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ARTIST PROFILE: KELLI MAY-KRENZ p. 18

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Sara Wilkins The artwork contained in this issue is solely for personal use. It is meant for inspirational purposes only. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher.

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HOW TO CONTACT US Art Journaling by Somerset Studio® 22992 Mill Creek, Suite B, Laguna Hills, CA 92653 U.S. Toll-Free 1-877-STAMPER (1-877-782-6737) Phone: 949-380-7318 Fax: 949-380-9355 artjournalingmagazine.com CUSTOMER SERVICE For customer service and subscription inquiries, please call U.S. toll-free 877-782-6737, fax 949-380-9355, email retail@stampington.com, or visit our website at stampington.com. Single copies are available for $14.99 plus S&H. All annual subscriptions are for four issues. Subscription prices (U.S. funds): One year/four issues $59.99 U.S. One year/four issues $67.99 Canada One year/four issues $75.99 International Please allow three to eleven weeks for delivery of new subscriptions.

EDITORIAL Art samples and project submissions are welcome. We will take excellent care of your artwork, but Art Journaling cannot be held responsible for damage or loss due to circumstances beyond our control. Please see the submission guidelines on our website at stampington.com/submissions. Brief email queries are welcome at artjournaling@stampington.com. or write to the editor at the address below. No phone calls, please. ADVERTISING To find out about advertising, and questions regarding ad production, call 949-380-7318 or email advertising@stampington.com. RETAILERS If you are interested in carrying Art Journaling by Somerset Studio in your store, please call 949-380-7318 or email wholesale@stampington.com. MARKETING For marketing inquiries, call 949-380-7318, or send an email to marketing@stampington.com. Art Journaling (ISSN 2377-7230) is published quarterly (Jan/Apr/Jul/Oct) by Stampington & Company, 22992 Mill Creek Drive, Suite B, Laguna Hills, CA 92653-1245. Periodicals Postage Paid at Laguna Niguel, CA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Art Journaling, c/o Stampington & Company, 22992 Mill Creek, Suite B, Laguna Hills, CA 92653-1245. Changes of address must be submitted in writing to the publisher. Stampington & Company will not be held responsible for missed issues due to delinquent changes of address or vacation holds. Publications Mail Agreement #40045993 Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: P.O. Box 2601, 6915 Dixie Rd. Mississauga, Ontario L4T 0A9 Canada TRADEMARKS Art Journaling is a division of Somerset Studio. Stampington & Company® and Somerset Studio® are registered trademarks. Product names referred to in this issue are trademarks or registered trademarks of particular companies. The names are used in editorial fashion only to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention to infringe on the trademarks. Stampington & Company is not liable for any misinformation or omissions within this magazine. When implementing the information and instructions within this magazine, readers should do so cautiously and with consideration. Stampington & Company does not endorse the companies advertised in this magazine, nor their products, services, or views, and does not validate any claims made by the advertisers.

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“Vulnerability is the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy, and creativity. It is the source of hope, empathy, accountability, and authenticity.” — Brené Brown Dear Friends, I think anyone who keeps a journal can agree that the act of journaling — or creating art in general — is cathartic and healing, often in ways you didn’t realize you needed. When I was reading through the articles in this issue one last time a couple of days ago, I noticed many of our contributors discussed how art journaling has helped them overcome hardships or cope with change in their lives. As someone who tends to bottle up emotions, I’ve always admired artists who allow themselves to be vulnerable through their art. Even braver are those who mail in their journals to be published in this very magazine. I was touched by the stories I read from our contributors in this issue of Art Journaling, and I’ve no doubt you will be as well. In her article, Diana Hernandez opened up about how her journals have become her friends: “They have listened to me process, pray, sing, and rant, always without judgment” (p. 96). Both Jannette Simmons (p. 88) and Lynne Moncrieff (p. 112) bravely shared how art journaling helped them move through difficult periods of grief in their lives. And in the midst of a creative rut, Dianne Fago challenged herself to make a different kind of journal and in the process learned “how much art journaling helps me, especially when I am feeling down or experiencing anxiety and stress over something” (p. 106). In the spirit of being vulnerable, it’s bittersweet to say that this will be my last issue of Art Journaling as I leave Stampington & Company to begin a new journey. While I could go on for some time about how lucky I feel to have had the chance to work with my talented and kindhearted coworkers for more than two years, I’ll keep it brief: I’m going to miss them dearly. Managing this inspiring magazine has been a pleasure, and I’m so grateful for my time working with such compassionate artists. I’ve unquestionably learned a thing or two about life from our contributors, and their stories will stay with me as I move on to the next chapter of my life. I hope you find them as inspirational as I do. All my best,

Kelly Kirchner Managing Editor artjournaling@stampington.com

Artwork by DeAnne Olguin Williamson of Redondo Beach, CA

Artwork by Imani Suwaris of Beaverton, OR

If you submit artwork to a future issue, try your hand at adorning the packaging. If your mail art is chosen for publication, you’ll receive a complimentary issue of Art Journaling.

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82 Reuse, Recycle, Rejoice! BY ELIZABETH TICHVON

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What’s your favorite way to fill empty spaces on a journal page? Do you prefer to keep areas purposefully blank?

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How did you get started with art journaling? What is your first journaling memory?

96 Creativity Transferred BY DIANA HERNANDEZ

106 A Study in Simplicity B Y D I A N N E FA G O

118 Do you consider yourself to have a specific style? If so, how would you describe it? Does your style change or evolve often?

112 Light Amongst the Shadows: Facing Grief B Y LY N N E M O N C R I E F F

120 Art & the Earth B Y K AT I E S M I T H

18 Artist Profile: Kelli May-Krenz

130 Square One

B Y K E L LY K I R C H N E R

131 Gallery 80 Techniques to Try 138 Submission Guidelines 88 Bound for Art: Embracing the Possibilities BY JANNETTE SIMMONS

139 More Stuff for Your Stash

102 The Written Word

144 About the Publisher

124 Art Journaling at the Speed of Life B Y PA M C A R R I K E R

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My Little Book OF HEALING BY JENNY PETRICEK

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M

y 2017 theme can best be summed up by this quote by John Lennon: “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.” The year started out promising enough. Throughout the first six months, I’d made a commitment to take better care of myself. I was making healthier food choices and exercising four to five times a week. My asthma was under control and I rarely came down with anything more serious than a cold — which, for a school teacher like myself who is surrounded by a multitude of germs every day, can be considered a miracle. By the time June arrived, I was eagerly anticipating the long summer that was about to begin. On the last day of the school year, as I bid farewell to my eighth-graders and packed up my classroom, I thought about all the fun I planned to have during my vacation and how I would use my time off to stay active. I resolved that I would remain a regular presence at the gym and that I’d spend my days running, weight training, and swimming. ROAD BLOCK The next morning I woke up with symptoms of what I believed to be a minor cold. Little did I know that within days, it would evolve into a severe upper respiratory infection that would require over seven weeks from which to heal. I couldn’t recall a time when I’d felt so sick or a time when my asthma had been worse! I could barely take a breath without coughing, and at times it was so bad that I’d have to hang up the phone because I couldn’t catch my breath, or pull over while driving due to a coughing fit. Exercise of any kind was out of the question, as was spending much time outdoors, since the heat and humidity only made breathing more difficult. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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After three doctor’s visits, two rounds of strong antibiotics, two courses of oral Prednisone, and countless bottles of cough syrup, I finally began to bounce back, but many weeks would pass before I felt even close to normal again. It took a long time to build up enough endurance to exercise, and I was feeling demoralized. My physician advised me that I needed to be patient because there was simply no way to rush nature’s healing process. SEEKING POSITIVITY My Little Book of Healing originated during this very slow period of recuperation. Because I couldn’t go outside and be as active as I’d planned, I occupied and consoled myself by retreating to my studio and creating a tiny journal that I could look at whenever I needed a reminder of what my body (and mind) needed most. Using a collection of blank ATCs, small white cardstock tags, and small daily planner dividers, I began the journal by covering them on both sides with white gesso, and then collaged them with tiny scraps of paper and bits of decorative tape. I added texture with rubber stamps and color with stenciled spray inks. Each page featured a positive affirmation and a corresponding image, as well as rub-ons, rhinestone embellishments, and pen doodles. I punched holes in each page, inserted small binder rings, and decorated each ring with knotted ribbon in matching colors. » 10

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BECAUSE I COULDN’T GO OUTSIDE

active AS I’D PLANNED, I OCCUPIED AND consoled MYSELF

AND BE AS

BY RETREATING TO MY STUDIO AND CREATING

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This journal has remained a source of strength and inspiration for me as I’ve continued to deal with lingering health issues. In October 2017, I began experiencing dizziness and disequilibrium of unknown origin, and in January 2018 it was discovered that my right ear had been retaining fluid ever since the previous summer’s infection. It would require an ear tube surgery and many months of physical therapy (which I still must do on a daily basis) to rehabilitate the problem. RESTORATIVE JOURNALING The Little Book of Healing is something you can create for yourself or as a special gift for a loved one or friend. Whether someone is suffering from a physical ailment or going through a rough patch emotionally, it will surely remind them of their inner courage and the need to be patient with the process of restoration. I actually created a journal very similar to the one shown here for a friend who’d been diagnosed with a serious illness, and it helped me convey exactly what I wanted to tell her in a way that was positive and hope-affirming. Who in your life needs a pick-me-up? Who can you inspire with a message of healing and love? Perhaps this little book is just what the doctor ordered!


TIPS t 8IFOZPVSFOPUGFFMJOHZPVSCFTU UIJOLTNBMM8IFO*XBTDSFBUJOHUIJTKPVSOBM *XBTJMMBOE EJEOPUIBWFNVDITUBNJOBJOUIFTUVEJP*UTUJOZTJ[FNFBOU*DPVMENBLFNPSFQSPHSFTTXJUIJO TIPSUXJOEPXTPGUJNF"MTP JGZPVOFFEUPNBLFBRVJDLHJGUGPSTPNFPOFFMTF BTNBMMCPPLDBO CFDPNQMFUFEJOOPUJNFBUBMM t *GPVOEJUIFMQGVMUPDPNQMFUFQBSUTPGUIJTKPVSOBMJOTUBHFTGPSDPOTJTUFODZ*QBJOUFEBMMPGUIF QBHFTXJUIHFTTPBUPOFUJNF UIFODPMMBHFEBMMUIFQBHFT UIFOTQSBZFEUIFNBMMXJUIJOL UIFO BEEFETUBNQJOHUPUIFN FUD t 5IFJNBHFTUIBUJMMVTUSBUFUIFQBHFTPGNZMJUUMFCPPLXFSFDMJQQFEGSPNNBHB[JOFT*LFFQBMMPG NZNBHB[JOFJNBHFTJOBDBSECPBSETIPFCPYTP*BMXBZTIBWFQMFOUZGSPNXIJDIUPDIPPTFGPS NZKPVSOBMT t .ZPXOIBOEXSJUJOHJTOUWFSZQSFUUZPSMFHJCMF TP*DSFBUFEXPSETBOEQISBTFTXJUIBWJOUBHF UZQFXSJUFSBOEMFUUFSTUJDLFST'FFMGSFFUPTVCTUJUVUFZPVSPXOIBOEXSJUJOHJGZPVXJTI Jenny Petricek is a mixed-media book artist who resides in Racine, Wisconsin. She can be reached at KFOOZQFUSJDFL!HNBJMDPN and invites readers to visit her blog, TUBSUJOHPWFSTUVEJPDPN. She also enjoys interacting with other artists on Facebook.

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Empowered Women EMPOWER WOMEN BY DEANNE OLGUIN WILLIAMSON

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I

f there is one thing I know for sure, it is that women are powerful. Women have strength beyond compare and important truths to express. I have come to realize this on more than one occasion in my life. The best example occured when my children were very young. I had quit working to stay home and raise them. I was so joyful to finally be a mother, and my husband was incredibly supportive and helpful. My home was beautiful and everything was in place. For some reason, however, I had this nagging notion that something was missing. It didn’t take me long to realize that I was craving the support and camaraderie of other women. When you go from a professional life to a stay-at-home life, the people in your life shift. Being a new mom, I didn’t know anyone with kids, so I had to go on a quest to find my tribe. LIFTING EACH OTHER UP Once I did, I still felt that we could go deeper. I was craving connections that went below the surface of playdates and school anecdotes. I took a risk and invited a few women to my house to form a group. I wasn’t exactly sure what form it would take, but I wanted to talk about common issues and concerns and goals and dreams. I’m so grateful they were willing to jump in with me. Once a month, we circled together and shared. We supported each other, we listened, and we flourished. It’s true what they say: empowered women empower women. My life changed and I believe the lives of all the women who took part greatly improved. I had found my tribe. We helped each other through difficulties and we cheered for each other. We shared our goals and dreams and, in so doing, we found the courage to pursue them. We were kind of shocked by how much this group meant to us. But for me, I learned something I will carry with me forever: I learned that the support and energy of other women in my life is invaluable. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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EXPRESSING MY JOURNEY I try to capture that strength and camaraderie in my work. I have been a mixed-media painter and an avid journaler for many years. Art journaling has been the next best iteration of those two passions. In my art journal I can express myself in a completely candid way. I love to combine my writing with my art, as it helps me to continue along on my journey of self-discovery. I use vintage fashion magazines and old dress patterns. To find old ephemera, I go to flea markets and antique stores. I especially love old letters and postcards. I love taking some of these outdated ideas of what women felt they should be and turning them into modern, powerful imagery. LAYERED COMPOSITION I always use old, discarded books as journals. I think that because I love mixed-media, I’d much rather start with a book page than a blank journal page — I consider it the first layer. My art journal pages contain many layers. I start in an abstract manner by putting color and texture on the page. That can mean anything from stamping, stenciling, and collage, to dripping or blowing paint across the pages. Quite often I use old credit cards to thinly scrape the paint onto the page as well. Then I do a collage layer; this is where I bring in imagery and text to create a focal point. Sometimes a big wash of black can create a great field

for journaling with a white gel pen. I try to integrate the collage with the paint that is already on the page to create a harmonious look. My final layer is always a detail layer, consisting of patterns and outlines, more journaling or highlighting, or even sometimes bringing a dark color back in on top to add a frame to the composition. I occasionally apply a glaze to bring everything together. JOYFUL & POWERFUL I still go back to the days with my group of strong women, and I use the topics we discussed, as journal prompts. Some of these topics included: manifesting goals, the divine feminine, self-love, cultivating joy, and soul stories to name a few. In my art journal, I feel joyfully and powerfully expressed. My journal pages are where I let my heart’s deepest longings and feelings reside.

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D E TA I L

TIPS t 8IFOVTJOHWJOUBHFCPPLTBTKPVSOBMT BMXBZTMPPLGPS VODPBUFEQBHFTBOEQBHFTUIBUBSFTUJUDIFEJO OPUHMVFE 5IFVODPBUFEQBHFTIPMEUIFQBJOUBOEDPMMBHFCFUUFS BOE UIFTUJUDIJOHLFFQTUIFCPPLGSPNGBMMJOHBQBSUXIFOVTJOH XFUNFEJB t 6TFXBUFSTPMVCMFQFODJMTUPESBXBOETDSBUDIJOUPUIF QBJOU5IFZXPSLXPOEFSTCFDBVTFUIFTQSFBETEPOUIBWFUP CFESZUPVTFUIFN DeAnne Olguin Williamson is a mixed-media painter and art journaling teacher who lives in beautiful Redondo Beach, California, with her incredible husband and two inspiring children. She shares her work on Instagram (@artbydeanne) and on her website,EFBOOFXJMMJBNTPODPN

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ARTIST PROFILE

Kelli May-Krenz B Y K E L LY K I R C H N E R

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V

ery few of us can say we knew the path we’d take in life at the age of 6. Not so for Kelli May-Krenz, whose vivid imagination as a young girl led her to the resolute knowledge of who she wanted to be: “I knew I would be an artist for my entire life. It is a crystal clear memory for me,” she recalls. From that early age, Kelli remembers spending countless hours creating and escaping into her imaginative world as she grew up in a little river town in Iowa, one block from the Mississippi River. With parents who encouraged her artistic side, she was always “drawing, painting, and making stuff,” and always wishing “for more hours in the day to make art.” There were no large art stores in her small town, making Kelli turn to her own imagination as the sole source from which she drew her creativity — something she still relies on to this day. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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ARTIST PROFILE

Looking back now, Kelli can pinpoint little things from her childhood that have clearly influenced her artistic style today. “My mom was always decorating our house, styling rooms, and making things cool. She offered this look at what creating your world could look like. My love for decor, music, plants, stitching, and sunshine comes from my childhood … Funny how we are shaped so clearly when we are young,” she says. While growing up, Kelli won several contests and earned scholarships with her art, ultimately leading her to Iowa State University, where she earned a degree in graphic design and fine art. Those college years opened her eyes to a whole new world and fostered her desire to live an art-filled life. After graduating, Kelli put her fine art on the back-burner and spent the following years (through to today) as a well-respected graphic designer and illustrator, creating for boutique and Fortune 500 clients.

As with many people, Kelli’s first memory of a journal was her junior-high diary: “I would write my thoughts, dreams, and sketches in it. I felt it was super personal and never wanted to share it with anyone. I was very shy and thought [it] was my sacred place to dream on paper.” Her first experience art journaling was in college on a 5" x 7" journal containing unlined pages filled with doodles of made-up characters and inspirational quotes — she still has this journal in her possession, barely held together with tape. Eventually, her love of art, vintage textiles, paper, thread, and more led Kelli to really dive in to begin art journaling, where she could combine all of her artistic passions and skills in one place. “My style evolves based on where I am at in my life. I always start with a pile of papers that I paint or stain, making them original,” she explains. One thing that ties it all together for Kelli — literally — is stitching. “I adore stitching,” she mentions, which is clear when flipping through her mixed-media journals. Along with sewn details is her love for layers. “My style is created by layering all of the 20

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things I love on pages: a lot of patterns words, vintage bits, and stitching. My love for illustration always adds a great last layer,” Kelli says. Combined with her knack for fashion and design, all of these beloved elements combined beautifully on the whimsical pages seen in this issue. On any given morning, Kelli begins her day with a glass of iced tea while she glances over the to-do list she made the previous night. Etsy orders are packaged up to mail out, and her most pressing deadlines are prioritized. Her creative practice is one that can consume a large portion of her day, as she tends to happily get lost in the process of it all. As many artists do, she has a routine that gets her in the zone: “I always light a candle, turn on music. I love listening to French music even though I do not speak French. I love all types of music, as it helps get me out of my head and just create [without] overthinking my art. I also like to burn sage once a week around my studio space with the windows open.” » artjournalingmagazine.com

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The serene atmosphere created by Kelli is amplified by the beautiful space in which she works. Together with her husband, she lives in a historical church built in 1838 that has since been turned into a home in Galena, Illinois. Her studio is nestled on the top level, where the choir would have sung back in the day. Colors of cream and white cover the room, accented by painted and distressed white furniture. Surrounded by the peaceful aesthetic, Kelli is able to happily devote hours to creating and crossing things off of her to-do lists. When not journaling, she’s “designing logos and branding, creating online classes, painting, stitching, and working on my line of greeting cards.” And in her free time, she chooses to be outside working in the garden, going to her local pool, and walking her little Jack Russell terrier, Pearl Button. She cherishes time spent traveling with her hubby, and adores going to concerts. “Surrounding myself with as much art, culture, and music is my passion for living a good life,” she shares. »

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The life Kelli has built for herself allows her to create for a living, but the journey to where she is today wasn’t without its bumps in the road. “At 39 years old I was told I had a renal artery aneurysm and could die. It was a very invasive surgery and took months to recover. To this day my health is watched. At 40 I went through a hard divorce. Soon after, one of my best friends died next to me. All of this happened in two short years,” she says. During those two years, Kelli turned to

journaling as a means to process the onslaught of hardships she was facing. “I wrote everything I was feeling down. I drew out my feelings of loss and fear. I wrote daily for one year. Healing came slowly, but journaling fueled my spirit and soul. I am grateful.” And while she doesn’t necessarily spill her innermost thoughts down onto the pages, her journal was — and still is — a therapeutic place where she could freely express that which she is most passionate about. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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ARTIST PROFILE

When asked to share a fact about herself that others would be surprised to learn, Kelli responded with a story simply too delightful not to share here. Years ago, she entered a contest found in the back pages of an issue of O, The Oprah Magazine. “You had to submit, in 50 words or less, why you deserved a spa vacation with Oprah and her entire staff,” she explained. She ended up being one of 50 women — out of more than 50,000 contestants — who won. The prize was more than she expected, and the experience was healing in ways she didn’t know she needed. “I spent one week in Arizona with Oprah and her staff learning, healing, and sharing broken parts of me. My wish was to learn to ride a horse, and I did that … [it was] truly a life-changing moment at that time in my life.” Kelli expresses tremendous gratefulness for that opportunity, but anyone who knows her even a little can agree she was more than deserving of the exciting occasion.

With so much experience in the art world under her belt, Kelli has sage advice for her fellow artists. “Do not look at other artists and compare yourself. Look for what speaks to you [and] inspires you. Take that inspiration and make it your own. Listen to what your voice is telling you. Try your best to get out of your own way and just play with ideas. Judging your art will freeze you in your tracks,” she advises. In addition, she suggests turning on your favorite music, and having friends over to talk with and create together. Online classes are another thing she considers important in the creative world, as they’re essential for learning new techniques and ways to express oneself. “I believe getting better at creating artwork is getting better at seeing who you are and honoring that,” she says. Kelli is happy to currently be teaching online courses, and is working on her third one this year. She’s also honored to be contributing to the 21 SECRETS workshop — Paper, Glue, Scissors — by Dirty Footprints 26

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Studio later this year, along with Wanderlust in 2019. In addition to her teaching, graphic designing, and creating her line of greeting cards, there are still a lot of goals she wants to meet. “I am really hoping to create a Spirit Warrior book filled with lessons for painting, stitching, and inspiration on living a creative happy good life,” she explains. “I have a dream of creating a licensed brand with a large national company. I know that my art will be a great fit for one special company. Personally, I want to always explore and teach myself new ways of sharing hope-inspired artwork every single day.” With all of her impressive accomplishments already, there’s no doubt we’ll see Kelli achieve everything she puts down on her nightly to-do lists. To learn more about Kelli May-Krenz, visit her website at kellimaykrenz.com and her Etsy shop at kellimay.etsy.com. Make sure to check out the launch of her new online class, Journaling 2, released July 2018 along with the release of this issue of Art Journaling. Kelli welcomes followers on Facebook (kelli.maykrenz) and Instagram (@kellimaykrenz), and may be contacted at kelli@kellimaykrenz.com.

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MY JOURNALS,

My Everything BY KAREN CAMPBELL

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I

n an adult world filled with endless responsibilities, I journal because it is a place to be free — free from the confines of social norms, from parameters, rules, judgments, and ideals. It’s a place to be me. In a world where every tiny little thing matters, in journaling, nothing actually matters at all! I am a mother of three wildly wonderful boys and a wife to a computer genius who works long hours. Between appointments and school, work and laundry, sick days, homework, and travel arrangements, every detail matters and the pressure to be “on” is ever-present. Moms don’t get sick days, do-overs, or second chances. They can’t be late or make anyone else late, and they are responsible for (what feels like) everything and everyone in their environment. While this may not be 100 percent true, it certainly feels like it is! Only in my art journals can I do, say, or show whatever I want, however I want, whenever I want. I can’t be wrong, I can’t fail anyone, and I can’t even be late! I can scribble, be messy, or glue down candy wrappers for a cool background, and no matter how hard I try, I can’t make any mistakes there. It is literally a consequence-free zone, and that just feels so good. A CHALLENGE RACE I use my journals as a place to challenge myself artistically. I find that if I am in an artistic rut, nothing helps fuel my creative fire like a weird challenge. I have long been a fan of upcycling in my art (as seen in the Spring 2017 Issue of GreenCraft Magazine, where my works on old album covers were featured), and I find that using out-of-the-ordinary materials in my work keeps me inventive. After painting on unusual cardboard surfaces for some time, I started to wonder if I could make art using other kinds of cardboard in my environment — such as cereal boxes. My crazy brain then immediately began thinking about ways to take this initial bolt of inspiration to the next level. It must be made of huge boxes! I can only do paintings that span both pages even though that means they will be ridiculously tall and skinny; and I have to do one every week! Inspiration piles up from there and soon enough I’m feeding my family cereal for breakfast, lunch, and dinner until I finally have a good hearty stack that’s big enough so I can begin. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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A GRAND SHOWCASE I automatically become inspired by the most ordinary things. On top of that, I can’t make up my mind or stick with one medium or technique for longer than a single art project. The result is that I am constantly switching up my projects. Watercolors on Monday, collage on Tuesday, encaustics on Wednesday … it is exhausting and exhilarating all at once. My art journals, with all their wildly different entries, are a pure reflection of this, and I’m not sorry! I think it’s a wonderful and fun way to work, and I am forever entertaining (as well as educating) myself in my crazy process of endless experimentation. Because I like to draw as much as I love to paint, one of my favorite exercises is to go online and find a super simple cartoon with no shading or depth, just a silly outline of an object. I then try to transform that plain drawing into the most elaborate, fun, and playful art journal masterpiece that I can come up with! Some of the spreads you see in these pages are the result of this play, and I highly recommend it if you are in a rut yourself. The end result is almost always amusing, as the finished spread very rarely looks like that simple drawing that started as my reference once I’ve slapped 10 layers of paint, pencil marks, decorative tape, and decoupage medium on it. MY TEACHING FACE Lastly, but no less importantly, my journals are a place to teach. I run a very active YouTube channel as well as online art school, and my students (not fans — my watchers are active learners!) are art sponges of all ages. They like to see my process, see what I am up to, and try out my madness for themselves. It is great to document my process personally, too. Since I hop around so much, it is a great way for me to remember how I did something, especially if it turns out well. If my students can learn a little something about the process, well, then, how cool is that? »

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Ironically, while I art journal alone, in reality I have this wonderful art community online that is always eager to learn, share, and listen. I have both students who are eager to explore what I am bringing to them and teachers who push me to be the best artist that I can be. All of my projects are documented either on YouTube or in my online art school — this way I practice and play in public so others can be exposed to whatever craziness I am toying with at the time. It is often difficult to make the decision to open up your studio to the greater world. The support and encouragement I receive in return feeds my soul and drives me to create even more! A SACRED PLACE At the end of the day, each of my art journals reflects who I am. Some days I am silly and carefree, and imagine myself as a cool, retro girl with a hipster kitty, and other days I am melancholy and dreaming about Inverness after a breathtaking, once-in-a-lifetime retreat I had just returned from. Unlike other artists who have so much continuity in their journals, mine directly reflect my myriad of artful interests as much as my moods, which change depending on the day, hour, and season.

TIPS t Don’t feel pressured to make your journal cohesive — every page can be its own masterpiece! t Go with the flow! If you’re in a dark mood, start with dark colors. If you’re happy and upbeat, throw on some bright colors or slap on some happy decorative tape. t If you’re in a rut, grab an unusual item from your stash and think about how you could incorporate it onto a journal page. Even if the item is bulky or weird, use it. t Gesso or paint on a few pages in your downtime or when you don’t have enough time to actually complete a project. That way when you do have time, the first step is already complete!

Karen Campbell lives in the Raleigh, North Carolina area, and is a full-time artist. She is also the author of the self-published “How to Draw Fun, Fab Faces” series and co-author of “For the Colorful Teacher,” a hilarious coloring and activity book for teachers (available on Amazon). Karen also owns and teaches drawing, painting, and mixedmedia classes online at awesomeartschool.com. You can find her on YouTube (coolmamacraftsapex), and visit her website to learn more at karencampbellartist.com.

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Baja J O U R N E Y J O U R N A L BY JACQUELINE NEWBOLD

S

pending time creating in my art journal is my favorite artistic outlet. When I travel, I always take along my watercolor art journal and a few art supplies, never knowing what I will encounter, what will motivate me to paint, or what will end up in my journal. Sometimes the colorful, wonderful world of nature inspires me and often becomes the theme for my journal. This is just what happened on a whale-watching trip I took to Baja California, Mexico. Âť

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BOTANY & BIRDS The focus of this watercolor journal quickly became about the birds and wild animals. While I was in Mexico, an abundance of nature, incredible diversity of wildlife, and a tropical paradise surrounded me. My scientific and botany background taught me to be an observer and recorder of the natural world. At a young age, my brother introduced me to bird-watching, and I have been fascinated by these lovely winged creatures ever since. On this adventure to Baja California, I encountered many new bird species I was able to add to my bird life list, a cumulative record of the bird species I have successfully identified in my lifetime. It was fun to identify the brightly garbed birds with equally striking names: Blue-footed Boobies, Verdins, Royal Terns, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, and Hooded Orioles. I painted colorful backgrounds on office supplies such as 36

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library pockets, index dividers, and shipping tags. I wrote my bird lists on these brightly painted papers and attached them in my journal. When I travel, I always bring along my small, lightweight Panasonic Lumix point-and-shoot digital camera because it has a very powerful zoom lens. During this trip to Mexico, I was able to capture some excellent photos of birds perched in the trees, sweetly singing from the top of cacti, flying overhead, and gathering by the water. These photographs became very helpful with my sketching and painting because often it is hard to find the time to sit down to draw and paint while on the go. Later, when I had more time, the photo on the cameraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s screen was a great resource to help me identify the birds, as well as giving me the information I needed for how to draw them. When I was back home, I had some of my favorite photos printed and added them to my journal. Âť artjournalingmagazine.com

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Jacqueline Newbold lives in Bend, Oregon, and is known for her warm and colorful watercolor paintings, and mixed-media travel journals. She has many articles published in Cloth, Paper, Scissors, various Stampington & Company publications, and "SU+PVSOBMJOH about creating art while on your journey. She has conducted watercolor workshops in France and Italy. Jacqueline is looking forward to her next overseas workshops in Orvieto, Italy, in September 2018 with Adventures in Italy (BJJUBMZDP), and Provence, France, in May 2019 with French Escapade (GSFODIFTDBQBEFDPN). Visit her websites, OFXCPMEBSUDPN and EKOFXCPMECMPHTQPUDPN for more information.

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ART JOURNALING

Defined

B Y T I N A WA L K E R

W

hat is art? The origin of the word “art” comes from the Latin accusative of “ars/artem,” which means “skill, craft, or craftsmanship.” The word originated in the 12th century and has various definitions, depending on its use. As a noun, it can mean the production or expression of what is beautiful, appealing, or of more than ordinary significance. Or, it can be used to describe a class of objects subject to a certain aesthetic criteria or collection. What is journaling? The origin of the word “journaling” comes from the late Latin equivalent “diurnal,” which means “daily” or “diary.” The word originated in the 14th century and is used to describe a daily record of experiences or observations, typically recorded in a book or ledger. When you combine both art and journaling, you arrive in a wonderful world. The artist can express, in a collection, what is significant in daily life. A notebook kept by an artist records a visual representation of their thoughts and memories, incorporating words to further express themselves. This is what makes art journaling such a powerful, healing, and therapeutic instrument. » 40

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HIDDEN STORIES I art journal for many reasons. When I originally found art journaling, it was a channel to experiment with new products, mediums, and techniques. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect size and shape for free, creative play that is forgiving and patient. Many of my experimental pages have been covered by layers and layers of goodness, as the play evolves and develops. To be honest, these layered pages often become some of my favorites, as the hidden stories build a depth of curiosity and attraction. As journaling became more of a prominent part of my creative life, it progressed into a way to capture images and words of importance, and to memorialize moments in time. It is no secret that I am inspired by quotes and song lyrics, as they formalize my contemplations in a way I am unable to. I struggle with the written word, and quotes are the way my brain can generate sentences with ease. Oftentimes, a quote will haunt me until I encapsulate it in paint and ink. Other times, the imagery I create will generate the word. Either way, words are an important part of my art journal play.

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POWER OF COLOR & CHAOS Since the catalyst for my pages can vary day to day, I don’t have a consistent creative process. But when I look at my pages in mass, several details appear: color, words, and organized chaos. Color is defined as the “property possessed by an object, of producing different sensations on the eye.” What a glorious way to describe the power of color and how it parades a feeling, thought, or idea. A word can be defined simply as “a person’s account of the truth.” Using words in journal play allows the creator to make with conviction and proclamation, without the fear of judgement. Organized chaos is a true symbol of an oxymoron. I covet chaos, especially in art. Some of my favorite artists are the embodiment of chaos and the organic nature of their disorder, and unpredictable creations make me joyful. Although I seek chaos in my own creations, the left side of my brain fights to retain control. My art journal pages usually begin with chaos, created by brushes of paint, spritzes of ink, or a quick swipe of project remnants and remains. This chaos is a wonderful way to build background layers and un-dimensional texture. This is the building block of interesting work. »

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D E TA I L Because the left and right side of my brain are always battling for control, the chaos (right side) gives way to my organized (left side) idiosyncrasy for what ends up as my visual aesthetic. My organization trait demands structure, which is achieved with stencils, stamps, and repetition. Stencils are must-have tools that always calm the chaos — they can be used as a way to define the chaos, surrendering the assailant to the art. Stencils can also be used to organize and create areas for confident and brave color, working in harmonization with the fearless chaos. MY AUTHENTIC SELF The result of this organized chaos is the outpouring of my reckless, defiant nature that coexists with my systematic, disciplined temperament. This is what makes me, me. When I combine these three elements — color, words, and organized chaos — what results is my authentic truth and is the ultimate reason I create. Creating is a way of life. It keeps my mind fresh and curious, and allows me to constantly release emotion. I cannot exist without it. » 44

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TIPS t /FWFSCFBGSBJE$SFBUJOHTIPVMEOPUCFGPSMJLFT GPMMPXFST PSGSJFOET*UTIPVMECFBCPVU FYQSFTTJOHZPVSTFMGXJUIPVUGFBS t )BWFBMPUUPFYQSFTTBCPVUPOFTVCKFDU $SFBUFBTQFDJBMKPVSOBMUIBUBMMPXTZPVUPFYQSFTTZPVS UIPVHIUTPONVMUJQMFQBHFT4PNFUJNFTJUUBLFTNPSFUIBOPOFQBHFUPGVMMZSFMFBTFUIFFNPUJPO Tina Walker is a creator, wannabe photographer, and dog lover. She is a frequent contributor to various Stampington & Company publications. You can find more about her on her blog, BEPHTMJGFUIJSUFFOCMPHTQPUDPN, or on her Society 6 storefront, TPDJFUZDPNBEPHTMJGF.

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INTO THE

Depths

B Y I M A N I S U WA R I S

J

ournaling has always been a constant in my life, which is in contrast to moving around a lot as I was growing up. Even though I was born in New York and will always consider myself a New Yorker at heart, I had the opportunity to call multiple places home. From the beautiful country of Sri Lanka where we lived in the rural hill country and later the beaches near Colombo, to the mountains and farmlands of Pennsylvania, each place helped shape me growing up. Although it gave me amazing experiences that a lot of my peers didn’t have, it was also a bit tough — especially the years moving around to four different high schools. Through it all, I found that journaling and art helped me not only to collect the memories and adventures but also process everything that was happening in my life. So, naturally, when I found out I had to move to the West Coast after marrying my best friend and love of eight years, I turned to art journaling again. » 48

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brewing MY FAVORITE CUP OF jasmine tea, I LOVE SITTING DOWN TO mix my own colors FOR THE BACKGROUND. AFTER

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WHIMSICAL PLACES I got the idea for this particular journal while we were on our honeymoon in France, where I learned about Marie Antionette. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hard to imagine how her amazingly lavish tea parties and her progressive sense of fashion inspired so many throughout history. I drew a few sketches and put them aside until we returned home. The more I read about her life, the idea of setting the whole journal in a place other than France became more appealing to me. The ocean seemed like an ideal place, especially since it mirrored how I was feeling at the time. With the move

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away from all my friends and family, being a newlywed, job hunting, and adjusting to a new place, it felt like I was dropped into the middle of the ocean. Even though Portland, Oregon, is one of the most whimsical places I have lived in, it felt like I was leaving my whole life behind on the East Coast. The culture around Portland particularly felt like a bubble from the rest of the world. Between that and life, there was a lot of exploring to do. Everyone goes through changes while discovering themselves in new places, and I wanted this art journal to reflect that.


D E TA I L BRAND-NEW SHADES After brewing my favorite cup of jasmine tea, I love sitting down to mix my own colors for the background. The journal I used was an old children’s storybook. I repurpose ones with hard cardboard pages because they’re great for heavy layering and work with any medium. Usually, I pick three or four acrylic colors for the backgrounds of a journal and create different color schemes by varying the amounts. For this book, I mixed the colors halfway and used a palette knife to smear it on the page so you can see the individual colors and the new color all at once. I like how it feels to watch each separate color mixing to becoming a brand-new shade. After letting it dry I added hand-drawn art, Sharpie marks, and Pébéo paint mixes to create different effects. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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For the hand-drawn art, I used Micron ink pens. These are my favorite since you can color over it and the lines wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t smudge. After attaching the cutouts, I added shadows and decorations using gel pens and permanent markers. The whale on page 49 was made using watercolors â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I loved the effect it had. The mermaid hair was inspired by an old scrapbook clipping that I used to create some white space on the pages. Finally, for the book cover, I used molding paste and a stencil to create a clean white look to contrast with the color explosions on the pages inside. FINDING HOME Looking back on this journal, it holds a special spot in my heart. I am thankful and very blessed to have had the opportunities to not just travel but to also live in all the places that have become home. I never feel out of place when I go somewhere and I always find something to connect with. This is only because of all the people, places, and experiences that have taught me that I am home within myself. For that I am truly thankful. 52

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TIPS t .ZOVNCFSPOFUJQJTUPESBXGPSBUMFBTUGJWFNJOVUFTBEBZ*UDPVMECFBEPPEMFBUBNFFUJOH B TLFUDIPOUIFCVT PSBOZUIJOHKVTUUPQSBDUJDFZPVSFZF*UTBMNPTUMJLFBNJOEGVMOFTTNFEJUBUJPO CFDBVTFZPVFOEVQOPUJDJOHBMMUIFXPOEFSGVMUIJOHTBSPVOEZPV t 5IJTUJQJTNPSFQSBDUJDBM6TFBQJFDFPGXBYQBQFSJOCFUXFFOZPVSKPVSOBMQBHFTUPLFFQUIFN GSPNTUJDLJOHUPHFUIFS t ,FFQBMJTUPGGBWPSJUFTZPVSGBWPSJUFTLFUDIFT BDPPMDPMPSDPNCJOBUJPOZPVMPWFE BRVPUFUIBU JOTQJSFEZPV PSBOZUIJOHUIBUSFTPOBUFEXJUIZPV5IJTIFMQFENFGJOENZBSUJTUJDTUZMFBOEDPMPS QBMFUUF5IJTBMTPDPNFTJOIBOEZPOUIFEBZT*GFFMVOJOTQJSFEÂ&#x2030;BRVJDLMPPLUISPVHINZMJTU BMXBZTHJWFTNFJEFBT Imani Suwaris is a self-taught artist with a background in chemical biotechnology and neuropsychology. She lives with her husband, Dasitha, and dog, Colonel Casper, in Oregon. This September they will be celebrating their 12-year anniversary since meeting at Penn State University. For more information, follow Imani on Instagram (@lifedraftink). BSUKPVSOBMJOHNBHB[JOFDPN

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Art Feeding Faith FEEDING ART BY TRACY WOODSFORD

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A

s a clergy wife, I spend some time each morning in quiet contemplation. For years I tried to keep a journal, writing down my insights in straight lines across the page. It was a hit-and-miss affair, and not very inspiring. It took the purchase of Gwen Diehn’s “The Decorated Page” (Lark Books, 2003) for me to realize that journaling didn’t have to be purely words. I could put color on the page, do drawings, or write in different directions and in differing styles. This was my journal and there were no rules — it was freeing. EVERYDAY PRACTICE As soon as I started to combine journaling with art, it took off. Journaling every day became a joy, the thing I started to look forward to. This was roughly 12 years ago, and I’ve been using art journaling as part of my everyday practice ever since. To start with, I kept one journal that had more words than images but was colorful. Soon, though, I was keeping a separate journal that was a lot more art with just a single thought or phrase written in it. This was my contemplation journal. I still keep both and work on them most days. The pages shown here are from my contemplation journal. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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FAITH IN ART For me, art journaling is inextricably intertwined with my faith. Art feeds my faith and faith feeds my art. While my hands are busy adding color and pattern to the page, my mind is free to wander. Things appear on the pages that cause me to contemplate. Often I find that several pages speak to a theme. When that happens, I know there’s something I need to think about or that is on my mind. The art journaling brings it to the surface and allows me to look at it more deliberately. NO PLANNING REQUIRED Occasionally I create a spread to record a quote or thought, but my usual practice is to start a page with no plan in mind at all. The blank page hasn’t ever put me off and I think that comes from having no plan in mind, so nothing is ever wrong or not going as I want it to. That’s not to say that I’m always pleased with the results. If I don’t like part of the page, I rework it or just turn the page and start

over. The first thing I tend to do is add a couple of bits of collage from foreign language books. Then I spread a thin layer of white gesso over the whole page with a plastic card, not worrying if there are little bits that are missed. The gesso pushes things into the background a little, and those missed bits add to the textural interest when the next layers go on. Next I apply the color, often in the form of acrylic paint, sometimes watercolor, but also as gel-printed art done on greaseproof paper to give a little bit of translucency and pattern. As I continue to add color, shape, and marks, something may be revealed. It can be as simple as a shape reminding me of something and setting my thoughts off in a particular direction. For example: a wiggly black line made by holding the pen at the top rather than near the tip reminded me of unraveled knitting. It made me think about how sometimes you just have to start over. If something isn’t going well, you may need to go back to the beginning and start again rather than investing further resources and energy. » 56

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MY ADVICE TO ANYONE THINKING

art journaling IS TO just go for it. USE YOUR OWN ABOUT

HANDWRITING AND REMEMBER THAT

there is no wrong way TO AR T JOURNAL!

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TIPS t 8IFOVTJOHCPPLQBHFTGPSDPMMBHF USZVTJOHGPSFJHOMBOHVBHF CPPLTÂ&#x2030;ZPVSFZFUSFBUTUIFXPSETBTBQBUUFSOBOEEPFTOUUSZ UPSFBEUIFNUISPVHIUIFMBZFST t 5SZIPMEJOHBQFOPSQBJOUCSVTIBUUIFUPQSBUIFSUIBOOFBSUIF UJQ:PVIBWFMFTTDPOUSPMBOEQSPEVDFTPNFJOUFSFTUJOHMPPTF MJOFTBOETIBQFT t *GZPVXBOUUPCSJOHUXPEJTQBSBUFFMFNFOUTUPHFUIFSPOUIF QBHF USZEPJOHBCJUPGTUFODJMJOHPWFSUIFKPJO Tracy Woodsford has spent the last eight years in South Australia and recently moved back to the United Kingdom with her husband and daughter. She is still finding her feet in a new city but hopes to lead quiet days and workshops soon. She shares her art journaling reflections on her blog, USBDZXPPETGPSECMPHTQPUDPVL, and on Instagram (@sojournertracy). Tracy welcomes email at USBDZXPPETGPSE!HNBJMDPN

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WE ASKED THE ARTISTS:

What’s your favorite way to fill empty spaces on a journal page? Do you prefer to keep areas purposefully blank?

Tina Walker With words. I usually keep an open space (either planned or unplanned) for my journaling.

Katie Smith If the page design needs the white space to balance it out, I will often leave it blank; otherwise, I really enjoy adding doodles and patterns into the blank spaces.

Artwork by Elizabeth Tichvon

Imani Suwaris Splashing two to three colors on a clean white page is very cathartic for me. Plus, it gets me over the blank-page paralysis. However, I do like white spaces — I add those later on with hand-drawn cutouts that I paste on.

Artwork by Kelli May-Krenz

Jenny Petricek Because I create so many layers on my pages, there are very seldom spaces that are truly empty or blank. There’s always something there, whether it is traces of handwriting in an under layer, a bit of book text peeking through gesso, or faded pen and pencil doodles scratched over a layer of paint.

I like to use dashes or dots — they’re what I find myself going back to again and again. Then again, I don’t feel it necessary to fill every part of every page. It depends on what I feel drawn to at the time.

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Artwork by Jenny Petricek

Tracy Woodsford


Artwork by Tina Walker

Jacqueline Newbold

Artwork by Diana Hernandez

I prefer to fill empty spaces on my pages by adding stamped images with my vast supply of rubber stamps, drawing doodles, or using colorful decorative tape.

Rebecca Sawatsky I usually use blank spaces for writing down my thoughts, struggles, and joyful experiences. But I hardly ever leave completely empty spaces, since my traveler’s notebook is not really big.

Artwork by Jacqueline Newbold

DeAnne Olguin Williamson

Artwork by Elizabeth Tichvon

I like to put paint or gesso down on the page and then scratch into it with writing or scribbling. I also like to use stamps or tissue paper to create texture. Because my pages are so layered, there is always something, even it it’s subtle, on the page — I rarely leave blank spaces.

Diana Hernandez I love blank spaces and being minimal, which is a practice I’m using consistently in my current journal. However, I do like to fill in spaces with rows of dash marks and ink drips.

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Art Journal

OF AN OLD SOUL B Y R E B E C C A S AWAT S K Y

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I

never think ABOUT WHAT A PAGE must look LIKE WHEN IT IS FINISHED — I JUST start AND LET THE PAGE develop.

E

xpressing emotions, processing experiences, and digesting the joyful (or not so joyful) moments of life — this is my way of art journaling. I always journal in my Traveler’s Notebook or in my journaling Bible. Either way, journaling is a way for me to work out the things that are going on in my heart, soul, and mind. Life is full of ups, downs, and is a continual process. Journaling helps me to meditate over certain things I’ve learned, struggled with, or want to remember. It’s my creative diary. It is often also a hiding place where I can develop, grow, and discover more creativity. And somehow, old things are always a part of my journaling process. My passion for all things vintage and antique is nearly a part of every page. Old vintage paper, vintage tickets, and wax seals have the old-fashioned touch I love so much. Pieces of nature are also often found on my journaling pages, such as dried leaves from the creek close to our house. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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DIVING INTO DREAMS My journaling process is usually layering various papers onto each other and securing them with glue. I try to give the pages an eye-catching element, but often my focus is to put as much as possible on one page. I work as though I’m losing myself in the pages — I dive into the world of vintage dreams. I very much like mixing different kinds of materials together, like handwritten vintage papers, vintage tickets, kraft paper, decorative tapes, vintage photos, dried leaves, and wax seals. I trim to bring my personal touch to it with my own 3-D printed stencils that my husband prints for me.

DEVELOPING A PAGE I love to write down my thoughts in Old German Kurrent font from the 1920s with a fountain pen, brush pen, or my vintage typewriter. Additionally, I use the stamps from Darkroom Door or Wintertime Crafts, as they are perfect at giving my pages a vintage touch. Sometimes I add a pattern on the background with stencils and ink applied with a sponge. I never think about what a page must look like when it is finished — I just start and let the page develop. »

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D E TA I L

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old things ARE always a part OF MY JOURNALING process â&#x20AC;¦ OLD vintage PAPER, VINTAGE TICKETS, AND wax seals HAVE AND SOMEHOW,

THE OLD-FASHIONED TOUCH I

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love SO MUCH.


TIPS t "SUKPVSOBMJOHJTOPUBCPVUQFSGFDUJPO*UJTBXBZUPMFUZPVS IFBSUTQFBL(JWFZPVSIFBSUGSFFEPNBOETQBDFJOZPVS KPVSOBMJOH5IFSFBSFOPNJTUBLFT t +PVSOBMBCPVUZPVSTFMGBOEZPVSMJGF*UJTIFBMJOHUPPQFOZPVS IFBSUBOEMFUBMMUIFGSVTUSBUJPOPSTBEOFTTGMPXJOUPZPVSQBHF *UT0,UPDSZPSUPMBVHIEVSJOHUIFQSPDFTTPGXPSLJOHPVU TBEBOEIVSUGVMFYQFSJFODFTPOZPVSQBHF#FCSBWFFOPVHIUP NBLFZPVSTFMGOBLFEBOEWVMOFSBCMFEVSJOHUIFQSPDFTT t *GZPVTUJMMUIJOLZPVWFNBEFBNJTUBLFPOZPVSQBHF KVTU DPWFSJUVQXJUIBTUJDLFS EFDPSBUJWFUBQF PSBOZUIJOHUIBU XPVMETVJUUIFDPMPSTDIFNF%POPUSJQPVUQBHFTGSPNB KPVSOBMUIBUJTGJMMFEXJUIZPVSIFBSUBOETPVM t *VTFGJYBUJWFTQSBZPWFSDFSUBJOQBHFTUPTFBMJOLPSBOZXBUFS CBTFENBUFSJBMT*ULFFQTJUBMMJOQFSGFDUDPOEJUJPO Rebecca Sawatsky is from Germany and lives with her Canadian husband in a little town in the southern prairies of Manitoba, Canada. She spends most of her free time journaling, collecting vintage papers, and selling handmade creations on Etsy. She shares her creations on Instagram (@rebecca_sawatsky) and YouTube (Rebecca Sawatsky). For more information, visit her Etsy shop at TBXBUTLZTDSFBUJPOTFUTZDPN BSUKPVSOBMJOHNBHB[JOFDPN

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B L A C K & TA N

Fantasy BY NANCY BALES

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his journal was named after a great musical suite composition created by Duke Ellington, first recorded in 1927. The music was then used in a short film made in 1929 about the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance was a movement that sought recognition of the many contributions from AfricanAmericans to music, literature, and intellectual philosophy. These artists and musicians gathered and performed in Harlem during the ’20s and ’30s. The music, art, and literature is smoky and delicious.

ESCAPING THE NOISE So often while reading Art Journaling and other Stampington & Company publications, contributors will mention how much they love color. Usually, however, this means they love bold, bright colors. Although I can recognize their choice, I’d be lying if I said I understood it. These bold colors can be described as whimsical and fanciful. To me, the really bright colors are yelling out, “Look at me!” It is as if the colors themselves are dancing around the page creating a lot of drama. They make me want to close my eyes to rest and escape all the noise. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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Some of us, myself included, really love neutral colors and the colors of nature: The browns, greens, creams, and blacks we see all around us. They include the rich earth tones of Tuscany, New Mexico, and here in the western U.S. Neutral colors are the colors of my home and of my clothes. These are the ones I surround myself with; they calm my soul and allow my eyes to rest. So, of course, they do seem to come up a lot in my art.

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QUIETING MY MIND While I was in the middle of another journal, the world around us all changed. Like so many people, I was feeling so sad and continued to be sad about what I see going on around me. Yet I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to become angry and negative. I have always worked on seeing the good in every situation and, before this, the good in every person. I needed a sense of calm, with none of the drama going on all around us. I turned off the news, put down the newspaper, and picked up a small journal sitting on my drawing table. I challenged myself to paint every page with black and tan as a tribute to Duke Ellington, and to quiet my mind and soul. This journal also was a challenge because it is so much smaller than I usually work. My journals in general are about 5" x 7". My paintings tend to be much larger, usually at least 16" x 24". This particular journal is about 2" x 3", which was very different for me. It allowed me to create without thinking so much and to embrace a sense of peace. Creating this was almost a meditative process, which was exactly what I needed at that moment and continue to need. In fact, I have begun another black-and-tan journal. Âť artjournalingmagazine.com

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WORKING WITHIN LIMITS Each page is created within the limited neutral palette. Because of its size, everything else had to be scaled down. While creating it, I, of course, played Duke Ellington, whose music always makes me happy inside. Although I was initially concerned about using such a small journal and limited colors, it actually was fairly easy and very enjoyable. The lesson I learned from this journal is that when things around us seem crazy, it helps to go inside and work within calmer limitations. It also reminded me that a calm life â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one with less drama â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is what works for me. In addition, it is a nice reminder that great things come in little packages.

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TIPS t 5SZJOHBEJGGFSFOUTJ[FDBOSFBMMZIFMQVTXJUIPVSTFOTFPGDPNQPTJUJPOBOECBMBODF*UTTPNVDI FBTJFSPOBTNBMMTDBMF BOEUIFOZPVDBOHSBEVBMMZJODSFBTFTJ[F t *GZPVXBOUUPTFFXIBUDPMPSTXPSLGPSZPV MPPLBUZPVSTVSSPVOEJOHTBOEDMPUIFT4PNFPGVTMJLF CMBDL*G*DPVME *EXFBSCMBDLFWFSZEBZXJUIEJGGFSFOUKFXFMSZ t 8IFOVTJOHOFVUSBMDPMPST ZPVOFFEBQPQPGDPMPSFWFSZPODFJOBXIJMF*UFOEUPBEEBCJUPG EBSL SJDISFEPSCMVFUPQVMMJUUPHFUIFS Nancy Bales is a frequent contributor to various Stampington & Company publications. She lives near Monterey, California, with her long-time husband and super supporter. She welcomes email at OCBMFT!TCDHMPCBMOFU BSUKPVSOBMJOHNBHB[JOFDPN

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CD Holders

WITH A STORY TO TELL BY INGRID DIJKERS

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O

h, those thrift shops! They offer more ideas than I really have time for! My latest kick has been those deliciously compact and nicely contained leather CD holders. I’m not interested in them for holding CDs but for far more precious contents. They are just the perfect size to house my latest experiments with new techniques and journaling. They make for a small journal that is easy to tote around. Plus, the bonus of being able to zip them closed is tantalizing. I have always loved pushing the standard bound journal to its limit. Often these experiments don’t work out as planned, but these CD journals certainly get high marks from me — so durable, so easy to bind, great potential for exterior embellishment, and altogether neat, tidy, and compact. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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A NEW SPIN Over the last several months, I have been collecting leather CD holders in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some have been bound and are awaiting my new journaling ideas, while several are still untouched. There are so many ideas simmering in my mind as to what can be done with them. The zippers make me think of including pockets with inserted treasures that are kept safe and secure in a zippered compact compartment. The smaller sizes of these journals are ideal to work on while perfecting new techniques or ideas. Often, when I come up with or discover a new technique, I like to work with it repeatedly to perfect it and/or expand upon it. Repeating the technique and adding a new spin on it each time further develops it, making it unique in its own right. Repetition throughout the journal gives a pleasing cohesiveness to the whole. I also like balancing and repeating colors for the same reason. With these being smaller journals, the story line continues throughout rather than having an individual story on each page, as I usually do. BUILDING PAGES The plastic inserts are simple to remove, and the plastic pages can be used as a template for your new pages. To begin, trace a shape onto mixed-media or heavyweight watercolor paper. This makes for a very sturdy journal, as the pages will be similar to lightweight board books by the time they are done. These pages can be worked on with various mediums in confidence knowing that there will not be any warping or bubbling of the completed pages. Make sure you do this on the fold so you are actually making two pages that can be sewn into a signature. I make a few signatures with a couple of pages to give a thickness that will allow additional paper to be added to the surface of the pages, yet not too much that it will make it difficult to zip the completed journal shut. I use a simple long stitch to bind using high-quality binding linen.

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NEW TECHNIQUES These journals came to be the vessels of a few new (to me) techniques that happen to work out perfectly, such as transfers and ransom lettering. The transfers are done with laser printouts and laminating sheets. There are so many transfer methods, but this was an effective way to get the look I wanted. After the images were transferred, a bit of pen work was added as well. While standard use of ransom letters is not a new method of lettering (I, as well as many others, have been doing it for years), embellishing those letters offers a new twist. It softens and adds a new spin on an old yet effective lettering technique. Once the journal is complete, I use a spray matte sealer to protect the pages from repeated handling. These two completed journals are similar in technique, but I chose to use various animal images in one and focus primarily on bird imagery in the other. I chose hand-lettered quotes that were appropriate in each. Âť artjournalingmagazine.com

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Ingrid Dijkers recently moved to rural Michigan into a fairy-tale home in the forest, where she is putting the final touches on her newly converted barn studio. New classes are being developed to be taught at various art retreats throughout the country and in her own studio. For more information, visit her website at JOHSJEEJKLFSTDPNor find her on Facebook (Ingrid Dijkers - Running Rabbit Studio). Ingrid welcomes email at JOHSJE!JOHSJEEJKLFSTDPN

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Lillian Lumachi

Melisa Waldorf

Anna Wight

Marion A. Wybranietz

Diana Britt

Presents

s e t la p m e T f o k o o B ble Now Availa

tion of our ver y best template Book of Templates offers a collec Sampler. vious issues of The Stampers’ pre m fro ted lec col as s, rn tte pa

Features Include:

all your favorite patterns This special resource collects into one, convenient location. plates s created using the featured tem sÜ Samples of cards and project plete with basic instructions to spark your inspiration, com use the templates sÜ Additional ideas on how to sÜ And more!

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nds. Look inside the premier sta ws ne on le ab ail av w no is Book of Templates plates or by stampington.com/book-of-tem at ies cop r you e erv res d an issue calling 1-877-782-6737.


Ransom letters are a popular way to add lettering to a journal page and always make a bold statement. Drawing quirky borders around each of the letters with a black pen is a clever idea to add a whimsical twist to the classic technique. Artwork by Ingrid Dijkers (p. 74)

It can be difficult to come up with unique ways to adhere elements to a journal page. Try using a wax seal to anchor an embellishment, such as a scrap of paper, to the page. Artwork by Rebecca Sawatsky (p.62)

Working on a small scale can make it hard to add dimensional elements without the bulk. Attaching twine to a crumbled piece of tissue paper allows for a subtle layered look. Artwork by Dianne Fago (p.106)

Stitching in your journal is an easy way to add a pop of color with thread. Instead of snipping off the leftover thread ends, keep them loose and flowing for a messier vibe. Artwork by Kelli May-Krenz (p.18)

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When you have a lot of elements covering a page, highlight the words with a circle of thread to draw in the eye. Artwork by Lynne Moncrieff (p.112)

There are so many ways to incorporate decorative tape into a design. Create a subtle detail by adhereing tape under stenciled layers, paint, and writing. Artwork by Tracy Woodsford (p.54)

An easy way to add a finishing touch to any page is with glitter. Use iridescent flakes to create anunderstated but sparkling effect. Artwork by Imani Suwaris (p.48)

With so many layers of ephemera and embellishments, it’s easy to lose elements that you don’t want to hide. Fix this problem by adding handmade photo corner frames around the image you’d like highlighted. Artwork by Jenny Petricek (p.8)

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REUSE, RECYCLE,

Rejoice! BY ELIZABETH TICHVON

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C

harming old books can easily be found for next to nothing at thrift stores and make the ideal base for constructing art journals. Also, as I recently discovered, libraries will sell old stock to make room for updated editions and sometimes give away donated books they can’t use. That’s where I found this delightful little English treasure, “Tales from Shakespeare,” an early 1800s children’s book written by Charles and Mary Lamb. This sweet little hardcover didn’t make it past me. I brought it home, and back to life, and now I share its design with you. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER Regular masking tape holds fast, so I think it’s a much neater method for combining pages than using decoupage or gel medium. Here’s how to construct this little gem. Starting at the front of the book, gather several pages at a time (depending on the thickness of the paper) and align them well. Attach a staple at the center edge of each of the three sides to help hold the pages in place. Close up each of the sides by applying masking tape over the edges, making sure the staples are covered. Continue with the remaining pages. »

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LUSCIOUS BULK Used books aren’t the only part of the process that can be recycled. Are you tired of using the same masks and stencils in your stash? It’s the perfect time of year to take a walk and find some of nature’s best templates, and they’re free! For example, the leaf impression on the front cover of this journal was brushed with black acrylic paint, pressed onto 70-lb. paper, dried, torn, and glued onto a piece of white stitched linen. The entire piece was then attached to the front of the book with tacky glue. After preparing each page with gesso and adding paints, inks, ephemera, and pen and pencil marks, embellish them! To add luscious bulk, finish off each page by stapling funky tags tied with a combination of threads, twines, and ribbons to different positions on the tops and edges of the pages. Using a heavy-bodied or tacky glue, adhere folded tags to random pages as places to journal personal messages inside. »

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Elizabeth Tichvon is a UCLA graduate and paralegal, published mixed-media artist/writer, and entrepreneur. She worked in the legal field for 35 years before retiring; now youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find her connecting with the public through her art and writings, while enjoying life to the fullest with her husband of 37 years. To see more of Elizabethâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artwork, visit pinksoulstudios.wordpress.com. Her art is for sale in her Etsy shop at pinksoulstudios.etsy.com.

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In Her Studio

Melissa Giglio

Natalie Toms

New!

magazine takes readers on a tour through the creative spaces and lives of female artists, designers, and makers. From traditional to not-so-traditional, artists showcase the places where they create and share the thought processes behind developing their spaces. In Her Studio spotlights creatives of all types, from full-time professionals to those who create purely for pleasure. And you’ll get to hear their stories.

What Sets In Her Studio Apart

Roben-Marie Smith

Premier Issue Kim Klassen

s s s s

Features and ideas suggested by our readers Studios in every size MORE artists and features in every issue Helpful ideas and information readers can use from each featured space s Creative confessions s Reader-submitted ideas and challenges. You’ll have a chance to tell us how you make small spaces work, share how you organize a specific material, show us your messiest corner, and more.

In Her Studio is available on newsstands August 1st. Look inside this brand-new title and reserve your copies at inherstudiomagazine.com or by calling 1-877-782-6737.

Olivia Steward

Anna Deakin

Natalie Toms

Available August 1st

144 Pages of Mixed-Media Inspiration provides a creative platform for you to learn from fellow artists.

Lynne Moncrieff

Edan Ruthan Miller

Inside our New Issue: ƌɄ ƌɄ ƌɄ ƌɄ ƌɄ ƌɄ

Get to know Rae Missigman A New Take on an Old Classic - Altered Altoids Tins Endless Ideas for Creating with Tea Stitched to Perfection Altered Tea Bags Using resin to make your art pop Grungy journals to make for yourself or for a friend

4 Free Artist Papers Inside!

Tiffany Goff Smith

Kim Collister

Heather Plewes

Somerset Studio is now available on newsstands. Look inside the Summer 2018 Issue, and reserve your copy at somersetstudio.com or by calling 1-877-782-6737 for only $9.99 + S&H. artjournalingmagazine.com

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BOUND FOR ART

EMBRACING THE

Possibilities BY JANNETTE SIMMONS

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I

am so very grateful that about five years ago I came across the world of mixed-media art. Throughout these years, I’ve learned that creativity is not only a very personal and unique expression of our own humanity and our story, but also a wonderful gift that reminds us of the inner beauty and capacity for connection that we all possess. A constant element that I’ve found fascinating about this form of expressive art is the endless possibilities that are available to us every single time we decide to work on any mixed-media project. The transformation that takes place on a surface as one builds layers of textures and colors is electrifying and therapeutic for the soul. However, another important lesson I’ve learned is that the creative process is not always easy. As one creates a piece that reflects the struggles and joys of her journey, it becomes a beautiful and tender process. Creativity will always require courage. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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BOUND FOR ART

When I felt inspired to create this journal folio, I was going through a very difficult season of grief. The tragic death of my father left me completely depleted and overwhelmed by pain. The full weight of this experience impacted every aspect of my life, and my creative life was no exception. For many months I was unable to create anything. I went to my art room as often as I could and sat there hoping to feel the energy and excitement to start creating something colorful again — but there was no creative flow. It was in this place where I realized that I maybe needed to change my approach to creativity during this particular season of life. It was time to try something different. A liberating process began in my heart when I realized that life isn’t always going to provide us with the right circumstances or timing for our creative spirits to flow freely. That said, we can always choose to open our hearts and our eyes to the possibilities that lay right in front of us, and work with that. On that particular day, what I had in front of me was a large manila envelope. I held it in my hands, looked at it for a little while, and before I knew it my eyes were opened to a whole new level of possibilities.

I decided to create 12 of these envelopes and bind them as a journal folio to collect memorabilia throughout the year. In addition to that, I wanted be able to process and write my thoughts; therefore, I also created prompts to pull from each month to help me document my journey and God’s activity in my life as I navigated through that season. This project was a courageous act that evolved into a joyful and mindful experience. Embracing the possibility within these envelopes was the beginning of a new rhythm and a tender practice that allowed me to reconnect with my heart again, and engage in the creative process. It gave me enough fuel to face my responsibilities while still honoring my grieving process. It’s been fun to discover a whole new way to document my life and practice mindfulness while collecting memorabilia along the way. »

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...Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE LEARNED THAT

creativity IS NOT ONLY A VERY PERSONAL AND unique expression OF OUR OWN HUMANITY AND our story, BUT ALSO A WONDERFUL GIFT THAT REMINDS US OF THE

inner beauty AND

CAPACITY FOR CONNECTION THAT WE ALL POSSESS.

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BOUND FOR ART

TECHNIQUE 1.

Begin by creating a collage on the envelopes using pages from old books, magazines, your own used papers from other projects, tissue paper, etc.

2.

Allow the envelopes to dry completely if using gel medium as glue. Once dry, apply small amounts of heavy gesso randomly over the collage to add dimension and depth to the composition.

3.

Continue building more layers by adding some acrylic paint with a brayer, or apply the paint on a gel-printing plate and then press onto the envelope to create even more fun backgrounds. Once that layer is dry, add random scribbles with a black pen, and make some additional marks using a palette knife, molding paste, and any stencils of your choice.

4.

To give the envelopes an extra personal touch, feel free to add recycled pieces of your own work or used papers (the under papers or papers where you clean your brushes/brayer on).

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5.

Turn the envelope to the backside and collage or decorate the flap opening. There is no need to work on the backside of the envelope, since you will be folding the envelope at the end.

6.

At this point, take a look at the envelopeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s composition and see if there is anything that you want to add or remove. This is the perfect place to give final touches with decorative tape, die-cuts, or any embellishments.

7.

Fold the bottom to the top of the envelopes, collaged sides out; leave just enough space to fold the flap down, and proceed to stitch the envelope all around the edges.

8.

Measure and punch two holes within 2 inches from each end, and place a hole reinforcement on the hole of each envelope. Insert the metal rings and lock in the 12 envelopes.

9.

Finally, place an assortment of sari ribbons and colorful yarns on each one of the rings, and attach them securely. Ta-da! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve completed a beautiful and simply bound art journal that will hold wonderful memorabilia and precious moments of life, fully documented.


TIPS t 8PSLPOZPVSFOWFMPQFTBTJGZPVBSFCVJMEJOHBOBSUKPVSOBMQBHF%POPUGFFMQSFTTVSFEUP SFJOWFOUUIFXIFFM3FVTFZPVSPXOXPSLBOEUFBSPMEJOLZQBQFSUIBUNJHIUIBWFCFFOTJUUJOH BSPVOEZPVSXPSLUBCMF)BWFGVOVTJOHXIBUZPVBMSFBEZIBWF t (FMQSJOUJOHQMBUFTBSFWFSZIFMQGVMUPCFHJOZPVSCBDLHSPVOETJGZPVBSFTUSVHHMJOH XJUIJOTQJSBUJPO t ,FFQXIJUFTQBDFTPQFOJOZPVSDPNQPTJUJPOJODBTFZPVXBOUUPXSJUFPOUIBUBSFBPGUIF FOWFMPQFBGUFSBTTFNCMZ t *EJEOPUMBCFMUIFFOWFMPQFTXJUIUIFTQFDJGJDNPOUITPOQVSQPTF*XBOUFEUIFGSFFEPNPG JOUFSDIBOHJOHUIFNPSSFVTJOHUIFNJOGVUVSFQSPKFDUTJG*XBOUFEUP t :PVSQSPNQUTBSFVOJRVFUPZPV5IJOLBCPVUQSPNQUTUIBUTQFBLUPZPVSVOJRVFTFBTPOPS KPVSOFZ*IBETJNQMFQSPNQUTMJLFi5ISFFNBKPSFNPUJPOT*GFMUUIJTXFFLXFSFy wi5IJT XFFL*GFMUNPTUMPWFEBOEDBSFEGPSXIFOy wPSi5IJTNPOUI*BNHSBUFGVMGPSyw t )BWFGVOTFXJOHZPVSFOWFMPQFTBOEJODPSQPSBUJOHTUJDIFTPOZPVSMBZPVUTBTZPVHP*GJOE VTJOHBQPMZDPUUPOUISFBEXPSLTCFUUFSGPSNZQBQFSTUJUDIJOH FTQFDJBMMZPOUIFIFBWJFS QBQFSTBTUIFUISFBEJTTUSPOHFS1VSFDPUUPOUFOETUPCSFBLUPPFBTJMZ Jannette Simmons is a passionate and self-taught mixed-media artist who loves to facilitate creative play groups and help individuals find connection and healing through art. She is originally from the Dominican Republic but lives in West Dundee, Illinois, with her husband, Roger, and their two children, Abby and Josiah. To see more of her work, you can find her on Facebook (DRSimpleCreatividad), Instagram (@jannettesimmons), and on her website, KBOOFUUFTJNNPOTXPSEQSFTTDPN BSUKPVSOBMJOHNBHB[JOFDPN

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WE ASKED THE ARTISTS:

How did you get started with art journaling? What is your first journaling memory? Diana Hernandez

Imani Suwaris

Carrie Todd of My Studio 13 gave me my first art journal. I was terrified but eager to fill it, so I drove to the nearest store that was still open late that night. It was a Rite Aid and all they had were crayons and Sharpies, so those were the first tools I used!

I always sketched growing up and I always journaled, but until high school these two activities were separate. The first memory I have about journaling is watching my mom writing in her journal when I was about 6 years old. She looked so peaceful that I just wanted to copy her.

Artwork by Jacqueline Newbold

Misty Granade My first memory of art journaling is carrying my brand new Dylusions journal with me to the beach to work in during vacation. I made some ghastly pages that trip, but I stayed with it anyway. I’m about to finish this book and looking through it from beginning to end, I can really see a lot of changes in the ways I approach art journaling.

Artwork by Tiffany Goff Smith

Jacqueline Newbold I took my first watercolor journal with me in 1991 on a tropical family vacation to the Virgin Islands. I remember the excitement and fear of looking at that blank page and trying to decide what to paint. In the beginning, my journals were undeveloped and basic. They have evolved and are now filled with complex pages of mixed-media and paintings.

My first journaling memories are of me working in our small mudroom late at night, with my infant son sleeping behind me in his cradle. I was so excited to finally be art journaling, and the best — and sometimes only — time for me to work on pages was in between those late-night feedings.

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Artwork by Tina Walker

Dianne Fago


Jenny Petricek Artwork by Tracy Woodsford

My initial experience with art journaling came after I read this magazine for the first time back in 2010. Brand new to mixed-media art, I was convinced I’d never have the courage or ability to create my own art journal, but after a few weeks of ruminating about it, I decided I had nothing to lose and dove right in. The pages in that first journal were primitive, but they’re still dear to my heart because at the time I was struggling emotionally and they were very cathartic; they also opened the door to many years of creative fulfillment and fun!

Artwork by Kelli May-Krenz

DeAnne Olguin Williamson I was asked to teach a painting class and decided I would rather teach something that was more about self-expression. I found art journaling, taught myself to do it, and then immediately started teaching it. In the beginning, my spreads relied heavily on images and words cut out of magazines, much like a vision board.

Lynne Moncrieff

Artwork by Karen Campbell

Artwork by Elizabeth Tichvon

I briefly dappled [with art journaling] on two or three pages a few years ago, but was not compelled to continue the art adventure. However, a commitment with That’s Crafty, who began to produce their own range of art journals, spurred me into action; the journal was required as a sample for a TV craft show. On completion, I was reawakened to the possibilities of art journals and immediately worked on another, which I submitted to Art Journaling and was published in 2017. A definite lesson: don’t give up!

Karen Campbell I first got started with journaling after going on an art retreat in 2014. We made our very own proper art journal with thick, yummy watercolor paper, and mine was terrible! I couldn’t believe how bad I was at making that thing. But as soon as it was secure and I covered up my horrible stitching and cover with glitter, collage, paint, and sparkly decoupage medium, I knew I was hooked!

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Creativity TRANSFERRED BY DIANA HERNANDEZ

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C

reatives live in a place of wonder, color, sound, and movement. Creativity has defined my life, as I am a singer, musician, and songwriter. My journals have always been a constant companion in my creative process. About five years ago while attending a creative arts workshop, I was gifted with a 16-page Teesha Moore-esque journal from my friend and mentor Carrie Todd. This beautiful, semi-filled art journal changed my creative world! Fear set in almost instantaneously. I was terrified to destroy how precious and sacred it was, but Carrie assured me art journaling would come easily for me and that “creativity is transferable.” When she said that, it was like my spirit — my insides — woke up and something inside of me agreed with those words immediately. I knew there was truth to this statement. My husband is a web designer and can hand-draw the prettiest fonts! My mom sews and designs, but can knit and crochet as well. My children draw, sing, act, tap, and play multiple instruments … I realized at that moment it was totally possible for me to tackle art journaling. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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WITHOUT JUDGEMENT My journals, at times, have been my best friends. They’ve allowed me to have security, clarity of thought, and balance. They have listened to me process, pray, sing, and rant, always without judgment. For someone whose brain wants to speak three sentences at once and for a girl who grew up with a lisp, having the ability to spill secret writings into a journal means having the confidence to be expressive and mix those sentences around! When I became awakened to art journaling and learned various techniques, there was a completeness that came about, connecting my mind and heart. I know my creativity levels were pushed into higher dimensions of wonder with the introduction to visual journaling.

COLORFUL WORLD My process is very intuitive. I usually start a page with “journal spilling” in my loose secret writings, and then apply gesso on top so some of the journaling is covered. In this art journal, which is the 9" x 12" Jane Davenport Canvas Journal, I wanted to explore more with ink. I used Jane Davenport Mermaid Markers and various Liquitex inks. I carried water brushes with me everywhere so I had a portable means to move the ink around, but when I was home at my desk, I would experiment moving the inks with gesso and white paint, letting them drip, and even adding Tombow brush markers on top. The results were vibrant, messy pages, with a ton of Jane-inspired faces, and a lot of “journal spilling” in my secret writing. There are songs in these pages. There are prayers. There are frustrations and lists of gratitude, just like before. There’s just more color in my world! » 98

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MY JOURNALS, AT TIMES, HAVE BEEN MY

best friends.

THEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE ALLOWED ME TO

security, CLARITY OF THOUGHT, AND balance.

HAVE

Diana Hernandez lives in Upland, California, with her husband, Marque, and four children. She is also the president of the Arts Council for the Inland Conservatory for the Performing Arts, a worship leader and minister, and just started Heritage Arts House, a nonprofit promoting creative identity. Follow her journal posts on Instagram (@diana.artjournal). For more information, visit heritageartshouse.org or email Diana at diana@heritageartshouse.org.

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Here we revisit some of the most innovative and artistic lettering that has graced the pages of Art Journaling. You are sure to be inspired by these wonderful interpretations of the written word.

BLACK & WHITE Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a toss-up between using either a black or white pen when writing text on a journal page â&#x20AC;&#x201D; both are equally impactful. Carrie Todd avoided having to choose just one by opting to use both white and black pens, making the words pop off the page. More from this art journal can be found in the Spring 2016 Issue of Art Journaling. To learn more about Carrie Todd, visit mystudio13.com.

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TIGHT SPACES Simply playing with the spacing of your written words in a journal can make for an interesting visual. In this case, Deb Weiers removed the spaces between the words, mirroring the urgency and vulnerability of the sentiment she chose to share. More from this art journal can be found in the Autumn 2016 Issue of Art Journaling. To learn more about Deb Weiers, find her on Instagram (@debweiersart). artjournalingmagazine.com

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PRIMARY COLORS Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no denying that complementary colors are pleasing to the eye. Amy Maricle made her blue design all the more striking by choosing a bold red for her writing. Look to the color wheel to find the best color pairings for your next journal spread! More from this art journal can be found in the Autumn 2017 Issue of Art Journaling. To learn more about Amy Maricle, visit mindfulartstudio.com.

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FRAME THE FACE When thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bold focal image on your page, it can be hard to know how to incorporate equally eye-catching text. Kim Collister masters this dilemma by framing the lettering around the face, simultaneously drawing your eye to both important elements. More from this art journal can be found in the Autumn 2016 Issue of Art Journaling. To learn more about Kim Collister, visit imgirlwithoutwings.com. artjournalingmagazine.com

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A Study

IN SIMPLICITY B Y D I A N N E FA G O

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I

’m not sure why, but 2017 was my most creatively dry year — ever. I felt overwhelmed with keeping up with what I was doing, which was combined with a strong desire and need to break free from my usual creative style. I eventually became so distraught with not knowing what to do that I ended up completely shutting down and stopped creating all together. By late August, I knew something had to be done and done altogether differently. I follow a lot of artists who share their journals on Instagram and YouTube, and I was drawn to the sense of simplicity and minimalism in their pages, as well as something that was totally foreign to me: white space. Their pages had only one image on them with a handful of words — one image with blank space surrounding it! Could I even do this? And if I tried, would I like what I created? The idea of simple pages while incorporating areas of uncovered space started to sound like the perfect way to freshen up my style and get me back on a creative path. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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TINY BUT MIGHTY For some reason I also knew I needed to change the size of journal I was working in, and the thought of using a smaller journal appealed to me. I have to admit, I have a slight addiction to collecting — well, treasuring — Field Notes Journals, and I have quite a stack of them sitting unused on my bookshelf. They have been adding up over the past couple of years and it was way past time to put them to good use. I also liked that the pages were dot-grid paper because it helped me with the fear of a blank page. As I started working in my journal more and more, I began to love the look and feel the dot-grid paper added to each finished page. UNLOCKING IDEAS It wasn’t long before I started to appreciate the smaller-sized pages because they helped me keep the elements to a minimum. I used things I found laying around on my worktable, including clothing tags, feathers, dried leaves, scraps of vintage paper, used and dried tea bags, deli paper from the bakery, as well bits of fabric and thread. I also started digging around in my stash and uncovered a pile of vellum I have had since my scrapbooking days way back in the late 1990s. Discovering these things inspired me to listen to my muse and try anything and everything that she thought up. What was there to lose? It was more important for me to try a crazy idea than to not create at all and keep an unattempted idea locked up inside my head. These bits of inspiration gave me the ideas to weave strips of vellum, wrap and cover parts of an image with tea bags and deli paper, and to stitch directly onto paper with a needle and embroidery floss to outline an image.

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ADDING MYSELF For journaling, I focused on using clipped words and parts of sentences from fiction books, as well typing onto tea bags and torn pieces of vellum and deli paper using a manual typewriter because I love the clean look of printed text. I soon realized I had made an unspoken promise to myself to use self-portraits as much as possible, instead of relying on magazine images. This was something I had never really done before. In doing so, my muse reminded me of a technique I had long forgotten about: image transfers using clear packing tape. I quickly started experimenting with images that were printed with an ink-jet printer, a laser printer, and with my Canon Selphy. The transfers made from printed images on paper were light and hazy while the transfers made with images printed with the Canon Selphy were vivid, colorful, and fantastically transparent. Âť artjournalingmagazine.com

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OVERCOMING FEARS The biggest thing I learned while working in this journal — besides gaining a newfound love of white space — was how much art journaling helps me, especially when I am feeling down or experiencing anxiety and stress over something. I was able to face and work through one of my biggest fears: the dentist. Not long after starting this journal, I had extensive dental work, and many of the pages I created during that time are of me exploring and tackling that fear. I discovered a lot of my fear was caused by shame, but I told myself that it’s OK to have bad days. I took joy in the simple days and I declared myself a magnificent “fear slayer.” I also learned my muse is alive and well. I think she was cluttered down with my trying to use too many elements on a page, and she just needed a little simplicity in her life, too.

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Light Amongst the Shadows: FA C I N G G R I E F B Y LY N N E M O N C R I E F F

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T

his small journal was an immense personal project relating to the grief from the sudden death of my dear father. I had not previously used art journaling as a safe space where I could retreat, so I was surprised to discover my desire to work within a journal. It was a cathartic process, with a dip pen and acrylic drawing ink, where I let my emotions flow from my head, through my hand, to the pen, and onto the pages with no deliberation over word choice, allowing my feelings instead of a thought process to be in control. I paid no care to my penmanship, using quick pen strokes that almost appeared scratched onto each page, illegible words providing comfort when previously they were one of my hurdles with the process of journaling — feeling exposed and vulnerable. FINDING THE LIGHT Although darkness permeates, it was essential to include areas of light — metallic paint, silver thread, shell buttons, and silver leaf — to symbolize something I quickly learned: Grief is not one shade, there are layers. These layers have lighter areas representative of future days, of more light within each day and the hint of light representing my dad, who brought so much light into my life. My dear art friend Dorthe, who lives in Denmark, previously gifted the speciality silver thread that appears within the journal. On completion, I shared photos with her. At this stage I had no plans for submitting it for publication, it was purely something for me. Her response touched my heart and she also enlightened me with her knowledge that the astral body is connected to the physical body with a silvery thread, which disappears when we die. I had not realized this when selecting the the Astral stamp by Lynne Perrella for Stampington & Company for the cover or incorporating silver threads. Dorthe had shared a new gift with me, which brought tears to my eyes. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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This journal also speaks of courage — the courage to create this grief journal to express my emotions. There was an inner tussle whether to submit, but it was the notion of courage that finally pushed me to the decision to mail it in. Stampington & Company publications bring courage to my creative life, and my father was deeply interested in not only my projects but those of other creatives. It seemed the most fitting of tributes to honor my dad and his unwavering support of my creative life by submitting. INTUITIVE CREATION The choice of the white greyboard journal by That’s Crafty was deliberate. Its sturdy pages allowed me to work freely with water, activating color crystals without fear of pages warping. The 5" x 3" size is a favorite of mine, as the completed journal nestles within the hands and somehow brings a sense of comfort. Many choices I made in the journal were instinctive as I worked in a loose, quick manner, avoiding editing my thoughts. While the Infusions Crystals Color Stain by PaperArtsy, gesso, and Pearl Metallic Paint by That’s Crafty were wet, I scraped away some areas prior to dripping titanium white Fluid Acrylic by Golden onto the pages. I dabbed the areas with a paper towel, and built up more color with Pearl Metallic Paint randomly applied with my fingertips.

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I had been playing with quote stamps by PaperArtsy EAB for another project, and they resonated with me for this journal even though no individual quotes came near to expressing emotions I wanted to convey. Instead, I borrowed particular snippets, almost in the manner of using found words. I stamped the words onto rice paper, doodled borders, and smudged drawing ink around those areas, which enabled the words to be cohesive with the background. When it came to placing the words, I paused and gave consideration to their flow prior to adhering. Fragments of Infusions-stained paper towels and black sari ribbon brought visual texture in the form of grungy borders and stamped marks by Darkroom Door and PaperArtsy. One of my favorite details is the beautiful silver thread formed into a circle, framing “the moon.” I left the thread tails loose so they would tangle just as grief can tangle us up, and also to symbolize fluidity — grief itself is a fluid emotion, which is something I quickly learned. Wanting a focal for the cover, I was about to look through my extensive stamp collection when the Astral stamp caught my attention. That expression within her eyes connected with me, seeming to perfectly capture a host of my emotions. To finish, I used a simple binding of black sari ribbon threaded through the pre-punched holes of the pages. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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TIPS t 4UVEZRVPUFPSTFOUJNFOUTUBNQTUPEJTDPWFSOFXXBZTUPVTFUIFXPSETXJUIJOUIFRVPUFT t $PMMFDUFYDFTTDPMPSTUBJOCZNPQQJOHJUVQXJUIDBMJDP GPVOEQBQFST BQBQFSUPXFM FUD"MMDBOCF VUJMJ[FEJOZPVSBSUKPVSOBMTBOEPUIFSQSPKFDUTPODFUIFZBSFUIPSPVHIMZESZ t *GIFTJUBOUBCPVUTIBSJOHZPVSXSJUUFOXPSET XPSLXJUIBEJQQFO HJWJOHZPVSTFMGQFSNJTTJPOOPU UPFEJUZPVSUIPVHIUT XPSET PSQFONBOTIJQ Lynne Moncrieff lives in Scotland, where she creates stamped art and beyond for several stamp/craft companies, including PaperArtsy and Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crafty. She relishes this creative life by being open to new art adventures. Lynne welcomes visitors to her blog, Adorn, at MZOOFTCPXTBOECFMMFTXPSEQSFTTDPN You can also find her on Facebook (lynne.moncrieff ) and Instagram (@stampingandbeyond).

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4VNNFS


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Tracie Hise

Sew Somerset represents a new way of looking at sewn art. In every 144-page issue discover the joy of combining sewing with mixed-media projects. Inside the Summer 2018 Issue: ı̀ ı̀

ı̀ ı̀

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Tracie Hise’s charming Garden Girl stitched Minki Kim canvases made from scrap fabric Learn how Anne Brooke brought the lovely scents of her garden indoors with beaded and embroidered diffuser bottles. Yeşim Dereli’s captivating painted portraits with watercolors and stitched details See how Ella Wilson transforms plain coffee bags into delightful pouches that can be used as planters, gift bags, and more. Explore a wide variety of stitched projects including fabric journals, tea-dyed leaves, phone sleeves, tiny brooches, and more!

Patricia Martin Caroline Stealey

Sew Somerset is now available on newsstands. Look inside the Summer ’18 Issue, and reserve your copy at stampington.com/sew-somerset or by calling 1-877-782-6737 for only $14.99 + S&H.

Now Available

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WE ASKED THE ARTISTS:

Do you consider yourself to have a specific style? If so, how would you describe it? Does your style change or evolve often? Rebecca Sawatsky

Tina Walker

Oh yes, I am vintage journaler. My style is shades of brown, crème, ivory, and a lot of vintage-style stamped images. It only changes when I journal in my journaling Bible, where I create a lot of color explosions on the pages.

Organized chaos. I believe I am always evolving as my life and art experiences grow and change.

Artwork by Dianne Fago

Ingrid Dijkers I like to think my style is ever-changing. Often when I discover a new technique I will use it several times until I am very comfortable with it, and then I move on to something else. I continually use up bits and pieces left over from my last journal page into my new ones, so my journal pages tend to flow from one to another. I am told that I have a very distinctive style that is easily recognized.

Dianne Fago Artwork by Tina Walker

I feel like my style has pretty much stayed the same through the years. My mixed-media work has always been full of brightly colored paints with a lot of texture. My magazine collage pages are usually images of women with butterfly wings and roses. My collage style has begun to change, as I have started to simplify things by focusing more on meaningful journaling and using my own photos.

I consider myself mainly a watercolor artist. My style is always evolving as I enjoy looking for ways to incorporate mixed-media with watercolor painting.

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Artwork by Jenny Petricek

Jacqueline Newbold


Artwork by DeAnn Olguin Williamson

Katie Smith I’m not sure my journals have a specific style but I think my sketches do, and I often include those into my journal spreads. I draw a lot of girls usually with a sad or dreamy look in their eyes, combined with nature or animals for a slightly surreal style.

Artwork by Imani Suwaris

Karen Campbell This is a tough question. I feel like every medium brings out a completely separate style within me. If you took a sample each of any of my watercolors, pen illustrations, mixed-media pieces, or encaustics, my guess is that you would never guess they were all from me because they look so different. And art is like clothes to me — I love to try on new styles and see how they fit!

Artwork by Kelli May-Krenz

Lynne Moncrieff

Artwork by Imani Suwaris

The style within my art journals perfectly mirrors my style outside of art journaling: working with an earthy color palette and an organic style. I favor working with what I have on hand, utilizing fragments to create texture, most often textiles or found papers such as recycled corrugated cardboard packaging and other forms of packaging papers. Being so new to art journaling, time will shed more light on whether my style will change.

Imani Suwaris I love colors that are unapologetically bright. The energy and the life this brings to a page compares with nothing I have done over the years. I originally started with black-and-white charcoal sketches, but it has evolved into a seriously deep love affair with colors.

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ART & THE

Earth

B Y K AT I E S M I T H

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I

completely agree with Vincent Van Gogh on this quote: “I have nature and art and poetry, and if that is not enough, what is enough?” My two passions in life are art and nature, so what could be better than a journal combining the two? Not much, in my opinion. I’m an artist who is constantly inspired by the world around me. I started consistently keeping an art journal in 2015 when I first heard about it and joined Get Messy Art Journal, an online art journaling community started by two talented artists: Caylee Grey and Lauren Hooper. Get Messy works in seasons, so every six weeks there are new “seasons” based off of different themes. I created this journal based on Get Messy Art Journal’s Season of Nature. When I saw that there was a season based on nature, I got so excited. NEVER-ENDING INSPIRATION Why I had never created a nature journal before, I am not sure. I wanted to have a journal specifically for this theme, so I decided to work in a Nomad notebook that I had recently received. The Nomad notebooks have a variety of papers inside, including white, kraft, cream, graph, tracing, and recycled newspaper, which I thought was perfect for my forest theme. Nature is a never-ending source of inspiration for me, so I have not had any creative blocks yet while working in this journal. Nature is fascinating. I love to wander the forests, touching the ferns, hunting for mushrooms, and imagining how old the giant trees surrounding me are. I think if you are creating something you are passionate about (whether that is nature, » artjournalingmagazine.com

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like me, or something else entirely), it is always a lot easier to work on and you are less likely to get stuck. The Season of Nature in the Get Messy Art Journal community is technically over, but now that I have a nature journal put together, I am going to keep working in it for quite some time, combining my two loves of art and the earth. PERSONAL SNAPSHOTS My goal for this journal was to include a lot of my own photographs. Since I often take photographs on my hikes and adventures, I thought I might as well put them to good use! I printed out a selection of some of my favorite snapshots so whenever I was creating in my journal, I would have a selection to choose from. Using a photograph you have taken can also add a more personal touch to your journal than using magazine images. Sometimes I would prep my journal background with a photo or a gel-printed print, and then take my journal outside to draw or write in. Many of my sketches are what I call â&#x20AC;&#x153;double exposure,â&#x20AC;? as they often have two different scenes in them: a bear within a bear, or a girl with a forest in her hair. I love the surrealistic feel of the style and it reminds me of the magic I feel in the forest. 122

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TIPS t 'JOETPNFUIJOHZPVBSFQBTTJPOBUFBCPVUBOEDSFBUFBKPVSOBMCBTFEBSPVOEUIBUUIFNF*GJUT OBUVSF USZUBLJOHZPVSKPVSOBMPVUTJEFBOEESBXJOHXIBUZPVTFF5BLFBQIPUPXIJMFZPVBSFPVU  BOEUIFOJODMVEFUIBUJOZPVSKPVSOBMBTXFMM t 6TFXIBUTVQQMJFTXPSLGPSZPV5IJTOPUFCPPLJTOPUNFBOUGPSBSUKPVSOBMJOH.BOZPGUIFQBQFST BSFQSFUUZUIJO CVUUIFZXPSLGPSNF t *GZPVBSFTUVDLPOUIFKPVSOBMJOH USZTFBSDIJOHGPSRVPUFTUPVTFJOTUFBE*SFBMMZMJLFUPVTF HPPESFBETDPNUPTFBSDIGPSRVPUFT Katie Smith is an artist and blogger living in the beautiful Pacific Northwest of the United States. She loves anything and everything creative, from scrapbooking and art journaling to drawing and painting. She can be found on her website at TUVEJPLBUJFDPN and on Instagram (@studio.katie). BSUKPVSOBMJOHNBHB[JOFDPN

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ART JOURNALING

at the Speed of Life

GEL-ICIOUS

Mixed-Media B Y PA M C A R R I K E R

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M

aking mono prints on a gel plate is so much fun. If you’re like me, you may have a lovely stash of printed papers on hand already. If you haven’t tried it, I highly recommend experimenting with it! You used to have to make your own gel-printing plate, but now there are a variety of gel plate sizes that you can purchase and they last indefinitely. Once you have a gel plate you can start playing around with some papers and mediums you already use in your artwork. It’s totally addicting and I love that each print pulled is unique. Some mediums to use on gel plates include acrylic paints, acrylic inks, alcohol inks, gesso, liquid pencil, Walnut ink crystals, and Tsukineko StazOn inkpads. A sample of some of the texturemaking tools to try on gel plates include stencils, stamps, leaves, rubber bands, string, or mark-making tools with soft ends. You can also use a variety of papers in the print-making process: copy paper, parchment, dry wax deli paper, magazine pages, book text, and music sheets, to name a few.

There’s really no end to the combinations of media and tools you can use together on the gel plate. Experiment and have fun! Even the “ugly” prints can be torn up for collage. So what do you do when you’ve made your stash of awesome printed papers? Well, you use them in your art journal of course! I’ve broken down one of my processes to add some mono-print papers into a mixed-media portrait journal page. COLLAGE Use a variety of printed papers within a certain color palette. Don’t look at what’s printed on the page as much as the colors. It’s also good to have a variety of types of papers that were printed on. Some will be more translucent than others, which will give added depth to the finished page. For this page I tore the papers using a ruler for straight edges; for a more organic look, you could simply tear them. I glued them down with matte medium and let them dry. » artjournalingmagazine.com

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ART JOURNALING

at the Speed of Life

D E TA I L

ADDING IMAGERY FROM YOUR OWN WORK Imagery can be added in many ways. I like to print black-andwhite images of my own work onto tissue paper and then collage it onto the page. You could use photos, stencils, or draw directly into your journal as well. CREATING A STORY WITH WATER-SOLUBLE MEDIA At this point I like to look at the page and see what the story is. Often I’ll add some journaling during this step, and I love to paint over the words so you can’t see all of them. With watersoluble pencils I’ll draw lines, sketch to connect the imagery, and then wash the lines with water, letting the pencil react.

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PAINTING PROCESS I keep to a really simple color palette while I work, using white, buff, and two or three colors from the background. Painting over the imagery will further change it, and I often stop and re-sketch details while I’m painting. The new image comes after layers of paint and pencil are applied, and as I work I keep the story in my mind. It’s exciting to see it unfold as you go. FINISHING TOUCHES When I’m finishing up I like to trace over things with pen and pencil, add additional bits of collage, maybe some more journaling, and whatever else I feel brings the page and story together. It feels good to use the collage papers in artwork. Sometimes it’s easy to feel like they’re too precious to rip and collage with, but you can always pull more prints! It’s so fun to see the bits and pieces come together to make new art. » Pam Carriker is a mixed-media artist, instructor, and author of the books “Art at the Speed of Light” (Interweave, 2011), “Creating Art at the Speed of Life” (Interweave, 2013), and “Mixed Media Portraits with Pam Carriker” (North Light Books, 2015). Her articles and artwork can be found in over 50 publications, and she writes the “Art Journaling at the Speed of Life” column for Art Journaling. She serves as a Director’s Circle Artist for Somerset Studio, and has created instructional videos for Strathmore Artist Papers’ line of Visual Journals, a signature line of art stencils for StencilGirl Products, and rubber art stamps for Stampington & Company. She also developed a signature line of mixed-media art products with Derivan Matisse. Visit pamcarriker.com to learn more. artjournalingmagazine.com

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SQUARE ONE

Sometimes when staring at a blank journal page, we need a little inspiration. Here you will f ind journaling prompts to help you move past â&#x20AC;&#x153;square one.â&#x20AC;? Whether a question, a quote, or a simple list, these prompts should have you journaling in no time.

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To share your favorite journaling prompts with us, send them to ,.$)/,(&#(!H-.'*#(!.)(8)'85

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GALLERY

REBECCA SAWATSKY Manitoba, Canada sawatskyscreations.etsy.com “Art journaling is not perfection. It is a way to let your heart speak. Give your heart freedom and room in your journaling. There are no mistakes in art journaling.”

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GALLERY

MISTY GRANADE Madison, AL misty.granades.com â&#x20AC;&#x153;These spreads and this book remind me that I need to hold nature in greater esteem. I tend to spend a lot of time inside. This book reminds me that I need to go outside more often and embrace the beauty of nature.â&#x20AC;?

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NANCY BALES Monterey, CA nbales@sbcglobal.net “In both my work and my life, I have found art as one of the best ways for me to work through what I am experiencing and feeling.”

LESTA FRANK San Antonio, Texas lestafrank.net “Consider everything an experiment. Don’t try to acquire a style — it will just emerge in its own time.”

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GALLERY

TIFFANY GOFF SMITH Summerdale, AL

Instagram: @southerngals_designs “I love finger painting — the joy it brings me to dip my fingers in the paint and play is priceless. My spreads were inspired by color, which is common in most of my journal spreads.”

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TIFFANY GOFF SMITH Summerdale, AL

Instagram: @southerngals_designs “I love to play with textures and collage. Nothing’s off limits — tea bags, staples, old paint rags … I will glue anything down!”

TINA WALKER Palmyra, PA adogslife-thirteen.blogspot.com “I struggle with the written word, and quotes are the way my brain can generate sentences with ease. Oftentimes, a quote will haunt me until I encapsulate it in paint and ink.”

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GALLERY

MISTY GRANADE Madison, AL misty.granades.com “I love the freedom of art journaling. It’s a great place to practice techniques or to try new things. It can be a private place to let off steam or a place to celebrate. There are no rules and everybody needs a place to play like that.”

LESTA FRANK San Antonio, Texas lestafrank.net “I feel what inspired me most was discovering the timeless, infinite resource within me that I would fall into while making art.”

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JUST A SAMPLING OF THE MANY AVAILABLE ISSUES!

Gather them up before they’re gone! With hundreds of issues on sale — starting at only 99¢ each — there’s no better time to complete your collection of a cherished title or try out something new. Now that you can get hold of select issues at more than 90% off, you’ll want to be sure to: s Complete your collections of favorite s Stock up on Christmas Stampington & Company titles and birthday gifts

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Inside our Spring ’18 Issue: ťƥ A beautiful hand-painted canvas with 3-D embellishments inspired by a wedding invitation, a dried flower collage, and drawings that have been layered with beeswax ťƥ Artwork by Diane Adams, Patti Roberts-Pizzuto, Jackie Paninski Neal, and many more ťƥ Stunning collages, canvases, assemblages, shrines, and plenty of spring-themed artwork to inspire.

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Somerset Apprentice is available directly from Stampington & Company. Look inside our Spring ’18 Issue, and reserve your copy at stampington.com/somerset-apprentice or by calling 1-877-782-6737 for only $14.99 + S&H. artjournalingmagazine.com

Jennifer Tritle

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SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Art Journaling is released on a quarterly basis. Submissions for specific issues must arrive on or before the following deadlines:

Upcoming Deadlines Winter 2019 Issue – August 15, 2018 Spring 2019 Issue – November 15, 2019 Summer 2019 Issue – February 15, 2019 Autumn 2019 Issue – May 15, 2019 Art Journaling is currently open to submissions from all our readers who wish to share their art journal pages with our audience. We encourage artists to submit entire journals so that we can evaluate how they will best fit into our publication. If there are pages in your journal you do not wish published (for reasons of privacy or otherwise), please be sure to mark them clearly so we do not consider them. GENERAL ARTWORK SUBMISSION GUIDELINES We prefer submissions of original art. If original art is not available, our next preference is hi-res digital images (300 dpi at 8½" x 11"). If hi-res digital images are not available, we will very rarely consider professional-quality transparencies or color slides. Colorcopy submissions are not accepted. For collaborative projects, it is the responsibility of the submitting artist to obtain permission from each participant prior to submission. In addition, each piece of the collaborative must be labeled with contact information of the artist who created it. Please be aware that the collaborative project in its entirety will only be returned to the submitting artist and must have sufficient return postage. All artwork must be properly identified with your name, address, and email address clearly printed on a label or tag attached to each submission. As artwork often gets separated from instructions during our selection process, we ask that you attach the information directly to the piece; for example, affix a label to the inside of a sleeve. If your piece is difficult to label, please attach your identification with a removable string, or pack the sample in a plastic bag with your identification. Artwork that is not properly identified cannot be considered for publication. A concise yet thorough description must accompany each submission. Include separate documentation for each piece you submit. NOTE: If you are able, please keep an electronic version of your instructions, as you may be requested to send those in if your work is selected for publication. All samples, queries, and correspondence should be sent to: Stampington & Company ATTN: Art Journaling 22992 Mill Creek, Suite B Laguna Hills, CA 92653 Please include a note inside the package indicating which publication the submission is for. For acknowledgment of artwork receipt, include a self-addressed, stamped postcard. No telephone calls, please. The editor welcomes brief email queries: artjournaling@stampington.com. ART MANAGEMENT POLICY We require you to supply sufficient funds if you wish your item(s) returned. We will provide tracking for all packages, but we strongly encourage you to request insurance and provide additional funds. Stampington & Company is not responsible for damaged or lost artwork once it has been shipped out of our office. Send a check or money order made out to Stampington & Company to cover return shipping costs (U.S. funds). Please do not include return envelopes, packing materials, stamps, or prepaid labels and do not attach postage to packaging.

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Checks or money orders will be cashed and put in a mail funds account within 30 days of submission receipt. When your artwork is returned, the funds you provided for shipping will be drawn from the account. Submissions intended for one issue may be better suited for another issue or publication, so we may request to hold your piece for up to 9–12 months. Rest assured that we will take excellent care of your artwork, but Stampington & Company cannot be held responsible for damage or loss due to circumstances beyond our control. If you move, please send a postcard or email to the editor with your new address. If you need your artwork returned by a specific date, please indicate this in your submission information and send an email to the editor three weeks before the date you would like your submission returned. If you have any questions regarding our submission guidelines and artwork returns, please contact artmanagement@stampington.com. If your piece is selected for publication you will receive a FREE issue of Art Journaling. ARTICLE IDEA SUBMISSION GUIDELINES We are always interested in proposals for articles. If you have a unique story, project, or technique, send photos accompanied by a query letter outlining your idea to the managing editor at the address below. Please note: If a technique you wish to share was learned in a class, workshop, television, book or other publication, Art Journaling requires that you give credit to the author, source, or teacher and obtain permission to publish his or her technique prior to submitting it to us. COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT Stampington & Company only accepts original artwork for publication consideration. All images used in artwork must be copyright free. Any techniques featured in artwork submissions that are not the artist’s own must be attributed to the proper instructor, book, artist, workshop, etc. It is the responsibility of the submitting artist to ensure that no copyright infringement has occurred and that all submitted work is their own. SIMULTANEOUS SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Stampington & Company will not accept simultaneous submissions of artwork. While your work is under consideration we ask that you do not submit the same piece of work to competing web or print publishers. Likewise, artwork that has already been featured in other competing publications or sites will not be accepted. Publishing on your personal blog is permitted, but we ask that you adhere to our reproduction guidelines. Any questions can be directed to our editorial staff. PUBLICATION SCHEDULE Artwork accepted for Art Journaling is published as soon as practical. Be advised we receive more submissions than we can accommodate and it may take several months from the time we accept your artwork for publication to the time it appears in an issue, so we ask for your patience. You will receive notification in advance of publication.


M O R E S T U F F F O R Y O U R S TA S H

Skrink Film by Grafix Many of us can remember using shrink film in our childhood as a quick and easy craft that seemed to work like magic. But shrink film is not just for kids — it can be an embellishment for any type of art from cards and art journaling to jewelry. Grafix has released 12 brand-new pre-printed designs from three popular artists: Gina Lee Kim, Julie Fan-Fei Balzer, and Marlene Meijer-van Niekerk. These designs range from modern florals and succulents to eye-catching graphics and words. You can choose to decorate the sheets with permanent markers, paint pens, or rubber stamps. After baking the film, simply cut out and use as desired! The possibilities are endless with Grafix Shrink Film. For more information on this product, visit grafixart.com.

Dylusions Dyalog System by Dyan Reavely for Ranger Never before has there been a line of journaling products more suited for an on-the-go-artist than Dylusions’ new Dyalog system. New for 2018, this line presents a brand-new way to keep your journaling organized in style. Included in this system are Dyalog Covers, Insert Books, and Pocket Inserts all in a variety of colors and designs. The Insert Books, which come with blank, lined, grid, dotted, black, and more types of paper, are meant to be contained inside the covers with the help of elastic bands. Each one has heavy mixed-media paper that can withstand any medium applied to it. The Dyalog Pockets add additional storage inside the covers, and have slots for holding extra ephemera. Besides adding a great deal of functionality to the journaling process, this line of products is beautifully designed by Dyan Reavely with her fellow artists in mind. Whether you are looking to bullet journal, start a new art journal, or simply keep a planner, the Dyalog System is truly a jack-of-all-trades. For more information, visit rangerink.com artjournalingmagazine.com

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This beautiful 144-page magazine is filled with the best of the mixed-media projects from past issues of Somerset Studio, Somerset Apprentice, Sew Somerset, Art Journaling, and Somerset Workshop. Shirley Vanvelle

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ANGELA CARTWRIGHT COLLECTION

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LYNNE PERRELLA COLLECTION

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Artists’ Café is available directly from Stampington & Company. Look inside Volume 11, and reserve your copy at stampington.com/artists-cafe or by calling 1-877-782-6737 for only $14.99 + S&H.


DESTINATIONS R E TA I L E R S I N Y O U R A R E A UNITED STATES CALIFORNIA Ben Franklin Crafts & Frames 598 Sutton Way Grass Valley, CA 95945 (530) 273-1348 Scrapbook Island 14090 Blossom Hill Road Los Gatos, CA 95032 (408) 978-8900 The Stamp Addict 7151 El Cajon Blvd, Ste K San Diego, CA 92115 (619) 667-5051

Mrs. O’Leary’s 126 N. Mead Street Wichita, KS 67202 (316) 262-0600

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NW Country LLC 41506 292nd Way Street Enumclaw, WA 98022 (206) 992-1100

KENTUCKY Ephemera Paducah 333 North Ninth Street Paducah, KY 42001 (270) 443-0003 ephemerapaducah.com A mixed-media haven attracting national instructors teaching incredible workshops, Ephemera Paducah is the place for the everyday artist!

Texas Art Supply 2001 Montrose Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 526-5221

Treasured Memories 5218 - 86th Street Edmonton, AB T6E 5J6 (780) 414-1540

VIRGINIA GoldensHill Papercrafts 12644 Chapel Road Clifton, VA 20124 (703) 298-7688

The Scrapbook Cottage 363 Main St Steinbach, MB R5G 1Z4 (204) 326-6777

FLORIDA Everything Scrapbook & Stamps 4095 State Road 7, Suite Q Lake Worth, FL 33449 (561) 432-5201

MARYLAND Queen’s Ink 8600 Foundry Street Savage, MD 20763 (301) 497-9449

Whim So Doodle 237 2nd Avenue South St. Petersburg, FL 33701 (727) 827-4911 whimsodoodle.com Planners, Agendas, Scrapbooking, Mixed Media, Stamping, Card Making, Sewing, Fine Art Supplies, Bible Journaling – We are your destination store!

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INDIANA Palette and Paper 6421 Oaklandon Road Indianapolis, IN 46236 (317) 459-3199 KANSAS Ink Paper Rubber 7299 W. 97th Street Overland Park, KS 66212 (913) 381-2217

NEW MEXICO The Gilded Page 516 North Guadalupe De Vargas Mall Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505) 820-0098 PENNSYLVANIA Joys of Life Scrapbooking 5222 E. Trindle Road Mechanicsburg, PA 17050 (717) 458-5723

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WASHINGTON Impress Rubber Stamps 120 Andover Park #140 Tukwila, WA 98188 (206) 901-9101

ONLINE CONNECTIONS Creative Art Materials, Ltd. creativeartmaterials.com The exclusive US distributor of Caran d’Ache “Swiss Made” fine art materials and writing instruments. Plus; M+R Sharpeners, Pepin Art & Design products, e+m Casual Writing and Blair Aerosol Art products.

Jubilee Flea jubileeflea.com An online shop filled with vintage paper + fun things for coloring or journaling + TN inserts. At ridiculously low prices. (Seriously. You need to check this out!) Use code AJ10 for 10% off your first purchase!

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ABOUT THE PUBLISHER

Since 1994, Stampington & Company has been a leading source of information and inspiration for arts and crafts lovers, storytellers, and photographers around the world. Launched with a small line of rubber art stamps by President and Publisher Kellene Giloff, the company has since expanded to include a variety of bestselling publications.

“When it comes to the art of crafting, no one does it better than Stampington & Company.” – Mr. Magazine™ Samir Husni PUBLICATIONS Known for its stunning full-color photography and step-by-step instructions, the company’s magazines provide a forum for both professional artists and hobbyists looking to share their beautiful handmade creations, tips, and techniques with one another. Since its 1997 debut, Somerset Studio has become the flagship publication within the industry and attracts a large, devoted following of readers seeking the latest innovations in paper arts and mixed-media. Art Journaling — the first publication of its kind — features exquisite mixedmedia work and inspiration for achieving stand-out pages in journals. Bella Grace is a 160-page book-azine devoted to discovering magic in the ordinary. Compelling stories and striking photographs capture soul lifting moments that celebrate life’s beautiful adventure. Belle Armoire Jewelry is overflowing with 144 pages of exciting projects for necklaces, bracelets, earrings, brooches, and accessories. Field Guide to Everyday Magic is a one-of-a-kind workbook that shines a spotlight on the here and now – through its inspirational quotes, photography, and prompts with interactive, journaling space. Mingle is an incredibly unique publication that explores the art of entertaining — from various types of intimate, creative gatherings to larger-scale art retreats. Willow and Sage shares more than 70 unique recipes, uses, and beautiful packaging and gift ideas for homemade bath and body products. For more information, and to look inside these publications, please visit: stampington.com/publications To learn how you could be published in an upcoming issue, go to: stampington.com/calls-and-challenges

SOCIAL MEDIA PRESENCE Stampington & Company provides daily doses of inspiration and a place for likeminded artists to connect on their Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, Google+, and Twitter pages, which currently have more than 210,000 followers. In addition to exploring the latest crafting trends on their creative blog, Somerset Place, the company continues to send out weekly and monthly e-newsletters with artist tips, special sales, and free how-to project ideas to their loyal subscriber base of more than 80,000 creative minds.

NEW IN 2018 Stampington & Company is thrilled to announce a number of unique magazine launches this year. Now Available! Book of Templates is a must-have resource that combines all of your favorite template patterns into one place. If you’re looking to infuse a touch of artfulness into your daily life, you won’t want to miss our special edition containing the BEST of the BEST Creative Living Ideas. Available August 1st: In Her Studio takes readers on a tour through the creative spaces and lives of female artists, designers, and makers. This special publication spotlights creatives of all types, from full-time professionals to those who create purely for pleasure. For more information, please visit: stampington.com/coming-soon

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NowAvailable by Stampington & Company

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Summer ’18 Welcome to the Summer 2018 Issue of The Stampers’ Sampler. Featuring more than 200 rubber-stamped projects and cards for every occasion, each 128-page issue will supply you with up-to-the-minute paper art tips and stamping techniques for you to try on your next handmade project. Inside the Summer Issue of The Stampers’ Sampler s Discover the many ways Eve Watters used her masterboard technique to create her latest collection. s Explore Tammy Wilson’s distressed and charming birthday cards. s One of our most popular challenges is back! Check out the Frightful & Delightful results! s Allow your imagination to take flight with the results of the feather template challenge. s Be inspired by Lynne Moncrieff’s shab-chic vintage cards.

Immerse yourself in colors, textures, found objects, paint, fabric, metal, and that eternal favorite — paper! Artist, author and designer Lynne Perrella, has invited over 50 mixed-media artists to contribute to this book of over-the-top imaginative interpretations of the human form. Far more than paper dolls, this selection of thought-provoking and innovative “paper personas” will awaken your urge to make artwork that is meaningful, expressive, and full of storytelling. $24.95 On Sale For a Limited Time – Only $12.95 + S&H

Summer ’18 The summer issue of Somerset Life presents 144-pages of inspiring ideas with stunning photographs to help make every day extraordinary. Inside the Summer 2018 Issue: s Claire Donovan-Blackwood from hearthandmade.co.uk shares her beautiful creative space s Vintage style boho floral crowns by Jo-Anne Coletti s Stunning artwork to beautify your life made from tea bags! s Bird seed wedding favors by Cheryl Dossey s Beautiful ways to display sand from your favorite beaches & travels s New & inventive Creative Living Ideas!

Available on newsstands or directly from Stampington & Company at stampington.com/whats-new or 1-877-782-6737 Unless otherwise noted, all publications are $14.99 plus S&H. For additional preview pages, please visit stampington.com/whats-new ** Visit stampington.com/special-subscription-package, or call Customer Service at 1-877-STAMPER and ask about our Special Subscription Package deal.

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Art Journaling Summer 2018  

Discover your own unique journaling style inside the Summer 2018 Issue of Art Journaling. With 144-pages of detailed photos, each issue is f...

Art Journaling Summer 2018  

Discover your own unique journaling style inside the Summer 2018 Issue of Art Journaling. With 144-pages of detailed photos, each issue is f...