSENGER PRIVILEGES Parents must assume the responsibility of communicating their wishes to their son as it is NOT possible for the School to monitor who travels as a passenger in student vehicles.

PART 4: SIGNATURE OF STUDENT I have read the attached regulations and restrictions and I agree to abide by them. DATE:_________________STUDENT:______________________________________________ Permission has been granted to the above student to bring a vehicle on campus during the 2018/15 academic year. DATE:____________________________________________________________

ASSISTANT HEADMASTER:_________________________________________

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ACTIVITIES The School offers an extensive co-curricular program. Some of the offerings are: Leadership and Experiential Learning #142 Highland Cadet Corps The Cadet Corps is an integral part of St. Andrew’s College life, operating in a manner that supports and complements the School’s mission and goals by providing a leadership program that: • • • • •

emphasizes leadership through experiential learning while offering skill options based on personal interests; focuses on learning in the outdoor classroom; is supported by sufficient and qualified staff and instructors; seeks opportunities to test and recognize skills and knowledge by participating in organized competitions both inside and outside the Canadian Cadet Organization; and recognizes both individual and group achievement.

Program Details The Leadership and Experiential Learning program consists of five areas of training: 1. Outdoor expedition skills and leadership training 2. Music programs 3. Duke of Edinburgh’s Award and other optional programs 4. Competitive teams 5. Cadet ceremonial events 1. Outdoor expedition and leadership training The outdoor expedition and leadership program consists of three main levels known as: • • •

Leadership in Training (grade 8) Leadership and Adventure (grades 9/10) Leadership in Action (grades 11/12)

All levels include instruction on leadership, outdoor field skills, high ropes and rock wall, canoe skills, mountain biking, orienteering, marksmanship, communication skills, and physical fitness. Instruction is provided by Master Cadets, faculty members, and CIC (Cadet Instructor Cadre) Reserve Officers. The Leadership and Adventure program for grades 9 and 10 is compulsory (unless selected for the bands); however, all levels are a pre-requisite for any students with leadership goals within any areas of the St. Andrew’s College community. Training and activities will be conducted during the fall and winter terms each Thursday afternoon for Upper School and on Friday after school for grade 8 Middle School students. All Upper School students take part in the annual camp (Exercise Trillium Falcon) each September at outdoor locations throughout the province. Additional expeditions will take place for the Leadership and Adventure program as part of the grade 10 course summative. Grade 8 students participate in the Beyond the Gates camp each September with the Middle School. 91


Ministry Approved Credits – Students completing the grade 9/10 Leadership and Adventure program will be awarded a Ministry-approved credit under GPP30 Leadership and Peer Support. Those students completing the grade 11/12 Leadership in Action program will be awarded the PLF4M Recreation and Healthy Active Living credit that is able to be used for university applications. Students are assessed in a variety of fashions and course marks are reported on the school term report cards as per academic course. 2.

Music Programs

Students may choose to take part in our celebrated music program in lieu of the Leadership and Experiential Learning. Participation in any of the bands requires a high level of commitment to practice and attendance. Students involved in the Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band, and the Pipes and Drums are selected by audition each fall. All musicians have an opportunity to earn the AMR3M Music Repertoire at the end of grade10 and the AMR4M Music Repertoire at the completion of grade 12. 3. Duke of Edinburgh’s Award and other Optional Programs Duke of Edinburgh’s Award – This highly recognized youth achievement award consists of three levels of challenge in four component areas: expedition, community service, skill/hobby, and physical fitness. All students are encouraged to participate by signing up with the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award and completing the online journal. An administrative fee of $50 is charged by the Ontario Duke of Edinburgh’s Award for registration. A variety of optional programs are offered each year to enhance the regular weekly programming. These programs vary annually, but generally include scuba training, driver training, St. John’s First Aid, safe boating, and lifesaving courses. Additional costs for these programs are charged directly to students’ school accounts. Often, these programs are included in the Complete Weekend brochure. Summer Camps – Students have the opportunity to attend one of the summer Cadet Camps at no charge. These may range from two to six weeks in length and are usually located at Blackdown Cadet Training Centre near Barrie, Ont. Information for summer camps is available through the Cadet office. Registration takes place in January for the following summer. 4. Competitive Teams Marksmanship Team – Those interested in competitive target shooting are welcome to join the Cadet Marksmanship Team that competes using air rifles. Competitions range from local, provincial, and national levels. Practices are normally held after dinner on Friday evenings from 6:45-9:30 p.m. Biathlon Team – The sport of biathlon combines marksmanship and Nordic skiing. Participants in this team must be part of the winter Nordic Ski program and also attend marksmanship practices. Orienteering Team – This team combines the skills of map and compass reading with cross-country running. Interested participants can compete in the area competition in September/October and progress to provincial-level competitions. In addition to Cadet competitions, participants can take part in civilian-run orienteering races throughout the year.

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5. Cadet Ceremonial Events There are a variety of annual ceremonial events, three of which are considered compulsory for all students: November – Remembrance Service and Parade at Queen’s Park March – Wellington Dinner and Leadership Lecture (compulsory for senior Cadets) April – Annual Church Parade (compulsory) April – Headmaster’s Parade (compulsory) April/May – Annual Cadet Inspection (compulsory) April/May – The Cadet Formal (grad prom night) Attendance Upper School weekly program takes place Thursdays from 12:30-2 p.m. Middle School weekly program takes place after school Fridays from 3:45-5:15 p.m. All students participating in the Leadership and Experiential Learning programs are required to attend training sessions each week. Attendance is a primary evaluation requirement of the program and therefore absences from training will dramatically affect a student’s mark in the course. Parents are asked not to schedule appointments during this period. Compulsory ceremonial events are considered part of the course summative evaluations. Uniforms All Upper School students in grades 9-12 and Cadets in the Leadership in Training program (grade 8) will be issued full Highland Dress that consists of a. Scarlet tunic b. Gordan tartan kilt c. Glengarry d. Sporran and waistbelt e. Spats, hosetops, and flashes f. Other accoutrements associated with rank or appointment Highland uniforms are issued on a temporary loan basis at no cost to the student; however, Cadets are responsible for the care of their uniform until it is returned. Students will be charged for replacement of uniform parts that are not returned at the end of each year. Please note that the replacement costs for items such as tunics and kilts are $500 to $1,000 each. Students must provide their own dress shoes, which should be black Oxfords or brogues. Given the outdoor nature of the weekly training activities, weekly training dress will be either school dress (with optional Cadet sweater) or SAC athletic dress as designated by the Course Officer. Student Leadership and Promotions Much of the instruction and day-to-day leadership of the Cadet Program are done by the Master Cadets under the supervision of the Course Training Officers and Headquarters Command Team. Appointments and promotions depend on the number of vacancies, rank appropriate to the appointment, Cadet qualifications, commitment to the overall program, school involvement, and demonstrated leadership ability. Major appointments are made at the beginning of each 93


year and additional appointments and promotions are generally made throughout the remainder of the year, prior to March Break. All senior-level promotions are reviewed by the Corps Promotions Board, which consists of the Corps Commanding Officer, Corps faculty, and senior Cadets. All promotions for the Cadet Corps, including the bands, are made under the authority of the Commanding Officer.

Duke of Edinburgh’s Award – Young Canadians' Challenge The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award - Young Canadians’ Challenge is an award program of individual development and achievement for students 14 years of age and older. It presents to young people a balanced, non-competitive program of activities which encourages personal growth and discovery, self-reliance, perseverance, responsibility to self, and service to their community. The wards are designed in ascending standards of achievement: bronze, silver, and gold. The four areas of achievement are: • Physical Fitness • Skill Development • Community Service • Expeditions A variety of staff team leaders, under the direction of Award Coordinator, Major Brian McCue (CO Cadet Corps), assist in the operation of the Award Program by conducting training and administrative meetings. The Cadet Training Office works with the expedition groups to prepare for adventurous expeditions planned at various times throughout the year. Expeditions increase in level of challenge and duration through the three award levels. Students may inquire about the Duke of Edinburgh’s awards at the Cadet Training Office and enrol at any time during the year.

The Complete Weekend Program A special program is offered on weekends for students who wish to participate. This involves a variety of activities—from cultural events in Toronto to attending a professional basketball or hockey game. A brochure describing these activities will be posted to the School’s webpage.

Chapel ALL STUDENTS MUST ATTEND CHAPEL The Memorial Chapel offers students the opportunity for reflection on spiritual and ethical matters and for participation in a variety of services. Although elements of the Christian tradition remain, Chapel will revolve around values based education and become a significant and engaging element of pastoral care for students, staff and faculty. Students from many backgrounds are challenged to embrace chapel as a time of reflection, self-awareness, and respect, becoming engaged, and involved where appropriate The integration of Chapel observance into the daily routine of the School throughout its history is based on the conviction that attention to the spiritual and moral dimensions of life is an essential aspect of a well-rounded education. 94


Chapel service is a community event requiring a standard of deportment based on respect for self and for others. Students are asked to demonstrate attentiveness, politeness, and appropriate regard for the values and convictions of their peers, members of staff, and guests.

The following guidelines are an important part of the St. Andrew's tradition: • An awareness of both the dignity of the Chapel and the rights of fellow students requires mature and disciplined behaviour. The Chapel is pre-eminently a place for meditation. The Chapel is a memorial to Andreans who gave their lives in World War I. • Maturity and good judgment is shown by participating in all aspects of music within the Chapel. • Punctuality is politeness. • The hymn books are School property and should be treated accordingly. • School Prefects are responsible for the deportment and atmosphere within the Chapel. Students have a responsibility to respect the Prefects in ensuring an appropriate atmosphere within the Chapel. • Students enter and leave the Chapel in an orderly manner as dictated by the School Prefects. • Attention to the speaker is an essential mark of respect.

Clan System Every boy, during his life at St. Andrew's College belongs to a clan. The clans are named after the traditional family tribes of ancient Scotland. During the year our clans compete head-to-head in activities such as the annual cross-country run and inter-clan competitions to earn points to win the Hockin Trophy in the Middle School and the Housser Trophy in the Upper School. In Middle School, clan pins are awarded to boys who accumulate sufficient points. Students will be given a list of the points assigned for each activity and level of academic achievement. Public presentation of these awards takes place at a special assembly near the end of the school year.

Community Service All students at St. Andrew’s are required to serve the community in some capacity. Upper School students are required to complete 40 hours in grades 9 – 12 to fulfil the Ministry of Education requirements for the O.S.S.D. All volunteer hours should be documented and submitted to the University Counselling Assistant. Opportunities to volunteer are offered throughout the year. Monthly volunteer events are advertised on the Community Service Conference. St. Andrew’s recognizes excellence in volunteering by awarding pins for completing 50, 100, and 200 hours of service. For further information please contact Mr. Joe Commisso, Community Service Coordinator.

Student Leadership There are a multitude of leadership opportunities in the Middle and Upper Schools. The School prides itself in developing leadership throughout the career of every young man who attends. The School has developed a comprehensive Leadership Development program through Cadets, leadership courses, and Student Leadership Councils.

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Prefects The position of Prefect is regarded as the most challenging form of leadership. The Prefects are elected through a comprehensive and rigorous process annually by students and faculty. Any student in their grade 11 year must be aware that any disciplinary or academic difficulties that would result in suspension and/or probation may result in the preclusion of the student from the Prefect election/selection process. The Assistant Headmaster, Director of Upper School & Strategic Development will be given a transcript of the disciplinary proceedings of any grade 11 student who goes on academic or disciplinary probation, in order to clearly understand the issues involved and to be able to judge the severity of the incident. The Prefect Selection Panel, in consultation with the Headmaster, will determine if a student on academic or disciplinary probation can run for Prefectship. Prefects have an opportunity and responsibility to: General • Exemplify the highest standards in the area of school dress and deportment at all times. • Represent the School at outside school functions when requested. • Act as a liaison between faculty, students, and the administration. • Be a mentor to younger Andreans by acting as a role model in the classroom, on the playing fields, in the hallways, and in the residences. • Take on leadership initiatives that will make the institution better, not just for the present year, but also into the future. • Be accountable for ones actions and recognize that you are School Prefects, not simply Prefects of the student body. • Assist younger students to reach their potential in all areas. • Work within a team concept for the betterment of the institution, not for personal gain or fulfillment. “Non Nobis Solum”—Not for Ourselves Alone. Specific • Attend Chapel • Set the tone for dress, personal appearance and conduct in the Chapel and around the School every day. • Attend all Prefect meetings. • Be accountable for all areas within your assigned Prefect portfolio. • Assist in running Social Awareness and other assemblies. • Assist with conduct in Cole Hall at lunch on a rotational basis. • Attend all classes. Prefects 2018-2019 Head Prefect: Willem Grier Deputy Head: Campbell Clarke Noah Hulton Osher Lee Graham Cassar Andrew Boland Jalen Gu Alastair Binnendyk Alexander Smith 96


Ryan Sutherland-Pace Eugene Lee Heads of House Each House has in place a Head of House. The Head of House is an important leadership position at the school and within the residence. The Head of House is responsible for working with the Housemasters of each House to ensure that day and residential life is a positive experience for all students. Additionally, the Heads work together and alongside student leadership councils to develop and run different events throughout the year. House Captains Two terms of Macdonald House Captains apply and are interviewed from boarding applicants in Grade 11 for work in Macdonald House. Day House Captains are selected in a similar process from the Day population to work with Middle School Advisory groups. Student Leadership Councils Grade 10 to 12 students are encouraged to apply and be interviewed for various student leadership councils within the School. These 13 councils are arranged into 5 distinct categories, based on their mandate and their role within the School: student life and school spirit; arts and culture; philanthropy and community service; school service; and character development.

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY STANDARDS AND POLICIES The moral development of the student through the ‘social awareness’ and the ‘residential life’ curricula is paramount at St. Andrew’s College. Within each academic day and within each residence is a developed curriculum, which is an important framework for educating our students outside the formal academic curriculum. These curricula encompass not only specific activities within each academic day and residence, but are an overall character education program that nurture students’ ethical, moral, and social development in issues such as respect, responsibility, cooperation, understanding, integrity, caring, and citizenship. We also strive to prepare boys for the future by encouraging them to develop healthy and positive relationships within the School and the residences; to teach them to learn to problem solve with their peers; and to encourage them to work with others to develop a positive atmosphere and community within the School. It should also in turn cultivate decision-making skills, time-management skills, leadership skills, study skills, and develop young citizens who will not only act locally within their school communities, but act and think globally in the larger community outside of the School environment. Our boarding vision statement is defined as follows: To support the School’s mission statement by teaching our students the essential life and character skills necessary to develop leadership, experience personal growth, manage their time and study habits, and foster the development of relationships in a nurturing and supportive environment. The success of each student's experience at St. Andrew's College is determined, to a large part, by the friendships formed amongst those living closely together in the houses. Respect one another 97


and treat the residences as you would treat your home. The following general house rules are designed to help us live as a community.

Background Information on Residences at SAC St. Andrew’s College is composed of four residences: Macdonald House (grades 5 – 9), which is primarily the residence for Middle School students and three Upper School residences (grades 9 – 12): Flavelle House, Memorial House and Sifton House. Macdonald House Macdonald House is named in honour of Reverend Dr. D. Bruce Macdonald, Headmaster of St. Andrew’s College from 1900-1935, and Chairman of the Board of Governors, 1937-1941. At one time, Macdonald House was a separate Middle School entity with its own dining room and classrooms for students from grades 4-9. In the early 1960s, it became simply a residence for grades 7-9 boarders, while today it is a residence for boys from grades 5-9 along with House Captains (grade 11) and Heads of House (grade 12). Mr. David Galajda is the ninth Housemaster of Macdonald House and serves as the Director of Residential Life. Assistant Housemasters include Mr. Kyle Fraser-Schoemaker, Mr. Jeff LaForge, and Mr. Paul Totera. Macdonald House also has two Resident Dons, and can accommodate up to 76 students. Clan: Macdonald Flavelle House Flavelle House is named for Sir Joseph Flavelle, a benefactor of the School. Until 1962, students moved from Macdonald House to Flavelle House for grade 10 and remained there until they completed grade 11. After 1962, Flavelle House was vertically integrated with students in grades 9-12. The current Housemaster of Flavelle House is Mr. Jamie MacPherson. Mr. Mark Burton is the Assistant Housemaster as well as coordinator of the Weekend program and resides in Flavelle House. Mr. Kevan Quinn is also an Assistant Housemaster residing in Flavelle House. Flavelle House also has a Resident Don and can accommodate up to 60 students. Clan: MacPherson Memorial House When the School moved to Aurora in 1926, Memorial House was established as a memorial to those Andreans who perished in World War I. The Memorial Chapel was built in 1931 and remains a reminder of those who did not grow old. Prior to 1962, grades 12 and 13 occupied Memorial House, which was the senior house. It now houses students in grades 9-12 and can accommodate up to 61 students. Mr. Michael Carroll is the current Housemaster of Memorial House and Mr. Kevin Gate and Ms. Emilia Macdonald are the Assistant Housemasters. Memorial House has a Resident Don living in the residence. Clan: Buchanan Sifton House Sifton House was the last Upper School boarding residence to be added to St. Andrew's College and initially served as the infirmary and cafeteria of the School. As the demand for 98


boarding grew, the building was converted into Fourth House in 1962. In 1984, the Housemaster's house was added (previously, they lived in a set of residence rooms) and the boarding house was later renamed to Sifton to honour the benefactions of the Sifton family. Sifton House can accommodate up to 59 students. Mr. Keith Ramon is the current Housemaster and Mr. Matthew Jaekel and Mr. Chris St-Cyr are the Assistant Housemasters. Clan: Stewart

Residential Community Standards and Policies Rooms New Boys will be assigned a residence, a room, and a roommate(s). Returning boarding students have, in some cases, previously chosen their rooms and also their roommates. While reactions to different rooms and roommates may vary from student to student and parent to parent, we ask that you give your new environment a chance. Through experience, we have found that new friendships quickly develop, most problems quickly resolve themselves, and most boys are very happy in a relatively short period of time. Your support and co-operation would be most appreciated in this area. At the discretion of the Housemaster and/or the Director of Residential Life, moves may be required to create a better environment within the residence for all boarding residents. Again, we ask for your co-operation and understanding in this matter. The Housemasters will do their best to ensure everyone is dealt with in a fair manner. The following regulations apply to a student’s residence room: • • • • • •

• • • • • •

No writing on walls, ceilings, or furnishings The furniture is to be left in its present location unless the Housemaster grants permission to change it No dart boards are permitted Posters may not be sexist, vulgar or promote the use of drugs and alcohol and must be hung on cork boards and not on the wall By order of the Fire Marshall's Office, flags or posters cannot be hung from the ceilings, including sloped ceilings Tampering with any fire or smoke detection device is strictly prohibited and is a violation of the Schools’ Fire Hazard Policy. In addition, fire of any kind, including smoking or vaporizer/e-cigarette use, is a serious hazard and not permitted in residences or any school building. Any student who violates the Fire Hazard Policy is in serious breach of school rules and subject to suspension, expulsion, or an appearance before the School’s Discipline Committee Rooms must be kept tidy at all times. Each student is expected to make his bed, tidy his desk each morning, and empty the garbage and recycling containers TV sets, large computer monitors, and video game console systems are not permitted in individual rooms Common areas (washrooms, TV room, common room, etc.) must be treated with respect. Please remember to turn the showers off and flush the toilets. Furnishings may not be removed from any common room without permission of the Housemaster Quiet times are exactly that. Please respect the needs of all students Damage to rooms will be charged to the student occupying the room Damage to common areas will be evenly divided among the residents of a house, unless it can be attributed to specific individuals 99


• • • • • •

Student pets are not permitted in the residence Students are not permitted to sleep in another student’s room due to reasons of hygiene and fire safety No hasps or other locking mechanisms may be installed on any piece of school furniture. Any damage will be assessed and charged to your account All baggage should be stored in the trunk room and not in a student’s room due to fire safety regulations The School supplies sheets, pillowcases, blankets, and pillows. Students may want to bring their own duvets and blankets. They should also purchase their own laundry bag and towels Students should report any issues (e.g. pest infestations) to their Housemaster as soon as possible in order that the matter be dealt with by professionals.

Room Appliances Due to the nature of the residence, the following will not be allowed to be kept in the rooms: televisions, large stereo units, kettles, toasters, toaster ovens, hot pots, air conditioners, portable heaters, and any other heat producing appliances. Because room circuits are not designed to handle the current these appliances produce, they are considered FIRE HAZARDS. Heat producing appliances may be used in the kitchenette area, which has a circuit designed to handle the extra current. Small refrigerators may be permitted in rooms as long as there is sufficient space. Diffusers and humidifiers are subject to the Housemaster’s discretion. Room Security Each room has a lock on the door. Each boy has been assigned a room key for safety and security reasons. If your key is lost, please report this to the Housemaster immediately. If your key is not found within 24 hours, a new lock and key system MUST be installed on your door – again, for security reasons for you and your roommate(s). For each lost key, your son’s account will be charged a fee to replace your lock and key. As such, please ensure you keep your key in a safe place during the day. Security Door Each residence is equipped with alarmed security doors. Students may not leave or enter the residence after the doors are activated at 11:00 p.m. in all residences. Students who know in advance that they will arrive late can have their SALTO adjusted by their Housemaster to gain entry into the residence. It is a serious breach of the School’s policy for a student to attempt, or to circumvent the residential security system. Money and Valuables Unfortunately, each year residents lose money or property either through carelessness or to theft despite the security procedures in place. Please do not bring a large sum of money (anything which you cannot afford to lose or anything over $50) or anything to the residence which has great personal value to you. All property should have your name on it for easy identification. It is highly recommended you have your name engraved on any electronic items. It is also highly recommended that each student purchase his own safe box to keep in his room for the storage of valuables and money. Some simple common sense precautions and some personal security will eliminate any thought of theft. 100


Students will also be provided with a storage locker for small personal items (students must purchase a combination lock) for any valuables they have. These will be located in the basements of the residences. Students are encouraged to keep money in the bank and withdraw money from our Business Department using their bank card during business hours if cash is required. Dayboys and Visitors in Residence Other than family, visitors to the house must be entertained in the Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s common areas. For security reasons, day students are NOT permitted in the residence unless permission has been given by the Housemaster. Security Cameras Security cameras are located throughout the residence in main traffic areas and the electronic lock-up room. These are in place to further increase and protect the security of our boarding students and the house itself.

Daily Routines Breakfast Attendance and Cole Hall All boarders must attend breakfast Monday to Friday and check-in by signing the breakfast sheets near the breakfast Duty Master. Failure to sign-in will result in a demerit. Food service ends 15 minutes before closing. Students will be notified of any changes to Cole Hall meal times via email. In the event of signing in another student, you will meet with your Housemaster to explain this indiscretion. This is considered a serious infraction and contradicts the community standards expectations as outlined in this Parent and Student Handbook. Chapel and Class Attendance Good attendance is vital to the learning process and is an essential component of every course and activity. Students are expected to attend all classes. It is the responsibility of the student and his family to inform the Housemaster (who in turn will inform the School) about planned absences such as appointments. The Housemaster must also be informed as soon as possible of absences that result from unforeseen circumstances. Boarding students must be cleared by our Health & Wellness Centre if they are too ill to attend classes (the parent/guardian of a boarding student cannot excuse their son from missing classes due to illness). Boarding students must sign out of their own residence if they have to leave school during the school day for personal, medical or dental appointments, but only after informing their Housemaster. Students who miss Chapel without an acceptable reason will be assigned an Unexplained Absence (UA). Demerits can be assigned to a student for being late for Chapel. A student who is ill cannot excuse himself from classes or Chapel (if he is on campus) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; he must report to our Health Centre for assessment.

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Study Study is mandatory in all houses. In Macdonald House, study runs from 8:00-9:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday and from 8:30-10:30 p.m. in the Upper School. If a student knows he will be missing study for a personal or school commitment, he must inform his Housemaster in advance. Daily study attendance and work habits are tracked by Housemasters and Duty Masters. Study takes place in study hall or one’s room, depending on where you have been assigned. Doors will be kept open during study. No music is permitted during study (except with headsets), nor is unnecessary noise or movement. During study, laptops are to be used for academic purposes only. Students are reminded that during supervised study they should not be playing games on their computers, watching movies, chatting, logging onto social networks, etc. Students should not have their phone, iPad, etc. near them during study in order to focus on their school work on their laptops. If a student is found to be using their computer in an inappropriate manner, gaming (e.g., phone, iPad, computer, etc.) or using their phone/iPad during study, they will be assigned a residential electronics strike: Housemasters or Advisors may intervene at their discretion if they feel a student is spending too much time gaming and not enough time on school commitments. In extreme cases, the student may be made a user only of his laptop for a specified period of time. Notes: • • •

Students should have their homework exercises organized prior to study If a student is going to be absent for study it is their responsibility to let their Housemaster know ahead of time (e.g., school play) Asking to go to another student’s room or for academic help or tutoring must be made through the Duty Master (DM). A student may not leave their room without permission for any reason

Bedtimes (Sunday through Thursday) Bedtimes are as follows: • • • • •

9:40 in rooms, 9:50 p.m. lights out for grades 5 & 6 9:45 in rooms, 9:55 p.m. lights out for grade 7 9:50 in rooms, 10:00 p.m. lights out for grade 8 10:45 in rooms, 11:00 p.m. lights out for grade 9 through 11 11:15 in rooms, 11:30 p.m. lights out for grade 12

Upper School students MUST be in the house by their specified ‘in rooms’ time. Arrangements outside this time must be made in advance with their Housemaster. Extension of Lights Out (Late Lights) may be requested from the Housemaster. Late lights may be granted at the discretion of the Housemaster. 102


After lights out there should be NO movement in the halls. Bedtimes (Fridays) All students should be in their residence and checked present by the Housemaster or Resident Don by 11:00 p.m. on Friday. Bedtimes are as follows: • • • • •

9:40 in rooms, 9:50 p.m. lights out for grades 5 & 6 9:45 in rooms, 9:55 p.m. lights out for grade 7 9:50 in rooms, 10:00 p.m. lights out for grade 8 10:45 in rooms, 11:00 p.m. lights out for grade 9 through 11 11:00 in residence, 12:00 a.m. in rooms for grade 12

Bedtimes (Saturday) Bedtimes on Saturday are as follows: • • •

9:00 p.m. in house, 10:30 p.m. in rooms and lights out, for grades 5, 6, 7, and 8 11:00 p.m. in house, 12:00 a.m. in rooms and lights out, for grades 9, 10, and 11 11:00 p.m. in house (unless permission granted for later time) for grade 12

Sunday Night All students are due in residence by 9:00 p.m. Students unable to make it back for this time MUST communicate with their Housemaster.

House Leave Long Weekends and Vacations The residences are closed during vacations (December and March Break) and long weekends (from Thursday at 6:00 p.m. until Monday at 6:00 p.m.). Students should make alternate housing arrangements if their departure or arrival is outside the prescribed time and make their Housemasters aware. A student will not be given permission from the Administration to spend the weekend in a hotel room or travel on their own. He must sign-out with a parent or local guardian and be in their care. If a student has no local guardian to sign-out with during long weekends, he must attend the Weekend program. Students with no local guardian can also spend the weekend with a day family, provided all permissions have been approved by the host family, parents, or guardian of the student and Housemasters via REACH. Absence from School or Campus It is critical that all boarding students make their Housemasters aware of their whereabouts at all times and obtain permission from their Housemasters when leaving campus at any time. Students are liable to suspension (and in serious cases, dismissal) if they leave campus without authorization and, in doing so, place themselves at risk and/or cause adults in 103


the community to go to some length to locate and secure them. Boarding students must make their Housemasters aware of their whereabouts at all times and MUST sign-out via the REACH boarding program every time they step off campus (e.g. this includes the St. Andrew’s Plaza, etc.). If students are going to be late returning to their residence, they MUST contact their Housemaster. Special leave requests must be discussed with Housemasters 24 hours in advance. This includes any trips outside the Aurora/Newmarket area. Misrepresenting weekend or leave plans is in direct violation of the Code of Conduct. Parent Notification Parents must notify their son’s Housemaster if they are: • Leaving school during the school day or overnight • Leaving school for a medical or personal appointment • Leaving home for vacation or any other reason during the school year • Missing classes or a school event • Parents must provide up-to-date contact information to the Housemaster if they are leaving home for a business trip or vacation • Changing their email or phone contact number Student Illness Any student who is ill or not feeling well must report to the Health & Wellness Centre where they will be assessed. Parents should not to pick up their son to take him home during the school day or evening until they have discussed the matter with our Health Centre staff and their son’s Housemaster. Students missing class or any other school commitments due to illness may only be excused by our Health Centre staff. The parent of a boarding student cannot excuse their son from classes via a phone call or email if he is directly under our care. The student must report to the Health Centre. Parents must notify the Health Centre if their son(s) have contracted any communicable illness. REACH Sign-Out System It is important that your Housemaster know your whereabouts at all times and that you use the REACH sign-out system anytime while leaving campus or during supervised study. In addition, if there is an issue with your REACH sign-out, you should not leave campus until you have resolved the matter with your Housemaster. In order to highlight the importance of the REACH sign-out system, the following demerits will be issued in the following situations: -

-

if a student creates an overnight leave request - goes green (approved by parents) but fails to sign-out - 4 demerits; if a student fails to sign-in from leave - 2 demerits; if a student creates an overnight leave request and does not have permission (pending leave or parents or host never approved) and is in direct violation of the Code of Conduct; and, if a student leaves outside local leave area (Newmarket, Aurora) without permission from both parents and the Housemaster (e.g. Richmond Hill, Markham, Toronto, etc.), he is in direct violation of the Code of Conduct

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Daily Leave Students may sign out to leave campus (Aurora/Newmarket) during lunch (MS Macdonald students are not permitted to leave campus during the academic day), after their sports and other school commitments on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. Students must be back in residence 15 minutes before the start of study. Leave after study is not permitted unless permission is granted by the Housemaster. In addition, there is no leave after 7:00 p.m. unless permission is granted by the Housemaster. Students should not leave campus until permission has been given and they have used Reach to sign-out. If a student mispresents his day leave, or does not sign out, (e.g. leaves outside the Aurora/Newmarket area), he is in direct violation of the Code of Conduct. Saturday/Sunday Leave Students may sign out from campus to Aurora/Newmarket, but must ensure that they sign out and return by the prescribed times. Special leave requests (e.g., trip to Toronto) must be made to the Housemaster in advance and requires parental permission via REACH. Housemasters may deny leave requests depending on the circumstances (e.g., inclement weather) surrounding the request for the safety or well-being of the student. There is no leave after 7:00 p.m. unless permission is granted by the Housemaster. Students should not leave campus until permission has been given and they have used Reach to sign-out. If a student misrepresents his leave, or does not signout (e.g. leaves outside the Aurora/Newmarket area) he is in direct violation of the Code of Conduct. Weekend Overnight Leave Students must request weekend leave no later than Thursday evening via the REACH boarding program. Any weekend overnight leave request after Thursday evening requires a meeting with the Housemaster and will only be granted if approved by host/parents via REACH. Overnight leave requires the parents or guardian to approve the leave request. Housemasters will approve the leave request to host families only after parents/host families have verified the leave request via the REACH boarding program. Students granted overnight leave must sign-out following school commitments and return by 9:00 p.m. on Sunday. Special requests should be made in advance. It is the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s responsibility to have their parent and the host family contact the Housemaster granting permission for overnight leave before a student leaves campus and signs out via the REACH boarding program. Any changes to a studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekend plans must be approved by the Housemaster, and it is the responsibility of the student to contact the Housemaster to obtain approval. Host Family Responsibilities: The REACH Boarding approval process provides all parties involved with the opportunity to decline any leave, and in turn makes being a host a choice. If a family agrees to be a host, they accept the responsibility for the care of the student/guest. As such they are responsible for the safety, care and well-being of student guests. If a student signs out to a host family, the Housemaster involved is relinquishing their guardianship to the host. It is therefore expected that, while in thier care, any St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student will adhere to the guidelines detailed in the Parent & Student Handbook. We encourage all parents and hosts to communicate with each other in order to ensure that everyone is aware of the specific plans involved with any leave request. 105


Parent If a parent gives consent for their son to enter into the care of a host family, the school assumes no responsibility for him until he returns to the School and signs back into his residence. Parental approval demonstrates that they understand that their son will not be in the care of St. Andrew’s College during the designated period but with the host family. We encourage all parents to communicate with host families so that you are aware of the details surrounding the leave request.

Miscellaneous Food Delivery Food deliveries are not permitted to any residence or to campus from Monday through Thursday inclusive. An evening snack will be provided for boarders. Food deliveries are permitted from Friday–Sunday until 10:30 p.m. All deliveries are to be made to the lobby of the residence and, not to individual rooms. Any food delivery after ‘in-room’ time will not be accepted and depending on the circumstances the student may be responsible to pay for the food. Residential Kitchenette Residential kitchenettes are located in each common room. Students are asked to respect the area and follow posted rules. House food is to remain in the kitchenette and may not be stored in residence rooms. Cellular Phones/Other Electronic Items Cell phones may not be used during study or after lights out. Students with cell phones must provide their number to their Housemasters. Improper use of cell phones (e.g., use after lights out) or any other electronic devices will result in an electronics strike. Residential Electronics Policy Only school issued laptops are permitted at SAC. During study: - Cell phones and other personal electronic devices must be placed in ROLODEX baskets. - Unauthorized use of any electronic device during study will be issued a residential computer strike. - grades 6-11s will lock-up their electronic devices in their residential lock-up room before in-rooms time. Pick-up is after 6:00 a.m; and, - grade 12 students will only lock-up their electronic devices if their Housemaster feels it is in their best interest to restrict the use of these devices. Residential Electronic Strikes: - strike 1 – loss of electronic devices for 1 day; - strike 2 – loss of electronic devices for 5 days; - strike 3 – loss of electronic devices for 7 days, and, 106


-

strike 4 – Circle of Care meeting including parents, advisor, and Director of the Health Centre.

Emails are sent to parents/advisor/health centre for each infraction. Any student who does not place all his electronic devices in lock-up, or intentionally places a ‘dummy device’ in lock-up, will receive the subsequent electronic strike and is subject to additional repercussions at the Housemaster’s discretion and in accordance with the Schools Code of Honour. A student who intentionally doesn’t lock his electronics during lock-up will receive a Tier one gating and electronic strike; Second Offence, the student will receive a Tier Two gating and an electronic strike. Third Office, the student will meet with a school administrator. Horseplay/Sports in Residence There should not be any playing of sports of any type in residence hallways and/or residence rooms. This includes any bouncing, kicking, or throwing of balls and horseplay. Fire sprinklers and heat sensors are very sensitive to any impact, so even brushing them in the hallway or room may set them off. A student will be held responsible for, and may be reprimanded, fined, and/or charged or fined by the Fire Marshall and the School should this occur. Laundry Etiquette In the basement there are washers and dryers. It is important that these be used in a manner which allows the greatest access for all residents. If a student puts a load in a machine, they should be aware of the time at which the cycle will end and clear the machine immediately after. There is no charge for the use of these washers and dryers. Do not remove clothes before a cycle is complete or throw clothes on the floor. It is also unacceptable to leave your laundry in the laundry room for an extended period of time. Washroom Etiquette Remember that these facilities must be used by everyone and that cleanliness is important. Please ensure that toilets and urinals flush after use. Linen Services Bed linen is provided by the School. Exchange is available after the house meeting on Sunday for US students. Macdonald House residents have their sheets changed every Tuesday. Dry cleaning services, clothing repair, and laundry services are also available. Charges will appear on your account for these services. Dry cleaning pickup is on Tuesday with return scheduled for Thursday. First Aid Kit There is a first aid kit and Epipen in each residence. Please report any serious injuries immediately to the Housemaster or Health Centre staff. Emergencies In the case of emergencies, students can contact either one of the Housemasters on their cell phone. If you are sick at night, contact the Housemaster and he will then contact the Health 107


Centre. Students should not call home and have their parents pick them up during the night without following this protocol. Cell phone numbers of all Housemasters are below: Housemaster Cell Numbers: Sifton House – Mr. Keith Ramon: Sifton House – Mr. Matthew Jaekel:

905.717.8763 905.751.9738

Flavelle House – Mr. Jamie MacPherson: 905.751.9742 Flavelle House – Mr. Mark Burton: 905.751.9741

Memorial House – Mr. Michael Carroll: 905.751-9732 Memorial House – Ms. Emilia MacDonald: 905.717.8765 Macdonald House – Mr. David Galajda: Macdonald House – Mr. Paul Totera: Macdonald House – Mr. Jeff LaForge:

905.717.8769 905.751.9743 905.751.8719

In a medical emergency, call 911 and have someone inform the Health Centre (or page them after hours at 416-331-5808). Fire Safety If you suspect fire, pull the fire alarm and alert an adult (e.g., Housemaster, Duty Master, etc.) as you exit the building. Follow the posted and rehearsed residential fire policy. It is a serious crime/penalty to pull the fire alarm without cause. Offenders will be dealt with by the Fire Marshall and proper authorities, and may face dismissal from the College.

School Policies Cars In order for you to bring a car onto campus, you must submit a form to register your vehicle with Mr. Courtenay Shrimpton, Assistant Headmaster. The School takes no responsibility in monitoring students getting in another student vehicle. It is a clear expectation that parents communicate with their son about their family expectations in this regard. Anytime that you plan to leave campus you MUST sign-out via Reach. Failure to do so will result in disciplinary action at the discretion of the Housemaster and school administration. Demerit System Please refer to the Discipline Process and Consequences section of the Parent and Student Handbook for more information on demerits and gatings.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL Director's Welcome Welcome to the Middle School at St. Andrew’s College. It is an honour to lead a Middle School that is committed to providing endless opportunities, in all areas of school life, to a curious, creative, hard working, and unique student body. We are fiercely devoted to honouring the unique development of boys through their most formative years. We recognize that this stage of growth brings an abundance of untapped potential; promise and risk-taking run high, often resulting in failures, but leading to glorious triumphs. Our academic and co-curricular programming, which includes the development of student leadership and community giving, is intentional. We aim to ensure that our offerings are forward thinking, innovative, exciting, and practical as we prepare our students for the skills and emotional intelligence that is required for tomorrow, all the while, striving to become “the complete man, the well-round citizen.” The dedicated Middle School faculty are eager to engage your son in the classroom, in the art studio, on the fields and courts, and in our local community in a challenging, yet supportive manner. The energy, enthusiasm, and commitment that every teacher brings to teaching and learning at SAC is inspirational; just wait and see! This section of the Parent and Student Handbook is offered specifically for our Middle School families. It provides important content as it pertains to our Middle School program. I am confident that you will find the information helpful as you begin or continue your educational journey at St. Andrew’s College. I look forward to personally welcoming you in September. Sincerely,

Sabrina D’Angelo Director of the Middle School

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MIDDLE SCHOOL VISION The Middle School at SAC provides: • • • • •

a team of dedicated Middle School faculty who are committed to the development of preadolescent and adolescent boys; a challenging, integrative, and exploratory curriculum that supports the School’s overall academic vision and is designed to meet the unique needs of Middle School boys; an involvement leading to an appreciation of the arts, fair play through athletics, and a commitment to serve one’s community; an environment that supports the socio emotional needs of pre-adolescence and fosters health, wellness, and safety through an active Advisory and student leadership program; and, a commitment to the development of a positive relationship between school, family, and student through ongoing communication.

Parent Communication We ask all parents to establish a working email address, provide it to the School, and check it regularly in order to facilitate communication between the Advisor and parents. Members of faculty are always prepared to assist you when needed. If you require support, please proceed as follows: Teacher: Immediate discussion with your son’s teacher is the most direct and useful manner by which to resolve an academic concern. Advisor: The primary purpose of an Advisor is to assist his advisee in dealing with school matters and he/she is the primary communication contact between school and home. Director of the Middle School: Mrs. Sabrina D’Angelo is available to assist parents with any issue or concern.

Advisory Program The Advisor Program at St. Andrew’s is designed “To strengthen and support young Andreans and allow them to more fully realize their potential to become “the complete man, the wellrounded citizen.” In the Middle School, Advisors and their advisees meet on a daily basis. The Advisor is the main contact person for the student and his parents or guardians. In grades 5, 6, 7, and 8, a student changes his Advisor every year in order to facilitate the greatest number of connections and contact time in the ‘team concept’ of the Middle School. The Advisor is the primary contact for home-school communication relating to academic achievement. Each Advisor has between eight and ten advisees.

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ACADEMIC PROGRAM The academic program at St. Andrew’s College is a rich and challenging experience that is intended to prepare students for the Upper School Program. This section of the handbook will give students and parents some of the important information that will help guide them and allow for our students to reach their full potential.

Academic Honours Grades 5 & 6 Academic Honours The Academic Merit Tie is awarded each term to students who have achieved an overall learning skills average of 80% or greater. These students are recognized at the November and March Academic Assemblies and on Prize Day in June. On Prize Day, students who achieved an overall academic average of 80% or greater will receive a Bronze Scholar’s Medal. A Silver Scholar’s Medal is awarded to the student in each grade who has the second highest overall grade average. The Gold Scholar’s Medal is awarded to the student in each grade who has the highest overall grade average. Grades 7 & 8 Academic Honours The Academic Merit Tie is awarded each term to students who have achieved an overall learning skills average of 80% or greater. These students are recognized at the November and March Academic Assemblies and on Prize Day in June. A Scholar’s Pin is awarded to students who have achieved an overall grade average of 80% or greater. These students are recognized at the March Academic Assembly. On Prize Day, students who achieved an overall academic average of 80% or greater will receive a Bronze Scholar’s Medal. A Silver Scholar’s Medal is awarded to the student in each grade who has the second highest overall grade average. The Gold Scholar’s Medal is awarded to the student in each grade who has the highest overall grade average. The Headmaster’s Honour Roll tie is awarded to those students who have achieved an average that places them amongst the top ten in their respective grade. These students are recognized at the March Academic Assembly and on Prize Day in June.

Academic Integrity We believe that the faculty at St. Andrew’s College has a responsibility to: • • • • •

teach its students to function with academic integrity; embed strategies in the curriculum that will enable students to operate with academic integrity; offer an academic integrity policy that can be enforced in a consistent and measured manner, taking into consideration the unique nature of each situation; ensure students’ understanding of academic integrity is enduring and prepares them for future academic success; create assignments that preclude the possibility of cheating; and, 111


ensure new boys are abreast of the expectations and skills required at the grade level they are entering.

We believe that our students: • • •

must demonstrate honesty in all academic endeavours and approach academic endeavours as Andreans must take an active role in the learning process have a responsibility to understand all academic integrity policies outlined in the Parent and Student Handbook

The “spirit” of the law will always supersede the “letter” of the law in these matters. Definitions Plagiarism consists of (but is not necessarily limited to): • • • • •

Misrepresenting someone else’s work as one’s own: e.g., copying another student’s paper or an article from a journal or website; buying an essay from a term-paper mill Patchwriting: writing a paper by simply patching together blocks of text, perhaps with slight modification, taken from one or more sources Paraphrasing or summarizing information from a source without citation Quoting material without proper use of quotation marks (even if otherwise cited correctly) Translating a work from one language to another without citation

Cheating consists of (but is not necessarily limited to): • • • • • • • • •

Using unauthorized notes or other aids in a test or exam, or copying from or being influenced by another student’s work during an evaluation or assessment Giving unauthorized aid to another student; allowing another student to copy or use one’s test, exam, paper or homework Receiving excessive assistance with homework or take-home tests from a tutor, parent or fellow student Using translating software or translations of texts studied in class without the permission of the teacher Submitting the same work for credit to more than one teacher, unless both teachers give their permission Misuse of technology, including, but not limited to, cell phones, calculators, laptops Using the intellectual property of another individual without acknowledging the source File sharing without the teacher’s permission The intentional manipulation of teacher/student feedback notes within any OneNote ‘shared’ file

Process Throughout the student’s academic career, the student is responsible for adhering to the academic integrity policy. Those found guilty of plagiarism/cheating or other violations of the Code of Academic Integrity will be subject to the following range of disciplinary action:

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Academic Warning: If a student is referred to the Director of the Middle School as a result of a concern that the Academic Integrity Policy has been breached, the matter will be reviewed carefully. If no definitive conclusion can be reached, yet the student has behaved, whether advertently or inadvertently, in a manner where there may be the perception of academic indiscretion, then the Director of the Middle School reserves the right to assign the student an Academic Warning. The assignment of an Academic Warning is meant to trigger a dialogue between the student, parent(s), teacher(s), and administration on the topic of academic integrity. The student will be required to review the Academic Integrity Policy carefully with the Director of the Middle School. Parents will be apprised of the situation. In the case of a First Offence: • • • • •

communication will be established with the student’s parents and advisor; student will meet with the Director of the Middle School; student will receive a zero for the work but will be afforded an opportunity to redo an assignment and receive up to 50% of the value of the assignment; student will lose his “Good Standing Status” for a period of three months; and, student’s current teachers and Housemaster will be informed.

In the case of a Second Offence: • • • • • • •

communication will be established with the student’s parents and advisor; student will meet with the Director of the Middle School; student will be ineligible to receive recognition at the subsequent end-of-term Academic Assembly, including Prize Day; student will be required to attend a remediation session in the GLC and will be required to provide a statement of enduring learning following the session; student will lose his “Good Standing Status” for a period of six months; student will receive a zero for the work but will be expected to redo the assignment; and, student’s current teachers and Housemaster will be informed.

In the case of a Third Offence: • • • • • •

communication will be established with the student’s parents and advisor; student will meet with the Headmaster and Director of the Middle School; student will be ineligible to receive recognition at the subsequent end-of-term Academic Assembly, including Prize Day; student will lose his “Good Standing Status” for a period of one school year; student will receive a zero for the work but will be expected to redo the assignment; and, student’s current teachers and Housemaster will be informed.

Note: Offences are cumulative in nature and will remain a part of the student’s file until the end of grade 8. A Final Note In the same way that the “spirit” of the law outweighs the “rule” of the law in all cases where the academic integrity of a given work is called into question, the Headmaster reserves the right to pardon, modify a response to, or dismiss a student at his discretion. 113


Evening Study and Homework Our boarding students are involved in a supervised evening study in the Rogers Hall classrooms, Monday to Thursday inclusive from 8:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:30 p.m. Certain students in grades 7 and 8 display greater independence and are able to study in their rooms in Macdonald House. As such, the following guideline has been stated to the boys: All Middle School students should spend 80 minutes, on average, on their evening preparation for classes. During this time, students should be working on assigned homework given that day, ongoing project work, revision of notes or with the reading of their novel that they are involved with for the Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reading program.

Reporting Teachers use a variety of assessment and evaluation strategies including: peer and selfassessments, tests, essays, independent study projects, oral presentations, portfolios, journals, group projects, skills checklists, labs, and examinations. One hundred percent of the grade is based on evaluation conducted throughout the course in grades 5, 6 and 7. Eighty-five percent of the grade is based on evaluation conducted throughout the course in grade 8 and fifteen percent of the grade is based on a final summative evaluation aimed at determining achievement of course expectations. The mathematics program and the comprehensive arts program are exceptions to this as they are grade 9 credit courses; therefore, the summative portion is valued at 30%. This final evaluation includes a required formal written examination and optional evaluations in the form of a performance, essay, oral presentation or evaluations suitable to the course. Formal reports are issued as described below. Grades 5 and 6 Report Period

Information Included

November Report Evaluation of subject learning skills, cumulative subject letter grade and comment, cumulative absences, Advisor comment, athletics comment, co-curricular comments, boarding Housemaster comment. March Report

Evaluation of subject learning skills, cumulative subject letter grade and comment, cumulative absences, Advisor comment, athletics comment, co-curricular comments.

June Report

Evaluation of subject learning skills, cumulative subject letter grade and comment, cumulative absences, Advisor comment, athletics comment, co-curricular comments, boarding Housemaster comment.

Grade 7 and 8

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Report Period

Information Included

November Report Evaluation of subject learning skills, cumulative subject letter grade and comment, cumulative absences, Advisor comment, athletics comment, and co-curricular comments, boarding Housemaster comment. March Report

Evaluation of subject learning skills, cumulative subject numeric grade and comment, cumulative absences, Advisor comment, athletics comment, and co-curricular comments.

June Report

Evaluation of subject learning skills, cumulative subject numeric grade and comment, cumulative absences, Advisor comment, athletics comment, co-curricular comments, and boarding Housemaster comment.

Attendance at evaluation sessions is compulsory. Do not make any other plans during the final examination period in June for grade 8 students. Students who miss a final evaluation will receive a zero unless the absence is verified and legitimate. In order for the absence to be considered legitimate, the student must have visited his family doctor, the hospital emergency ward, or the SAC Health Centre, and provide the Director of the Middle School with a medical certificate stating the exact date(s) the student was seen for treatment. For any other absence to be considered legitimate, approval of the exceptional circumstance must be given by the Director of the Middle School or her designate. Students missing an evaluation because of a verified legitimate absence will receive an estimated mark for the evaluation.

CENTRE FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING A Comprehensive Academic Support System The Centre for Learning and Teaching (CLT) at St. Andrew’s College provides a variety of programs and resources designed to promote student learning and improve instruction.

The Guided Learning Centre The Guided Learning Centre is unique to St. Andrew’s. Students who have not finished assignments on schedule are required to attend the GLC after school and are given the guidance and time to complete their work. The GLC also provides teachers with support for students who may miss evaluation opportunities because of other school commitments. A similar program to the GLC, the “GLC Plus” identifies students who regularly neglect assignments or other school work. The “GLC Plus” differs from the GLC in that instead of permanently pulling these students from co-curricular activities, which can be detrimental to the St. Andrew’s experience, they are assigned to a weekly one-hour GLC session. At these weekly sessions, teachers work with students, helping them to better manage their academic portfolio. The Need:  

some students have trouble keeping up with the rhythm of a course; some students habitually hand in work late; 115


 

some students may go through a busy period, finding it difficult to balance commitments and so they get behind in their work; and, and some students may benefit from the support of a supervised learning area.

The Circumstances:   

the subject teacher assigns the student to the GLC if an assignment is not submitted by the due date; the Director of the Middle School and the Advisor feel that some short-term focus on academics is required; and, the student voluntarily attends the GLC. A student will not be permitted to attend unless he acquires written permission or an email is sent from his coach/supervising teacher to the Director of the Middle School or the GLC co-ordinator approving the student’s missed co-curricular commitment. This permission should be communicated to the Director of the Middle School or the GLC co-ordinator 24 hours in advance of the GLC session.

The GLC is not:    

a “homework” room (the focus is on overdue assignments); a replacement for extra help; a replacement for tutoring; or a detention centre where students are referred to as a result of discipline issues (attendance and behaviour).

Day, Time and Place: 

Monday and Friday from 3:45 to 5:00 p.m. and Wednesday from 1:45 to 3:00 p.m. in room R106.

Procedure: 1) Students can be assigned to attend the GLC for an assignment that has not been completed. 2) Failure to submit on the “Due Date” results in the subject teacher emailing student names to the GLC co-ordinator’s email account by the end of the class. 3) The student, parent, Advisor, coach, and housemaster are then informed of the GLC referral. The assignment must be submitted to the GLC co-ordinator on the 4th day following the referral. 4) Ten percent (10%) is deducted from the assignment. 5) Starting on the day of the assignment due date, the student is withdrawn from his cocurricular commitments and must attend the GLC. Students are ineligible to participate in any co-curricular activity if work is outstanding. All students who are assigned to the GLC are not able to attend any co-curricular activities on that day unless the assignment is completed before the co-curricular activity begins. 116


6) A “closure date” of four days after the original due date is established. 7) Once the assignment has been completed, the student will be allowed to re-join his cocurricular commitment(s). 8) When the closure date passes, the student will be required to submit the work that has been completed to the GLC co-ordinator. Marks will be awarded in accordance with assignment expectations that are successfully demonstrated. The portion of the assignment that has not been completed will be assigned an “incomplete mark” (effectively a zero).

Consequences for Not Attending the GLC The GLC is considered to be an extension of the classroom. Students who choose not to attend will be subject to a Tier 1 or Core gating.

“Good Standing” Students Many students are able to manage both their academic and co-curricular commitments effectively. “Good Standing” (GS) students are boys who have achieved Scholar status during the previous academic term. While GS students are subjected to the same 10% deduction for missing due dates, they do not have to attend GLC sessions. Assignments are due four days after the original due date. If an assignment is not submitted by a GS student by the end of the four-day period, the student will lose his GS privilege. Additionally, any student referred to the GLC three times in a single term will lose his “good standing” status.

Extensions Occasionally, students will require assignment extensions for extenuating circumstances. Students must apply to their subject teacher for extensions at least 48 hours before the due date.

GLC Plus Referral Process and Protocol In conjunction with the GLC Coordinator, team leaders, Advisors, and parents, the Director of the Middle School will assign at-risk students to the GLC Plus. Automatic referral to the GLC will be applied to at-risk students, defined as those boys who have a grade average and/or a learning skills average of less than 65%. Students must attend the GLC one day a week for the entire term. The GLC co-ordinator will work with the identified students throughout the term in order to improve their academic standing. Students must attend the sessions on a weekly basis. Failure to do so will result in a gating. Specific action will be taken: • The student will be assigned to the GLC for one day a week, Monday, Wednesday or Friday. 117


â&#x20AC;˘ The student and the GLC co-ordinator will formulate a written remedial plan for the student to complete in that week. Missed Test Procedure Students who miss an assessment for a legitimate reason may complete the assessment in the GLC upon their return. It is incumbent upon the student to complete the assessment in an expedient manner.

Open Classroom Teachers are committed to providing extra help to boys in their classes. This help will take place from 12:25 to 12:40 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays during our Open Classroom. Faculty will be available during these times for boys to drop in for any minor clarification of work covered during class. If extensive assistance is required, the services of a tutor may have to be obtained.

The Writing Centre The Writing Centre is a branch of the library that provides classes, tutorials, workshops, and individual consultations to help students develop effective writing and research skills.

ESL Plus The ESL Plus program is designed to help students whose first language is not English and who have already completed the ESL program at St. Andrew's, or who are taking both the ESL and the regular English Program. Many of these students often need ESL support until the end of grade 12 to further develop their English language skills; this is especially true with writing and speaking skills.

Math Centre The importance of mathematics in so many university disciplines makes it essential that we provide students with a strong foundation. The Math Centre was designed to assist those students who struggle with mathematics through individual and small group tutorial sessions. The program is facilitated by a University of Waterloo co-operative education student who is currently undertaking a degree in mathematics, and is supervised by the staff of the CLT. The Math Centre is offered in the Towers Library on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.

Learning Resource Services This is the designated office at St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that maintains the records of students with learning exceptionalities, certifies eligibility for services, determines reasonable accommodations, and develops plans for the provision of accommodations for students. For more information regarding the accommodations currently offered to students with learning exceptionalities, please contact Ms. Amanda Thorne, the Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Learning Resource Specialist, at (905) 7273178 ext. 236, or by email at amanda.thorne@sac.on.ca.

Tutoring

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Students who feel that they require additional assistance in an academic subject, or who would benefit from an “academic coach” may opt to request a tutor. Tutors may be senior students or tutors engaged from outside the school community. All requests for tutoring should be made through Amanda Thorne at (905) 727-3178 ext. 236, or by email at amanda.thorne@sac.on.ca.

Standing Committee for Excellence in Teaching and Learning In addition to a comprehensive academic support program, the CLT is the locus of a faculty professional development committee called SCETL (Standing Committee for Excellence in Teaching and Learning). The group is currently engaged in developing a vision for the academic program for the purposes of ensuring that our policies, procedures, and programs are in line with our pedagogical beliefs.

ST. ANDREW’S COLLEGE INDIVIDUALIZED LEARNING PROTOCOL Eligible Students As St. Andrew's College is a university preparatory school, policies to support the learning of “identified” students must be consistent with the policies/guidelines of Canadian universities. There are two ways in which a student can be identified as requiring individualized academic support: 1. There is a Ministry of Education Individual Education Plan (IEP) already in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR) when he starts at St. Andrew’s. 2. A formal Education Assessment is completed by a licensed psychologist. In keeping with Ministry and university policy, St. Andrew’s College reserves the right to request an updated version of the IEP/Ed. Assessment in the event that the original be more than five years old.

Accommodations The term “accommodations” is used to refer to the special teaching and assessment strategies, human supports, and/or individualized equipment required to enable a student to learn and to demonstrate learning. Accommodations do not alter the provincial curriculum expectations for the grade. At St. Andrew’s, students who have been identified as exceptional may receive the following accommodations: 1. They will be granted extra time on tests and exams. 2. They may write examinations in a separate, quiet room. 3. They will be afforded the opportunity to use a laptop whenever doing so will clearly help them achieve at their potential.

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4. Students who have been identified as those who will benefit from the use of a formula sheet for math and science will be afforded this sheet on all math and science examinations. Requests must be made to the Learning Resource Specialist at least 48 hours in advance, and the teacher must approve the sheet before it can be used. This formula sheet must be no larger than one 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper (single-sided), 12-point font, or handwritten. While these are the only formal accommodations offered at St. Andrew’s, subject teachers make every effort to ensure that they are using “best practices” in the classroom and are supported in these endeavours by the School administration and faculty, and in cases where students have been identified as exceptional are involved, by the School’s Learning Resource Specialist.

Communication It is the responsibility of the School’s Learning Resource Specialist to communicate (in writing) the specific recommendations listed on the IEP/Ed. Assessment with each subject teacher before the end of September. Subject teachers will receive this information in the form of a Student Support Plan which will outline significant background information, necessary accommodations, and suggested “best practices” for the student in question. All formal documentation pertaining to IEP/Ed. Assessments will be kept in the strictest of confidence in the student’s OSR. In the event that it becomes apparent that a student is experiencing academic difficulty, the student’s Advisor will contact the School’s Learning Resource Specialist who may initiate an InSchool Team process. It is the responsibility of the Learning Resource Specialist and the Academic Support Co-ordinator to ensure that the student’s Advisor, parents, subject teachers, and Housemaster work together to ensure that the student receives the appropriate support.

Extra Time (Exams) If the IEP/ Ed. Assessment recommends that the student be given extra time for exams, he will have the option of taking additional time to complete this evaluation. The student must write his exam in the “Extra Time” room if he would like to take additional time. The classroom teacher, in conjunction with the Middle School Learning Resource Facilitator, will be responsible for making the necessary arrangements.

Extra Time (Tests) If the IEP/Ed. Assessment recommends extra time for tests, the student will make the necessary arrangements with his teacher.

Ontario Student Record The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is the confidential record of a student’s educational progress through school. The OSR is an ongoing record and is transferred from previous schools to future schools. The OSR contains biographical information about the student, a listing of schools attended, parent and guardian information, Ontario Student Transcript, final report cards, any special records of standardized testing, identifications or placement determinations, and health and psychological reports. Parents or students can review the contents of the OSR by contacting the Administrative Office. 120


DAILY ROUTINE INFORMATION Mobile Phones and Personal Entertainment Devices Students are permitted to have cellular phones and personal entertainment devices on campus, but they must be left in their lockers during the academic day (8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.). If the boys use their phone or personal entertainment devices during the academic day without permission, the item will be confiscated from them and returned after parent communication from the Assistant Director of the Middle School. The boys are able to use mobile phones after school to communicate with their parents. Any parent communication to the School during the academic day must come through the School Reception.

Co-Curricular Program An integral part of the Andrean experience is our Co-curricular program. This program takes place daily after classes and includes activities such as arts, athletics and Cadets. The times of the co-curricular programs often vary from day-to-day and as such the School has tried to assist parents by listing the times of each program on the School website.

Arts Program All Middle School students are expected to be involved with the Middle School Arts program every Tuesday. Boys will choose from the following programs: Band, Debate, Drama, Drumming, Piping, Film and Media Studies, Robotics, or Visual Arts. The Arts program runs from September to May with the option of selecting a new program in January. Any student missing an arts commitment, without permission from the instructor, will be held accountable for their absence.

Athletics Program All Middle School students are expected to be involved with the athletics program for all three terms (fall, winter, and spring). The Athletic Program operates on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, and some Saturdays. Our interscholastic teams will often have a commitment on Saturday mornings, which is usually a game day. All boys are expected to try out for an interscholastic team each term. Boys playing on interscholastic teams should review the season schedule with the appropriate coach in advance so as to decide whether they can fully commit to the team in question. Selection to a SAC team will be based upon meeting the commitment of that team. Attendance at the CISAA championship tournament is mandatory for all members of an interscholastic team. These are usually held on the last day of each athletics season. Any student missing a sports commitment, without the permission from the coach, will be held accountable for their absence. 121


Fall Term (September to October) – cross-country running, soccer, volleyball and an Intramural Multi-Sports program Winter Term (November to March) – alpine skiing, basketball, hockey, squash, swimming and an Intramural Multi-Sports program Spring Term (March to May) – badminton, field lacrosse, rugby, slow pitch, tennis, track and field. An intramural 3 on 3 Basketball program is offered during this term.

Optional Programming (Fridays) Middle School students will have an opportunity to take part in optional programming on Fridays following classes. The optional programming time slot includes Band, Drama*, Robotics*, Piping, and Leadership in Training. *These programs may require additional time with their students in preparation for school events.

Clan System Each student is assigned to a clan during his time in the Middle School. Each clan has a mix of grades 5, 6, 7 and 8 boarding and day students. Points are earned for both the student and his clan in three different areas: academics, co-curricular activities, and community service. The clans in the Middle School are Bruce, Douglas, Montrose, and Wallace. Students can earn bronze, silver, and gold clan pins for outstanding achievement and involvement in all that SAC offers.

Community Service In addition to the monthly Community Giving Project which the students are involved in, Middle School students are encouraged to achieve fifteen hours of community service over their Middle school career. For further information, students should consult the community service website or discuss opportunities with their advisor.

Leadership in Training - #142 Highland Cadet Corps This leadership and experiential learning program is available to grade 8 students interested in pursuing leadership in all aspects of the St. Andrew’s College Middle School community. The weekly program will take place each Friday after school from 3:45-5:15 p.m. from September to May. Activities will include leadership and team-building, outdoor expedition skills, marksmanship and archery, watermanship programs, orienteering, and physical fitness. Participants will have an opportunity to take part in periodic field trips and weekend expeditions organized by the Cadet staff. Students involved in this program will be issued full Highland Dress and will be able to take part in the Cadet Corps ceremonial events each spring. These events include the Church Parade, the Headmaster’s Parade, and the Annual Cadet Inspection. Those who complete the program will be awarded rank advancement and leadership roles as Syndicate Leaders in their grade 9 year.

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Daily Program Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday Morning Activity Period 1 Period 2 Lunch Recess Open Classroom Period 3 Period 4 Advisory Co-Curricular Activity

30 70 70 30 40 15 70 70 10 TBA

8:30 – 9:00 9:05 – 10:15 10:20 – 11:30 11:30 – 12:00 12:00 – 12:40 12:25 – 12:40 12:45 – 1:55 2:00 – 3:10 3:20 – 3:30 3:45 – TBA*

Wednesday Period 1 Period 2 Reading Period Family Style Lunch Recess/Clubs & Councils Period 3 Period 4 Advisory Co-Curricular Activity

45 45 20

9:30 – 10:15 10:20 – 11:05 11:10 – 11:30

30

11:30 – 12:00

35

12:00 – 12:35

45 45 10 TBA

12:40 – 1:25 1:30 – 2:15 2:20 – 2:30 2:45 – TBA*

* TBA: Finish time depends on the student’s activity.

Activities Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

Morning Advisory Activity Afternoon Co-Curricular Activity Morning Advisory Activity Afternoon Co-Curricular Activity Afternoon Co-Curricular Activity Morning Advisory Activity Afternoon Co-Curricular Activity Morning Advisory Activity Afternoon Co-Curricular Activity

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Chapel Athletic Program Gathering Arts Program Athletic Program Chapel Athletic Program Open Advisory Optional Programming


Demerit System Day and boarding students at St. Andrew’s College have many daily compulsory commitments that they must meet in order to be in good standing within the School community. When they fail to meet such a requirement, a demerit is given. A demerit is given for the following reasons: • • • • • • • • • •

Late arrival to morning activity, classes, afternoon Advisory, Tuesday Arts program or the intramural program; Arriving to reading period without the appropriate reading material; Arriving to afternoon Advisory without an agenda; Leaving personal items in areas other than their locker or Advisory classroom; Arrival with improper dress (experience has shown that the main areas of concern are white socks, running shoes, and no belt. Please remember the need for Number 1 Dress each Wednesday); Hair not meeting the standards of the dress code; Failing to maintain the standard of dress during the academic day; Found in the School building during lunch recess, unless otherwise instructed; Other issues may be subject to a demerit at the professional discretion of faculty; Residential students are also able to receive demerits that are unique to the residence environment. The Housemaster of Macdonald House, Mr. David Galajda, has communicated these to the boys of Macdonald House.

When a day student receives a total of seven demerits, the student and parent are notified by email to indicate that there is a need to look at how these demerits have accumulated. When the accumulation of eight demerits is reached, the student will be required to serve a Core Gating (grade 5 and 6 students) or a Tier 1 gating (grade 7 and 8 students). Please refer to the index of the Parent and Student Handbook for the details of a gating. When a student serves his gating successfully, his demerit total is reduced to zero.

Dress Code During the academic day, all Middle School students are required to wear a SAC blazer, white dress shirt, appropriate school tie, grey flannels, black belt with a discrete belt buckle, dark dress socks, and black dress shoes. Each Wednesday, the only tie worn must be the Middle School tie. There will be other special days when the Middle School tie must also be the only tie worn and these will be indicated in advance. On occasion, the Middle School has a clan spirit day where the dress will consist of the student’s clan T-shirt along with casual pants, socks, and shoes. Students are encouraged to wear their clan tie on Tuesdays as part of our Tartan Tuesday initiative. Students are encouraged to wear spirited and colourful socks on Fridays as part of our Fun Feet Friday initiative. Once each month, the entire school body has a casual dress day in support of a charitable cause. On these days students are asked to donate $3 in exchange to wear casual clothing. In addition, the School has an expectation in reference to a student’s hair. It must be off the collar at all times, not fall over the eyebrows at any time, and avoid extremes in style and colouring. 125


Laptop Policies In addition to the Computer and Laptop Policies section in this handbook, please note the following specifics to the Middle School: •

• •

Students’ laptops are to be kept closed from Monday to Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (3:30 p.m. on Wednesdays) unless supervised by a teacher. Students may use their laptops for academic work and email during these times in the Rogers Hall classrooms, under the supervision of a faculty member, or in the Towers Library. Student laptop activity will be monitored by the School with the use of Qustudio, a control software program. Please note that Macdonald House residents will have expectations for computer use in residence explained by the residential team.

Carrying Around a Laptop: Special laptop backpacks and hard protective sleeves are provided to students to protect their laptops. Laptops must be transported in their sleeves at all times as these provide the best protection. Students are not permitted to bring their backpacks to class, they must remain in their lockers during the academic school day. Academic Use First: Academic use of the laptops must always take priority over recreational use. Each student is given an Administrator equivalent user account on their laptops. Students can lose this privilege after one computer strike. Movies: • • • • •

No movie watching is permitted during the academic day starting at 8:00 a.m., sports practice times, during study or after lights out; Movie watching is permitted after dinner until study and after study until lights out; Movie watching on campus is only permitted in residences; All academic buildings, sports facilities, Chapel and Cole Hall are movie-free zones at all times, no exceptions; and, Movie watching on athletic trips is at the discretion of the coach. The School recommends that at least the same amount of time be spent on school work.

Content Restrictions: Students are not allowed to have installed on their computers or to share or distribute files which offend community standards, break laws, compromise the School’s computer systems or violate academic policies. Files may be in the form of executable, text, sound, image or video. Here is a list of the sorts of files students should not have on their computers: • •

Pornography in the form of images, videos, or cartoons; Music which offends community standards on issues such as swearing, promotion of drug use, treatment of women, or racism.

First Infraction - meeting with Director of the Middle School and communication home to parents. 126


Second Infraction - meeting with Director of the Middle School and parents. Third Infraction - meeting with Director of the Middle School and parents. Laptop is taken at end of evening after study and returned in the morning. Fourth Infraction - meeting with the Headmaster and parents to determine status at the College.

Leave Policy All Middle School day students are expected to remain on school grounds until they leave for home. They may only leave during the day when accompanied by a parent or guardian. Any student leaving the School during the day must be signed out by their parent or guardian at Reception by Mrs. Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office. Students found off campus during the school day, without a parent or guardian, will be truant and subject to a Tier 1 or Core gating.

Lockers Every Middle School student is issued a locker for the storage of all his classroom articles, along with other personal belongings. Backpacks are only to be used to transport personal belongings to and from school and as such are expected to be stored in the lockers at all times while a student is on campus. The combination must be registered with Ms. Brenda Burston.

Lost and Found The School is aware of the problem concerning the loss of a student's clothing and personal items. This causes a great deal of inconvenience and undue expense to parents. All clothing and personal possessions must be clearly marked with the student's name. Students are expected to place all personal items in their locker. Any backpack, laptops and other items left in hallways or common areas will be removed. Lost items (excluding laptops) can be retrieved from the Middle School Office. Any item without identification will be placed in the lost and found area in Reception by Mrs. Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office. On the last Friday of each month, the lost and found will be cleared from storage and displayed in the foyer of Rogers Hall.

Recess Program All students are required to participate in the daily recess program. The Fall and Spring terms offer outdoor opportunities and a clan intramural program, along with Open Classroom sessions. The Winter term offers indoor, outdoor, a clan intramural program, and Open Classroom choices. Students will be notified when they should return to Rogers Hall if they wish to attend Open Classroom. There are three faculty members and Middle School House Captains to supervise the recess program.

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Morning Arrival All Middle School students are expected to arrive early enough so that they are able to be at their morning activity promptly beginning at 8:30 a.m., with the exception of Wednesday mornings when first period begins at 9:30 a.m. Please be aware that if you are dropping your son off at the School before 8:00 a.m., there is no faculty supervision in Rogers Hall. Boys are welcome to access their locker and attend breakfast in Cole Hall. Similarly, there will be no formal supervision after 4:30 p.m. and as such, parents should arrange for pick-up of their son as soon as he completes his co-curricular program. Parents are expected to call Mrs. Williams if their son will be late or absent from school on any given day. A voice message may be left at extension 291 if calling before 8:00 a.m. Students arriving after 8:30 a.m. MUST report to the Middle School Office and check-in with Mrs. Williams.

Music Instrumental Music: Middle School Middle School offers academic instrumental music classes to all our students regardless of musical ability (grades 5 through 8). Students in our instrumental music program will be charged a $150 rental fee or have the option of supplying their own. In addition, all students will be charged a maintenance fee for reeds, instrument supplies, and general upkeep of their instruments. All sheet music is supplied by the Music Department, method books, and history books and folders will be charged to the student’s account in September. Middle School Band is an option for those students with a desire to play in a more advanced performing ensemble. Rehearsals are offered every Tuesday after school as part of the Middle School Arts program. Middle School Teaching Piping and drumming lessons are offered every Tuesday after school as part of the Middle School Arts program. Equipment costs consist of a practice chanter (a small, quiet, oboe-like instrument that the boys use to learn the complex fingering required to play the pipes) for $130, or snare sticks and practice pad for $50. Sign-up takes place in September and January. Piping instruction is offered at all levels as part of this program. Private tutoring is also available after hours at regular tutoring rates. Once a boy has reached the point where he can try the actual bagpipe or snare drum (usually by March or April), the piping program lends him an instrument. If he continues the following year, he will pay a $195 bagpipe rental fee for the instrument and an $85 maintenance fee for reeds, bags, drum heads and general upkeep of instruments. Drummers pay a $135 rental fee and $50 maintenance fee. Pipers who own their own pipes pay a $50 maintenance fee, but purchase their own bags.

Student Leadership Program St. Andrew’s College recognizes the important role that student leadership plays in fulfilling the School’s mission: “The development of the complete man, the well-rounded citizen.” We 128


depend heavily on the leadership of our student body and as such encourage students to develop strong leadership skills. It is our vision to have as many Middle School boys become involved in a student leadership role as possible. We are proud to offer a variety of student leadership teams in the Middle School: • • • • • • • • •

Anti-Bully Facilitators (Guyship Committee) Athletic Council Clan Captains Environmental Committee First Class Conference Moderators Information Technology Integration Committee Middle School Council Outreach Committee Public Address Announcers

Each year there are a group of grade 11 day students who serve in the role of Middle School House Captains. These senior students work closely with the Advisors to assist in a variety of activities offered in the Middle School. For more detailed information on any of the areas identified in the Middle School section, please refer to the main table of contents.

Weekend and Evening Commitments Some of the College’s most treasured school events take place on the weekends and as such the School is committed to insist that all members of the SAC community be present. Students who are absent from these compulsory events will be held accountable for their absence. The major school events that require compulsory attendance for all St. Andrew’s College students for the upcoming academic year are: Saturday, September 22 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Homecoming SAC

Friday, December 14 7:00 p.m.

Andrean Christmas Roy Thomson Hall, Toronto

Friday, January 25 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

MacPherson Hockey Tournament Opening Ceremonies & Game La Brier Family Arena

Tuesday, May 21 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

Middle School Music Night SAC - Day students are expected to remain at the College after school and have dinner in Cole Hall.

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HOLIDAYS AND MAJOR DATES, 2018-2019 Fall Term Sports Camps (First Teams Only) New Boarders Arrive, Grades 9-11 New Family Orientation Day, Gr. 9-11 Headmaster’s Reception for New Parents, Grades 9-11 New Boarders Arrive, Grades 5-8 New Family Orientation Day, Gr. 5-8 Headmaster’s Reception for New Parents, Grades 5-8 New Boy Orientation, Grades 9-11 Classes Begin Parent Welcome Back Reception Middle School Curriculum Night Homecoming Upper School Curriculum Night Thanksgiving*

Fall Mid-term Break*

Parent/Teacher Interviews

Andrean Christmas December Break*

2018 Contact Mr. Paul Bedard for details – 905.727.3178, ext. 258, paul.bedard@sac.on.ca Tuesday, Sept. 4, 8:30–10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4, 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4, 3:45–4:30 p.m. at the Headmaster’s House Wednesday, Sept. 5, 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 5, 9:30 a.m.–2 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 5, 12:45–2 p.m. at the Headmaster’s House Wednesday, Sept. 5, 9 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 6, 8:45 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 13, 7 p.m. at the Headmaster’s House Tuesday, Sept. 18, 6:15 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25, 6:30 p.m. in the Memorial Chapel Students’ Break: Thursday, Oct. 4, noon Faculty PD: Thursday, October 4, 1–4 p.m. Boarders Return: Monday, Oct. 8 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, Oct. 9, 8:30 a.m. Break on: Thursday, Nov. 8 starting at noon Boarders Return: Monday, Nov. 12 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, Nov. 13, 8:45 a.m. Upper School Students: Thursday, Nov. 8, 1:30–3:30 p.m. and Tuesday, Nov. 13, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Middle School Students: Thursday, Nov. 8, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m. and Tuesday, Nov. 13, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, 7 p.m., Roy Thompson Hall Break on: Thursday, Dec. 20, 3:30 p.m.

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New Year MacPherson Hockey Tournament Winter Mid-term Break*

2019 Boarders Return: Monday, Jan. 7 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, Jan. 8, 8:45 a.m. Friday, Jan. 25 to Sunday, Jan. 27 Opening ceremonies and game Friday, Jan. 25, 7 p.m. Break: Thursday, Feb. 14, 3:30 p.m. Boarders Return: Monday, Feb. 18 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, Feb. 19, 8:45 a.m. Thursday, March 7, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Upper School Parent-Teacher Interviews Middle School Parent-Advisor Thursday, March 7, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Interviews March Break* Break: Thursday, March 7, noon Boarders Return: Monday, March 25 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, March 26, 8:45 a.m. Easter Break* Thursday, April 18, 3:25 p.m. Boarders Return: Monday, April 22 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, April 23, 8:45 a.m. Cadet Church Parade Sunday, April 28: 12:45 p.m. Parade; 2 p.m. Service of Worship Headmaster’s Cadet Inspection Tuesday, April 30, 2:30 p.m. Annual Cadet Inspection Saturday, May 4, 1 p.m. Focus Festival May 8–10 Spring Mid-term Break* Break on: Thursday, May 16, 3:30 p.m. Boarders Return: Monday, May 20 by 9 p.m. Classes resume: Tuesday, May 21, 8:45 a.m. Upper School Exams Thursday, May 30 to Friday, June 7 Grade 8 Exams Thursday, May 30 to Thursday, June 6 Middle School Classes End Thursday, June 6 Upper School Exam Viewing Tuesday, June 11, 9–10 a.m. Grade 8 Graduation Dinner Wednesday, June 12, evening Grade 12 Graduation Dinner Thursday, June 13, evening Prize Day Middle School: Thursday, June 13, 12:30 p.m. Grade 12: Friday, June 14, 1 p.m.

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STAYING CURRENT: • • • •

Visit the SAC website at www.sac.on.ca and click on the News and Events tabs on the right side of the home page. Also check out the Calendar quick link at the top of the home page. Read A Look Ahead, the weekly SAC e-newsletter for parents Read events@sac.on.ca emails Follow SAC on Twitter (@StAndrews1899), Instagram (@StAndrewsCollege1899), and Like us on Facebook (facebook.com/StAndrewsCollege)

Notes • Break dates are scheduled to allow parents to take advantage of booking student travel in advance. Please allow four hours between break start times and flight departures. • The School will be closed on all long weekends indicated by an asterisk (*) and during the December and March breaks. Parents must make arrangements for boys to be away from the School during these periods. For boys not visiting classmates, parents or guardians, the School offers trips within Canada for most long weekends. Current as of Friday, November 16, 2018

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PARENT AND STUDENT HANDBOOK - St. Andrew's College  
PARENT AND STUDENT HANDBOOK - St. Andrew's College