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Photo: glenn cook, St. Albert leader

No More Excuses!

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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

Lead the

INDEX News . . . . . . . . . 3 Opinion . . . . . . . . 8 Entertainment . . . . . 15 Culture . . . . . 20-23 Lifestyle . . . . . . . 24 Fun & Games . . . . . 28 Business . . . . . . 30 stalbertjobs.com . . . . 31

COVER

Connie Osgood, one of 20 resident artists at the Visual Arts Studio Association (VASA) of St. Albert’s facility at the Hemingway Centre, spreads some paint on one of her paintings Monday morning. VASA is holding a grand opening for the facility on Saturday as part of Alberta Culture Days and the StArts Fest. Story, page 18.

FUN WITH NUMBERS

162,374 That’s how many speeding tickets the Edmonton Police Service have handed out so far in 2012. The EPS has sounded the alarm on speeding after already recording 25 traffic fatalities so far this year, up from 20 in all of 2011. Cops have also handed out 15 charges of dangerous driving since May for going more than 50 km/h over the posted speed limit — including an impaired driver going 94 km/h over the limit on Friday, Sept. 21.

Teens step up for City social plan GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

The City of St. Albert got an earful from young people in the community over the weekend. About 30 teens — along with Coun. Cathy Heron and Mayor Nolan Crouse — showed up to St. Albert Catholic High School Saturday to give their input on social issues facing the community as part of public consultations for the City’s Social Master Plan, which is currently in development. Issues tackled over the two-hour session included bullying, addictions, race and discrimination, mental health, vandalism and encouraging volunteerism. “If you want to see the change, people have to work for it,” added Nicholas Hertz, a Grade 10 student at Paul Kane High School. “There are problems we can fix, and this is where we can fix them.” Family and Community Support Services director Scott Rodda said he was very encouraged by the turnout, and that getting input from young people was an integral part of the master plan process. “I think it’s critical,” he said. “Sitting in on a couple of the conversations, who knows youth better than youth themselves? The insight they have, the contributions they have in terms of strategies and actions are creative and dead-on accurate.” Some of the issues brought up during the session may not come up very often in public, but they’re bigger issues for young people than most may realize. “People don’t view them as problems; they view them as things that happen everywhere,” Hertz said. “Today is to get our our voices out there so people understand there are problems that need to be fixed.” In fact, some felt high school students are currently being unfairly discriminated against as a developer refuses to hand over title to land in Kingswood because he doesn’t want a high school built there. “That’s a big stereotype, thinking that teens are going to trash [the neighbourhood],” said SACHS Grade 10 student Amy LaBuick. “But they don’t realize there are teens that are going to make it a better place, make it more welcoming for neighbours.” The discussions were led by members of the Building Assets and Memories (BAM) youth asset team, most of whom were the same age or

Photo: GLENN COOK, St. Albert Leader

Facilitator Zoe Downing writes an idea down on a Post-It note during consultations with high school students for the City of St. Albert’s Social Master Plan at St. Albert Catholic High School on Saturday. only slightly older than those participating. Zoe Downing and Brent Saccucci were two of the facilitators, and said that they were glad to see the City soliciting their input. “It’s finally the City taking the initiative to talk to the youth. They’re not just talking to each other as adults and saying, ‘What do we think could work?’ It’s really the youth’s opinion on what they think will work for other youth,” Downing said. “It’s not an online survey, it’s not a health class PowerPoint,” Saccucci added. “It’s me talking to you, saying ‘What’s wrong?’ and let’s fix it.” Having their peers leading the discussion made a big difference to the participants, allowing them to relate more and be more forthright in their answers. “It makes you feel more comfortable, because they understand you more and they’ve been through what you have,” LaBuick said. For their part, Downing and Saccucci were impressed with just how involved the participants were in the process. “Usually it’s hard to get kids involved. Even 50-year-olds, you always want to sound cool and be cool; society tells you that’s the norm,” Saccucci said. “But when you come here and make a safe environment, they can talk to us, tell us what’s going on, and we’re people who can fix it.”

FULL SYNTHETIC OIL CHANGE One coupon per visit. Expires October 31, 2012. Cannot be combined with any other offer or used in addition to fleet discounts. Only valid at participating Jiffy Lube ® locations in Canada. Jiffy Lube ® is a registered trademark of Jiffy Lube ® International, Inc. © 2012 Jiffy Lube ® International, Inc. All rights reserved.

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There were a lot of ideas bandied about during the session, some of which, while still good ideas, were out of the scope of the Social Master Plan or the jurisdiction of the City. In those cases, though, Rodda said that the City still has an important role to play. “Then our role is to advocate on behalf of the community to whoever that is — to the provincial government, to the federal government, to businesses, to the tobacco industry,” he said. “If young people are saying, ‘Consider this,’ then I think we need to help them voice that opinion.” The feedback from Saturday’s session will be compiled with that gathered at other community consultations — the last of which takes place this Saturday from noon to 4 p.m. at Servus Credit Union Place — and be used by a citizen committee to compile a draft report. Saccucci said that he has seen youth development take great strides in St. Albert over the past few years, and he hopes that the input provided Saturday and the Social Master Plan as a whole will help that continue into the future. “So many things that were so taboo and unorthodox towards youth work in St. Albert have now come in in the past couple of years,” he said. “That’s motivation — to give someone a little bit, then a little bit more, you see the success, and you want more success.”

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YOUR COUNCIL NEXT CITY COUNCIL MEETING October 1 | 3:00 p.m. Council Chambers St. Albert Place, 5 St. Anne Street

Agenda Highlights:

• Servus Credit Union Place – Future Conceptual Plan • Public Hearing – 5:00 P.M.: Reconvene Public Hearing for amendments to Land Use Bylaw 9/2005 – adding new Downtown District and redistricting • Heritage Management Plan Workshop – Private and Public Properties The complete agenda package is posted to www.stalbert.ca You can address Council on these or any other issues. Public appointments are heard at the beginning and end of each Council meeting. Call 780-459-1500 to register. Council meetings are televised on SHAW TV Channel 10 from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m., webcast live and archived: stalbert.ca

COUNCIL TOWN HALL MEETING October 3 | 1 to 2:30 p.m. Meeting Room 1, Fountain Park Pool 4 Cunningham Road Agenda: • Opening Remarks • Open mic/agenda • Social Master Plan • St. Albert Trail Improvement Committee • Employment Lands/Economic Development • Attracting young families to St. Albert • Affordable Housing • AUMA • Other The Town Hall will be chaired by Deputy Mayor Cathy Heron. For information, contact 780-459-1500.

SUBDIVISION & DEVELOPMENT APPEAL BOARD October 3 | 6:00 p.m. Council Chambers St. Albert Place, 5 St. Anne Street MPSSCS4376085MPSE

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

HAVE YOUR SAY! ST. ALBERT TRAIL IMPROVEMENT OPEN HOUSE

The St. Albert Trail Improvement Committee invites you to share your ideas and thoughts on its vision for improvements along St. Albert Trail, including aesthetics and mobility. September 29 | 11 a.m.to 3 p.m. Centre Court, St. Albert Centre For information and to learn more about the Committee, visit www.stalbert.ca/ trail-improvement or contact the Project Coordinator, Sandyne Beach-McCutcheon at 780-459-1605 or sbmccutcheon@ st-albert.net .

SOCIAL MASTER PLAN

You have told the City of St. Albert that these social issues are important to you: housing, access to health care, drug abuse, bullying among youth, creating safe neighbourhoods. Let’s continue the conversation on how we can address these issues and further strengthen our community. Join us for the next round of community conversations. Register early by email at cparenteau@ st-albert.net or call 780-459-1756. Seating is limited. September 29 | 12 to 4 p.m. Morinville Room, Servus Place For information and ways to get involved, visit www.stalbert.ca/social-master-plan.

“We save money on gas and it’s nice to have time to do what we want and not worry about the roads.” Marianne StAT rider for 3 years

StAT LONG-TERM DEPARTMENT PLAN

You have an opportunity to provide input on St. Albert Transit’s Long-Term Department Plan which provides recommendations for the development of future transit services for the next 15 years. Recommendations include revisions to StAT’s service standards and fare strategy, implementation of new transit facilities, and improvements to customer information systems. The plan also incorporates recommendations from the Handibus Specialized Transit Review. The plan is available online at www.ridestat.ca. For a hard copy, call StAT at 780-418-6060. Comments can be sent to transit@st-albert.net or via mail at: St. Albert Transit, 235 Carnegie Drive, St. Albert, AB T8N 5A7. Please provide input by November 17, 2012.

WASTE COLLECTION BAGGED LEAVES COLLECTION

Public Works is collecting bagged leaves from residents on their normal waste collection day throughout October. Please use the green organics carts. Any excess leaf material can be brought to the Compost Depot on Villeneuve Road or placed in clean bags. All bags must be placed out by 7 a.m. on your normal collection day. Leaf material that is bagged will be composted. For more information, visit www.stalbert. ca/public-works

SKATE PARK REFURBISHMENT AND ENHANCEMENT PROJECT CLOSED SEPTEMBER 12 – NOVEMBER 2012 Construction is underway at the City of St. Albert Skate Park to replace aging infrastructure as well as to add enhancements which will increase safety and enjoyment for users. The skate park, located at Sturgeon Road east of Boudreau Road beside Woodlands Park, is closed during construction.

Construction will include concrete repairs, as well as adding numerous enhancements such as new rails, flat bars, roll over corners, and transitions to hubba ledges. Anticipated completion is November 2012 (weather dependent). For more information and to see conceptual designs, visit: www. stalbert.ca/skate or call Recreation Services at 780-459-1600.


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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

LARGE ITEM EVENT

ST. ALBERT HIGH SPORTS FIELD REFURBISHMENT

For more information: contact the City of St. Albert, Manager, Major Projects and Parks Planning, 780-459-1509 or visit: www.stalbert.ca/SACHS. AVE

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For details and nomination forms visit stalbert.ca/goodneighbour or call 780-459-1756 MPSSCS4381085MPSE

Thank you for your patience during the 2012 construction season.

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CONFIDENTIAL DRUG TIP LINE

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Residents should be aware of the following disruptions associated with the Saturdays only October 13 to November 17 | 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. refurbishment of the sports field behind St. Albert Catholic High School at 33 Prerequisites: 16 years of age and current Malmo Avenue. Bronze Cross or higher. 780-460-DRUG (3784) • Work includes the stripping of grass and Completion of this course also certifies the Keep St. Albert safe – provide topsoil, the addition of a new base and individual with their Lifesaving CPR Instructor. tips about drug dealers topsoil, and seeding the sports field to operating in our community. grass. The sports field will be closed until fall 2013. St. Albert High has made alternate arrangements to play at other Good neighbours are the building blocks sports fields in the city. of a great neighbourhood! • Heavy truck traffic will occur on The City invites you to McKenney, Mission and Malmo Avenues celebrate your good in both directions for approximately neighbour by nominating three days. Dates have yet to be and thanking them for confirmed as the contractor is awaiting creating a connected, Alberta One-Call locates. Truck traffic safe and caring community. dates will be posted on the website at www.stalbert.ca/SACHS. Trucks will be working from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Warning signs will be placed and construction signs will be controlling truck traffic onto the site. Fencing will surround

the field and the grass access lane. There will be a temporary sidewalk closure at the site access on Malmo Avenue.

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OCTOBER 1 – OCTOBER 31, 2012 (WEATHER DEPENDENT)

Route with temporarily increased truck traffic

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Swim for Life and Lifesaving Instructor Lifesaving Instructors are trained to teach and evaluate Swim for Life program levels, Canadian Swim Patrol awards, and the Bronze level certifications. Topics covered include various approaches to teaching water rescue, first aid and related aquatic skills. Candidates learn about long- and short-term planning, class management, safety supervision and the principles of evaluation.

For more information on eligible projects and applicants, visit www.stalbert.ca/ environmental-initiatives-grant-program or email environment@st-albert.net for a complete application package.

For information please refer to the City of St. Albert Bylaw at www.stalbert.ca or call 780-457-1557 or speak to cemetery operations.

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For more information, visit www.stalbert. ca/fire-prevention

w:stalbert.ca/fountain-park-recreation-centre p: 780-459-1553

Application Deadline: October 9 | 5 p.m.

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Enjoy giveaways, displays, inflatable castles and slides, draws, free hot dogs, refreshments and ice cream. Put your child’s name into the draw to become Fire Chief for a Day!

FOUNTAIN PARK RECREATION CENTRE

Help the City maintain safe and respectful use of the cemetery grounds by removing any personal articles, flower structures and monuments from gravesites.

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October 7 | 1 to 4 p.m. Fire Hall No. 3, 100 Giroux Road

/StA_Recreation /StARecreation

Personal items left at gravesites may get destroyed by maintenance equipment; may pose a safety risk and therefore under the Cemetery Bylaw, may be removed.

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Fire Prevention Week is October 7 to 13. This year’s theme: Have Two Ways Out!© Bring your family and learn about fire safety at the Fire Prevention Week Open House:

The Environmental Advisory Committee and the City of St. Albert is now accepting applications for the 2012 allocation of the Environmental Initiatives Grant. This grant is for St. Albert schools, non-profit organizations and community groups.

The City of St. Albert will be conducting regular maintenance and clean-up activities at the St. Albert Municipal Cemetery from October 1 to 15, 2012.

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FIRE PREVENTION WEEK OPEN HOUSE

READY SET GO

Do you have an idea, large or small, for a citizen-action project that would benefit the environment in our community, but you are without the funds to make it happen?

CEMETERY CLEAN-UP

Sports field to be refurbished

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For more information, visit: www.stalbert. ca/compost-giveaway

ENVIRONMENTAL INITIATIVES GRANT

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September 29 | 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. or while quantities last Public Works Jack Kraft Facility, 7 Chevigny Street

GRANTS

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The City of St. Albert is holding the Fall Compost Giveaway Event:

Residents can bring large, hard to dispose of items in exchange for two garbage tags per item. Restrictions on acceptable items apply. For more information, visit: www.stalbert.ca/junkevent

TAKE NOTE

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FALL COMPOST GIVEAWAY EVENT

October 13 | 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Public Works Jack Kraft Facility, 7 Chevigny Street

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

The City of St. Albert is holding the fall Large Item Event:

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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

Cat licenses won’t be part of animal bylaw GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

Sweeping changes are coming to St. Albert’s animal bylaw, but rules regulating cats won’t be among them. At their regular meeting Monday afternoon, city council approved a number of guiding principles for City of St. Albert staff as they complete the first major overhaul of the animal bylaw in over 20 years. But, even though writing in rules requiring cat licenses and against roaming cats was debated at length, the idea was eventually voted down, mainly due to cost. “I am sympathetic to the 10 or 20 people who email us or call us about their cat challenges, but I do have to vote against this,” Mayor Nolan Crouse said. “If it didn’t cost us any money, it would be easy for me. But the fact is, it’s going to cost too much.” Staff estimated that regulating cats could cost between $160,000 and $200,000 in the first year of enforcement, and $100,000 to $130,000 in subsequent years. This cost, however, did not take into account workload increases at St. Albert Place or at the RCMP detachment to deal with licensing and complaints, and it also assumed a viable contract with a private kennel could be secured. If the City had to operate its own

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kennel facility to house cats before they are claimed, costs could skyrocket. Coun. Wes Brodhead brought forth the motion to regulate cats in the new bylaw, even though it was not recommended by City staff. But eventually he too joined the rest of council in voting against the idea. A survey completed by City staff indicated that 71 per cent of people would support cat licensing if it could be done without an increase in spending, but that number dropped to only 53 per cent if more money was needed. Another of the more contentious issues that was discussed was adding a provision to the animal bylaw that would require dogs to be on a leash at all times, except when it is in an identified dog park or an uninhabited open field, like a farm. “Having dogs on a leash simply acts as a deterrent,” said Coun. Malcolm Parker, who proposed the change. “Dog

owners have a responsibility, but at least if a dog is on a leash, the owner has some control.” Currently, dogs can be off-leash anywhere in St. Albert, including parks, except for tot lots and the Red Willow Trail system. Coun. Cathy Heron called the provision a “huge, drastic step” that would fundamentally change St. Albert. “[We’re going] from a totally dog-friendly, off-leash city to the exact opposite — a controlling on-leash dog city,” she said. “Mandatory leash laws may be the simplest solution to out-of-control dogs, but that doesn’t make them the best.” Council also narrowly approved an addition to the bylaw that would require owners to carry a means of picking up waste with them while walking their dogs. “[We need] to get the message out to the public that have dogs that we do expect them to take responsibility and clean up after their dogs,” Parker said. Heron — who voted against the

motion along with Brodhead and Coun. Cam MacKay — felt that such a measure could punish responsible dog owners who had to pick up waste early on in a walk, then run into a bylaw officer later and can’t produce a bag. “I’m opposed to [introducing] another rule in the city that’s just not enforceable,” she said. Council also voted to add provisions to the bylaw that would prohibit certain other animals from being kept on private property, including pigs, sheep, goats, pigeons and chickens. Heron voted against this motion as well, saying she had yet to hear a compelling reason why such animals should be banned. “It’s very arbitrary, and it’s one neighbour’s opinion against the next neighbour’s opinion. ... Until somebody says that it’s not safe, it’s unhealthy, or its affects their neighbours in the way of noise or smell, then I cannot support this,” she said. Such animals are already prohibited in the City’s land use bylaw, and the new animal bylaw will mirror those regulations. Other principles council approved Monday include a late payment fee for dog licences, and higher fees for dogs who are deemed dangerous due to a history of biting or other bad behaviour. Councillors should have a draft version of the new bylaw by the end of March 2013


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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

OPINION

iStAlbert

No balance in leash law

Here’s what people are saying about #StAlbert on Twitter:

@GelNailBar Looking for your inner child? I usually find mine in Happy Baby pose @SoulFitYoga #StAlbert #yin #giggles

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ans of dog trainer Cesar Millan — more affectionately known as “The Dog Whisperer” — or even those who occasionally catch his show on the National Geographic Channel on a lazy Sunday morning are likely familiar with one of his many catchphrases: “It’s all about by Glenn Cook balance.” Of course, Millan is referring to both the method and mindset of training dogs, but the principle also applies to the rules municipalities have to govern them. There has to be a balance between the freedom and enjoyment of the dogs and their owners, and the freedom and enjoyment of others. And it’s that balance that got thrown out of whack by St. Albert city council on Monday afternoon. Among many other guiding principles they approved Monday for the drafting of a new animal bylaw, councillors voted to require dogs be on leashes almost everywhere in the city. The only exceptions would be in identified dog parks and in “uninhabited open fields.” Granted, the current regulations are already out of balance. The current animal bylaw allows dogs to be off-leash almost anywhere in the city, with the exception of tot lots and the Red Willow Trail system. Leashes, unfortunately, are necessary for responsible dog ownership — not only to control the dog from biting or otherwise behaving badly around humans, but for their own safety. No matter how well trained they are, dogs are still unpredictable by nature, and could go darting into traffic or other dangerous situations without notice. Leashes can prevent such situations. But the new provision council approved Monday swings the pendulum too far the other way. It’s inconceivable and almost absurd that one could not have a dog off leash in any city park, that one would not be able to play fetch in a vast open space like Seven Hills simply because it not a designated dog park. Really, the best balance would have been what City of St. Albert staff was originally proposing: on-leash on the sidewalks and trails, off-leash in parks and open spaces. In taking that tack, council would have truly proven they are the pack leaders.

@PKNStAlbert We are looking for presenters for PKN2 on Nov. 15th. Let us know if you are interested! pknstalbert.com #stalbert

EDITORIAL

@tim_osborne Since Katz seems to be shopping around... “Ladies and Gentlemen, your #stalbert Oilers!” has a nice ring to it.

@mattbecigneul

It’s embarrassing that #StAlbert doesn’t have SticknPuck times except for 3 hrs of “parent & tot” during weekday mornings when people work

Compiled by Swift Media Group

swiftmedia.ca • @SwiftMediaGroup

Follow us at @stalbertleader

‘Discover, experience, celebrate’ culture “Education and the fine arts engage the human mind, forcing us to think in new ways, forcing us to use our most powerful tool for progress: our imagination.” — Lois Hole (October 2003)

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rowing up in Pointe Claire, Que., my local library afforded me many opportunities to travel to far-flung galaxies, fight historic battles and learn about other cultures. As Lois Hole advocated, it taught me to use my imagination and stretched my boundaries. Four years ago, the Province of Alberta initiated an exciting project to celebrate the arts with Alberta Arts Day (later evolving into Alberta Culture Days). At the time, I had just finished two terms on the St. Albert Public Library Board, giving back in a way, for the

Peter

MOLONEY St. Albert Cultivates the Arts Society My City library of my youth. Mayor Crouse asked me to help start up a festival that would become St. Albert’s contribution to the Arts Days weekend. This inspired me to explore the dimensions of artistic expression in St. Albert and to discover for myself the creative diversity that exists. The predominant theme of the Culture Days weekend is to “discover, experience and celebrate” our culture. What I discovered, experienced and wholeheartedly celebrate is the richness of the arts in St. Albert. I’ve discovered that the arts are an important element of what

Publisher: Rob LeLacheur rob@stalbertleader.com

Editor: Glenn Cook

glenn@stalbertleader.com

Client Services: Michelle Barstad michelle@stalbertleader.com

makes St. Albert such a unique community. I’ve experienced the passion that local artists of all ages and abilities have for their art — whether it’s music, dance, visual arts or literary arts. And I celebrate the fact that any of these talented, inspired artists, from beginners to renowned professionals, could be your neighbour. StArts Fest is the primary focus of the St. Albert Cultivates the Arts Society. Formed this year from the committee that was responsible for the city’s Culture Days, the society is dedicated to promoting the arts in St. Albert. Made up of a creative team of volunteers, the society gives their time generously so that the community can experience the full-spectrum of the arts in one weekend. In collaboration with the

Delivery concerns? Email us at delivery@stalbertleader.com All claims of errors in advertisements must be received in writing by the publisher within 5 days after the first publication. Liability for errors or failure to publish is limited to the amount paid for the space occupied. The opinions expressed within publication are not necessarily those of the St. Albert Leader or RJ Lolly Media. Material published may not be copied or reproduced without the express written consent of the publisher.

City, the St. Albert Public Library, the Arts and Heritage Foundation and the St. Albert Place Visual Arts Council, the society provides activities, workshops and performances from Friday through Sunday, and promotes other artistic activities happening in the City throughout the weekend. So this weekend, I encourage you to venture out and experience the culture of St. Albert. Listen to music at the Young Artist Showcase, learn something about your heritage at the Musée Heritage Museum, enjoy the award-winning play Grocer Story, meet an author or two, or attend a workshop. StArts Fest (a part of Alberta Culture Days) runs from Friday through to Sunday. For details on these and many more exciting activities, visit www. startsfest.ca. Owned and operated by

RJ Lolly Media Inc. 13 Mission Ave. St. Albert, Alta. T8N 1H6

Phone: 780-460-1035


9

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

FREE BACK UP CAMERA AND NAVIGATION PACKAGE WITH EVERY PURCHASE!

LEATHER

That’s a wrap

BLOW OUT

Photo courtesy City of St. Albert

Mayor Nolan Crouse and FortisAlberta stakeholder relations manager Dora L’Heureux stand next to a switching box on St. Anne Street Friday with in an anti-graffiti floral wrap. Wraps have been installed on 20 boxes in St. Albert as part of a pilot project.

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St. Albert Leader

A committee planning the future of St. Albert Trail is hoping the road ahead will be smooth. Chris Creran, the chair of the City of St. Albert’s St. Albert Trail Improvement Committee came before city council Monday afternoon to give a status report on the committee’s work so far, saying that the work the committee is doing is not just for the present, but also for the future. “Our greatest hope for this plan is not that the current city council and administration agrees to it and decides undertake some suggestions, but rather that future councils and administrations continue to review this document for years to come,” Creran said. The trail improvement committee also includes Mayor Nolan Crouse, Coun. Cathy Heron, representatives from the St. Albert Chamber of Commerce and the St. Albert Economic Development Advisory Committee and several local businesspeople. While St. Albert Trail is seen mainly as a commercial corridor, Creran reminded council that there are still many subdivisions that back onto the road and use it as an access point, so the residential component can’t be forgotten. “The City of St. Albert, the residents and the business community will need to work together to make the plan viable and accepted, cost-effective, maintainable and safe,” he said. As time has gone on, though, the trail’s primary use has evolved, Creran said. “Several decades ago, it was the continuation of a provincial highway, cutting through an independent city,” he said. “It is

now the ingress and egress point of a major ring road, a central destination point for people in and around St. Albert to access shopping districts, including the farmers’ market and the downtown core, and a primary hub for St. Albert Transit.” Another big part of the committee’s work is the aesthetics of the road, finding ways to improve its look and, as the main gateway into St. Albert, make sure it lines up with the city’s Botanical Arts brand. “How do we take the City of St. Albert brand of ‘Cultivate Life’ and incorporate this into something usually considered mundane — a road?” Creran asked. Councillors asked about the possibility of establishing a business revitalization zone along St. Albert Trail, but Creran said the associated tax would be a big turnoff. “Any business-minded individual will look at a BRZ and not be agreeable to it at first blush,” he said. “If it was even to be examined — it is included in the terms of reference and we are going to have to look at it at some point — it would have to be accountable and it would have to address immediate needs.” Another initiative the committee is looking to implement is the “Trail Blazers” program, which would see volunteer captains take charge of portions of the trail to keep it well-maintained, informed and safe. The next step for the committee is an open house scheduled for Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at St. Albert Centre. “Changes to St. Albert Trail will not happen overnight, nor will they happen without proper stakeholder involvement and acceptance,” Creran said. A final report is due back before council by June 2013.

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Pickup artist Photo: glenn cook, St. Albert leader

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Fowler receives medal GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

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One of St. Albert’s greatest community leaders received some deserved recognition on Monday afternoon. The family of former mayor and MLA Richard Fowler was at city council chambers on Monday as Mayor Nolan Crouse presented him posthumously with a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal that was accepted by his wife Dawne. “Richard was a community leader — if not one of the best community leaders in the past, maybe the best, some have said, and that’s certainly not for us to argue,” Mayor Nolan Crouse said. Fowler passed away in July after battling pneumonia for a few months. He served as St. Albert’s mayor from 1965 to 1968 and again from 1980 to 1989. He then served as the Progressive Conservative MLA for St. Albert from 1989 to 1993, serving in several cabinet posts, including justice minister and municipal affairs minister. He also served as president of the Alberta Urban

Municipalities Association. “When council submitted his nomination, we did not want to do this posthumously, but we are where we are,” Crouse said. Dawne said that her husband would have been extremely humbled by the honour. “He always said, ‘I’m not deserving of this. It’s the people around me,’” she said in her best booming baritone impression of Richard. “He had such a gift for attracting really good people … He was a good leader.” Another St. Albertan, John Stafford O’Neill, was presented with a Diamond Jubilee Medal at Government House in downtown Edmonton on Thursday, Sept. 20, at a ceremony hosted by Lt.-Gov. Donald Ethell. O’Neill, who is already a member of the Order of Canada, was recognized for his work advocating for human rights and working toward national unity, culture and heritage preservation. He is also a past chief commissioner of the Alberta Human Rights Commission.


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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

Locals hot stuff in Sizzling 20 GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

Leader file photo

Dan Davidson of Tupelo Honey performs at the 2012 Rainmaker Exhibition and Rodeo.

A couple of St. Albertans are hot stuff after earning honours from a local magazine. Edmontonians magazine published its 11th annual Sizzling 20 Under 30 issue last week, honouring Capital Region entrepreneurs under the age of 30 who are succeeding not only in their business ventures but also in giving back to their communities. St. Albert was well represented in the issue, with both Tupelo Honey lead singer Dan Davidson and Earls St. Albert general manager Christina Reboh named among the 20 honorees. “It’s pretty cool when you see some of the other nominees for the award. It’s quite an honour because there’s some pretty successful, forward-thinking young entrepreneurs and businesspeople and interesting people all around,” said Davidson, who graduated from St. Albert Catholic High School. “It’s just nice to know somebody thinks you’re special enough to nominate you,” Reboh added. “And to actually get selected is an honour in itself.” The winners were honoured at a ceremony on Thursday, Sept. 20. Although Tupelo Honey has been around for years, this past year saw the band take big strides, getting more exposure through licensing songs

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for television coverage and commercials. “We had a really big synch with a song on a Sunkist commercial in the States that was played during the Billboard Music Awards, so that was pretty cool. And we had a couple of TV shows like Degrassi and commercials. It’s been pretty amazing,” he said. Tupelo Honey’s song “Can’t Stop” also won a contest put on by the Edmonton Journal to find a hockey anthem for the Edmonton Oilers, and was featured in CTV’s coverage of the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London, England. Meanwhile, Davidson has also been busy this year writing and composing with his companies Hands Up! Music and Sound the Belle Publishing. Plus he recently opened a Chipmaster Auto Centre franchise in Riel Business Park. “We’re writing with some artists and developing a couple … we’ve written a couple of other songs that have been looked at by some artists on Universal Canada,” he said, also noting he recently finished doing the score for a documentary film on stand-up comedians. For her part, Reboh is the first female general manager of an Earls Restaurant in the Capital Region in nearly 20 years, and she is proud to be leading the charge of women in the restaurant industry. “I think it’s pretty cool. When I started with Earls and got into management, I was

the only female in management, even junior management,” she said. “Now you look at the management in Edmonton, it’s almost all females looking to get into the general manager positions. It’s kind of cool to see how it’s done a complete flip.” Reboh has been working with the Earls chain for about 10 years, and when she came back from maternity leave in March, she was appointed regional trainer. But when the manager position in St. Albert opened up, she jumped at the chance. “I like St. Albert,” she said. And she likes the chances of keeping the restaurant’s success going well into the future. “I’ll keep plugging away, keep making Earls one of the hottest destinations in St. Albert,” she said. “If we keep sales going the way they’re going, who knows — maybe we’ll grow and get bigger and make more space for more customers.” Davidson, meanwhile, recently returned from a songwriters’ camp in Ontario, and he hopes that will continue to spark his creative fire. “Tupelo Honey, we’re in the studio next weekend starting our new record,” he said. “And we’re working on a lot of video projects to go along with the new audio stuff we’re coming out with — trailers, music videos, behind-the-scenes stuff, live sessions. We’re just preparing for the next big wave.”

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Alberta Party to stick around for 2016 vote Munsey also called the fact the party was able to even mount a campaign after just two years in existence “a significant The Alberta Party is sticking around, and accomplishment.” Tim Osborne is glad to see it. Provincially, Osborne said the party needs Osborne, who ran under the Alberta Party to clarify its stand on issues so voters can in the St. Albert riding in May’s provincial identify with them. election campaign, was in Calgary over the “We need to have some clear ideas and weekend when the party released the results policies so people can see what we stand of an internal survey on whether to continue for and rally around them,” he said. “It’s or to fold. important that people know what we stand More than two-thirds of for, that we’re not afraid to take a respondents felt the party should position on issues.” continue, and Osborne, for one, He also noted that leaders from wasn’t surprised. other progressive provincial parties “There are a lot of people who — including Liberal leader Raj have put a lot of time and effort Sherman — were at the AGM, and into this, and just because we didn’t it may be time for them to start elect an MLA the first time around, talking about co-operation. most parties don’t have that kind of “That doesn’t necessarily mean a success the first time, so packing up merger by any means,” he said, “but Tim after one election would have been there are some similar ideas out Osborne pretty unlikely,” he said. there, and how do we best utilize Candidate He added that there were a few the shared energies we have over new faces at the party’s annual the coming years?” general meeting, meaning there’s “still some In the St. Albert riding, there were high energy there,” and the big challenge will be hopes for Osborne, but he eventually decided where to focus that energy. finished well back in the field of five Incoming party president Will Munsey candidates with 1,195 votes. said in a press release he too was pleased in But Osborne said he can see that gap the survey results. closing as long as local volunteers continue “After the results of the election, we put putting in the work. it all out on the table to let our members “We need to keep doing the work of decide our fate,” Munsey said. “The majority letting people know who we are and what we has spoken and their message is that this is a stand for,” he said. “Just being involved in movement worth continuing. the community is really important, reaching “Not only are we not folding, we’re just out and getting involved so people know beginning, folks.” what the Alberta Party’s all about.”

GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

Road warrior Photo: PERRY MAH, Sun Media News Services

Curler and St. Albert native Scott Pfeifer traded his broom for a stick at Northlands on Saturday as he took part in the Road Hockey to Conquer Cancer fundraiser.

Best of Edmonton has St. Albert flavour

GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

A local magazine’s ranking of the best Edmonton has to offer has a distinctly St. Albert flavour. VUE Weekly published its annual Best of Edmonton issue last week, and while many of the reader-selected favourites were from Edmonton proper, a couple call St. Albert home. First, the Enjoy Centre took home honours for Best Gardening Centre, something co-owner Jim Hole said was a nice tribute to what they’ve been doing. “It’s nice to know the customers appreciate some of the changes we’ve made,” Hole said. “We’re constantly listening to them and trying to improve. And obviously we’re doing something right.” Knowing that the award is

voted on by readers is a big plus, he added. “When it’s customers voting and validating it, it means an awful lot,” Hole said. Also, St. Albert resident Josh Classen won Best Local TV Weatherperson — not much of a surprise given he won the category in 2007 and 2008. What was a surprise, though, was his tie for first place in the Sexiest Local Media Celebrity category with Carole Anne Devaney of Global. “I like winning that one [the weatherperson award] — the other one makes my wife laugh more than anything else,” Classen said. Part of Classen’s popularity, though, is his interaction with viewers through social media, especially Twitter.

“When I talk to social media experts and gurus, the thing they tell me ... is that [I] reply to everybody,” he said. “Absolutely everybody who writes me something, I will write them back.” With those two titles under his belt, Classen will be looking to bring home one more next month when he competes in the Funniest Media Person Competition as part of the ATB Comedy Festival at the River Cree Casino on Monday, Oct. 15. Classen has done standup comedy before for charity, but is starting to sweat this one out. “It’s a couple of weeks away, and I have no act ... I don’t know what I’m going to do on Oct. 15 — aside from not win,” he said with a laugh. “That’s pretty much the only guarantee.”

Home invasion rare, not random, say RCMP

St. Albert RCMP say that a home invasion robbery last week in North Ridge is a rare occurence, but this one was not random. Police were called to the home at about 10:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 19. The 41-year-old man who lives at the home told cops that his doorbell rang at about 8 p.m., and when he answered the door, three men rushed in and grabbed him. The suspect then tied up the homeowner and beat him, then ransacked the home before leaving at about 10 p.m. The homeowner was able to leave the house, and went to get help from a neighbour, who called police. The homeowner was taken by ambulance to the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton for treatment. RCMP describe the assailants as wearing dark clothing and toques, and with masks on their faces. The police investigation is still in its early stages, and anyone with information is asked to call St. Albert RCMP at 780-4587700 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). — GLENN COOK


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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

50+ Club unveils vision for new digs GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

Photo: AMBER BRACKEN, Sun Media News Services

Hockey great Mark Messier is greeted by a fan as he makes his entrance to the Legends Experience, an annual Kinsmen gala fundraiser, at the Edmonton Expo Centre on Friday evening.

Messier sounds off on arena at Legends dinner

KEVIN MAIMANN Sun Media News Services

Mark Messier says the future of the Edmonton Oilers depends on a new downtown arena. The former St. Albert Saint and NHL star, who won five Stanley Cups with the Oilers, spoke to media Friday before his appearance as the featured guest of the Kinsmen Legends Experience fundraising gala at the Edmonton Expo Centre. “I would have to think it’s pretty well tied to getting a new arena, there’s no question,” Messier said. “But I don’t think anybody’s really thinking that right now. I think they’re trying to figure out a way to get a deal done. “Everybody wants a deal done, everybody knows it’s a great idea, everybody says it’s a great idea, so I can’t imagine that there won’t be a deal done.” Messier said he doesn’t have any specific suggestions on getting the deal done faster as negotiations continue between the city and the Katz Group, but he hopes “smarter and cooler heads prevail.”

Oilers owner Daryl Katz and several top team officials were in Seattle Monday, apparently scoping out plans for a new arena in that city. Katz also recently declined an invitation to come before Edmonton city council to clarify recent demands for an operating subsidy from the city.

“I can’t imagine that there won’t be a deal done.” Const. Janice Schoepp St. Albert RCMP Messier is disappointed by the NHL lockout, but sees the current Oilers as a team with a bright future that has been built in a similar fashion to the 1980s dynasty teams he was a part of. “I think it’s pretty evident what’s being built,” said the legendary hall-of-famer. “They’re amassing a tremendous amount of talent. They’ve been doing it through the draft and through development,

and that’s the way you have to do it now with the salary cap the way it is. “Now it’s trying to get to the point where they’re all putting it together and becoming a team, and learning how to win as a team. So that’s the next step.” Messier said he and his former Oilers teammates have forged strong bonds with the city, people and businesses in Edmonton that keep them coming back. The Kinsmen fundraiser, which brought Wayne Gretzky to town last year, especially hits home for Messier. “When I was a kid a long time ago, the Kinsmen was a big player in town helping out children. They built the Kinsmen field house on the south side and I used to play soccer there,” he said. “I think helping them to reach out and continue on their quest to help the kids and build the facilities and help with the monies and equipment whatever way they can (is) an awesome way to be able to help out.” The Legends Experience supports Kinsmen and non-profit organization Kin Canada.

The St. Albert 50+ Club has a grand vision for a new building downtown, and say they’re willing to work with the City of St. Albert and other local not-for-profit groups to bring it to reality. Representatives from the club came before St. Albert city council Monday afternoon to present their vision for a proposed new building to replace their old one on Taché Street. While the current building has excellent parking, Clark said, it also has major structural problems, limited space, high operating costs and issues with odours and dampness. And their membership, currently sitting at about 500, is set to explode, with an estimated 20,000 people in St. Albert aged 50 or over. “We are not able to offer all the services and activities we’d like to be able to provide,” said Tom Clark, a member of the club’s board of directors and the chair of its new building committee. The club is looking at a base building with two floors in Millennium Park, adjacent to their current site. But those plans could be expanded with a third floor for medical and support services, and another two floors above that for seniors housing. “We’re finding it would be a very quick payback on the rental of the [medical] space,” Clark said. “It would certainly attract developers or other agencies that would be interested in that.” Other sites being considered include their current site and a vacant lot along St. Anne Street, across from Grandin Medical Clinic. No matter which site is chosen, though, Clark said there was one consideration that rose above the rest in

consulting with the rest of the 50+ Club’s members. “Parking is a very critical need for all the locations,” he said. “It’s by far the most critical need they saw, and several of our members are people that have access and mobility challenges.” Funding for the project has been set aside in the City budget but, as councillors pointed out Monday, the vision for that was for a more inclusive building, with other community agencies also having space.

“Parking is a very critical need for all the locations.” Tom Clark 50+ Club director “It would be beneficial to the whole community if they were all together … I think it’s really important that we work together on this, with the other community agencies and with council,” Coun. Cathy Heron said. “And there’s a lot of community members that have expressed a lot of interest to get involved — they’re not part of agencies, but they want to have a voice and help out.” Clark said that he hasn’t yet talked to the St. Albert Youth Community Centre, but has had interest from the Stop Abuse In Families (SAIF) Society and the St. Albert Housing Society, among others. “We pledge to co-operate with other agencies, and we’ve already started setting the groundwork for that,” he said. The base two-storey building would cost about $15.6 million. The third floor could be tacked on for $6.5 million, and the housing floors for $8.6 million each.


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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

E. coli beef recall grows

KEVIN MAIMANN Sun Media News Services

The recall of potentially E. coli-tainted beef products from an Edmonton producer was expanded for a sixth time Sunday. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) has added new products to the recall list, which now stretches to the Maritime provinces. Products added Sunday to the countrywide recall list include beef patties, meat loaf and ground beef distributed to Sobeys and Foodland stores in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Prince Edward Island. CFIA spokeswoman Lisa Gauthier said the list of more than 200 products could continue to grow. “There is a possibility that, through our food safety investigation, we could identify additional products and the recall could be expanded again. At this point, we’re working with the company and distributors to

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ENTERTAINMENT

Jeffery Thriving as 2nd novel launches

56 Natural Area near her Woodlands home to relax and reflect. “It is getting very exciting, but I have to keep my Corinne Jeffery is ready to leave her audience feet planted firmly on the ground,” she said. hanging just a little bit longer. Jeffery began writing the The St. Albert author is getting set to launch the trilogy nearly nine years ago second novel of her Understanding when she was in her late 50s. Ursula trilogy, Thriving She has had many trials and 1920-1939, with tribulations along the way an event Sunday that caused her to question at the St. Albert whether or not the books Public Library. would ever see the light of The historical day, including a bout with fiction series, breast cancer, but she said which Jeffery the support of her family wrote all at once — her husband Jack, but had to split her daughter Sara and into three novels, her grandson Aidan — chronicles the trials helped see her through and tribulations it all. of the Werners, a “Every now and then, family of German [Aidan] will come Lutheran pacifists who up with a question: immigrate from Russia ‘Grandma, it doesn’t to settle on the harsh matter that you’re Saskatchewan prairie. going on all these While they were all book tours. You’re written at the same still going to look time, Jeffery said the first after me, aren’t book, Arriving 1909you?’” she said 1919, was more of an with a laugh. “[I’ve introduction, while this said before] that one delves deeper into those he is my number characters. one fan, and he She added that the still is.” cliffhanger the first book Feedback ended on isn’t necessarily from Jeffery’s first book where the second one picks up. was overwhelmingly positive, and she “I’ve had all kinds of people hopes the new installment clears the bar that has speculating — because I’ve been set pretty high. been at the markets and on emails — about what “This has been the most incredible year of my happens and how the next book starts,” she said. life,” Jeffery said. “I mean, the learning curve this “I did this by design — I did not start Page 1 of year … I think the learning curve is steeper than Thriving letting my readers know. In fact, at the end graduating from university, because it’s been so of Arriving, there is an excerpt from Thriving, and intense.” a lot of people thought they were going to jump to In particular, Arriving was well received in that excerpt and find out what happened. But that Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and Jeffery is headed didn’t happen, and it doesn’t happen when they start back to these provinces as part of her publicity tour to read Thriving either. And it’s in October. not going to happen at the launch. “I think my readers like reading I’ve already selected my reading, about ordinary, true Canadians,” and I’ve chosen very deliberately.” she said. “People tell me over and Having the launch event in over again, ‘Your characters are her own backyard is immensely so real.’ … [They say,] ‘I know it’s exciting for Jeffery. supposed to be a fictional family, “I’ve lived in St. Albert now for but you are writing about my Corinne Jeffery 32 years, and to be able to host a siblings, my cousins, my parents, Author launch in that beautiful building my aunts.’ Everybody seems to be is just awesome,” she said, noting able to relate to the characters.” that staff at the St. Albert library have been big fans Sunday’s book launch event in Forsyth Hall at the of her efforts since day one, and they’ve already pre- St. Albert Public Library kicks off at 3 p.m., with ordered copies to put on the shelves. Jeffery reading excerpts from the new book and But, even with all the hoopla, Jeffery is still taking signing copies. To register, call the library at 780time for herself, making regular trips to the Riverlot 459-1682.

GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

“I think my readers like reading about ... true Canadians.”

Leader file photo

St. Albert author Corinne Jeffery will be at the St. Albert Public Library on Sunday to officially launch her second novel, Thriving 1920-1939.


16

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

Sam ‘The Record Man’ Sniderman passes away at 92

JANE STEVENSON Sun Media News Services

They just don’t make them like Sam Sniderman anymore, said Canadian veteran musicians and industry leaders following the death of the Sam The Record Man chain founder Sunday night. Montreal-born Andy Kim of Rock Me Gently fame, whose relationship with Sniderman stretched back more than 40 years to Kim’s first 1968 album, said Sniderman will be remembered for the personal touch. “Sam took me to his office, talked to me, he was concerned that I would be able to take care of myself and be able to care of finances,” said Kim.

“Then you went and you met the staff at Sam The Record Man ... He’s always been involved in records, but he’s involved in the artist’s lives which is something unusual. He took you into his world. He was invested in the artist.” Winnipegger Randy Bachman, who was inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame over the weekend in Toronto, released this statement: “Sam Sniderman was truly everyone’s friend. As kids from Winnipeg all of us in The Guess Who and Bachman-Turner Overdrive couldn’t wait until our next Toronto visit and go to his store. It was the equivalent of Disneyland for all music lovers.” The Sam The Record Man chain, once one of the biggest in the country, went bankrupt in 2001.

Sniderman, who was 92 when he passed away in his sleep, opened his flagship store on Toronto’s Yonge Street in 1959 and closed it in 2007. Arthur Fogel, a former Torontonian who is the L.A.-based CEO of Live Nation Global Touring, said his relationship with Sniderman was its closest when Fogel worked as a Toronto concert promoter CPI from the early ’80s to the early ’90s when they sold tickets at the Yonge Street store. “He was a great man, sort of a larger-than-life figure,” said Fogel. “It does seem like a lifetime ago because it’s so different today. But at that time, he was the king and was so much in the mix with artists and managers. It was like he was a central figure in the launch of sale of records.”

Photo: Sun Media News Services

Record mogul Sam Sniderman died Sunday at the age of 92.

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17

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

End of Watch, House at the End of the Street tie atop box office

SUN MEDIA NEWS SERVICES – Police drama End of Watch and horror thriller House at the End of the Street tied for the top spot at the North American box office this weekend, with Clint Eastwood’s Trouble With the Curve close behind. Each of the top films brought in $13 million respectively at U.S. and Canadian box offices. The gritty End of Watch, written and directed by the writer of 2001 crime drama Training Day, David Ayer, brought in $13 million at U.S. and Canadian box offices. The opening by End of Watch was the

largest for independent film distribution company Open Road, a two-year-old joint venture between theater chains AMC and Regal. Its two other films this year, Hit and Run and Silent House, opened with less than $7 million apiece. Open Road CEO Tom Ortenberg said End of Watch was successful because it appealed to a wide swath of moviegoers. Referring to End of Watch as a “smart action movie,” Ortenberg added that it is a prototype for the type of films Open Road hopes to make. Its next film, action ensemble Breacher, is another David Ayer

project. House at the End of the Street, which features Jennifer Lawrence in her first role since this year’s blockbuster The Hunger Games, also brought in $13 million. The timing of horror thriller’s release capitalized on Lawrence’s Hunger Games fame, said Relativity president of distribution Kyle Davies. The film primarily targeted young females and did a large share of marketing through mobilephone-based applications. The audience for Street was 61 per cent female, and 70 per cent of filmgoers were

under 25. Baseball movie Trouble with the Curve was hot on the heels of the top films, taking in $12.7 million, according to box office estimates released on Sunday. The film is Clint Eastwood’s first starring role in four years and comes less than a month after his headline-grabbing speech at the Republican national convention. Rounding out the top five was the 3D rerelease of Finding Nemo with $9.4 million, and Resident Evil: Retribution with $6.7 million. Both films premiered in theaters last weekend.

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18

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

VASA opens doors for housewarming

including the Monday night chat room, held on the last Monday of every month, and the altered books workshop every The Visual Arts Studio Association Tuesday. (VASA) of St. Albert is throwing a “That’s part of our mandate, to have housewarming party, and art lovers from public programs,” Beerens said, also noting the city and beyond are all invited. there are drop-in sessions for all artists, After negotiating a five-year lease with both VASA members and non-members on the City of St. Albert, VASA moved into Thursday nights. its new home in the Hemingway Centre In the middle of it all, though, is an — the old RCMP building on Sir Winston exhibition and sitting space, where Churchill Avenue — on June 1. Now, with members can relax, enjoy a cup of coffee all the furniture arranged and the moving and draw inspiration from the work of boxes stowed away, they’re throwing their others. doors open for their grand opening, just “Someone will run out and yell, ‘Look in time for Alberta Culture Days and the what I discovered!’ And then we’re all StArts Festival. there like dirty shirts,” Beerens said. “We are just thrilled to bits to be here “Even people who come in say, ‘We like — thrilled to bits,” said Carla Beerens, to hear your artists talk,’ because we talk one of the 20 resident artists with studios shop — in any workspace, you talk shop. in the facility and VASA’s director of Sometimes it’s technical and sometimes it’s communications. “It fits all of us. It’s conceptual.” perfect right now. I don’t know how we’re The exhibition changes every month. going to grow from here.” Most of the resident artists in the facility “When you can come into a space are primarily painters, but some dabble in like this and a north window and a west sculpture, wood carving, pottery and other window, and all this light to work with, it’s mediums. just huge,” she added. “I think we have 60 VASA occupies 64 members in VASA; we’re per cent of the space in a significant organization the Hemingway Centre, in St. Albert,” Beerens about 5,300 square said. feet in total, and pays a While the lease on proportional amount of the Hemingway Centre Carla Beerens the yearly operating costs. is just five years long, VASA The City uses the other 36 VASA still has its eyes per cent to store materials on the future and where used by the recreation things could go down the and cultural departments, as well as road. administrative archives. “We’d like to make the best use of this VASA members have been hard at work for five years,” Beerens said. “When you customizing their space. Many of the small get into a place like this, you have 100 ideas offices in the building have been converted running through your head, and it’s just into studios, which are often abuzz with a matter of manpower to put them into activity, along with the large communal fruition. We all want to paint first and do table in a central open area. [other] things second.” “Our productivity and our interest is, “I would like to see this as a go-to like, tenfold of what it was” in their old place for any artist in St. Albert and the studios in Grandin Park Plaza and on Edmonton area,” she added. “There are Perron Street, Beerens said. “Artists do feed three artist-run centres in Edmonton, but off each other.” I don’t think any of them are as big as what Proof of that, she added, is the turnout we are. To have 20 resident artists, that’s they’ve seen for ArtWalks this year, pretty significant.” compared to the sparse crowds they saw in VASA’s grand opening takes place on their old locations. Saturday from 2 to 4 p.m., with speeches “Here, even our first ArtWalk, we had from Mayor Nolan Crouse and from Todd 150 people through that night,” she said. Janes, executive director of Latitude 53, “By the time we finished five months later, a similar artist-run centre in downtown I think we had 400 through that night. It’s Edmonton. getting really busy; we were surprised. But VASA is also hosting an art and design that’s St. Albert for you.” showcase on both Saturday and Sunday There is also a small kitchen off to featuring displays from across the Capital one side, along with a classroom, where Region as part of Alberta Culture Days several courses open to the public are held, celebrations.

GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

“We are just thrilled to bits to be here.”

Photos: GLENN COOK, St. Albert Leader

Above: Connie Osgood, one of 20 resident artists in the VASA facility in the Hemingway Centre, pours paint over a canvas to achieve just the right effect. Below: VASA communications director Carla Beerens in her studio at the Hemingway Centre.


19

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

Q A Q Nickname?

RON: Gunner.

SUZANNE: Sue.

Q Favorite pets or animals?

R: Dogs. Penelope and Daisy…both miniature daschunds. S: None.

Q Vacation this year... you’re heading to?

R: Phoenix. S: Ski Sunset Ranch, a beautiful water ski vacation in sunny California.

Q This weekend in St. Albert, what are you doing?

R: Birthday dinner with family for my oldest boy Jonah…now 14. S: Farmer’s Market, biking on our beautiful red willow trail system, hockey with the kids and church.

Q Favourite place to eat in St. Albert? R: Earl’s. S: River House Grill.

Q Your singing out loud in your car, what are you singing? R: Top 40…91.7 The Bounce. S: Anything by Coldplay.

Q Best thing about your job?

R: Helping get people out of pain. S: Teeth and people, I’m passionate about both.

Q Favorite movie?

R: Terminator. S: Almost any movie with Jim Carey in it.

Q Favorite hobbies?

GETTING TO KNOW DR. RON BEAUCHAMP & DR. SUZANNE DEGNER

Q Great moment you had at work?

R: Pretty average…shop at the Gap. S: Busy mom on the go.

Q What’s the one problem customers come to you most often

Q What’s your goal for your business over the next 12 months?

Q What’s the best piece of business advice you’ve ever

Q Any advice you can give St. Albert residents regarding your

with? R: Broken tooth…need a crown to repair it. S: Sore teeth or broken teeth.

received? R: Always do the right thing in the best way you can and success will follow. S: Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted (Albert Einstein).

Q What’s the best way you’ve found to keep a balance between work and family life? R: Try to stay involved with all my kids activities and supporting them in all their endeavors. S: Balance is so important. At the moment I work part time so that I can devote myself to serving my dental patients and doing dentistry part of the week. My four young children and husband keep me busy the rest of the time.

R: Hire a new associate to expand our ability to service new patients. S: To continue providing quality dental care with a gentle touch.

industry? R: Have thorough discussions with your dentists especially about types of materials we have available to repair teeth…the pros and cons of the differing options available. S: Dentistry has changed so much with regards to technology and materials but also in the approach to patient care. Dentistry is important to all of us because good oral health contributes directly to our overall health and well being. I encourage people to make regular dental checkups and professional cleanings a part of your life.

Q If we’re heading on a coffee run, you’re having? R: Tim Hortons ice cappuccino. S: A latte, extra hot.

Q How messy is your desk/workspace?

R: Quadding. S: Waterskiing, playing the cello, running.

R: Not at all. I like to be neat and orderly. S: Super neat and tidy.

Q What sets you apart in your business?

Q What video game or phone

Q Favorite thing about St. Albert?

app are you addicted to? R: Not really any. I did like Uncharted…Drake’s Fortune on the PS3. S: None, my children are always playing with my phone.

R: Dedication to customer service. S: I believe my previous experience as a nurse and as a mother help to shape my approach to patient care. Gentleness, patience, care, professionalism and respect are fundamental in my work as a dentist.

Q You would describe your sense of style as... ?

R: When one of my patients wore a set of ugly Halloween teeth and opened for his checkup and I was quite shocked.

R: Small town atmosphere…safe for children. S: The people in St. Albert are great! I also love the simplicity of St. Albert and that everything is close by.

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20

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

C E L E B R AT E S

Culture

A L B E R TA C U LT U R E D AY S • S TA R T S F E S T

Arts key to overall success in education knows that the cognitive and social skills gained from the arts are skills that Special to the Leader employers want to see. “You need to be In 2009, Fran Smith, contributing editor a critical thinker and creative problem for Edutopia, the George Lucas Educational solver,” says Gluck. “It’s problems in real Foundation’s website and online magazine, time and actually making the decisions as wrote an article highlighting the benefits you go.” of having the arts be a part of a child’s Gluck mentions the accessibility of art education. Smith points out that years programs within the schools and how of research from groups like The RAND students have the option of joining any Corporation, an independent research of the programs at any point in their group, shows students’ improved abilities educations. It’s a matter of sparking in math, reading, cognitive ability, the student’s imagination and having critical thinking and verbal skills in their supportive mentors. educations as well as a person’s overall “It’s important to keep in mind that this social and emotional development and will one day be many of these students’ civic engagement when the arts play a career paths,” says Gluck. “Even if it’s not regular role in their educations. the performance aspect, our schools even For the City of St. Albert, this seems to offer things like theatre set design courses. be old news as the municipality sponsors It’s just a matter of having the options many arts programs for kids in theatre, available throughout their educational visual art, music and dance including part careers.” of the school curriculum. Integrating arts into In fact, this weekend, education isn’t limited both Leo Nickerson to only St. Albert Elementary School schools. Through the and Paul Kane High St. Albert Cultural School are participating Services program guide in Alberta Culture (available online at staDays with a day of culture.com), a variety Colleen Hewitt art engagement at the of programs in visual Paul Kane art teacher schools. and performance arts “Our students are are offered to children going to set up art displays around the as young as toddlers to integrated classes school, busking to raise money for the where youth work on projects with their Hope Café,” explains Paul Kane art teacher parents. Colleen Hewitt who, in the 20-plus years “We want to help build a balanced that she’s been teaching (13 at Paul Kane) lifestyle and increase the awareness of knows first-hand what makes art education what’s available,” says Kelly Jerrott, the so crucial in a youth’s development. director of cultural services with the “Unlike the stereotypes, there’s nothing City of St. Albert. Jerrott explains that reclusive about the arts,” Hewitt points even exposing kids to the family series out. “You see the kids constantly talking to of productions at the Arden Theatre or each other and collaborating. You see them performances by the St. Albert Children’s aware of audiences, knowing that other Theatre could help pique that initial people will be engaging with their work. interest to get kids involved with the arts. There’s really nothing introverted about Something that Hewitt, Gluck and that.” Jerrott agree on is that the arts programs Some of the best interactions that Hewitt give students an opportunity to express gets to experience are when someone new themselves in a safe and supportive to the craft starts out and the seasoned environment where experimentation is students will actually help them along. encouraged and students are allowed to “You see these students try to catch up make mistakes. quickly, but then there’s that leveling “It’s like forming a hypothesis in off point as everyone continues to work science,” says Gluck. “There’s such a variety through and learn from each other.” to choose from. The options are there St. Albert Public Schools supervisor right from kindergarten and students can of curricular services (K-12) Lois Gluck explore what fits them best.”

CHRISTOPHER SCHIEMAN

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“There’s nothing reclusive about the arts.”


21

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

Celebrate Culture Days at the Art Gallery of St Albert and Musée Héritage Museum Event Listings Show-and-Tell, Games and Tours: Families in the Archives Saturday, September 29 from 12 – 3 pm at the Musée Héritage Museum

At Show-and-Tell, Games and Tours, we invite you to bring in your scrapbooks to share with museum staff. Adults and children are welcome to participate in various activities and crafts which allow you to engage with archival materials such as photographs and maps. The event includes behind-the-scenes tours of the archives.

Sketch & Sew

Saturday, September 29 from 10:30 am – 12 pm at the Art Gallery of St. Albert

Creating Memory Pages

Saturday, September 29 from 1 – 3 pm at the Musée Héritage Museum Drop in program for children at the museum on Saturday afternoon inspired by the current exhibit Cut and Paste.

Drop in to the Art Gallery of St. Albert for a guided tour of the current exhibition, Patterns of Places, featuring the paintings and fibre works of Linda Hawke, Pam Weber, and Linda McBain Cuyler. Then, with inspiration from the art on display, walk over to the nearby Satellite Studio and create a mixed-media masterpiece with needle, thread, paint and paper. It’s fun, it’s free and it’s family-friendly! For all ages.

Patterns of Places

Saturday, September 29 from 10 am – 5 pm at the Art Gallery of St. Albert Join us for the exhibit Patterns of Places with Linda J. Hawke, Linda McBain Cuyler and Pam Weber at Art Gallery of St Albert. Explore the fabric of the prairie landscape. These three artists take us on a journey from the ground and upwards with paint and fibre.

Contact Us Art Gallery of St. Albert 19 Perron Street | St. Albert, AB T8N 1E5 | ArtGalleryofStAlbert.com | p. 780-460-4310 | ahfgallery@artsheritage.ca | ArtGalleryofStAlbert.com Musée Héritage Museum 5 St. Anne Street | St. Albert, AB T8N 3Z9 | MuseeHeritage.com | p. 780-459-1528 | museum@artsheritage.ca | MuseeHeritage.com Images from Left to Right, Top to Bottom: Alberta’s Women’s Institute Scrapbook, Musée Héritage Museum Archives; St. Albert, Musée Héritage Museum, St. Albert Historical Society fonds; Linda McBain Cuyler, Three Views on the Queen E Two, acrylic, machine stitching and applique; Pam Weber, It’s All About Me, acrylic on canvas

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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

C E L E B R AT E S

St. Albert Public Library invites you to

discover, experience, celebrate

Culture

A L B E R TA C U LT U R E D AY S • S TA R T S F E S T

Never too late to start GLENN COOK St. Albert Leader

Prairie Tales 14 Friday Sept. 28. 7-9pm Writers Guild of Alberta:

Polish your Prose: Practical Editing Tips

Saturday Sept. 29. 9:30-10:30am Teen ‘Book Flowers’ Craft Saturday Sept. 29. 1-3pm

Art Extravaganza for families with children Saturday Sept. 29. Drop in 1-3pm CBC Radio Presenter and Author Nora Young Saturday Sept. 29. 7-8:30pm Book Launch by Corinne Jeffery Sunday Sept. 30. 3-4pm

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When it comes to the arts and culture, it turns out that old dogs can learn new tricks. St. Albert’s creative communities are full of people who have taken up their respective medium — be it writing, pottery, painting or something else — later in life, giving them a renewed sense of purpose in their golden years. After a fruitful career in nursing and teaching, St. Albert resident Corinne Jeffery began writing nearly nine years ago while in her late 50s. Today, she’s about to turn 67 this December, and is getting ready to officially launch her second novel this weekend at the St. Albert Public Library. The biggest step on her journey, she said, was the first. “I think my biggest challenge was to get at it,” she said. “Someone said to me the other day they wanted to be a writer, and I know it sounds prosaic, but if you want to write, you have to make a beginning.” Jeffery’s first book, Arriving 1909-1919, chronicles the adventures of a family of German Lutheran pacifists from Russia as they settle in the harsh prairies of Saskatchewan. Her second book, Thriving 1920-1939, continues the family’s story. The final installment of the trilogy is set to be released next year. It was Christmas 2002 when the fire was sparked, though, when Jeffery’s daughter Sara gave her an odd Christmas gift: four cork boards and some recipe cards. “She said, ‘Mom, you put that up on your wall, and every time you have an idea, you write it down on a recipe card and tack it up.’ That’s how I made my beginning,” Jeffery said. “It was kind of like my catalyst. Pretty quickly, that board was full, and I realized I had to stop talking — I talked all my life about writing this book, from the time I was seven years old — and make that beginning.” Meanwhile, St. Albert Painters’ Guild members Rick Rogers and Miles Constable both picked up their brushes and canvases later on in life — in Rogers’ case, in his 40s, while working as a systems consultant. “I’ve always been a little bit involved in the arts, but fine visual arts wasn’t something that I thought I was particularly suited for at the time,” said Rogers, who is also partowner of the Daffodil Gallery on 124 Street in Edmonton. “I just sort of figured I’d try my hand at a drawing class one time, and got hopelessly hooked on it.” Constable started painting seriously in

2004, and only recently retired from his science job with the federal government. But he always had an interest in art, and took classes here and there while working full-time. “It was really a lack of time and a lack of opportunity when you have houses and kids and mortgages and cars,” he said. “In 2004, I decided to try a painting class with a local school in St. Albert, and really liked using oil paints. That really launched me into considering painting as an end-of-career hobby, moving into something to do during my retirement.” For both Rogers and Constable, being part of the Painters’ Guild and having the experience of other members to lean on was invaluable. “There are so many organizations you can get connected with, especially in a large centre like the Edmonton area,” Rogers said. “The St. Albert Painters’ Guild is a really great example, and there are others around the Edmonton area, that cater to artists of all ages and persuasions.” “It’s really a good, close-knit organization and a good place to start from,” Constable added. However, Jeffery said that, while classes work for some, she has always been more of a solitary creature due to her upbringing on a farm, so she went at writing on her own without taking classes or further instruction. “In many ways, it’s kind of like how I play tennis,” she said. “I’m a very unorthodox tennis player. I have an unusual swing; everything about my game is unorthodox. And apparently somebody once said to the young man who was the tennis pro at the St. Albert Tennis Club … if he would ever consider giving me lessons. And he just laughed, apparently, and said, ‘No, if I tried to give Corinne tennis lessons, I’d ruin her game.’ “That’s how writing was for me. It was a natural thing for me to do.” That is the reasoning behind Jeffery’s advice for anyone else in the same situation, wanting to pick up a new creative pursuit at midlife or beyond. “They have to assess who they are as a person. Some people need groups, need support, need to go to writing classes. That’s not who I am as a person … I’m a self-motivator; a lot of people are othersmotivated,” she said. Meanwhile, Rogers has his own advice for folks in the same boat. “You just need to find the time to get involved in a small way. That’s really the start. If it’s for you, you’ll end up hooked on it as well,” Rogers said.


23

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

QUICK LOOK

PAINT BY NUMBERS Arts and culture statistics in St. Albert

500

City of St. Albert Visual Arts Program Participation

300

486

474

400

371

2011

2010

13,000

414

2012 Year to Date

2009

Hours the St. Albert Place Visual Arts Guild studios are in use every year

200

ST. ALBERT’S GRAIN ELEVATORS 1906: St. Albert’s first elevator is built 1929: St. Albert’s second elevator is built 40: The number of years a wooden elevator was expected to last

100 0

600

Statistics courtesy City of St. Albert and Arts and Heritage Foundation Metro Creative Services graphics

500 400 300

30,000: Capacity in bushels of the 1906 St. Albert grain elevator

200

5,000,000: Estimated bushels moved through a wooden elevator over 40 years 1,755: Peak number of elevators in Alberta 180: Estimated number of elevators remaining in Alberta in 2006

351

300

2010

200

358 2011

151*

2012 Year to Date

100

36.37: Number of litres (UK) in a bushel of grain

35,000: Capacity in bushels of the 1929 St. Albert grain elevator

* Following a review in 2011, the City decided to no longer offer social dance or hip hop classes.

2009

400

Attendance at Art Gallery of St. Albert, Musée Heritage Museum and local heritage site programs in 2011

7,000: Dollar amount to build a wooden elevator in the early 1900s 1,000,000: Estimated dollar amount to build a wooden elevator today

565

500

30,000

City of St. Albert Performing Arts Participation

0

465 482 2009

2010

363 185

2012 Year to Date

80000 70000 60000 50000 Pounds of H435 clay used in AGSA school programs 40000 each year — nearly the 30000 weight of ‘Mother Bear 20000 Prays for Earth 10000 Healing’ 0

7,500

25,000 Students from 13 different school boards who took part in over 1,100 AHF school programs in 2011.

2011

100 0

St. Albert Children’s Theatre Participation

72,561 70,234 68,617 2009 2010

2011

Arden Theatre Attendance

53,650 2012 Year to Date


24

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184 St.Albert Trail

www.stalbertdodge.com

Green suggests security, abundance, love, growth, luck and balance. It’s also associated with envy. Wear green when you want to see things from a different perspective, need to feel grounded, calm or generous. Don’t wear it when you feel stagnant or want to be alone.

Make a great impression. Create your desired effect. You’re that first flash of colour others see.

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Yellow is associated with happiness, freedom, optimism and mental concentration. Wear yellow when you need to attend to details, maintain mental alertness or feel happy. Avoid yellow when you’re fearful, want to evade attention, want to relax.

Pink represents love, affection and serenity. Wear it when you want to feel feminine, lovable, need to concentrate and listen. Avoid pink when you feel vulnerable, insecure, fragmented or are giving more than receiving.

White symbolizes purity, cleanliness, safety, completion, strength and neutrality. Wear white to feel peaceful, convey a well-balanced, optimistic personality. Too much can project coldness and isolation.

St. Albert Dodge

Orange represents creativity, confidence, joy, sensuality and ambition. It has positive effects on emotional states. Wear orange when you want to have fun, heighten creativity or heal emotions. Avoid it when you want to relax.

Brown is associated with stability, honesty, practicality and commitment. Wear brown when you need to work hard, be a team member or organized. Avoid it when you want to expend energy, play or feel insecure.

Black represents power, elegance, discipline and mystery. Sometimes, it’s associated with evil or grieving. Wear black to communicate an authoritative image or protect emotions. Since too much black can overwhelm some, don’t wear it to establish rapport.

Local & Long Distance

Red exudes power, energy, excitement and passion. Wear red when you want to be assertive, need an energy boost or exude sexuality. Avoid red when you feel nervous or want to elude attention.

Grey is practical, timeless, cautious, successful and solid. Some shades are associated with aging. Excessive use may lead to feeling invisible, but a touch adds feelings of stability. Wear it when you want to feel self-sufficient or isolate yourself. Avoid it when feeling lonely or stressed.

Purple is associated with prosperity, spirituality and sophistication. Wear purple to project wisdom, trust or release destructive emotions. Don’t wear it when you want to evade societal regulations.

Serving Alberta for over 30 Years!

When I wore black to business meetings in San Francisco I was perceived as sophisticated. However, when I wore black to meetings in certain small school districts, I was considered aloof. A change of wardrobe colour altered perceptions. Colours you wear may affect your mood as well as how others perceive you. Work environment colours also matter. At a subconscious level, colours affect people in different ways. Using colours effectively to dress, decorate your office or design your web site can put you ahead of the competition. Research on the psychology of colour consistently demonstrates that colours evoke emotional, behavioural and physical responses. Advertisers know a product can have different impacts if the packaging colours are changed. Psychologists have found certain colours in our environment help or hinder performance of certain tasks. Generally, warm colours such as red and its neighbouring hues on the colour spectrum are active, exciting. Cool colours such as light green, blue and violet are passive, calming. Reds tend to stimulate the central nervous system, while cool colours release tension. Meanings change with lighter or darker shades of colours. Select colours that suit you and project your desired image. Surround yourself with favourite colours to lift your spirit.

Blue represents authority, structure, communication, dependability, trust and loyalty. Too much blue can project coldness. Wear blue when you want to exude power, have mental control, be conservative, respected or communicate important messages. Don’t wear blue when you feel isolated, depressed or critical.

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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012


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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

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Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

S T. A L B E R T R E A L E S T A T E M A R K E T R E P O R T FOREST LAWN

AKINSDALE Active Listings: 14

Sold Listings: 15

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $299,999 / High $449,500

Low $237,000 / High $438,500 Avg. days on market: 30

$370,314

MISSION

Active Listings: 5

Sold Listings: 12

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $334,900 / High $365,000

Low $279,500 / High $380,000 Avg. days on market: 23

$346,860

$360,492

$338,833

W

LI ST IN G

GRANDIN Sold Listings: 22

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $275,000 / High $579,900

Low $262,000 / High $609,000 Avg. days on market: 44

NE

54 ASPEN CRES 1270 Sq Ft Bungalow 4 Beds 2 Baths $314,900

BRAESIDE

Sold Listings: 5

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $255,500 / High $384,000

Low $320,000 / High $399,000 Avg. days on market: 50

$334,833

$343,000

NORTH RIDGE

Active Listings: 18 $367,238

Active Listings: 3

$351,381

Active Listings: 20

Sold Listings: 27

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $389,500 / High $1,189,900

Low $364,000 / High $685,000 Avg. days on market: 47

$576,534

$450,367

OAKMONT

HERITAGE LAKES

Active Listings: 9

Sold Listings: 9

Active Listings: 12

Sold Listings: 22

Active Listings: 25

Sold Listings: 13

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $273,000 / High $1,397,000

Low $295,000 / High $395,000 Avg. days on market: 28

Low $359,900 / High $529,900

Low $340,000 / High $583,500 Avg. days on market: 42

Low $384,900 / High $750,000

Low $360,000 / High $760,000 Avg. days on market: 44

$531,788

$337,788

$455,049

Active Listings: 32

Sold Listings: 9

Average sale price:

Average list price:

$1,062,975

Average sale price:

$367,934

Low $299,000 / High $471,000 Avg. days on market: 32

Low $479,900/ High $5,250,000

Low $490,000 / High $1,750,000 Avg. days on market: 53

Active Listings: 19

Sold Listings: 33

Average list price: Low $299,900 / High $669,000

Sold Listings: 25

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $419,900 / High $989,888

Low $380,000 / High $893,000 Avg. days on market: 38

$811,888

LORENE LECAVALIER 780.990.6266 direct 780.458.9399 lorene@sutton.com

16 OVERTON PLACE

PINEVIEW

LACOMBE PARK

150 DAYS

Active Listings: 12

Sold Listings: 5

Average sale price:

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $310,000 / High $834,500 Avg. days on market: 49

Low $359,000 / High $584,900

Low $338,000 / High $462,000 Avg. days on market: 46

Active Listings: 28

Sold Listings: 29

Average list price: Low $329,900 / High $1,290,000

$561,504

$593,922

$481,953

$450,378

$415,400

STURGEON HEIGHTS_SALB

NE W

LI

ST

IN G

$598,337

$504,376

$695,000 Walk-out Bungalow, 2123 sq.ft., 3 bdrms, 2.5 baths.

ERIN RIDGE Active Listings: 57

$637,348

KINGSWOOD

DEER RIDGE

$416,778

$414,279

197 ERIN RIDGE DRIVE $609,900, 4 bdrms, 3.5 bath, 2,499 sq.ft., 2 Storey.

HOUSE FOR SALE

REALTORS Advertise your Listings on the St. Albert Real Estate Page

Active Listings: 4

Sold Listings: 9

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $344,900 / High $368,800

Low $290,000 / High $370,000 Avg. days on market: 41

$352,025

12 LACROIX

3390 st Ft 4 Beds 3.5 Baths Fully Finished Custom Built 2 storey $879,900

$326,722

WOODLANDS_SALB Pierre Hebert

50 LEONARD DRIVE $499,900, Open Concept, 5 Beds, 3 Baths, 1750 sq.ft.

Guy Hebert

Active Listings: 2

Sold Listings: 6

Average list price:

Average sale price:

Low $485,000 / High $549,900

Low $386,000 / High $586,000 Avg. days on market: 44

$517,450

780-459-7786 www.bermontrealty.com

ADVERTISE ON THE S T. A L B E R T R E A L E S TAT E PA G E A great way to market your real estate listings in over 20,000 copies of the St. Albert Leader.

$449,483

ONLY $35.00!

Call us today for details. 780-460-1035 or email: homes@stalbertleader.com MPSSCS4376806MPSE

*The above area market averages represent the trailing 3-month averages, except where otherwise indicated, of single-family homes only as of the Friday prior to publication week. Data is provided by CRAIG PILGRIM of RE/MAX Real Estate (St. Albert), member of the Real Estate Association of Edmonton. Data does not include condos, townhomes or apartments, and does not differentiate between styles of homes. All efforts are made to ensure data is accurate for information purposes, but please consult a licensed real estate agent for additional market information.


27

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

No puck? No problem! THIEN HUYNH Sun Media News Services

If the NHL season is put on ice for a while there does exist some hockey-related diversions that can prevent your passion for the game from going cold: Two Thumbs Up: Finger Hockey Desk Game Price: amazon.ca Where to buy: $8.95 Instead of twiddling your thumbs waiting for the pros to get back on the ice to snap a wrist shot, try working on your pinky shot with the Finger Hockey Desk Game. The kit comes with a spreadable rink layout, two small sticks, two miniature goals, one petite puck, and two cute goalie pads for your fingers. A 32-page rulebook is even included — which seems unnecessary since most people play Finger Hockey using the rule of thumb. When playing this game, you have to be extra careful about inadvertently giving the referee the middle finger — or risk getting a two-minute misconduct penalty for fingering. It would be a huge disadvantage to play a game of finger hockey

shorthanded.

A really short intermission: Radio Controlled Zamboni Price: $29.99 Where to buy: canadiantire.ca Aside from dreaming of playing in the NHL, die-hard hockey fans also fantasize about the next best thing — getting to drive the Zamboni in-between periods. Well, now you can drive a mini Radio Controlled Zamboni in your own living room. The mini Zamboni can run on tabletops, carpets and anything else — except ice. You can even customize your Zamboni with two NHL stickers provided in the box. Although the manufacturer says this toy is ideal for ages 3 to 5, ages 35 and up might find the mini Zamboni ideal for cleaning the house. Petite Puck Handling: Mini-Table Hockey Price: US$13 Where to buy: likecool.com Just because the NHL season is delayed, the puck doesn’t have to stop here. It just gets much smaller. Re-live the good old days of playing table hockey in your family basement with a portable mini-air hockey

table that you can discreetly take in to the office. There are even fold-away legs to make the pocket-sized rink easier to carry around. Oddly enough, this mini-hockey table is only available through a Japanese company. If your boss wonders why there is cheering suddenly coming from your cubicle, just tell him/her the truth: You just stick-handled through some obstacles and assisted on a big goal. However, you might have already crossed the red line if they ask why you are holding your coffee mug over your head in celebration as if it were the Stanley Cup.

Forgetting Pro Hockey is a Breeze: Voit 32-inch Table Top Air Hockey Game Price: $67.50 Where to buy: overstock.com Instead of listening to NHL players and owners spewing a lot of hot air at each other, try blowing off some steam during the lockout with the Voit 32-inch Table Top Air Hockey Game. The Voit Air Hockey Game has a powerful electric motor with a high-flow power-air box and sliding score unit to minimize arguments about the number of goals you actually let in.

SAVING

Based on every dollar you invest in The Greater Interest GIC®, Canadian Western Bank will make a donation to your local Big Brothers Big Sisters organization. Available September through October.

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28

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

FUN & GAMES

rst job

KNOW?

3

4

by Margie E. Burke 5

6

7

8

9

10

15

16

18

19 22

11

12

13

25 29

30

31

34

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37 40 43 45 48

53

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29 Bathtub sealant 43 Toaster's 30 Computer subject 45 Great time accessory 31 Stage direction 46 "Wheel of 33 Sweet, in Italy Fortune" prize 36 Vacation 47 Rocky, for souvenir Stallone 37 Prison term 48 Lowly laborer 39 Stylish 49 Beer topper 40 Main point 50 Wrinkled fruit 42 Biblical 51 Place for hay promised land 54 Fawn's mother Answer to Last Week's Crossword

R E D O

G E O R G E B U R N S

A Q U A

L U S T

L I T E R

E D O E N I T E T E A Y E R T S R I V H E A D O O R I O L T E L L E

Rapper Lil Wayne is born in New Orleans, La. He was first signed to a record label at age 9.

O P N E E R I E G N E T E E R M T I A N I E N E R

V A U N L A T T A S L I M I G L R A A R S L P Y

Boston Red Sox outfielder Ted Williams records six hits in eight at-bats during a doubleheader against the Philadelphia Athletics, boosting his batting average to .406. No player has finished with a .400 average since.

SEpt. 30, 1955

Oct. 1, 1908

T H E T A

E V O K E

L E P E R

E A A T R E

Television firsTs: The first televised sporting event was a Japanese elementary school baseball game, broadcast in September 1931. The first TV commercial was a 20-second ad for a Bulova clock, broadcast by WNBT in New York during a game between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the Philadelphia Phillies in July 1941. (didyouknow.org)

The first of seven people die in the Chicago area after taking Tylenol pills that were tampered with and laced with cyanide. Movie star James Dean is killed at age 24 when his Porsche 550 Spyder is involved in a head-on collision on a California highway.

A S S E T



The first Model T car rolls off the assembly line at the Ford Motor Company’s Piquette Avenue plant in Detroit.

Oct. 2, 1985

Movie star Rock Hudson dies at the age of 59 due to AIDS complications. Hudson’s battle with the disease raised awareness of the AIDS epidemic.

Oct. 3, 1995

Former NFL star O.J. Simpson is acquitted of murder charges in the deaths of his estranged wife, Nicole Brown, and her friend Ronald Goldman.

Edited by Margie E. Burke

Difficulty : Medium

HOW TO SOLVE:       

 

  

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SEpt. 28, 1941

SEpt. 29, 1982

Copyright 2012 by The Puzzle Syndicate

A T O P S O R E P E A T N A P E G L L E E E R A A I D S T E E T R A T F I C H I P U R N T E A E E L

This week in history and celebrity birthdays

SEpt. 27, 1982

23

33

Milestones

Answer to Last Week's Sudoku

    

        

Copyright 2012 by The Puzzle Syndicate

• Spot the Difference? •

DID YOU

2

There are five differences between these two photos. Can you spot them all?

ACROSS 1 Mouth off to 14 5 Fictional rabbit 17 10 Whimper 14 In ___ of 20 21 (instead of) 24 15 Martini garnish 16 Once again 26 27 28 17 Roman date 32 18 Container weights 35 19 Blow a fuse 38 39 20 Pattern 22 Magazine bigwig 41 42 24 Alleviate 44 25 Poke fun at 26 Horrid smell 46 47 29 Rook or Rummy 52 32 A bit lit 33 Cut a rug 56 34 Debate side 59 35 Woodwind instrument 36 Barely DOWN chewable 37 Put a lid on 1 Skirt feature, 38 Blender setting sometimes 39 Yo-Yo's strings 2 White House 40 Gaggle members worker 41 Worker's 3 Appear to be 4 Hitchcock genre compensation 43 Stand in the 5 Soap ingredient 6 Tickle pink way 44 Salary increase 7 Whitewall, e.g. 45 Second to none 8 Bette Davis film, 46 Soldier's ditch "All About ___" 48 Generous 9 Fact-finding helping process 52 Civil Rights 10 Knife type 11 Single figure Parks 53 Best-case 12 Building-block scenario brand 55 NASA 13 Fancy pitcher 21 Like some cancellation 56 Pelvic bones lingerie 57 Pigeon's perch 23 Surfer's greeting 58 Barnyard baby 25 Dance that takes 59 "I Am Sam" two 26 Tread heavily co-star 60 Tithing portion 27 Leg bone 61 Give off 28 Strong adhesive 1

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        

        

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        

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Photo: GLENN COOK, St. Albert Leader

A man walks into St. Albert Place as a StArts Fest banner is hung outside the front entrance on Tuesday morning.

ANSWERS: 1. ‘L’ removed from ‘ST. ALBERT PLACE’ signage; 2. Fourth flag added; 3. Lamppost removed; 4. Website removed from banner; 5. Man’s shirt changed from green to purple.

The Weekly Crossword

Carriers... Thursday Delivery Only!

- Approximately 1 hour to deliver a route - Delivery only once per week - every Thursday - No flyer inserting - Earn $0.15 per copy - Best first job ever!

Call 780.460.1035 or Email michelle@stalbertleader.com


29 Answers online at stalbertleader.com

Compiled by Leader staff

© 2012 FROGLE COMICS

THE BOO BIRDS

© 2012 FROGLE COMICS

PRINCESS

© 2012 FROGLE COMICS

IN THE STANDS © 2012 FROGLE COMICS

ACROSS

PROF. DONKEY’S DICTIONARY

WHAT IF?

Kids Krossword SCHOOL DAZE

© 2012 FROGLE COMICS

HOYLE & GUS

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

2) Express yourself 4) Takes you to and from school 5) Bonjour! 6) Don’t end up in his/her office 9) Gets words onto paper 11) Become someone else 12) Calculate 14) Write your story 15) Don’t forget your combination 16) Bring him/her an apple

© 2012 FROGLE COMICS

DOWN 1) Filled with knowledge 3) To measure with 4) Carries supplies 7) Nom nom nom! 8) Mistake fixer 9) Slides and monkey bars 10) Exercise venue 11) Where you sit in class 13) In the past

Michael’s @ The Inn

WEDNESDAY STEAK SANDWICH SPECIAL 11:00AM – 2:00PM Steak Sandwich with Fries & Garlic Toast, with choice of Soup or Salad served with dessert. 4:00PM – 9:00PM Steak Sandwich with Garlic Toast, with choice of Fries, Baked Potato or Rice, $ choice of Soup or Salad served with dessert.

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30

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

BUSINESS

Get Connected with new business group

CHERYL WALSH Special to the Leader

A new business networking group is partnering with a local company to offer facilitated discussion for small business owners that want to learn how to effectively network. James P. Burgess, from the Edmonton company Everyday Entrepreneur, and St. Albert’s Staring Down the Elephant are hosting what’s called a “Connect Group.” It is open to the public and anyone is welcome to sit in on a session before making the decision whether or not to purchase a membership. The Connect Group meets twice a month at the Northern Alberta Business Incubator (NABI) located at #200, 200 Carnegie Dr. in St. Albert. Staring Down the Elephant’s main office is located there and the Connect Group runs out of one of the boardrooms. Burgess says that his Connect Groups provide an opportunity for like-minded people to surround themselves with the positivity and support of others facing the same challenges or successes in owning a

promote and enhance their lives. They small business. offer online courses and support for Everyday Entrepreneur began anyone who chooses to join. three years ago and has grown quite Everyday Entrepreneur has the successfully ever since. same fundamentals, but Burgess’s Burgess’s background was initially strategy is more hands-on, focusing in counseling professionals but he on face-to-face support for members. has always known that he wanted to Considering that the two interact more with people in companies have similar a group atmosphere. There mission statements and were many trials and errors provide similar services in before Burgess was able to empowering entrepreneurs, filter into the profession that they decided to collaborate. he knew he was good at and Staring Down the Elephant actually enjoyed doing. handles the online support The main idea in aspect and Burgess runs most Everyday’s Connect Group of the group meetings. is business networking and “When people get together focusing on practical, tactical James P. Burgess and share experiences and and inspirational issues Entrepreneur ideas, the quality of business within building a business. “When two business becomes better,” said Burgess. collaborate, they can build long-term Anyone attending these bi-monthly friendships, which brings value and meetings can expect to get something builds goodwill,” said Burgess. “A from it, said Burgess. lot of members share the same issues “It’s not about sitting in a room and and are able to provide support and being lectured,” said Burgess. “It’s coaching among themselves.” dialogue. The facilitator is there to Staring Down the Elephant is a guide the discussion and keep it on newer company in St. Albert. It was point, but participants are welcome to founded in April 2012 and its goal interject whenever they want.” is to help small business owners

Apple fights to meet iPhone demand

SUN MEDIA NEWS SERVICES – Apple Inc sold over five million iPhone 5 smartphones in the three days since it hit stores, but shares sagged as the company struggled to meet demand.

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While sales were solid, the company said on Monday it had run out of its initial supply and many pre-orders were scheduled to go out in October. Apple chief executive Tim Cook said the company is “working hard to build enough iPhone 5s for everyone.” Expectations for new Apple products were so high — some analysts forecast Apple selling as many as 10 million phone over the weekend — that Wall Street was not wowed by the latest numbers. The stock was down 1.7 per cent at $688.64 in afternoon trade. Given the demand, Apple, the world’s most valuable company,

is being closely watched for any supplier problems that may slow down the smartphone production. “We believe that sales could have potentially been much higher if not for supply constraints,” William Power, an analyst with Baird Equity Research, wrote in a note. Supply limitations are likely to weigh on Apple as the iPhone 5 is launched in another 22 countries on Friday. To complicate matters, Apple’s largest contract manufacturer, Foxconn Technology, closed a factory in the northern Chinese city of Taiyuan after a riot broke out among 2,000 employees.

“If participants engage properly, they will walk away with something,” said Burgess. “Whether it’s from our topic of discussion or just conversations they have with other members, Connect Group can be for anyone.” Connect Group participants are encouraged to relax, be real and let people experience them by just being themselves. “People want to talk,” said Burgess. “They want to get to know each other.” In the future, Burgess would like to engage with the public a little more through social media. He currently has a social media expert assisting him get Everyday Entrepreneur up and running in the social media world and soon hopes to learn how to make his own video blog. “Because I spent so much time face-to-face, I don’t have a whole lot of time to update or check my social media accounts,” said Burgess. Eventually, Burgess would like to start doing some non-profit work and charity events, but for now, the focus is on empowering relationships between businesses.

Pierre Hebert MPSSCS4376845MPSE

S&P/TSX

Down 165.53

12,257.18

NASDAQ

Down 60.07

3,117.03 DOW

Down 107.09

13,457.55

Down 8.90

$1,763.30 US OIL

Down 5.89

$90.87 US Photo: IAN KUCERAK, Sun Media News Services

Ashley Eduveje shows off her new iPhone 5 at the Apple Store at Southgate Mall in Edmonton on Friday.

�Office Spaces �Administrative Services �Business Education �Coaching & Mentoring

www.nabi.ca

Guy Hebert MPSSCS4376842MPSE

Down 0.57¢

102.02¢ US

GOLD

Call us today for all your St. Albert Real Estate Needs

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DOLLAR

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780.460.1000

SERVICE YOU CAN TRUST Expect More MPSSCS4008426MPSE

Figures as of 3 p.m. Tuesday, compared to one week prior. For information purposes only.

LORENE LECAVALIER

780-458-9399 Direct 780-990-6266 lorene@sutton.com


31

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

STALBERTJOBS.COM

Families to get EI SUN MEDIA NEWS SERVICES – The federal government plans to give families caring for sick children extended access to their own Employment Insurance contributions, Human Resources Minister Diane Finley announced last week. “We are improving the EI program to make it more flexible for Canadians by adding benefits for parents who need to take time away from work and focus on their child who is critically ill or injured,” she said. Finley tabled the Helping Families in Need Act, proposing to allow parents of seriously sick or injured children to qualify for sick leave as well as extending EI benefits to them for up to a 52-week period. If passed, the bill would take effect next June. It also proposes to allow unpaid leave for parents of children missing or dead as a result of a Criminal Code offence, without fear of losing their jobs. Labour lawyer Robert Monti said he supports the bill in theory, but wondered why the changes won’t come into effect until next year.

Employment Opportuni�es

WAREHOUSE TEAM MEMBERS

New team members start at $18.10/hr with potential to earn an additional $4.25/hr or more in productivity incentives, shift premium and team based gainshare. You could soon be earning $22.35/hr! Connect Logistics, third-party liqour distributor (warehouse) for Alberta, is seeking hard-working, reliable team members. Applicants must be physically fit and able to lift up to 40lbs regularly. Positions are available in our main warehouse in St. Albert, as well as in our satellite warehouses throughout West Edmonton. Applicants must be over 18 years of age.

Business Development Agent in St. Albert As a Business Development Agent, you will: • Generate new business; • Develop key relationships and contacts; and • Participate in valuable business and community events. If you: • Are a highly motivated seasoned sales professional; • Are ready to take your sales career to the next level; • Have a proven track record of sales success; • Have above average interpersonal skills • Can easily build strong relationships, and • Either have a General Insurance Licence or are willing to obtain one, and….. ……are looking for a challenging and rewarding sales career with an industry leader that offers an outstanding compensation package with a bonus plan, an exceptional reward and recognition program including an annual international sales conference, and flexible benefits, this is the role for you. To learn more about this financially rewarding opportunity, send your resume in confidence to LGroth@allstate.ca, fax to 780-473-0247 or drop off at #240, 2 Hebert Rd. St. Albert

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Ph: 780-961-3088 FAX: 780-961-3084

Wabash Mfg. Inc. is a progressive custom Manufacturing/Repair company. As the western Canadian and global mining/oilfield sectors constantly grow and evolve, we strive to deliver world-class products designed and built right here in Alberta.

We have the following employment opportunities available:

COMPLIANCE OFFICER

· Pilates Instructors · Starbucks Barista · Starbucks Shift Supervisor · Utility and Accounts Receivable Controller

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We’re growing, charting a new course that will place us on the leading edge. We are building on the “You’re in Good Hands” legacy by providing consumers with access to a team of experienced and knowledgeable Allstate Agents in strategic locations. To help get us there, we need a

Box 278, Legal, AB T0G 1L0

Our employees take pride in providing more than 60,000 residents with high-quality programs and services. A wide array of opportunities are available to suit your passion and experience. You can cultivate your career in a place where staff not only care about the work they do but also the people they work alongside.

Apply to: Anton Smith, Executive Director, Box 97, Bon Accord AB T0A 0K0 Fax: 780-921-2379 Email: schalifoux@oakhillboysranch.ca

A New Allstate – Be Part of it

Please submit resumes to

STURGEON VALLEY FERTILIZERS

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A Police Information Check and Intervention Record Check must be completed upon hire. Oak Hill Boys Ranch is a not-for-profit residential treatment agency that delivers a variety of services to meet the needs of their clients, and families.

Minimum Class 3 license required, Class 1 an asset For the fall season (2-3 weeks)

Are you looking for a unique opportunity to grow your career in a place where people care?

Oak Hill Boys Ranch is currently recruiting a FULL TIME ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT to cover a maternity leave

Skills & Knowledge • Advanced knowledge of Microsoft Office, Word, Excel & Publisher • Strong communication and interpersonal skills • Effective time management and ability to multi task • Ability to work independently • Demonstrates professionalism and confidentiality • Possess organizational skills

DELIVERY DRIVERS

Wish to apply? Email: exel-ca-hr-resumes@exel.com with subject line LDR Visit our website at: www.connect-logistics.com MPSSCS4366694MPSE

In this Administrative position you would support the organization and its employees in a variety of capacities. In this role you would: answer and direct all incoming phone calls; greet visitors as the front end receptionist; prepare program correspondence and distribute accordingly; photo copy/fax/scan/ email as required; maintain filing system; maintain/update spread sheets.

Established Agri-Retailer Is seeking Fertilizer Tender and Anhydrous Ammonia

For information on these and other current opportunities available at the City of St. Albert please visit our website at www.stalbert.ca/employment or drop by our Human Resources department. Human Resources The City of St. Albert 216, 7 St. Anne Street St. Albert, Alberta T8N 2X4 Fax: (780) 459-1729 Online applications: www.stalbert.ca/employment

We have 120+ full-time employees on a 22-acre site located in the industrial area of Westlock, AB (about an hour north of Edmonton).

This full-time key position has three main areas of focus: 1) Compliance a. Work directly with engineering and project management staff to ensure that all fluid transport and mining equipment products are manufactured and labeled in accordance with the governing codes and standards 2) Import/Export 3) Mechanical Engineering a. Successful completion of Technologist program would be a definite asset b. Knowledge of Autodesk Inventor and AutoCAD is an asset WABASH: • Provides training and on-going mentoring • Offers excellent wages • Offers bonuses based on attendance and health initiatives • Provides a comprehensive health benefits plan and a matching RRSP program • Operates as a small business, yet presents opportunities of a large corporation • Believes that time for family and recreation is important, so we never work weekends Please send resume, references and salary expectations by fax to 780-349-4716; by email to hr@wabash.ca or apply on-line at www.wabash.ca. Further details about this position are also available on-line. All offers of employment will be subject to the successful completion of a company provided pre-employment physical & drug/alcohol exam.

We wish to express our appreciation to all applicants for their interest and effort in applying for this position but only candidates selected for interviews will be contacted. MPSSCS4376815MPSE

Check out other available opportunities at www.wabash.ca including: *LOADER OPERATOR *JOURNEYMAN WELDER *JOURNEYMAN/APPRENTICE HEAVY EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN *BRAKE/SHEAR OPERATOR MPSSCS4376831MPSE


32

Thursday, Sept. 27, 2012

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St. Albert Trail

St. Albert Leader - Sept 27, 2012  

St. Albert Leader - Sept 27, 2012

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