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DEVELOPMENT BRIEF DR AFT FOR CONSULTATION


“DELIVERING AN EXCEPTIONAL AND BEAUTIFUL NEW STADIUM AT THE HEART OF THE CITY, WHICH RESPONDS APPROPRIATELY AND CREATIVELY TO ITS SENSITIVE CONTEXT. IT WILL PROVIDE WIDE RANGING SPORTING, LEISURE AND COMMUNITY OPPORTUNITIES FOR RESIDENTS AND VISITORS ALIKE. IT WILL CREATE A DESTINATION THAT REVITALISES THE RIVERSIDE, WHICH ENCOURAGES SPORTING PARTICIPATION AND WHICH CO-HABITS RESPECTFULLY WITH ITS NEIGHBOURS. THIS DEVELOPMENT BRIEF PROVIDES THE DETAILED FRAMEWORK TO ACHIEVE ITS REALISATION.”

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Prepared by

for Stadium for Bath www.turley.co.uk

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CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS

2.8 TREES 2.9 ARCHAEOLOGY

1.0 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

2.10 FLOOD RISK / DRAINAGE 2.11 AIR QUALITY 2.12 SOCIAL / ECONOMIC CONTEXT

1.1 PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE DEVELOPMENT BRIEF 1.2 STADIUM FOR BATH 1.3 BATH RECREATION LIMITED 1.4 PLANNING POLICY AND STATUTE OVERVIEW 1.5 CONSULTATION AND STATUS OF DOCUMENT

2.0 SITE CONTEXT

3.0 CLUB OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVES 3.2.1 STADIUM CORE VALUES 3.2.2 STADIUM TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS

2.1 SITE DESCRIPTIONS, SURROUNDINGS AND DESIGNATIONS 2.1.1 'THE REC' 2.1.2 THE RIVERSIDE 2.1.3 THE REC

4.0 DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES AND PARAMETERS

2.1.4 SURROUNDING AREA

4.1 SITE IDENTIFIED AS AN OPPORTUNITY AREA

2.1.5 SITE DESIGNATIONS

4.2 THE BATH SETTING: RELATIONSHIP OF BUILD FORM,

2.2 PLANNING HISTORY

LANDSCAPE AND TOPOGRAPHY

2.3 HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT CONSIDERATIONS

4.3 HISTORIC VIEWS AND RIVER VIEWS

2.3.1 WORLD HERITAGE SITE

4.4 STADIUM SITE CONNECTED BACK TO THE CITY FABRIC

2.3.2 BATH CONSERVATION AREA

4.5 OUTDOOR ROOMS AND THE RIVER ROOM

2.3.4 LISTED BUILDINGS

4.6 DEFINING THE SITE'S OUTDOOR ROOMS - MENDING THE EDGE

2.3.5 REGISTERED PARKS AND GARDENS

4.7 LIMITED ACCESS DUE TO LEVEL CHANGE

2.3.6 SCHEDULED ANCIENT MONUMENTS

4.8 WIDER AND LOCAL VIEWPOINT LOCATIONS

2.3.7 HERITAGE STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOPS

4.9 UNDERSTANDING THE SITE

2.3.8 PROJECT HERITAGE PHILOSOPHY

4.9.1 NORTHERN EDGE

2.3.9 REQUIREMENT FOR HERITAGE IMPACT (ENVIRONMENT)

4.9.2 WESTERN EDGE

ASSESSMENT

4.9.3 SOUTHERN EDGE

2.4 LANDSCAPE CHARACTER

4.9.4 EASTERN EDGE

2.4.1 LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL IMPACT APPRAISAL 2.4.2 EXISTING LANDSCAPE CHARACTER ASSESSMENTS 2.4.3 BATH BUILDING HEIGHTS STRATEGY (BANES 2010) 2.4.4 GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE STRATEGY (BANES 2013) 2.4.5 COTSWOLD AREA OF OUTSTANDING NATURAL BEAUTY (AONB) AND MANAGEMENT PLAN 2.4.6 NATIONAL TRUST OWNED LAND 2.5 TRANSPORT AND ACCESSIBILITY 2.5.1 PEDESTRIAN ACCESS 2.5.2 CYCLING 2.5.3 BUS 2.5.4 RAIL

5.0 DELIVERY AND IMPLEMENTATION 5.1 DESIGN PROCESS 5.2 PRE-APPLICATION DISCUSSIONS 5.3 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT 5.4 LIST OF CONSULTEES 5.5 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT 5.6 PLANNING APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS AND LISTED BUILDING CONSENT (INCLUDING CONSERVATION AREA CONSENT) 5.7 PLANNING OBLIGATIONS AND CIL

2.5.5 VEHICULAR ACCESS AND CAR PARKING 2.5.6 TRANSPORT FRAMEWORK

APPENDIX

2.6 THE ROOF TYPOLOGY OF BATH 2.7 ECOLOGY

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS

LANDSCAPE This Development Brief sets out a range of issues, opportunities and constraints which any new stadium at the Rec will need to consider. It is an important stepping-stone on the journey to create a new stadium that is a positive addition to the City and to the site. It is important in both meeting the requirements of Placemaking Plan policy SB2 and in setting clear guidance for the design stage.

The supporting Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will consider the impact of the proposed stadium including roof designs, heights, and materials on heritage assets, the setting of designated heritage assets and the wider World Heritage Site and its setting. Agreed static viewpoints are contained at diagram 36.

The purpose of the proposed development is to create a permanent sporting, cultural and leisure stadium to act primarily as the home of Bath Rugby, but also suitable for other uses, including wider community users. It will act as a catalyst for creating a destination which revitalises the riverside, which encourages sporting participation within the wider Recreation Ground and across the city, and which co-habits respectfully with near neighbours, the city and its architecture. There is also the opportunity for an enhancement of the use of the wider Recreation Ground as a whole by other users, and for an improvement of the amenity of the riverside between Pulteney Weir and North Parade Bridge.

It is acknowledged that the stadium will necessarily be a large building, which will transform this part of the city and will be seen from within the city and the surrounding landscape, and will become an integral part of the city. The assessment will also consider dynamic views. Viewpoints from Grand Parade, Alexandra Park, Sham Castle, Little Solsbury Hill, views from the site to the Abbey and Pulteney Bridge will need careful consideration.

This Executive Summary reflects on the content set out within this document, in order to provide a clear framework as to the expectations of any planning application submission.

DESIGN •

The final design will be informed by detailed contextual analysis. The supporting Design and Access Statement will set out the iterative design process undertaken, and explain and demonstrate how the design responds to technical and other evidence baseline reports. It will be important to explain the design process and the consideration of design alternatives that led to the final design proposals, which will require an understanding of and translation of Bath’s design values and policy framework.

The application will be supported by a range of cross sections, photomontages and 3D modelling (as appropriate and agreed with the LPA) to demonstrate, explain and justify how the proposed stadium and related works would sit within the townscape, and its interaction with surrounding buildings.

Detailed consideration will need to be given to the approach to building height, roofscape, sustainability, architectural treatment and materials.

HERITAGE AND ARCHAEOLOGY •

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The application, through the preparation of an Historic Environment Assessment, needs to evidence how the proposals will impact on the OUV of the World Heritage Site, the scale of the impact both positive and negative, and where negative, how that has been minimised and the proposed mitigation to reduce impacts to an acceptable level, if required, or demonstrate the exceptional circumstances of the development to justify the scale of impact. In accordance with statutory requirements, particular regard will be had to the Grade I listed properties fronting Johnstone Street and Bath Abbey, which will require comprehensive assessment of the scheme on their settings and views. Assessment of other heritage assets, including other listed buildings, the Bath Conservation Area, and Parade Gardens will inform the design. The application will be accompanied by a Desk Top Appraisal, prepared in consultation with the Council and in accordance with the Institute for Archaeologists’ Standards and Guidance for Historic Environment Desk-Based Assessments (revised 2011).

STADIUM FOR BATH

ECOLOGY •

The application will protect existing biodiversity and where practical provide for enhanced ecological habitats along the river edge, particularly with regard to bats. A full Ecological Assessment will be submitted with the application.


TRANSPORT AND ACCESS •

The application will be supported by a Transport Assessment and Travel Plan which demonstrates access arrangements by all modes of transport to Bath, to the Rec, and to the stadium itself.

Physical access to the site, in particular for pedestrians and disabled people, will be substantially enhanced.

Assessment of the effect of the proposed redevelopment on flooding upstream and downstream of the site using a hydraulic model provided by the Environment Agency (EA); Consideration of the mitigation of flood risk to the redevelopment and incoproration of these into the proposals; and A Flood Evacuation Plan

SOCIO - ECONOMIC IMPACTS RIVER FRONTAGE AND SITE USES •

The proposals will demonstrate how an enhanced sporting, leisure and community offer can be provided at the site, in order to encourage wider participation at the Rec, as well as the re-activation of the riverside through the introduction of appropriate uses.

The application proposals will demonstrate a safe and high quality public realm approach, particularly along the River Avon, providing an enhanced experience for pedestrians and cyclists. Development will harness opportunities to provide active frontage along the riverside, as envisaged by Placemaking Plan policy SB2.

The application will demonstrate how the proposals respond to and form part of wider strategy for proposed riverside enhancements, including an appropriate type of uses, as envisaged by policy SB2 of the Placemaking Plan.

NOISE •

A Flood Risk Assessment will be submitted with any planning application and will detail: •

Consultations with the Environment Agency (EA) including the acquisition of all available flood risk data for review; Confirmation of the EA’s attitude to the potential redevelopment, and clarification of key requirements for this FRA including the need for and likely scope of the Sequential and Exception Tests as set out in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF); Consultation with BANES Officers in relation to the Sequential Test and the relationship with the riverside public realm; The undertaking of a thorough review of flood risk to the site, utilising previous work carried out along the River Avon corridor;

The proposed redevelopment has the potential to generate noise during its construction and operational phase. Consideration and mitigation will be considered and detailed in a supporting Noise Assessment and Noise Management Plan, paying due regard to amenity of residents and the requirements of the BANES document ‘Code of Practice – Noise on Construction Sites’.

PLANNING POLICY •

A supporting Planning Statement will be submitted with the application, detailing how the proposals accord with the statutory development plan and other material considerations.

The application will be supported by an Environmental Statement, and a Scoping Report will be submitted to the Council in advance of the submission of a formal application. This will cover a range of technical considerations and report back on the baseline studies undertaken. A summary of the likely contents of the application submission are found in section 5.

FLOOD RISK •

The application will be supported by an assessment of the socio-economic and cultural impact of Bath Rugby, and consideration of the opportunities for further enhancement of these positive impacts and community benefits through the delivery of a new Stadium.

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT •

There will be several stages of open and targeted consultation with stakeholders during the design process, continuing the engagement work already undertaken by Stadium for Bath and recorded in the Exploring the Opportunities document.

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1.0

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INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES OF THE DEVELOPMENT BRIEF 1.1 PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE DEVELOPMENT BRIEF This Development Brief has been prepared by Stadium for Bath in order to assist in facilitating the provision of a new stadium at the Rec, Bath, in accordance with the policies contained within the adopted development plan. Its purpose is to support and supplement the development plan, to inform and guide development, but not to prescribe design or inhibit innovation.

Although there is no specific guidance on what could or should be contained within a Development Brief, in broad terms its purpose is to inform developers and other interested parties of the constraints and opportunities presented by a site, to consider the wider site context, and the type of development expected or encouraged by local planning policies.

Throughout 2017, Stadium for Bath worked closely with key stakeholders including near neighbours, local businesses, schools, community groups, city stakeholders and technical and planning stakeholders to understand what matters most to them regarding this project.

It is a detailed framework which will help to ensure that an exceptional development is delivered, whilst taking into account the opportunities and constraints of the site. It will inform and guide the design process (but not dictate architectural approach). It provides a basis on which a formal planning application can be submitted to the Council for its formal consideration.

The feedback has then informed and been captured in the document entitled ‘Exploring the Opportunity’ which bookends the pre-design phase. This Development Brief should be read in conjunction with that document.

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Any future planning application will be required to be accompanied by a full Design and Access Statement, demonstrating how the proposals accord with this Development Brief (and other detailed considerations and the development plan), as well the feedback received and contained within the Exploring the Opportunity document.


1.2 STADIUM FOR BATH The Stadium for Bath project group comprises the three founding members who will deliver the project: Bath Rugby, Bath Rugby Foundation and Arena 1865. On 30th November 2017, Stadium for Bath released a document entitled ‘Exploring the Opportunity’ which details an array of engagement with key stakeholders, statutory consultees and local community groups, which was undertaken throughout 2017.

The contents of that document are not repeated here; however that document, read alongside this Development Brief, will inform the application proposals. The process of the preparation of this Development Brief is set out at section 1.5 of this document.

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1.3 BATH RECREATION LIMITED (FORMERLY BATH RECREATION GROUND TRUST) Bath Rugby’s facilities at the Rec currently occupy approximately one quarter of the overall Rec which is owned and operated by Bath Recreation Limited, an independent charity. Redevelopment of Bath Rugby’s facilities at the Rec requires the agreement of Bath Recreation Limited.

The Trustees have recently (January 2018) prepared a Strategic Development Plan to further enhance the opportunities for all. The proposed stadium will need to pay due regard to Bath Recreation Limited’s aspirations to provide a broad range of recreational and sporting facilities that can best fulfil its charitable objects.

Whilst there has been a long held appetite and ambition of Bath Rugby Club to redevelop the site, it has been necessary to clarify the potential parameters for any redevelopment before this could occur.

A document, entitled “Bath Recreation Limited Strategic and Operations Plan” has recently been published by Bath Recreation Limited. The Strategic Plan will be delivered through an operations plan and budget which will be approved by the Board annually and implemented by the Chief Executive and staff. The document advises that their Objects are:

Since a High Court decision was issued in 2002, there have been a number of non-planning related issues surrounding the Rec, particularly involving charitable law, as well as a failed application for the site to be designated as a Town and Village Green in 2013. These are not however matters that relate to the planning system and are therefore not considered within this Development Brief.

“The provision, with or without charge, of property in or near Bath (including, but not limited to, the Bath Recreation Ground) for use as outdoor recreation facilities for the benefit of the public.” The document envisages the following Vision for the Rec:

The ruling of the Charity First-Tier Tribunal in December 2016 has however finally provided clarity over the site redevelopment. Following this decision, the powers of (the then) Bath Recreation Ground Trust have been clarified, including its ability as land owner to lease the Club additional land for the development of the stadium. Bath Recreation Ground Trust became incorporated on 2 January 2018 and is now ‘Bath Recreation Limited’. The current Directors / Trustees were appointed in 2013 with the remit to establish the Trust as an independent body. Following a complex legal process a final Scheme was issued by the lower tier tribunal in December 2016 which gave clarity of the objects and powers of the Trust (these are now the objects of the incorporated Charity). With the Scheme as the guide the Directors / Trustees have developed a vision and strategic plan which they feel make best use of the assets and opportunities available to deliver its charitable objects. The income received from its primary tenants (Bath Leisure Centre and Bath Rugby) enables the charity to continue investing in the provision of a wide range of sporting and recreational facilities including events at the Rec, and more widely across Bath.

1

Vision – June 2017 to June 2022 “To provide a broad range of recreational and sporting facilities, on the Rec and beyond, that can best fulfil our charitable objects.” Strategic Goals: 1. Provide and maintain enhanced outdoor recreational and sporting facilities adjacent to the Sports and Leisure Centre. 2. Maintain and improve where prudent revenue streams from the Charitable Company’s assets. 3. Use best endeavours to identify demand for recreational and sporting facilities in or near Bath and meet those needs when deemed prudent and possible to do so. This may include: a. Identifying existing grounds for enhancing recreational and sporting uses. b. Identifying ground with potential for recreational and sporting uses. c. Consideration of vulnerable recreational and sporting facilities for intervention and support. 4. Promote attempts to ensure that all facilities have the opportunity for Community Use. 5. Create financial reserves and current cash flow to enable the above.

http://www.bathrec.co.uk/bathrec2015/images/Strategic_Plan_Web_document_2017.pdf

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1.4 PLANNING POLICY AND STATUTE OVERVIEW The adopted Development Plan facilitates the provision of a new stadium at the Rec. The Core Strategy (adopted July 2014) at Policy B1(b) (Bath Spatial Strategy) states that:

• “b At the Rec, and subject to the resolution of any unique legal issues and constraints, enable the development of a sporting, cultural and leisure stadium.” In July 2017, the Council adopted the Placemaking Plan. Policy SB2 (Central Riverside and Rec) sets out a Vision for the Rec and the surrounding area (as identified on Plan 1) and notes that there are a number of interrelated projects that have enormous potential to re-energise and re-define the important role and function that this area can play as a recreational heart to the city. The Placemaking Plan sets out a Vision for this area that can comprise of: • A 21st century re-interpretation of the historic ‘pleasure garden’ of Harrison’s Walks (now Parade Gardens); • An inspirational setting for the development of a new sporting, cultural and leisure stadium that safeguards the valued assets and attributes of the World Heritage Site, including key views;

The provision of an enhanced green infrastructure throughout the area, including improvements to the important biodiversity role of the river and the riverside; Potentially, an enhanced role as a point of access into the central area.

As part of this, it identifies that there are significant opportunities to transform the visual and physical connectivity of this area to its surroundings and these will be strongly encouraged provided they protect and enhance the Outstanding Universal Value of the World Heritage Site. Specific measures include: •

Improving the connections from the streets and spaces of Terrace Walk, Orange Grove and Grand Parade, including the Colonnades into Parade Gardens and to the riverside; Transforming the existing links from Pulteney Bridge and North Parade Bridge to a remodelled riverside path on the east side.

Policy SB2 splits this area into sub-areas and identifies specific policy requirements under an area entitled “Riverside East (The Rec, including Bath Rugby Club, Bath Sports and Leisure Centre, the Pavilion, and other associated areas)”.

DIAGRAM 5 CENTRAL RIVERSIDE & RECREATION GROUND KEY Key Active Frontage Landmark Pedestrian Link Potential Pedestrian Link Public Realm Improvement Site Boundary View Point Green Infrastructure

1. Placemaking Plan 43

© Crown copyright. All rights reserved 100023334 (2015) DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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It states the following policy requirements: “1 The preparation of a Development Brief, in conjunction with stakeholders, the local community and statutory consultees, will provide the detailed framework which will enable the development of a permanent sporting, cultural and leisure stadium, in accordance with Core Strategy policy B1(8)b. 2 The design will respond appropriately and creatively to its sensitive context within the World Heritage Site, including the importance of open views for example from Grand Parade, Orange Grove and Terrace Walk to the hillsides beyond, and the iconic view from North Parade Bridge to Pulteney Bridge and Weir. The range of views is to be agreed through the Development Brief and Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment process. 3 Development proposals will enhance and intensify the leisure offer with more variety and year round use. 4 The safety and convenience of access to and from the Rec will be improved. 5 Ensuring landscape, tree planting and public realm enhancements along the river corridor contribute positively to its character, and that development alongside the riverside provides a positive relationship to it. 6 Where practicable, introduce measures that enhance Green Infrastructure including the biodiversity and character of the river, and the provision of habitats for important species. It is a requirement for a biodiversity study to be commissioned to inform the development of a new stadium, and this should consider the impact of lighting, particularly in relation to bats. 7 Providing the opportunity for the Leisure Centre to be refurbished and improved. 8 In discussion with landowners explore options for parking in this area or on adjacent sites. 9 Ensure no net loss of floodplain storage. 10 Undertake a detailed historic environment assessment, and where necessary evaluation, in order to identify and implement appropriate mitigation.”

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This Development Brief therefore has been drafted in accordance with policy SB2 criterions 1 and 2. The policy requires the Development Brief to provide the detailed framework which will enable the development of a permanent sporting, cultural and leisure stadium which responds to its context. It therefore specifically relates to the provision of a stadium, rather than covering the wider policy area. Of course, these matters are interlinked and the proposals will need to have regard to other projects in the vicinity as well as a consideration of its impact on the immediate site, at a local level, and on a City scale. Neither the Placemaking Plan, nor the Core Strategy designates a specific area within the policy boundary for the stadium to be located. This Development Brief therefore does not seek to identify a specific location for the stadium within the Rec, albeit the Stadium for Bath are committed to retain the development within its current leased area, with the potential to use adjacent land further to the east. It considers the opportunities and constraints of the Rec. The site specific Core Strategy and Placemaking Plan policies cannot however be read in isolation and a significant number of other development plan policies are relevant to the consideration of any application at this site. APPENDIX 2 lists those policies in full, for convenience. It is not considered necessary to refer to them in full within this document, albeit this will be a necessary part of the formal planning application process, and in the preparation of technical evidence base reports. In addition to Development Plan assessment, given the location of the site within a sensitive heritage setting, it will be necessary to consider any proposals against planning statute on heritage matters. Sections 66(1) and 72 of Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 set out statutory duties concerning the conservation of listed buildings and conservation areas respectively. National policy and guidance on the historic environment are set out in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) and the associated national Planning Practice Guidance. Section 12 of the NPPF deals with the historic environment; paragraphs 128140 of that section set out development management policies. Paragraphs 133 and 134 deal with ‘substantial harm’ and ‘less than substantial harm’ respectively, and set out the circumstances in which planning permission may be granted where the public benefits of proposals are determined to outweigh any harm to heritage significance. Such decisions have to be taken in the light of the statutory duties referred to above.


The duties in respect of world heritage sites are covered in the 1972 World Heritage Convention and in National Planning Practice Guidance paragraphs 026 to 038 (Reference ID: 18a026-20140306). Bath and North East Somerset Council has an excellent range of other non-statutory and Supplementary Planning documents which describe the adopted policy on townscape issues, often with specific relevance to the Rec. The stadium design should have regard for this guidance, noting in particular: • • • • • •

The Bath Pattern Book The Public Realm and Movement Strategy documents The City of Bath World Heritage Site Management Plan Bath Building Heights Strategy The Bath Brand The City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting Supplementary Planning Document

A number of Historic England guidance documents will be relevant to the redevelopment of the Rec, in particular: •

Historic Environment Good Practice Advice in Planning Note 2: Managing Significance in Decision-Taking in the Historic Environment (2015).

Historic Environment Good Practice Advice in Planning Note 3 (Second Edition): The Setting of Heritage Assets (2017).

The County of Avon Act 1982 – section 33, gives BANES powers to protect the natural thermal springs that arise under artesian pressure in the centre of Bath, from damage that could result from excavations, piling operations or bore holes in the Bath area.

CREATING THE CANVAS FOR PUBLIC LIFE IN BATH

PATTERN BOOK : VOLUME 01 PUBLIC REALM FRAMEWORK

as proposed to be adopted

Bath and North East Somerset

July 2017

Adopted July 2014

incorporating Inspector’s recommended Main Modifications and additional modifications

Core Strategy Part 1 of the Local Plan

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1.5 CONSULTATION AND STATUS OF DOCUMENT This document has been prepared by Stadium for Bath in consultation with relevant Officers from Bath and North East Somerset Council and other key stakeholders. An early draft of the document has also been considered by Historic England and Bath Preservation Trust, in advance of formal publication for public consultation. This Development Brief was issued for public consultation for a 3 week period between 11th April 2018 and 2nd May 2018. Comments received will be considered and the document amended as appropriate, in advance of a final draft being published. It is intended that all comments received will be made publicly available. It can therefore be afforded some weight in the planning decision making process, and is a material consideration in the determination of any future planning application(s) for the development of a new stadium at the Rec.

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PRE-DESIGN

BANES CORE STRATEGY BANES PLACEMAKING PLAN BATH RECREATION LIMITED STRATEGIC VISION STADIUM FOR BATH EARLY STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION DOC 2017 – EXPLORING THE OPPORTUNITY


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CONCEPT DESIGN

BATH RUGBY OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS/ PLAN TECHNICAL, ISSUE SPECIFIC, BASELINE STUDIES DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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DETAILED DESIGN DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT INCLUDING TECHNICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENTS OTHER SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED WITH A PLANNING APPLICATION

EIA SCOPING DESIGN PROCESS

PLANNING APPLICATION SUBMISSION

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2.0

SITE CONTEXT

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SITE CONTEXT

2.1 SITE DESCRIPTION SURROUNDINGS AND DESIGNATIONS 2.1.1 'THE REC' “The Rec” 2 is one of the most iconic and recognised rugby grounds in world rugby and displays the City of Bath to a global audience due to the televised views out of the Rec and across the City. It currently has a capacity of approximately 14,500 spectators, with much of that comprised of a variety of temporary stands. During the off-season, the rugby ground's temporary East Stand is currently removed, in order to provide for open sporting and recreational use by a range of users. Bath Rugby’s facilities at the Rec currently occupy approximately one quarter of the overall Rec which is owned and operated by Bath Recreation Limited (formerly the Bath Recreation Ground Trust), an independent charity. The existing layout of the Bath Rugby ground is shown in Figure 2. The site currently comprises two stands which are predominantly covered (South and West stands), a temporary uncovered, seated stand (the East Stand), and a temporary uncovered terrace stand (the North Stand), with a separate Clubhouse building comprising bar, changing rooms and some ancillary accommodation.

The section of the riverside envisaged to be included as part of any development proposals for the stadium is shown in Figure 2 and comprises the length between the Radial Gate to the north and the grass bank adjacent to the Sports Centre. This section includes 25no. trees (Sycamore, Tulip trees, Cherry, Birch). The Club have an existing lease with Bath Recreation Limited running until 2069 and it is their intention to lease further land to the east of their current site in order to facilitate the new stadium. It is within the powers of Bath Reacreation Limited to consider a request for a lease of such additional land. As such, the Club are committed to delivering the new stadium on its existing, and extended, available footprint, the exact extend of which is not agreed at the time of drafting this document. It is noted that the Placemaking Plan is also silent on this matter. It is considered appropriate that these matters are properly explored through the iterative design process, rather than being fixed within the Development Brief. This document therefore intentionally does not specify an exact site area, but rather identifies the broad location of the new stadium on an extended site.

The Grade II President’s Lounge, adjacent to Johnstone Street, houses first aid facilities at ground floor and a meeting room at first floor.

2 For the purposes of this Development Brief, the term ‘Recreation Ground’ describes the wider site, as owned and operated by Bath Recreation Limited, whilst ‘The Rec’ relates specifically to that area leased to Bath Rugby and currently used as a stadium. The description of ‘The Rec’ used in the context of future development proposals also encompasses the riverside and the area of land to be leased to the Club to the immediate east of its current footprint.

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Bath Recreation Ground Limited Site Ownership 2. Existing Site Plan DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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3. Existing Site Photo (looking north)

4. Existing Site Photo

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5. Sports and well-being Spine

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2.1.2 THE RIVERSIDE The adjacent riverside path (Riverside Walk, a public right of way footpath) comprises a 3m wide tarmac path, which for part of the length includes a paved slope/ bank down to a narrow river edge with boat mooring posts and railing. A number of timber benches/ picnic tables are located at the back of the path. The path edge includes a metal handrailing, which has recently been extended to cover the whole rear of the West Stand, with access steps to the river. The existing West Stand of rugby facilities backs onto the riverside path.

The local section of the river and riverside path, with lighting columns, semi-mature/ maturing trees, and benches, continues north to Pulteney Bridge and south to North Parade Bridge. To the north of the Site is located the ‘Beazer Maze’. This is an open space of grass, accessed from the riverside, with a ‘paving maze’, well enclosed by walls and vegetation. Other notable elements include Pulteney Weir and the ‘radial gate’. The latter is a structure (managed by the Environment Agency) which was installed in the early 1970’s to assist with flood management. The riverside area next to the weir opens out into a wider space with a range of trees.

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The Rec Bath Stadium

CULTURE and LEISURE Baird’s Maltings

Parade Gardens

Queen Square

North Parade Road

Bath City Centre

Footbridge

Bath Cricket Club

Top Lock

Green Park Station

Pulteney Lock

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2.1.3 THE RECREATION GROUND The remaining three quarters of the Rec is dedicated to Bath’s Leisure Centre and associated parking facilities, croquet lawns, all weather five-a-side football pitches and open grassed land used for sports and other events. Parts of the eastern area of the Rec are used by Bath Croquet Club, Bath Drama Club and for some tennis courts. Pitches are available for a range of amateur sports and community events, such as the Bath Half and the Rotary fireworks. There is a cricket pavilion at the William Street entrance to the ground which has recently been refurbished. The Bath Sports and Leisure Centre is located on the southern edge of the Rec, accessed via North Parade.

2.1.4 SURROUNDING AREA To the north of the Site lies Johnstone Street, consisting Grade 1 listed buildings in its entirety, with the gable ends, and associated garden spaces, of the terraces bounding the site, with Laura Place and Great Pulteney Street beyond. To the west of the river lies the eastern edge of the city centre, which includes a number of elements and features of importance and high value of different heritage designations (see later section) including Bath Abbey, Orange Grove, Grand Parade, Terrace Walk, North Parade and the Parade Gardens Registered Park and Garden. Parade Gardens is a park situated at river level, Bath’s popular and most centrally situated pleasure grounds, which attract tourists (for a small entrance fee) and BANES residents (who have free entry). Overlooking the River Avon, Parade Gardens includes flower bed displays, floral features, concerts at the bandstand during summer months, deck chairs for hire, space for picnics, and a café with outdoor seating.

2.1.5 SITE DESIGNATIONS The site lies within the City of Bath World Heritage Site. World Heritage Sites are places listed by the United Nations Educational and Scientific Organisation (UNESCO) as of special cultural or physical significance, under the 1972 World Heritage Convention. The City of Bath was inscribed onto the World Heritage List in December 1987, the inscription noting

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that the City of Bath has ‘outstanding universal value’ under criteria (i), (ii) and (iv) of the Convention, which are: (i) To represent a masterpiece of human creative genius; (ii) Exhibit an important interchange of human values, over a span of time or within a cultural area of the world, on developments in architecture or technology, monumental arts, town planning or landscape design; (iv) Be an outstanding example of a type of building or architectural or technological ensemble or landscape which illustrates (a) significant stage(s) in human history. The site also lies within the Bath Conservation Area, designated by the Council. Conservation Areas are 'areas of special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance' designated under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990. BANES are currently undertaking a review of its Conservation Areas and have prepared a new Conservation Area Character Appraisal for each sub area (current draft dated 2015). There are many listed buildings adjacent to the site at Johnstone Street, Argyle Street, Laura Place and Great Pulteney Street, as well as North Parade and Pulteney Bridges. Listed buildings are protected under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 for their special architectural or historic interest. Listed buildings in the vicinity of the site are identified in Section 2 of this Development Brief. Parade Gardens, located to the west across the River Avon, is designated by Historic England as a Registered Park and Garden of Special Historic Interest. The River Avon, adjacent to the site, is identified as a Site of Nature Conservation Interest (SNCI). The above designations are shown in Figure 8.

2.2 PLANNING HISTORY The site has been the subject of a number of planning applications over a number of years. These are not listed here but are available on the Council’s planning application register.


2.3 HISTORIC ENVIRONMENT CONSIDERATIONS The new development will sit in the centre of the World Heritage City in a highly visible location, surrounded by listed buildings, albeit at the lowest point of the City. It will therefore have to respond to, and not over-dominate, its surroundings. The rich historic context of the Rec will be an important influence on the design of the new building. The site for the new stadium lies within Bath’s World Heritage Site, within the Bath Conservation Area, and within the settings of nearby listed buildings and registered parks and gardens. Policy SB2 requires the undertaking of a detailed historic environment assessment, and where necessary evaluation, in order to identify and implement appropriate mitigation. This document will be submitted alongside the planning application and is being prepared in order to inform the proposals. In advance of that process being completed, this section sets out a summary of historic environment considerations that will be relevant to the development of the design. The principal historic environment designations relevant to the site are set out below. The historic environment chapter of the Environmental Statement for the project will set these matters out in more detail, including statements of significance, and assessments of contribution of the site to heritage significance. These assessments will inform the development of the design.

THE CITY OF

WORLD HERITAGE SITE

In December 1987 the City of Bath was inscribed into the list of World Heritage Sites. The World Heritage Convention, for the protection of World’s Cultural and Natural Heritage, which came into being in 1972, recognises properties of ‘Outstanding Universal Value’ which are part of the “world heritage of mankind as a whole” and deserve “protection and transmission to future generations”. Such properties are recognised through inscription on the World Heritage list by the World Heritage Committee, which consists of representatives from 21 States Parties. World Heritage sites are therefore single heritage assets with an international value that has been clearly articulated. Not everything within them contributes to OUV, but those attributes that do must be appropriately protected. Policies and guidance for the WHS are set out in two principal documents: • •

City of Bath World Heritage Site Management Plan, 2016-2022 City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting Supplementary Planning Document, August 2013.

The Outstanding Universal Value prescribed in the World Heritage Site guidelines include Bath’s Roman culture, the neo-classical 18th century buildings linked by green spaces and their setting in a green semi-urban bowl surrounded by rural hills. The landscaping of the crescents and terraces which range up Bath’s hillsides is a major attributre and the proposed development will need to demonstrate a positive impact on the heritage assets by ensuring that the development stands in harmony with those features of the Georgian townscape.

City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting

1

Supplementary Planning Document August 2013

Supported by

NIO MUN MO D RI

L IA

PA T

Management Plan 2016-2022

2.3.1 WORLD HERITAGE SITE

MO

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ND I AL •

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BATH RUGBY STADIUM

1810 AD

1774 AD

1771 AD

1760 AD

ROMAN ERA CITY OF HOT SPRINGS AND RECREATIONAL BATH

1661 AD

1643 AD

1636 AD

1625 AD

1604 AD

1539 AD

1499 AD

1189 AD

1088 AD

885 AD

577 AD

407 AD

50-80 AD

860 BC

KENNET AND AVON CANAL COMPLETED

• ROYAL CRESCENT BUILT • PULTENEY BRIDGE BUILT

ASSEMBLY ROOMS BUILT

CIRCUS BUILT

BATH WATER'S HEALTH BENEFITS RECOGNISED

• ROYALISTS TAKE BATH

• BATH HIT BY PLAGUE FOR THE FOURTH TIME

BATH HIT BY PLAGUE FOR THE THIRD TIME

BATH HIT BY PLAGUE AGAIN

BATH HIT BY PLAGUE

HENRY 8TH CLOSES ABBEY

BATH ABBEY CONCEIVED

BATH GIVEN ROYAL CHARACTER

BATH BURNED BY REBELS

ALFRED THE GREAT FORTIFIES THE CITY

SAXONS TAKE CITY

ROMANS LEAVE BRITAIN

ORIGINS OF BATH ROMAN CITY OF AQUAE SULIS

LEGEND OF PRINCE BLADUD-FOUNDER OF BATH

CITY OF BATH TIMELINE

GEORGIAN ERA CITY OF PLEASURE, RECREATION, HEALTH GIVING WATERS AND CULTURE


2010 AD

2008 AD

2002 AD

1998 AD

1997 AD

1991 AD

1988 AD

1987 AD

1984 AD

1975 AD

1964 AD

1950 AD

1933 AD

1897 AD

1894 AD

1893 AD

1849 AD

1835 AD

IT Y G BATH C

R OW T

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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BRUCE CRAIG TAKES OVER AS CHAIRMAN OF BATH RUGBY

WINNERS OF EUROPEAN CHALLENGE CUP

HIGH COURT DETERMINES RECREATION GROUND AS CHARITY

BATH BECOME THE FIRST NON FRENCH TEAM TO WIN THE EUROPEAN CUP

BATH EQUAL THE ENGLAND RECORD OF 7 IN THE STARTING LINE UP FOR A TEST

BATH RUGBY BEGIN RUN OF 5 LEAGUE TITLES IN 6 YEARS

BATH RUGBY WINS THE INAUGURAL PILKINGTON CUP

RICHARD HILL IS BATH RUGBY'S FIRST INTERNATIONAL CAPTAIN

BATH RUGBY WINS FIRST JOHN PLAYER CUP

SPORTS AND LEISURE CENTRE OPENED

BATH UNIVERSITY

ARNOLD RIDLEY BECOMES FIRST PRESIDENT OF BATH RUGBY

WEST STAND BUILT

HENRIETTA PARK OPENS

FIRST RUGBY PLAYED AT REC

FRANK BUSTER BECOMES FIRST ENGLAND CAPPED PLAYER FOR BATH

CHOLORA HITS BATH

PARADE BRIDGE OPENED


The significance of the WHS is set out in a Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV). The principal aspects of the OUV of Bath can be summarised as: • • • •

The Roman remains The Georgian city - the ambition of the Georgians for a beautiful city with architecture and landscape combined The Georgian public buildings and monumental ensembles in harmony, reflecting C18 social ambitions The individual Georgian buildings and their collective organisation - Palladio’s ideas realised at the scale of a city, situated in a hollow in the hills, informed by a landscape sensibility

• •

• •

• The WHS Management Plan 2016-2022 notes the prospect of development coming forward, stating at 5.5.5 that “Bath Rugby play at the Recreation Ground (‘The Rec’) which is situated alongside the River Avon in close proximity to Pulteney Bridge. The club first played here in 1894 and wish to remain in the city and develop this ground to modern standards. Proposals are likely to see the capacity of the ground rise from 12,000 to around 16,500 spectators. Plans have been delayed by Charity Commission rulings over the land and discussion has been on-going for many years. This proposed development represents both opportunity and risk, as Rugby brings both economic gain and civic pride, but there is also the potential to negatively impact upon key views. This development was flagged up in the 2009 UNESCO Mission Report, the 2013 UNESCO Periodic Report submission and the 2014 update report to UNESCO.”

2.3.2 BATH CONSERVATION AREA The Bath Conservation Area covers c.60% of the City and some of the undeveloped area around it, although its boundary is different from that of the WHS. The Rec is located within ‘Area 14 – Pulteney Road’ of the Bath City Wide Character Appraisal (BANES Adopted SPD 2005) and adjacent to both ‘Area 8 - City Centre’ to the west and ‘Area 9 – Bathwick’ to the north. Relevant key elements of Area 14 are as follows; • • • • •

‘Part of flat river valley floor…’; ‘Mixed land uses…with substantial amounts of sports pitches’; ‘variety [of Building form and heights] across the area… dwellings up to 4 storeys high’; ‘Buildings are relatively modern’; ‘A range of materials are used for the buildings associated with the sports area’;

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‘Density and enclosure is very varied … wide views around sports pitches’; ‘Vitality and tranquillity is greatly influenced by the playing pitches…The riverside path is a well used recreational route. On match days, the rugby creates significant vibrancy in this area…’ ‘There is much open space within this area. Sports pitches predominate (cricket pitch and rugby ground). ‘The space by Pulteney Weir is one of the most important riverside areas in the city…‘The most important landmarks in this area are Pulteney Bridge, Pulteney Weir and North Parade Bridge, but the Abbey… in Area 8 [has] a strong influence on this area.’ ‘In the early C18 routes for promenading were provided adjacent to the river, (now Parade Gardens) and the central riverside remains the busiest stretch of the River Avon for admiring views of the Abbey and the Georgian city in its fine landscape setting.’

The proposed development will be required to complement most of the elements specified within Area 14, which is distinguished for its ‘mixed land uses…with substantial amounts of sports pitches’; ‘variety [of relatively modern Building form and heights] across the area… dwellings up to 4 storeys high’; ‘range of materials…for the buildings associated with the sports area’; varied ‘Density and enclosure … [with] wide views around sports pitches’ which predominate and greatly influence the ‘Vitality and tranquillity’ of the area… On match days, the rugby creates significant vibrancy in this area…’ The 2005 Character Appraisal also highlights the importance of the riverside area by Pulteney Weir: ‘The riverside path is a well used recreational route’ in particular on match days, and its combined significance both as an area for promenading in the 18th century and for admiring views of the Abbey [Area 8] and the Georgian city in its fine landscape setting.’ The Pulteney Road appraisal states of the existing rugby ground stands that ‘Their scale and materials make a negative contribution to the highly sensitive environs of Great Pulteney Street, Pulteney Bridge and the riverside setting of Bath Abbey. At the same time their social significance and contribution to the sporting life of Bath is recognised. Sports buildings of this type are rarely of more than utilitarian design and materials.’ More encouragingly, however, it goes on to state that ‘Proposed development work to Bath Rugby Club’s facilities at the Rec offers the opportunity for new architecture which may enhance the special qualities of the surroundings rather than working against them.’


2.3.4 LISTED BUILDINGS The heritage assets both within and around the Rec include, as would be expected within this World Heritage Site, a considerable number of listed buildings, many Grade I and II*. These feature alongside further heritage assets on the Bath and North East Somerset Historic Environment (formerly Sites and Monuments) Record [HER], which include a number of ‘lost’ heritage and cultural sites; for example the 18th century Spring Gardens, a Georgian pleasure garden which incorporated the north-east corner of the site. The Site is part of the Bath Recreation Ground (Sites and Monument MBN30356, BANES HER). There are three Grade II listed buildings within the Rec. One is within the Site itself and currently in use by Bath Rugby Club as the President's Lounge (LB 1406031). The other two are the c1900 Entrance Kiosks and Gates To Recreation Ground (LB 1394518) and the 1895 Sports Pavilion at the Bath Recreation Ground (LB1406570).

The riverside, weir and river corridor between Adam’s Palladian Pulteney Bridge and the late Georgian North Parade Bridge are also key heritage and cultural assets, incorporating both Parade Gardens and the 1930s Colonnades opposite. The late 18th century Pulteney Estate to the north of the Rec is also a significant heritage asset, in particular Johnstone Street which directly overlooks the site. The impact to historic views to and from the Rec will need to be considered, in particular the views across Grand Parade and Orange Grove to and from the surrounding hills; the setting of Bath Abbey plays a major role in this. In summary, the Rec is an aspect of the setting of many listed buildings in the area around the site, including some highly graded buildings. Some of the more important for the project will be: • • •

Pulteney Bridge (Grade I) Bath Abbey (Grade I) Houses in Johnstone Street (Grade I)

KEY Listed Building Grade I Listed Building Grade II Listed Building Grade II* 7. Listed buildings in proximity to the site DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

29


2.3.5 REGISTERED PARKS The site lies across the river from the Grade II registered Parade Gardens.

2.3.6 SCHEDULED ANCIENT MONUMENTS There are no Scheduled Ancient Monuments within 100m of the site. There is also no evidence for any of the following within the study area: • Important hedgerows; • Historic battlefields; • Burial grounds (in use or disused).

KEY HER Monument Record HER Event Record Listed Building Scheduled Monument

8. Sites and monuments in proximity to the site

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A significant number of archaeological sites and investigations are located close to the study area. An extract from the Bath Historic Environment Record (BHER) was provided by Mr Rod Millard (BANES Historic Environment Record Officer), the results of which are summarised in the Figure below:


2.3.7 HERITAGE STAKEHOLDER WORKSHOPS Two round table discussions were held in 2017 with a number of the organisations with responsibility for or an interest in Bath’s historic environment: • • •

Bath and North East Somerset Council (BANES), the planning authority Historic England (HE), the government’s statutory advisor on the historic environment Bath Preservation Trust (BPT), an independent local charity which exists ‘to preserve for the benefit of the public the historic character and amenities of the City of Bath and its surroundings’.

After discussion and a tour of the site and its environs, a number of themes emerged: •

In respect of the OUV of the Bath World Heritage Site, the interrelationship between the developed part of the city and the wooded slopes around it, and the views from centre to edge and vice versa, were acknowledged to be an important characteristic relevant to project, and this is noted in policy SB2. Such views are available from many places in the city and in many directions; views across the Rec, such as those from the Grand Parade area, are an example, although not the most notable example in considering the WHS as a whole. In respect of views into the city, the new stadium is likely to be visible in many of the elevated views from the wooded slopes around it. Given that these are generally views from some distance away and looking over the whole city; this should be acceptable if careful consideration is given during design development to what will be seen in these views, particularly in respect of materials and lightspill.

In respect of the settings of listed buildings, the stakeholders considered that the most important considerations are: •

• •

The setting of Pulteney Bridge, particularly as seen from North Parade Bridge, noted as an ‘iconic view’ in policy SB2. The setting of the terraces of houses on Johnstone Street, with their distinctive unfinished stub ends facing the Recreation Ground. Views of the Abbey from within the Recreation Ground. Views of the listed Bathwick St Mary’s Church and the ascending hillside terraces

The treatment of the riverside edge of the site, and the role of tree planting as an aspect of the design, will be of considerable importance. There is a positive opportunity to create a greater sense of openness on the Rec side of the river, to improve the green landscape and the quality and amenity of this area more generally, and to enhance the conservation area.

A further consideration with respect to the character and appearance of the Bath Conservation Area is the historic open character of the Rec. Given the scope for improving on the quality of the existing rugby club buildings, and the fact that much of the Rec will remain as green open space, the project offers the opportunity to enhance the conservation area with a project in the Bath tradition of designs that celebrate the relationship between buildings and green landscape.

Other organisations who have been or will be consulted during the development of the design include the National Trust, who own and manage some of the surrounding countryside which affords elevated views into the city centre; and ICOMOS, the body which advises UNESCO on World Heritage Sites.

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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2.3.8 PROJECT HERITAGE PHILOSOPHY The above considerations can be synthesised into a ‘project heritage philosophy’ which Stadium for Bath considers is the correct approach to designing a new stadium in this historic setting. The club’s aspiration is to build a new stadium of world class quality which will be an asset to the World Heritage Site and of which the club and the city of Bath can be proud. This aspiration is supported by adopted Council planning policies and by the WHS Management Plan and the conservation area appraisal; in accordance with the first of the core planning principles set out in paragraph 17 of the NPPF, and as is appropriate for a major project on a sensitive site, the project will therefore come forward as an example of plan-led development. In ‘The Historic Urban Landscape’ (2012) , the authors note in their conclusion that “the partition between what is ‘historic’ and what is not is increasingly seen as an artificial one, as every city is densely layered as a series of ‘episodes’, where heritage is viewed as the flow and mix of these events rather than as an arbitrary selection of some urban parts defined as ‘historic’”. This is highly relevant to a large city such as Bath, and it reflects the spirit in which the design of the new stadium should be approached. The extracts from the WHS Management Plan cited above can also be reading as reflecting the same spirit. ‘Leisure’, as the modern term has it, underpins the importance of the Roman phase and of the Georgian phase of Bath’s development which are the principal sources of the OUV of the WHS. The baths and the spa were integral to civic life. Rugby is a more recent example of a recreational pursuit – present in the city for over 150 years - that with the success of Bath Rugby in recent years has become central to the civic life of the city and a source of pride to many who live there. The Thermae Bath Spa project and the Holburne extension are recent examples of site specific, imaginative and high quality civic buildings which have added positively to the quality of the World Heritage Site, exemplifying the ‘episodic’ view cited above. The stadium project clearly has the potential to match the success of these projects in a similar spirit. National policy on the historic environment and Historic England guidance both emphasise the importance of developing an understanding of the historic character and context of a site, and the contribution of a site to heritage significance, in order to inform development proposals. This will be an integral part of the process of developing designs for the Rec. The development of the design of the stadium will proceed in parallel with, and informed by, the ‘clearly expressed and nontechnical narrative argument that sets out ‘what matters and why’ in terms of the heritage significance’, as suggested by Historic England in their guidance on setting, but

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3

applicable to heritage significance more generally. This Development Brief sets out a framework for such a document. The new stadium will be a significant new civic building for Bath. While sensitivity to and responsiveness to the historic setting should inform the design of the stadium from the outset, its status should be celebrated rather than suppressed. The design will need to be informed by a thorough understanding of the site’s historic character, and by its immediate and its city-wide context. The site’s historic setting should enrich the project rather than constrain it. The architecture of the stadium should be inspired by and should belong to Bath; it should not be a design that could have been built anywhere. Effects on the historic environment are not limited to visual impact, but visual impacts will be an important consideration in developing the design for the new stadium. Visual impact assessment will be an integral part of the design process from the outset, as explained in Section 2.3. Viewpoints important to the project and important to affected heritage assets will be identified, and the developing design will be tested using digital modelling, and also in photographs of winter and summer views, as part of the iterative process of developing the design. Recognising that the experience of townscape and views is for the most part dynamic rather than static (that is, experienced while walking around rather than standing still), this will include dynamic modelling. While it is possible that the new stadium will cause some harm to affected heritage assets, there are also considerable opportunities for it to deliver a variety of public benefits; section 12 of the NPPF sets out the ways in which public benefits can be weighed against any harm to the historic environment in reaching a decision about a project. This major project clearly has the potential to make a positive contribution to all three of the dimensions of sustainable development set out in the NPPF: economic, social and environmental. As well as wider public benefits, there is the potential for the project to deliver benefits to heritage significance, as an aspect of more general environmental enhancement of the present site. For example, the project could bring about major improvements to the riverside, enhancing the settings of Pulteney Bridge and Parade Gardens, to which the present west stand makes a negative contribution; and more generally, the replacement of the existing structures by a new stadium of high architectural quality will in itself be an enhancement of the site, and therefore of the WHS and the conservation area and the settings of nearby listed buildings. The design must therefore embrace the heritage opportunities of the site to ensure that the overall impact of development is positive and beneficial to the city.

The Historic Urban Landscape’, by Francesco Bandarin and Ron van Oers, Wiley Blackwell, 2012.


2.3.9 REQUIREMENT FOR HERITAGE IMPACT (ENVIRONMENT) ASSESSMENT Policy SB2 requires that there is a requirement for applicants to “[10] Undertake a detailed historic environment assessment, and where necessary evaluation, in order to identify and implement appropriate mitigation.” A Heritage Impact Assessment will therefore need to be carried out and submitted with the planning application, in line with the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), English Heritage’s guidelines (The Setting of Heritage Assets, 2012), ICOMOS guidelines (Guidance on Heritage Impact Assessments for Cultural World Heritage Properties, 2011) and Bath and North East Somerset Council’s ’The City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting: Supplementary Planning Document’ (August 2013). The Heritage Impact Assessment will identify the cultural history of the site in relation to all identified heritage assets, their settings and significance, any areas of ‘lost’ heritage. It will include the historic evolution of the site and the surrounding area, with reference to relevant maps and images. The study will need to consider the area within the site boundary and an additional area with a radius of 3-5 km, to allow consideration of potential effects on the settings of any significant heritage assets identified by the Landscape and Visual Impact Appraisal process. The initial scoping process identified the following potentially significant cultural heritage effects from the proposed development: • • • • • • • • • •

the World Heritage Site. the City of Bath Conservation Area and its setting the setting of Pulteney Bridge and Pulteney Weir the setting of North Parade Bridge, Grand Parade and the Colonnades the Bathwick/Pulteney development features of cultural significance within the site the setting of other listed buildings and structures, including those from or to which the view might be affected Henrietta Park, Parade Gardens and Sydney Gardens, all registered Parks and Gardens the Rec the River Avon and the riverside

The Heritage Impact Assessment will be required to observe the guidelines from the ICOMOS Guidance on Heritage Impact Assessments for Cultural World Heritage Properties: A publication of the International Council on Monuments and Sites (January 2011). This states that: “Every reasonable effort should be made to eliminate or minimise adverse impacts on significant places. Ultimately, however, it maybe necessary to balance the public benefit of the proposed change against the harm to the place. It is therefore also important to know who benefits from the proposed change and for what reasons. In such cases the weight given to heritage values should be proportionate to the significance of the place and the impact of the change upon it. WH properties de facto are seen to have global value and thus logically have a higher significance that national or local heritage value [2-1-5]

Where change may affect the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of a WH property, consideration of the cultural [and/or natural] heritage attributes should be central to planning any proposal… Managers and decision makers should consider whether the heritage conservation needs should be given greater weight than competing uses and developments. A key consideration is the threat or risk to the WH status and this should be clearly addressed in the HIA report [2-1-6].” The HIA will also need to accord with other international and national policy and guidance including the National Planning Policy Framework, Circular 07/2009 on the Protection of World Heritage Sites. It is essential that as far as possible the impact of the proposed changes will outweigh as much as possible any perceived harm to the heritage assets, either directly or indirectly. The proposed development must seek to retain and provide new glimpses of the Abbey and other parts of the City as much as possible. It will be necessary to show how the riverside corridor between the two bridges would be rejuvenated by the proposed development, both culturally and aesthetically. The regeneration of the public realm and the adjacent open space of the Colonnade will benefit the setting of both bridges, the river and weir and Parade Gardens. This is one of the few places in Bath where it is possible to walk along the riverside, and should therefore be one of the most inspirational, is marred, amongst other things, by the current development which has turned its back on the river. The overall quality of the public realm, including constrained path widths, is also poor. The potential opening up of the West Stand to face the riverside would have a positive impact on the cultural use and vitality of this area, in terms of its improvements to the riverside public realm, improved disabled access, and also improving the site’s boundary with the much overlooked Beazer’s Maze, which celebrates the former 18th century Spring Gardens on that site and is protected as an open space. Historically, this area once flourished as the venue for Bath’s longest lived pleasure gardens which provided fireworks, circus acts, concerts, dancing, breakfast and suppers and a variety of entertainments where hundreds flocked across the river for much of the 18th century. This was complemented by Harrison’s Assembly Rooms and riverside walk opposite, as well as Wood’s Parades high above the riverside and his gardens which remain today as Parade Gardens. The proposed development, integrated with the riverside walk, should demonstrate how it resonates with both the cultural activities in Parade Gardens and those in the proposed restaurant quarter in the Colonnades, and the various bars and restaurants already operating around the top end of Argylle Street which open onto the riverside. Pulteney Bridge should oversee a thriving, regenerated riverside once again. DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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2.4 LANDSCAPE CHARACTER 2.4.1 LANDSCAPE AND VISUAL IMPACT APPRAISAL Policy SB2 of the Placemaking Plan identifies some significant views in the text, and viewpoints are also shown on the associated Diagram 5. It requires that “[2] The design will respond appropriately and creatively to its sensitive context within the World Heritage Site, including the importance of open views for example from Grand Parade, Orange Grove and Terrace Walk to the hillsides beyond, and the iconic view from North Parade Bridge to Pulteney Bridge and Weir…. The range of views is to be agreed through the Development Brief and Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment process”.

Guidance is also provided by "Landscape Character Assessment: Guidance for England and Scotland (Countryside Agency and Scottish Natural Heritage, 2002)". Consideration has also been given to English Heritage’s guidance ‘Seeing the History in the View’: A Method for Assessing Heritage Significance within Views’. The WHS Setting SPD has informed the selection of representative viewpoints assessed in the LVIA, and are referenced below in this chapter as appropriate. Guidance for Heritage Impact Assessments for Cultural World Heritage Properties (ICOMOS Jan 2011) has also been considered.

These issues have been identified as sensitive, and impacts potentially significant, due to the site location in the centre of Bath, within the Bath World Heritage Site, the Bath Conservation Area and approximately 400m from the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), with associated actual and potential visibility from a wide area around the city and environs.

An EIA Scoping report was previously submitted to BANES on 24th September 2013 setting out the intended approach for assessment, including for landscape and visual effects. BANES Council’s Scoping Opinion, dated 25th October 2013 included a list of suggested viewpoints for inclusion in the assessment, and stated the assessment will need to consider daytime and night time impacts. Natural England also commented on the need to assess impacts on the Cotswolds AONB. Following further consultation with English Heritage 3no. additional viewpoints have also been included and assessed.

In this context, any application will need to identify the landscape character and visual context and amenity, in terms of receptors, of the existing Bath Rugby site at the Rec and assess the impacts of the proposal upon the same. A full Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment will be required, and the scope of this should be agreed with the Council to inform the design process in advance of formal submission.

The viewpoints proposed for the assessment have subsequently been agreed in discussion with BANES Council’s Landscape Officer and are identified in the plan below.

The content of this assessment will be required to reference the methodology set out in 'Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Assessment (3rd Ed, Landscape Institute and IEMA, 2013) which provides the most up to date guidance for LVIA. It will also need to draw upon the Bath World Heritage Site (WHS) Setting Study Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) since this document provides useful background on the WHS context and key.

A methodology is to be agreed with BANES Council’s Landscape Officer which allows for a reasoned assessment to be made of the effects of the development on baseline receptors (physical and visual), based on clearly set out criteria. The assessment undertaken will be of a mitigated scheme. Any residual effects identified will therefore be those aspects which cannot be mitigated.

21

22 23 24

26

25

2 28 27

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9. Wider and Local Viewpoint Locations STADIUM FOR BATH


2.4.2 EXISTING LANDSCAPE CHARACTER ASSESSMENTS

2.4.4 GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE STRATEGY (BANES 2013)

There are a variety of documents which will inform the Landscape and Visual Impact Appraisal process, as summarised below.

This strategy sets out objectives for ensuring ‘that the natural environment works for the community, by making the most of the benefits that the natural environment can and should be providing for people, places and nature.’ The location of the Site within the Rec and adjacent to the River Avon requires consideration of the proposals in terms of GI assets and objectives.

The area is within Area 14 – Pulteney Road of the Bath City Wide Character Appraisal (BANES Adopted SPD, 2005) and adjacent to Area 8 - City Centre to the west and Area 9 – Bathwick to the north. Relevant key elements of Area are as follows: • • • • • •

‘Part of flat river valley floor…’; ‘Mixed land uses…with substantial amounts of sports pitches’; Building form and heights – ‘variety across the area… dwellings up to 4 storeys high’; ‘Buildings are relatively modern’; ‘A range of materials are used for the buildings associated with the sports area’; ‘Density and enclosure is very varied … wide views around sports pitches’;

2.4.3 BATH BUILDING HEIGHTS STRATEGY (BANES 2010)

The Site is outside of the Cotswolds AONB, but is located approximately 600m from the boundary located at Bathwick Fields. Natural England have previously requested “… consideration of direct and indirect effects upon this designated landscape and in particular the effect upon its purpose for designation, as well as the content of the management plan for the Cotswolds AONB”. The purpose of the Cotswolds AONB is stated as;

The overall purpose of this strategy is to provide a framework within which decisions can be made about the appropriate height of new buildings in Bath. The Site lies within ‘Zone 2 – The immediate setting of the Georgian city’. This states: •

2.4.5 COTSWOLD AREA OF OUTSTANDING NATURAL BEAUTY (AONB) AND MANAGEMENT PLAN

“Recommended Height - Building shoulder height of new development should not exceed the shoulder height of nearby buildings. The overall height should not exceed the overall height of nearby buildings. Modifiers; It may be necessary for the height to be less than the shoulder height of nearby buildings in response to heritage assets and to prevent intrusion in views”.

“The primary purpose of the AONB designation is to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the area, now and for future generations. The designation gives a formal recognition to an area’s landscape importance and allows for the development of communities and economic activity. However development is only permitted in ways that enhance the landscape character of the AONB.” (Cotswold AONB website). The Cotswold AONB Management Plan sets out policies for ‘conserving and enhancing’, understanding and enjoying’ and implementation, monitoring and evaluation’ of land generally within the AONB. However Policy LP2 states: “Development proposals and changes in land use and management, both within and outside the AONB, take account of guidance and advice published by the Board.” Such advice includes the AONB Landscape Character Assessment, the Landscape Strategy and Guidelines, and Position Statements. The latter includes a statement on ‘Development in the setting of the AONB’. This includes reference to the potential for adverse effects caused by “…blocking or interference of views out of the AONB particularly from public viewpoints; Blocking or interference of views of the AONB from public viewpoints outside the AONB; Loss of tranquillity through the introduction of lighting,..”

Valuing people, place and nature Bath and North East Somerset Council

BATH Building HeigHts strategy

a green infrastructure strategy for Bath & North East Somerset March 2013

UI No: 3596

Date: 09/2010

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

35


2.4.6 NATIONAL TRUST OWNED LAND

2.5 TRANSPORT AND ACCESSIBILITY

The National Trust own and manage open spaces to the east and south of the site. This includes Bathwick Fields, Smallcombe Valley, parts of Claverton Down and Prior Park (Registered Park and Garden). An established and popular recreational walk – The ‘Bath Skyline’ follows a circuit of around Claverton Down and Bathampton Down, including a traverse across Bathwick Fields and Smallcombe Valley.

It is apparent that the Rec is in an extremely accessible location for access by sustainable travel modes, being located in a central area of Bath, which can easily be accessed on foot or by cycle from much of the city. It is also within 600m of the city’s main railway and bus stations, an easy walking distance, with many other bus stops being located in the surrounding area, including those for the buses serving Bath’s Park and Ride sites.

The views to and from these locations are recognised as important and of value in terms of the WHS designation and public amenity, and, in terms of Prior Park specific heritage designation.

10. City Centre Extended Connectivity

36

STADIUM FOR BATH


The Paragon

ansdown Rd

2.5.1 PEDESTRIAN ACCESS There are however some challenges in ensuring that disabled access can be achieved, and a number of access points are challenging. The new stadium provides an opportunity to significantly improve this existing situation, as well as circulation to, around, and within the Rec.

W a lc

ot S t

The Rec can currently be accessed on foot from all four corners, as well as at the rear of the West Stand. There are footways present on all adjacent highways including North Parade, Argyle Street and Great Pulteney Street. Both Argyle Street and North Parade link to north western and south western access points via steps and ramps, whereas Great Pulteney Street links to the north-east access route via footways on William Street and Pulteney Mews.

Sydney Gardens

The Riverside Walk is a public right of way footpath BC54/11 Walk), which starts at Pulteney Bridge and runs along the western boundary of the site in a north-south direction, linking to footpath AQ91d (Riverside Walk), which passes under North Parade Road and continues to the south alongside Dolemeads to Widcombe. These footways are approximately 2.4m to 3.3m wide.

Henrietta Gardens (Riverside

Henrietta St

15%

3 2

ey

en

lt Pu

at

Gre

WALK TO THE STADIUM

St

4

eS

on

nst

Joh m illia

St.

te

Ga

ate

eG

rsid

Union S

ath g B um stin Stadi i x E by g Ru

s

t

ort

IT

EX

s n Bath

Bath Abbey

Sp

LY

ON

th

Sou

Roma

tre

n Ce

te

Ga

te

Ga

7

Parade Gardens

North Parade

ec

eR

Th

W

e Riv

Pulteney Rd

y ne lte & Pu idge Br eir W

The Guildhall

t

1

6

5

Stall St

9

8

The Cricket Ground

South Parade

a Station

Southgate St

de

ara ’s P es

Jam

Percentages extracted from the Transport Assessment (October 2015)

To Bath Sp

11. Existing Pedestrian Access

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

37


2.5.2 CYCLING Great Pulteney Street and Argyle Street form part of National Cycle Route (NCR) 4, as shown in Figure 12 on the facing page. This route links London to Fishguard via Bath and Bristol. The recently opened Two Tunnels route (NCR 244) joins NCR 4 at Fieldings Road footbridge. This provides a link to NCR 24 (Collier’s Way), which runs from Frome to Bath via Radstock. It is intended that this will form a continuous cycle route to Southampton and Portsmouth.

2.5.3 BUS For Bath City services, bus stops are conveniently located in High Street, Grand Parade, Great Pulteney Street, North Parade, Manvers Street and Dorchester Street. Bath Bus Station provides 16 boarding bays for some city services, plus inter-urban, country and National Express services. There are however challenges in the City related to the location and quantum of drop off and collection locations, and there may be opportunities to provide further facilities as part of the stadium proposals.

2.5.4 RAIL Bath Spa railway station is less than 10 minutes’ walk from the Rec and provides access to frequent high speed rail services between London Paddington and Bristol Temple Meads, calling at Reading, Didcot, Swindon and Chippenham, with some services extending to Weston Super Mare, Taunton and beyond (operated by Great Western Railways). Other direct services include: Cardiff to Portsmouth Harbour; Gloucester and Bristol to Weymouth; Great Malvern to Westbury, via Gloucester; and Bristol Temple Meads to London Waterloo, via Salisbury (operated by South West Trains). Occasional services include an early morning departure to Glasgow, operated by Cross Country Trains. Connecting trains from Bristol Temple Meads provide access to the Midlands, northern England, Scotland and Somerset, Devon and Cornwall. The walk from the railway station is short and, with better signage and riverside enhancement, could be kept off the main streets and pinch-point accesses.

2.5.5 VEHICULAR ACCESS AND CAR PARKING Vehicular access, particularly for larger vehicles, to the Rec is recognised as currently being poor, and this is a matter that will

38

STADIUM FOR BATH

need to be considered in detail through the application proposals. Vehicular access to the site is currently mainly from the north-east side, via William Street and Pulteney Mews. Pulteney Mews can be accessed from Great Pulteney Street, via William Street, or directly from Edwards Street. Occasional or emergency access to the ground is also possible from the south-east side, from North Parade and through the sports centre car park. A gate of sufficient width for vehicles is provided between the Sports Centre and the Rec in this area. Emergency access is also possible on the north-west corner of the site, via Spring Gardens Road and the Riverside Walk. Service vehicles can only access the north east corner of the site. Goods are unloaded in this location and distributed around the rest of the ground by trolley. The route to this area through Pulteney Mews is of limited width, making access difficult for large vehicles. Match day parking at the Rec itself is very limited, with only 130 spaces being provided for use by some staff and VIPs. These spaces are located next to the cricket pavilion on the north side of the Rec. Spectators arriving by car are therefore required to park off-site, using Park and Ride, the city’s public car parks, on-street parking, and private car parking areas to which they have access.

2.5.6 TRANSPORT FRAMEWORK In advance of the submission of a formal planning application the scope of a supporting Transport Assessment will be agreed with the Local Planning Authority. This Transport Strategy will, in accordance with policy SB2, demonstrate how the safety and convenience of access to and from the Rec will be improved, and set out, as required appropriate mitigation measures. That policy also encourages discussion with landowners to explore options for parking in this area or on adjacent sites and the proposals therefore provide an opportunity to consider whether there is the potential for car parking to be included as part of the proposals. There is also the potential to look for opportunities to positively contribute to the Council’s coach parking strategy. A Travel Plan currently exists at the Rec and this will be reviewed and updated to reflect any proposal and to set out measures to promote sustainable travel to the site and reduce car travel within the city.


8%

USE THE BUS TO THE STADIUM

4%

CYCLE TO THE STADIUM

KEY

Bath City Centre Bus Route Bus Stops Cycle Route 1 (starting from Orange Grove) Cycle Route 2 (starting from Train Station)

12. Existing Pedestrian Access

P

21%

d an S AR ES L C CU C HI CE A E I V V R SE

P P

USE THE TRAIN P TO THE STADIUM

47%

P

USE PRIVATE CARS TO THE STADIUM

P

P

P

P

P

VEHICULAR and EMERGENCY ACCESS

P

KEY Bath City Centre

P

P

Pedestrian Priority Core Vehicle Strategic Route Primary Road Secondary Road

P

Parking Space

13. Existing Vehicular Access Percentages extracted from the Transport Assessment (October 2015)

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

39


2.6 THE ROOF TYPOLOGY OF BATH Bath’s predominant Georgian architecture and its topography give rise to a characteristic roofscape. The baseline of the roof character is the linear form of the city’s Georgian terraces where typically slated roofs sit behind parapets with a rhythm of party wall upstands and chimneys, rising and falling with the gradient of the streets. Gables are rarely expressed and corners turn with the terraces or terminate with discrete hipped ends. Playing over this baseline is a melody of finials, domes and spires, enriching higher status houses, denoting civic buildings or the city’s many fine churches - marking their location and their high social status and expressing the glory of God. From most city streets roofs are barely visible but looking into the city the vantage points are often elevated and the roofscape becomes a 3 dimensional map, predominately slate grey, rarely

40

STADIUM FOR BATH

banded like contour lines but boldly stepping up and down steep streets. Uniquely the Rec has this same characteristic of being within a bowl and viewed from above but at the micro instead of the macro scale. The predominant form nonetheless has many exceptions, most notably the Abbey, its tower and pinnacles being exceptional in every sense. The empire Hotel does its own thing with a variety of eclectic styles. The unintended ending of Johnstone Street forms a rare gabled silhouette and the sports and leisure centre features the flat roof intrinsic to its modern style. Understanding the roofscape of the city and the uniqueness of the Rec within it will be a key component of the heritage appraisal of the site and its context and will help inform design solutions that knit into the city’s rich and varied composition.


2.7 ECOLOGY

2.8 TREES

The Rec is located in a largely urban area of Bath and comprises predominantly of buildings and amenity grassland, of low nature conservation value, associated with the Bath Rugby playing surface and adjacent Rec. There are also a number of mature trees adjacent to the river along the western boundary of the site.

The western section along the riverside includes 25no. trees (Sycamore, Tulip trees, Cherry, Birch). These are shown on the plan below.

The Rec lies within approximately 2.4km of the nearest SSSI component of the Bath and Bradford on Avon SAC, designated for bats (including greater horseshoe bats) and immediately adjacent to the River Avon SNCI. The river corridor through Bath provides important supporting habitat for the Bath and Bradford on Avon Bat Special Area of Conservation (SAC). The loss of bankside trees and increases in levels of artificial illumination of the River Avon corridor are identified as having potential to have a negative impact on horseshoe bats (including greater horseshoe bats). During periods of high artificial illumination, light sensitive bat species (e.g. horseshoe bats) could potentially be dissuaded from using the river corridor (with effects compounded if loss of trees adjacent to the river corridor were not mitigated). Policy SB2 of the Placemaking Plan states that “[6] Where practicable, introduce measures that enhance Green Infrastructure including the biodiversity and character of the river, and the provision of habitats for important species. It is a requirement for a biodiversity study to be commissioned to inform the development of a new stadium, and this should consider the impact of lighting, particularly in relation to bats.” The design process will need to respond to the need to avoid light spill to the river corridor and to minimise loss of bankside vegetation. The location and scale of the development provides significant opportunities to reduce existing light spill levels over and adjacent to the river, and to enhance riverside habitat and site based habitats. The structure of the stadium buildings also provide opportunities to provide integrated nest boxes for birds and bat boxes. The new development should avoid any additional light spill to the river corridor and reduce existing light levels where practicable, in accordance the Council’s lighting policy. It should provide habitat enhancements to the river corridor to increase habitat connectivity, as well as providing opportunities for birds and bats within the structure of new buildings.

An Arboricultural Report containing details of Tree Constraints Plan, an Arboricultural Impact Assessment and a Preliminary Arboricultural Method Statement will need to be submitted with the application. The report will need to assess the arboricultural, landscape and cultural (conservation) value of the trees on and adjacent to the site in accordance with the methodology set out in BS5837: 2012, in order to demonstrate to the Local Planning Authority that the trees within influence of the site have been properly considered.

2.9 ARCHAEOLOGY A number of previous archaeological studies have been undertaken at the Rec. In summary, they considered that the north-west end of the study area has the highest archaeological potential. Crossing points of the river from a number of periods (Roman ford, medieval ferry, post-medieval bridge) are all located 50 to 150m to the north, as are the remains of a medieval mill. In the 18th century Spring Gardens was established immediately to the north-west and may have extended slightly on to the study area. In the later 19th century part of a complex of industrial buildings, which included the Victoria Iron and Brass Works, was located in the north-west corner of the study area, and remains associated with either the buildings or the processes carried out there may survive. The study area as a whole is considered to have a low archaeological potential for Roman, medieval and early postmedieval remains and a moderate potential for later post-medieval remains at the north-west end. Any application will need to be supported by a full Desk-Based Assessment, undertaken in accordance with criteria set out the Institute for Archaeologists’ Standards and Guidance for Historic Environment Desk-Based Assessments (revised 2011).

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

41


2.10 FLOOD RISK / DRAINAGE In the Council’s Strategic Flood Assessment (SFRA) the application site is identified as falling within Flood Risk Zone 3a, however the Environment Agency consider that it lies within Zone 3b (functional floodplain). In summary, the main source of flood risk to the site comes from the River Avon. In events greater than the 1 in 10 year event, the defences along the west side of the Rec are overtopped, leading to flooding of the Rec. Construction activity could potentially cause temporary negative effects on water quality. Mitigation measures are proposed for incorporation in to a Construction Environmental Management Plan to prevent pollution to the water environment during construction. With the suggested mitigation, the effects on water quality in the River Avon are considered to be negligible.

42

STADIUM FOR BATH

The proposed development should be considered suitable for the level of flood risk based on the guidance within the National Planning Policy Framework. A precautionary approach should be adopted to ensure there is no need to evacuate people from the ground during a flood, with matches being postponed if flooding is likely. Matches should be postponed if flooding to the riverside walkway is expected, although before this point the pitch may already be too wet to play on. As part of the application, a Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) will be prepared in accordance with the NPPF and the accompanying Technical Guidance, and following consultation with the Environment Agency (EA). Full consideration of the likely effects of the proposed development on the water environment, in particularly the potential effects on the hydrology of the site and the surrounding area, will be set out within the FRA. A Flood Evacuation Plan will be required to be submitted with the application to deal with these eventualities.


2.11 AIR QUALITY

2.12 SOCIAL / ECONOMIC CONTEXT

An Air Quality Assessment which considers the air quality impacts of the proposed development during both construction and operation will be required.

The Club currently makes a positive social and economic contribution to the City. This includes its direct employment and expenditure and the positive impacts generated by the spend of Bath Rugby spectators in the City, and the work undertaken by the Bath Rugby Foundation. In the 2012/13 season Bath Rugby Club contributed ÂŁ26.7m of turnover (output). This equated to ÂŁ10.2m of GVA and supported 264 jobs locally.

Although the site itself is not located within an Air Quality Management Area (AQMA), a large proportion, including many of the main roads throughout the City of Bath have been declared AQMAs due to exceedances of national objectives for nitrogen dioxide (NO2). During construction and demolition, site activities will have the potential to affect local air quality in particular from dust deposition and an increase in PM10 concentrations. Mitigation measures will need to be recommended for implementation to ensure that any impact on local air quality will not be significant.

The construction of a new stadium will generate positive impacts during the construction and operational phases. A commitment to use local firms and labour, where possible, will maximise the temporary beneficial impacts at the local level. A redeveloped stadium will increase capacity and provide improved facilities, which will attract additional visitors to Bath and stimulate further expenditure. The activities of the Club and expenditure generated by staff and visitors will support additional jobs in the local economy. The redeveloped stadium is therefore expected to have a permanent beneficial impact on the local economy. The application should be accompanied by a full socio-economic impact assessment which considers the economic impacts of the new stadium, as well as health, social and community impacts.

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

43


3.0

CLUB OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVES 44

STADIUM FOR BATH


DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

45


CLUB OPERATIONAL OBJECTIVES

3.2.1 STADIUM CORE VALUES This section of the Development Brief considers the role of the stadium within the city of Bath and the core values to be retained and enhanced in future proposals. Stadium for Bath have identified a number of core values to be embraced within proposals for a new stadium, and have set out their commitment as to how these will be considered and addressed. These recognise the profile of the stadium and its unique presence in the city, and the need for any new stadium to be modern and future-proofed. It needs to consider its sensitive setting in a World Heritage City and its impact on its neighbours. The opportunity to ensure that the facility is open to the wider community and to positively address socio-economic and environmental sustainability presents a significant opportunity. A. PROFILE IN THE CITY Rugby in the heart of the city.

B. A MODERN STADIUM FOR BATH A modern stadium benefiting a premiership rugby club.

DESIGN RESPONSE Maintain and enhance Rugby in the city of Bath ensuring future legacy through quality design.

DESIGN RESPONSE Provide a world class facility to meet and exceed standards for players, spectators and the community.

46

STADIUM FOR BATH


C. CITY PRESENCE WITHIN THE STADIUM The playing surface, the terraces, the city features, the landscape beyond and the presence of the city from within the stand form one of its unique attributes.

LANDSCAPE

WALL

CH PIT DESIGN RESPONSE Respond sympathetically to sensitive context and retain its presence within the stadium. Enhance and amplify atmosphere of playing Rugby in a world heritage city.

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

47


Max Standards

NOT EXCEEDING 100M

22m IN GOAL

Stadium for Bath also wish to ensure that an area of terrace standing is retained in the new stadium, and that the east stand becomes a permanent erection. Amongst other matters, detailed consideration will particularly need to be given to any proposed lighting (internal, external and floodlighting), noise attenuation measures and PR systems, and match day technology to ensure they meet best practice.

48

STADIUM FOR BATH

5M RUN OFF

Fit an 18.000 seat stadium on R current zone leased to Bath Rug LIME KILN

Not exceeding 22m IN GOAL

e

6m RUN OFF

70M PITCH WIDTH

n Zo ce

a erf Int NOT EXCEEDING 100M

Max Standards

NOT EXCEEDING 100M

5m RUN OFF 7m IN GOAL

LEISURE CENTRE

COMMITMENT DESIGN RESPONSE Locate in west zone of Design with recommended standards however consider thestadium site’s constraints Fine tuning of position to consid and its limitations; Bath Leisure Centre and Lime Kiln.

scale of civic space to the rivers LIME KILNMULTIPLE SPORTS E. PITCH FOR Pitch surface robust enough to accommodate multiple sports in all seasons. 5m RUN OFF

70M PITCH WIDTH

6m RUN OFF

7m IN GOAL

NOT EXCEEDING 100M

Stadium for Bath require a stadium of approximately 18,000 spectators to meet their objectives. The increase in capacity will necessarily result in a stadium that is larger than is currently at the site, particularly when improved seating, inclusive design, safety and design standards are imposed. This will necessarily be the case as the new stadium would be required to obtain Secretary of State sign-off as a permanent facility, resulting in a different set of checks than the current stadium.

Size pitch to achieve recommended standards for a premiership Rugby ground.

ium

In this context, Stadium for Bath has identified a number of technical requirements which in their opinion must be met to facilitate the construction of the new stadium. These include ensuring that minimum pitch size standards are met, that the gradients of the seating allow a good spectator experience, and that the orientation and positioning of the pitch meets best practice.

LOCATION

ad St

As an overarching principle the design to be delivered needs to respond to policy requirements in order to achieve best standards. Due to the current arrangements being largely temporary, dispensations and / or fines have been levied upon the Club for many years, however a new permanent stadium will be required to meet more rigorous standards. Full details, as set out by Premiership Rugby are set out in the PGB Standards and the Green Guide, which are regularly updated to ensure best practice in stadium design and spectator experience. The stadium proposal will have due regard to these.

D. PITCH SIZE Size pitch to achieve recommended standards for a premiership Rugby PITCH SIZE ground.

Max Standards

As a modern Premiership Rugby club, the stadium design will have to address certain technical requirements set by the league and other relevant legislation.

3.2.2 STADIUM TECHNICAL REQUIREMENT

Max Standards

3.2.2 STADIUM TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS

LEISURE CENTRE

DESIGN RESPONSE Identify appropriate artificial surface to allow use of pitch year round. Consideration to be given to appropriate level for pitch with regard to flood.


F. LOCATION Work within zone of existing Stadium.

e

er Int

n Zo e fac

c

Re

d Sta

x

ium DESIGN RESPONSE Locate stadium in west zone of Rec. Fine tuning of position to consider appropriate scale of civic space to the riverside.

G. POSITION AND ORIENTATION Pitch orientation to be in range of acceptable Rugby standards.

x DESIGN RESPONSE Orientate the Stadium according to Rugby standards. A 90 degree rotation doesn't meet appropriate Rugby association standards.

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

49


H. CAPACITY Deliver a Stadium capacity of 18,000 .

18,000 14,500 + 3,500 UP LIFT TO ACHIEVE 18,000 CAPACITY STADIUM Spectator accommodation – seating

12. 4

111

Sightlines for wheelchair users

14,500 CAPACITY DESIGNED TO SAFETY AND INCLUSIVE ACCESS STANDARDS

The provision of areas located around the stadium designated for spectators in wheelchairs has implications for the sightlines of both disabled spectators and other spectators seated or standing nearby.

EXISTING 14,500 CAPACITY STAND

Wheelchair users may not be able to stand up to avoid having their view blocked. Any wheelchair seating area should be designed so that spectators in wheelchairs can still see the event when located behind standing accommodation or where people in front may stand up (see Bibliography). Moreover, some wheelchair users cannot lean forwards or sideways in their seats or turn their heads like other spectators. It is also acknowledged that at exciting moments during an event some seated spectators will stand. This can affect the quality of view of those in wheelchair spaces behind.

DESIGN RESPONSE In order to create an acceptable viewing standard for those in wheelchairs, an increased height riser, or ‘super riser’, will be necessary which may be several times the height of a Seeknormal to accommodate 18,000 capacity and upgrade stand to modern standards. stepping riser. Design to consider and toincontext. It is recommended that there shouldrespond be a minimumsympathetically elevated position, as illustrated Diagram 12.3 which allows a person in a wheelchair to see the playing surface over any people standing in the row directly or diagonally in front. Spectators in wheelchairs must have a clear view of the whole pitch at all times, especially when seated spectators directly or diagonally in front stand up. The helper seated adjacent to the wheelchair user should enjoy at least the minimum ‘C’ I. ACCESSIBLE, SAFE AND COMFORTABLE VIEWING value even when the spectators in front are standing. The provision of seats behind the wheelchair spaces is onlystadium acceptable if adequate sightlines maintained for thosesafe and Design a modern that is fullyareaccessible, seated there. provides comfortable viewing.

23. LIGHTING Deliver best technical standards in lighting while considering the residential setting to allow floodlit premiership rugby.

Diagram 12.3 Sightlines for wheelchair users

‘C’ Value

Increased height riser or ‘Super riser’

Note: Designers should consider potential problems for other spectators when viewing from the sides and at high levels

For reasons of clarity, all handrails have been omitted from the diagrams

DESIGN RESPONSE Work to all relevant and applicable codes.

50

STADIUM FOR BATH

DESIGN RESPONSE Design to provide consistent lighting level across playing surface and minimise light spill and glare.


x

DESIGN TO FOSTER INTENSE IN BOWL ATMOSPHERE

LIMIT NOISE TO NEIGHBOURS

UNCONTROLLED NOISE SPILL

J. ACOUSTICS AND NOISE IMPACT Deliver best technical standards in acoustics while considering the residential setting. Design to minimise noise spill to stadium setting and seek to provide amplified atmosphere within the stadium managing crowd noise. PA system to be evenly distributed for clarity of address, safety and low impact on wider context.

K. VEHICULAR STRATEGY Modern stadia demand a provision of multiple vehicle types on site. OUTSIDE BROADCAST

COACH DROP OFF

SERVICING

DROP OFF

L. TECHNOLOGY Design to identify and safeguard for emerging technology.

EMERGENCY

CAR PARK

P DESIGN RESPONSE Modern stadia demand a provision of multiple vehicle types on site. Design to consider the scale of provision, access and proximity to key accommodation areas. Care will be taken to ensure that vehicular routes and pedestrian flows do not cross. The vehicular movement on site will engage with the wider traffic management plan and seek to minimise disruption to immediate neighbours.

DESIGN RESPONSE Seek to provide best viewing experience through technological elements such as player stats, screens, real time data etc.

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

51


4.0

DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES AND PARAMETERS 52

STADIUM FOR BATH


DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

53


DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES AND PARAMETERS This section explains the principles and opportunities for the Stadium context, at a strategic, City and site specific level and identifies key characteristics to be considered in the design proposal.

A 21st century re-interpretation of the historic ‘pleasure garden’ of Harrison’s Walks (now Parade Gardens); • An inspirational setting for the development of a new sporting, cultural and leisure stadium that safeguards the valued assets and attributes of the World Heritage Site, including key views; • The provision of an enhanced green infrastructure throughout the area, including improvements to the important biodiversity role of the river and the riverside; • Potentially, an enhanced role as a point of access into the central area. As part of this, there are significant opportunities to transform the visual and physical connectivity of this area to its surroundings and these will be strongly encouraged provided they protect and enhance the Outstanding Universal Value of the World Heritage Site. Specific measures include: • Improving the connections from the streets and spaces of Terrace Walk, Orange Grove and Grand Parade, including the Colonnades into Parade Gardens and to the riverside; • Transforming the existing links from Pulteney Bridge and North Parade Bridge to a remodelled riverside path on the east side.” •

A number of key attributes have been identified as being needed to be demonstrated in order to ensure a successful scheme can be implemented.

4.1 SITE IDENTIFIED AS AN OPPORTUNITY AREA

4.0 DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES & PARAMETERS Policy SB2 (Central Riverside and Recreation Ground) of the

1. OPPORTUNITY Placemaking Plan identifiesSITE the Rec and the wider area as an opportunity area. It states at page 42 that,

River Avon

The Circus

Walcon St

Lansdown Rd

The Royal Crescent

The Pragon

“There are a number of interrelated projects that have enormous potential to re-energise and re-define the important role and function that this area can play as a recreational heart to the city: A place that willRoyal have the river at its centre, and will act as a forum for leisure, Victoria sport,Park recreation, wildlife, entertainment and culture. It can comprise of:

Sydney Gardens Henrietta Gardens

t

e St

Milso

Hilton Hotel

Henrietta St

Gay S

Georg

e Gr

P at

en u lt

S ey

t

m St

Queen Square Norfolk Crescent

y ne lte & Pu idge Br eir W

The Rec Pulteney Rd

The Guildhall

Union S t

Green Park Station

Mi

dla

B nd

r

e idg

Bath Abbey

Rd

Baths Roman

Parade Gardens North Parade

Corn St

Avon St

The Cricket Ground

Manvers Street

e

54

Bath College

South Parade

Southgate St

Opportunity Sites

St

Primary Shopping Area

Rd

ad ar

Important Heritage Assets

rk

P ’s me

Green Space

Pa

Ja

Existing Buildings

n

St

KEY

Gr ee

Milk St

Stall

Green Park

Innovation Centre

KEY

B

E

Bus Station

G

a Sp tion th B a y S ta a lw i Ra

I

P

27. Rec as an Opportunity Area STADIUM FOR BATH

O


37

4.2 THE BATH SETTING: RELATIONSHIP OF BUILD FORM, LANDSCAPE AND TOPOGRAPHY As detailed in section 3 of this Development Brief, a range of viewpoints 5.23 are The are listed below with The unique setting of the Rec to zones be assessed to inform the proposal. the original character area number in City, presents both challenges location, located at the lowest part of the brackets. and opportunities.

A (16) Cotswold Plateaux and Valleys Landscape Character Zone DISTINCT TOPOGRAPHY

ce B (18) Bathford and Limpley Stoke er Valley Landscape Character Zone

e

e

h pe

Fog Settled in Bath's Hollow

C (17) Hinton Charterhouse Plateau Landscape Character Zone LANSDOWN PLATEAU

E (12) Cam Brook Valley Landscape Character Zone

CLAVERTON DOWN

LYNCOMBE HILL

D (13) Peasedown St. John Ridge Landscape Character Zone F (6) Newton St. Loe Plateau Lands Landscape Character Zone G (14) River Avon Valley Landscape Character Zone AVON VALLEY

+

Camden Crescent in its Green Setting CLAVERTON DOWN

LANSDOWN PLATEAU AVON RIVER

LYNCOMBE HILL

AVON VALLEY

>

CREATE A GREEN BACKDROP TO BUILD FORM AND VIEWS OUT OF THE CITY TO THE HILLSIDES

BATH STADIUM

LANDSCAPE 28. Bath Setting DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

55


yal nt

4.3 HISTORIC VIEWS AND RIVER VIEWS A full Heritage Impact Assessment and Landscape and Visual Impact Appraisal will inform the proposals and identify any impact on historic views. The Placemaking Plan requires that the “design will respond appropriately and creatively to its sensitive context within the World Heritage Site, including the importance of open views for example from Grand Parade, Orange Grove and Terrace Walk to the hillsides beyond, and the iconic view from North Parade Bridge to Pulteney Bridge and Weir.”

Bath Abbey +25m AOD

Empire Hotel +28m AOD Parade Gardens

Johnstone Street

River Avon

The CITY CENTRE Circus

Kennet & Avon Canal

Bath Stadium

THE REC

29. HISTORIC VIEWS Stadium located within a sensitive setting where views from/to landscape should be respected. DESIGN RESPONSE Ensure heritage assets including Sham Castle and Prior Park designed to view and be viewed to minimise impact by development of the Stadium. Retain and enhance views from both sides of the river to/from the landscapeQueen and to Square key landmark buildings. PULTENEY BRIDGE

Green Park Station

56

THE ABBEY

STADIUM FOR BATH

DYNAMIC VIEWS ALONG RIVER EDGE


Sham Castle +165m AOD

VIEWS HISTORIC STLE HAM CA S O T d n FROM a

+165m AOD

+25m AOD

CLAVERTON DOWN

SHAM CASTLE PULTENEY BRIDGE

THE ABBEY DYNAMIC VIEWS

FROM TERRACE WALK DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

57


4.4 STADIUM SITE CONNECTED BACK TO THE CITY FABRIC The location of the site is such that it offers opportunities to provide an enhanced public realm along the riverside, and to provide complimentary uses to reactivate the area and linkages to the city centre.

NORFOLK CRESCENT

GREEN PARK

PARADE GARDENS

NORFOLK CRESCENT

THE REC PARADE GARDENS

*

* E AD AR OP S K T DEN LIN GAR

GREEN PARK

* *

30. A new green activated space along the river

58

STADIUM FOR BATH


Residential Residential

Retail

Mixed Use

Residential

31. Stadium site in the heart of the mixed use part of the city DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

59


OPPORTUNITY SITE

CITY CENTRE

POTENTIAL TO CREATE SYNERGIES

CITY CENTRE

A NEW RIVER ROOM

CITY CENTRE

COMPLEMENTING THE CITY CENTRE

CITY CENTRE

ENHANCE + CONNECT

32. Stadium site in the heart of the mixed use part of the city

60

STADIUM FOR BATH


RIVER CORRIDOR

EV E S NT

COMMUN IT Y

TS OR SP

*

RE SU

*

BIOD IV

LE I

SITY ER

*

*

CULT UR

SH O

UNITY MM

E

RIVE R WA LK

ING PP

CO

33. River Corridor as a Catalyst for Bath's Future

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

61


4.0 DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES & PARAMETERS 14. DEFINING THE SITE’S OUTDOOR ROOMS - MENDING THE EDGE

4.5 OUTDOOR ROOMS AND THE RIVER ROOM POLICY

EASTERN EDGE UNDEFINED

MEND RESPO

EASTERN EDGE UNDEFINED

The city of Bath has a rich legacy of open spaces defined by set piece built form. Drawing from this typology of space defining buildings, one approach could conceive of this river space as a defined “outdoor room”; a new river room for Bath. Design will seek to repair the site's Eastern edge and form a backdrop to an open space at the right scale and proportion to provide an active frontage to the river. DIAGRAM 5

CENTRAL RIVERSIDE & RECREATION GROUND KEY Key Active Frontage Landmark Pedestrian Link Potential Pedestrian Link Public Realm Improvement Site Boundary View Point

4.0 DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES & PARAMETERS Green Infrastructure

© Crown copyright. All rights reserved 100023334 (2015)

43

13. OUTDOOR ROOMS

The Circus

Queen’s Square

NEW OPEN SPACE AT A RIGHT SCALE AND PROPORTION CONNECTED TO THE EXISTING ONE

34. Outdoor Rooms in Bath

62

STADIUM FOR BATH

The Crescent

Laura Place

ACTIVE FRONTAGE - ANIMATING THE ROOM

ACT


CITY

COMMUNITY RUGBY

THE REC

THE CAULDRON

THE RIVER

River Room

Rec Room with an object in it

Cauldron in the Rec

35. Defining the site's outdoor rooms

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

63


4.0 DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES & PARAMETERS 14. DEFINING THE SITE’S OUTDOOR ROOMS - MENDING THE EDGE 4.6 DEFINING THE SITE'S OUTDOOR ROOMS MENDING THE EDGE The diagrams below illustrate the design objective to repair the eastern edge respecting the Grand Parade datum. The well defined open space, will activate the riverfront while the upper level extends city promenade. The design will seek to improve and enhance existing connections to the site as well as to Parade Gardens.

POLICY

EASTERN EDGE UNDEFINED

POLICY

MEND RESPO

DIAGRAM 5 CENTRAL RIVERSIDE & RECREATION GROUND KEY Key Active Frontage

DIAGRAM 5 Landmark CENTRAL RIVERSIDE & Pedestrian Link RECREATION GROUND Potential Pedestrian Link KEY

Public Realm Improvement Site Boundary Key Active Frontage View Point

Landmark

Green Infrastructure

Pedestrian Link

© Crown copyright. All rights reserved Potential 100023334 (2015)Pedestrian Link

43

Public Realm Improvement Site Boundary View Point Green Infrastructure © Crown copyright. All rights reserved 100023334 (2015)

43

NEW OPEN SPACE AT A RIGHT SCALE AND PROPORTION CONNECTED TO THE EXISTING 3. NEW OPEN SPACE DEFINED OF CIVIC SCALE AND PROPORTION ONE CONNECTED TO THE EXISTING ONE

64

STADIUM FOR BATH

4. ACTIVE FRONTAGE - ANIMATING THE ROOM

ACTIVE FRONTAGE - ANIMATING THE ROOM

ACT


ERS ERS PRINCIPLES & PARAMETERS

OUTDOOR ROOMS - MENDING

IDE & OUND

EXTEND THE CITY PROMENADE ENHANCE AND IMPROVE EXISTING ACCESS EXTEND THE CITY PROMENADE MEND THE EDGE 2. EXTEND THE CITY PROMENADE ENHANCE IMPROVE EXISTING ACCESS RESPONDING TO DATUM ENHANCE AND AND IMPROVE EXISTING ACCESS

MEND THE EDGE RESPONDING TO DATUM MEND EASTERN THE EDGE UNDEFINED 1. EXISTING EASTERN EDGE CURRENTLY UNDEFINED RESPONDING TO DATUM

EXTE ENH

+18m +16m +25m

+18m

+16m +25m

+18m

+25m +25m

+16m +25m

+25m

e

n Link

vement

e

eserved

OM G OM

5. ACTIVATE THE RIVERFRONT

ACTIVATE THE RIVERFRONT

ACTIVATE THE RIVERFRONT ACTIVE FRONTAGE - ANIMATING THE ROOM

6. ENHANCE THE RIVER BIODIVERSITY

ENHANCE THE RIVER BIODIVERSITY

ACTIVATE ENHANCE THE THE RIVERFRONT RIVER BIODIVERSITY

ENH

BIOD IVE RS

ITY

BIOD IVE

RS

ITY

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

6532 32


4.7 LIMITED ACCESS DUE TO LEVEL CHANGE The public realm of Bath has various examples of addressing accessibility where level change occurs. Usually access is provided through stepped or sloped treatment, underground passages or through buildings. The proposal will draw from the city context and shall seek to improve and enhance existing access points as well as explore the potential of new ones.

Typical approach to link across: • Stepped access • Sloped access • Underground passage through buildings

1

SOUTH PARADE EXAMPLE • • • •

Dead-end street Height difference Gable end walls Rivers access through ramped pedestrian path

2 1

DEAD END

RIVER PEDESTRIAN ACCESS

66

STADIUM FOR BATH


PARADE GARDENS • • • •

2

Height difference Access points through staircases on the garden’s periphery Former underground access through Bog island Colonnade treatment on the garden level

FORMER UNDERGROUND ACCESS

PARADE GARDENS - AMBITION Upgrade or enhance existing and establish new connections into and through the river room.

Policy SB2 Extracted Diagram

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

67


4.8 WIDER AND LOCAL VIEWPOINT LOCATIONS The development needs to respond appropriately to its sensitive context including the importance of retaining wider and local views. Section 2.4.1 sets out the context for the assessment of landscape considerations, and the range of views that will need to be assessed. This will inform and test the emerging proposals, recognising that change and effect will occur, whilst ensuring that appropriate mitigation is considered and implemented.

15

16 17 18

19

20

23 22 21

26 11

8 1

14

12 9

13

10

2 25

6

4 3

5

36. Wider and Local Viewpoint Locations

68

STADIUM FOR BATH

7

27


4.8 WIDER AND LOCAL VIEWPOINT LOCATIONS As part of the initial heritage assessment work, consideration has been given to the Outstanding Universal Value attributes of the World Heritage site, in order to identify which ones are considered particularly relevant to the site. These are identified in the following tables. A full Heritage Impact Assessment is currently being prepared and this will inform the emerging concept designs. DOCUMENT

HEADLINE ATTRIBUTE

SIGNIFICANCE

ATTRIBUTE

RELEVANCE

1

Outstanding Universal Value

Roman Archaeology

The archaeological remains of the Roman temple of Goddess Sulis Minerva and baths complex built around the Iron Age Sacred Spring, including the Great Bath, East baths, Circular Bath and West Baths, with the Roman Baths still capable of being used for their original function

Form & Design

none

2

Outstanding Universal Value

Roman Archaeology

Roman archaeological remains within the city wall (itself thought to be of Roman origin) beyond the temple and baths complex, demonstrating the extent of the city

Form & Design

none

3

Outstanding Universal Value

Roman Archaeology

Roman and Iron Age archaeological remains beyond the city wall including hill forts, field systems, villas and funerary monuments, demonstrating the context of the Roman city

Form & Design

none

4

Outstanding Universal Value

Roman Archaeology

The surrounding road system and street plan of the Roman city, overlain by the medieval layout and influencing the form of the Georgian city, such as London Road

Location & Setting

none

The culture and traditions associated with bathing and healing (recovered fragments, including Roman pewter, coins and inscribed curses, are artefacts and not themselves of OUV, but help demonstrate the function of the Baths and Temple Complex).

Language & other forms of intangible heritage

none

Traditions, techniques & management systems

none

COMMITMENT

KEY EXTRACTS

5

Outstanding Universal Value

Roman Archaeology

6

Outstanding Universal Value

The Hot Springs

Bath as a centre of healing, the medical research and learning associated with the ‘cure’ of the hot waters and medical establishments developed around them including almshouses and hospitals.

7

Outstanding Universal Value

The Hot Springs

The spiritual importance of the hot springs, the cultural use of the waters and the continuous flow of hot water from antiquity to present day

Spirit & feeling

none

8

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The introduction of innovative forms of town planning including squares, crescents and circus

Form & Design

indirect

innovative forms

9

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

Visual homogeneity of the city due to widespread use of local Oolitic (Bath) limestone, a limited palette of colour tones and the uniform scale and height of buildings

Form & Design

direct

visual homogeneity limited pallette of colour tones

10

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The deliberate creation of a beautiful city

Form & Design

indirect

deliberate creation beautiful

11

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

Views and vistas, within the Georgian city deliberately created by awareness of context, and beyond, including such components as Prior Park and Sham Castle, designed to view, and be viewed from, the city centre.

Form & Design

direct

views and vistas awareness of context

Retain and enhance views and vistas

12

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The positioning, orientation and layout of Georgian buildings, for example in serpentine terraces, to use slopes and contours to create dramatic forms

Form & Design

direct

positioning, orientation and layout

Respond sympathetically to Georgian buildings setting

13

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The design of the Georgian city to facilitate outdoor social interaction and activity, including walks, promenades, colonnades to afford weather protection, and pleasure gardens

Form & Design

direct

outdoor social interaction afford weather protection

Explore opportunities to activate and promote social interaction through the public realm treatment

14

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

Form & Design

none

15

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The influence of Georgian town planning in Bath on subsequent developments in the UK and beyond

Form & Design

indirect

influence of Georgian town planning

16

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The creation of wide, flat pavements to encourage promenading

Form & Design

direct

encourage promenading

Promote pedestrian promenading through the public realm treatment

17

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The harmonious and logical integration of individual Georgian developments, with residential terraces interspersed with public buildings such as Assembly Rooms and Pump Rooms, and multiple architects building to a common ethos rather than to an overall master-plan

Form & Design

direct

harmonious and logical integration common ethos

Integrate the development within the context and respect the residential development

18

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The principal historic road routes into the city, marking the arrival points for visitors who almost universally came by road

Use & Function

indirect

routes arrival points

19

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The design of the Georgian city as a theatre set, with visual surprises and open spaces linked with one another

Use & Function

direct

theatre set visual surprises linked open spaces

Public realm treatment to consider wider linkages and interconnectivity

20

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

C18th picturesque principles including the relationship of buildings to landscape, the concept of blending countryside and town, and historic parks and gardens

Location & Setting

direct

picturesque blending countryside and town

Preserve and enhance the city's setting

21

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

Transposition of Palladio’s ideas to the scale of a complete city in a British setting, and employed in a wide range of building forms including houses, public buildings, Pulteney Bridge and churches

Form & Design

indirect

Palladio scale of a complete city

22

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

Key visual landmarks within views, such as the Royal Crescent and Beckford’s Tower

Form & Design

direct

Key landmarks

23

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

The contrast between polite, controlled, formal facades and the informal rear of Georgian buildings

Form & Design

indirect

contrast formal façade informal rear

24

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

The Abbey Church as a key part of the urban form of the Georgian city

Form & Design

direct

Abbey

25

Outstanding Universal Georgian Architecture Value Attribute relevant to design strategy

The works of noted architects including the John Woods, Robert Adam, Thomas Baldwin, John Palmer, John Eveleigh and John Pinch

Form & Design

indirect

John Wood…

26

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

The design of terraced houses to appear as though they were a single country house or palace, demonstrating the social aspiration of occupiers to emulate the aristocracy

Form & Design

indirect

terraced houses to appear as a palace social aspiration

27

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

The Georgian monumental ensembles of crescents, squares, circus and terraces forming iconic, internationally recognisable structures, where the whole is greater than the sum of the individual parts.

Form & Design

direct

whole is greater than parts

The Kennet & Avon Canal, Somerset Coal Canal and associated features

Maintain the visual homogeneity by applying limited pallette of colour tones

Enhance appreciation of key landmark features and retain their presence withinh the stadium

Enhance appreciation of key landmark features and retain their presence withinh the stadium

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Attribute relevant as an overarching principle

69

Design to consider scale and proportion of parts of the development


Integrate the development within the context and respect the residential development

17

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The harmonious and logical integration of individual Georgian developments, with residential terraces interspersed with public buildings such as Assembly Rooms and Pump Rooms, and multiple architects building to a common ethos rather than to an overall master-plan

Form & Design

direct

harmonious and logical integration common ethos

18

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The principal historic road routes into the city, marking the arrival points for visitors who almost universally came by road

Use & Function

indirect

routes arrival points

19

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

The design of the Georgian city as a theatre set, with visual surprises and open spaces linked with one another

Use & Function

direct

theatre set visual surprises linked open spaces

Public realm treatment to consider wider linkages and interconnectivity

20

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Town Planning

C18th picturesque principles including the relationship of buildings to landscape, the concept of blending countryside and town, and historic parks and gardens

Location & Setting

direct

picturesque blending countryside and town

Preserve and enhance the city's setting

21

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

Transposition of Palladio’s ideas to the scale of a complete city in a British setting, and employed in a wide range of building forms including houses, public buildings, Pulteney Bridge and churches

Form & Design

indirect

Palladio scale of a complete city

22

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

Key visual landmarks within views, such as the Royal Crescent and Beckford’s Tower

Form & Design

direct

Key landmarks

23

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

The contrast between polite, controlled, formal facades and the informal rear of Georgian buildings

Form & Design

indirect

contrast formal façade informal rear

24

Outstanding Universal DOCUMENT Value

GeoHEADLINE rgian Architecture

The Abbey Church as a key part of the urSIGNIFICANCE ban form of the Georgian city

FATTRIBUTE orm & Design

direct RELEVANCE

KEYAbbey EXTRACTS

25 1

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

Georgian Architecture Roman Archaeology

The archaeological remains of the Roman temple of Goddess Sulis Minerva and baths complex built The works of noted architects including the John Woods, Robert Adam, Thomas Baldwin, John around the Iron Age Sacred Spring, including the Great Bath, East baths, Circular Bath and West Palmer, John Eveleigh and John Pinch Baths, with the Roman Baths still capable of being used for their original function

Form & Design

indirect none

John Wood…

26 2

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

Georgian Architecture Roman Archaeology

The design of terracedremains houses within to appear they thought were a single house or palace, Roman archaeological the as citythough wall (itself to be country of Roman origin) beyond the demonstrating thecomplex, social aspiration of occupiers to emulate temple and baths demonstrating the extent of thethe cityaristocracy

Form & Design

indirect none

terraced houses to appear as a palace social aspiration

27 3

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value Value

Georgian Architecture Roman Archaeology

The Georgian monumental ensembles of crescents, circus and terraces forming iconic, villas Roman and Iron Age archaeological remains beyond squares, the city wall including hill forts, field systems, internationally recognisabledemonstrating structures, where the whole is greater and funerary monuments, the context of the Romanthan citythe sum of the individual parts.

Form & Design

direct none

whole is greater than parts

Design to consider scale and proportion of parts of the development

28 4

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

Georgian Architecture Roman Archaeology

extent of Georgian redevelopment, obscuring previousby mediaeval buildings andand the The surrounding road system and street almost plan oftotally the Roman city, overlain the medieval layout widespreadthe survival leaving unique complete example of a Georgian city. influencing form of of this the fabric Georgian city,asuch as London Road

Form &&Design Location Setting

none

29 5

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

Georgian Architecture Roman Archaeology

The culture and traditions associated with bathing and healing (recovered fragments, including Roman Detached villas, largely in the suburbs of the city, showing the transformation of Bath toward a pewter, coins and inscribed curses, are artefacts and not themselves of OUV, but help demonstrate genteel retirement settlement at the end of the Georgian period. the function of the Baths and Temple Complex).

Language & other forms of Form & Design intangible heritage

none

30 6

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value Value

GeThe orgiaHot n ArSprings chitecture

Bath as a centre of healing, the medical research and learning associated with the ‘cure’ of the hot The universal use of natural building materials in the Georgian city waters and medical establishments developed around them including almshouses and hospitals.

Traditions, techniques & Materials & Substance management systems

dnone irect

universal use natural building material

Design to maintain the use of natural building materials and explore options for controlled diversity

31 7

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

Georgian Architecture The Hot Springs

The spiritual importance of the hot springs, the cultural use of the waters and the continuous flow of Widespread creation of basements and vaults to level the land below the Georgian city hot water from antiquity to present day

Materials Spirit & Substance feeling

indirect none

32 8

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

GeorgianTown Architecture Georgian Planning

The widespread use of timber vertically sliding sash windows in the Georgian city, with scale and The introduction of innovative forms of town planning including squares, crescents and circus detailing that evolved over time and often closing directly onto a stone cill

Materials Form & Substance Design

indirect

vertically sliding sash windows innovative forms detailing evolved ofver time

33 9

Outstanding Universal Outstanding Value

GeorgianTown Architecture Georgian Planning

The use of wrought of iron provide external features such as railings, lanterns, Visual homogeneity thework city to due to widespread use of local Oolitic (Bath)overthrows limestone, afor limited etc. palette of colour tones and the uniform scale and height of buildings

Materials Form & Substance Design

indirect direct

visual homogeneity wrought iron limited pallette of colour tones

10 34

Outstanding Outstanding Universal Universal Value Value

GGeorgian eorgian To wn Planning Architecture

Components of Georgian street furniture, including coal holes, basement winches, foot scrapers, lamp Tbrackets, he delibewatchman’s rate creationboxes, of a beand autifsimilar ul city items.

&D Form & esign Materials Substance

iindirect ndirect

deliberate creation street furniture beautiful

11 35

Outstanding Universal Universal Outstanding Value Value

Georgian Planning GeorgianTown Architecture

Views and vistas, within the Georgian city deliberately created by awareness of context, and beyond, including components as Priorin Park and Sham Castle, designedand to view, and be viewed from, the The high such quality of craftsmanship Georgian building construction ornamentation city centre.

& Design Form & Materials Substance

direct indirect

high quality of craftmanship views and vistas awareness of context ornamentation

Retain and enhance views and vistas

12 36

Outstanding Universal Universal Outstanding Value Value

Georgian Planning GeorgianTown Architecture

The positioning, expressed hierarchy in and bothlayout the exterior designbuildings, of Georgian buildings,inand the use terraces, spaces within, The orientation of Georgian for example serpentine to use slopes contours to create dramatic formsornamentation and decoration. and theand subsequent difference in their scale,

Form&&Function Design Use

direct direct

positioning, orientation and layout expressed heirarchy

Design to consider hierarchy sympathetically toof Respond Georgian setting buildingsspaces exterior-interior

13 37

Outstanding Outstanding Universal Universal Value Value

Georgian Planning GeorgianTown Architecture

The the Georgian city to facilitate outdoor interaction including walks, Shopdesign units, of coffee and ale houses, demonstrating thesocial evolution of the and retailactivity, industry in the Georgian promenades, colonnades to afford weather protection, and pleasure gardens period

Form&&Function Design Use

direct indirect

outdoor social interaction evolution of the retail industry afford weather protection

Explore opportunities to activate and promote social interaction through the public realm treatment

38 14

Outstanding Outstanding Universal Universal Value Value

GGeorgian eorgian ToArchitecture wn Planning

The ubiquitous use of chimneys and fireplaces within Georgian buildings reflecting the use of coal as a The Kennet & Avon Canal, Somerset Coal Canal and associated features fuel source

Use Form&&Function Design

indirect none

ubiquitous use of chimneys coal as a fuel source

15 39

Outstanding Outstanding Universal Universal Value Value

Georgian Planning GeorgianTown Architecture

Building design adaptions such as semi-circular stair walls and ramps for the use of sedan chairs, The influence of Georgian town planning in Bath on subsequent developments in the UK and beyond reflecting the adaptation of architecture to cater for the needs of a spa town.

Form&&Function Design Use

indirect indirect

adaption of architecture influence of Georgian town planning cater for the needs

16 40

Outstanding Outstanding Universal Universal Value Value

GGeorgian eorgian To wn Planning Architecture

TMany he crof eatthe ion Georgian of wide, flbuildings at pavemremain ents toin, enor coare uragcapable e promeof nabeing ding used for, their original purpose

Form&&Function Design Use

dnone irect

encourage promenading

Promote pedestrian promenading through the public realm treatment

41

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian Architecture

Traditions, techniques & management systems

none

42

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the The compact and sustainable form of the city contained within a hollow of the hills City in a Hollow in the Hills

Location & Setting

direct

compact sustainable

Care will be taken to preserve and enhance setting and views

43

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the The distinct pattern of settlements, Georgian houses and villas in the setting of the site, reflecting the City in a Hollow in the Hills layout and function of the Georgian city.

Location & Setting

indirect

distinct pattern of settlement reflecting the layout and function

44

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the Green, undeveloped hillsides within and surrounding the city City in a Hollow in the Hills

Location & Setting

direct

green undeveloped hillsides

Care will be taken to preserve and enhance setting and views

45

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the Trees, tree belts and woodlands predominantly on the skyline, lining the river and canal, and within City in a Hollow in the Hills parkland and gardens

Location & Setting

direct

tree belts lining the river within parklands and gardens

Care will be taken to preserve and enhance setting and views

46

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the Open agricultural landscape around the city edges, in particular grazing and land uses which reflect City in a Hollow in the Hills those carried out in the Georgian period

Location & Setting

indirect

landuses which reflect those carried out in the georgian period

47

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the City in a Hollow in the Hills Fingers of green countryside which stretch right into the city

Location & Setting

indirect

fingers of green stretch right into the city

48

Outstanding Universal Value

The Green Setting of the Oolitic limestone mines, quarries, outcrops and historic features including Ralph Allen’s tramway, City in a Hollow in the Hills inclines and structures used to exploit the stone from which the city was constructed.

Materials & Substance

none

49

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian architecture reflecting 18th century social ambitions

The patronage and vision of John Wood Senior, Ralph Allen and Beau Nash in leading the social, economic and physical re-birth of the city from a small provincial English town into an internationally famous resort

Traditions, techniques & management systems

indirect

patronage and vision

50

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian architecture reflecting 18th century social ambitions

Bath as a place of resort, attracting visitors from a wide geographical area, and the historical associations with the extensive list of famous and influential people who visited.

Use & Function

indirect

place of resort attracting visitors

51

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian architecture reflecting 18th century social ambitions

Custom and practices associated with ‘taking the waters’, including promenading

Use & Function

direct

promenading

52

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian architecture reflecting 18th century social ambitions

Rules and etiquette developed in the polite society, largely intangible but embodied in buildings such as the Assembly and Pump Rooms.

Language & other forms of intangible heritage

indirect

rules and etiquette

53

Outstanding Universal Value

Georgian architecture reflecting 18th century social ambitions

The reflection of mythological, folkloric and antiquarian influences on the decorative motifs, alignments and dimensions on buildings such as the Circus.

Spirit & feeling

indirect

reflection of mythological, folkloric and antiquarian influence decorative motifs

70

ATTRIBUTE

STADIUM FOR BATH

Individual internal fitting out of Georgian houses behind a uniform facade, and incomplete, truncated terraces, demonstrating the speculative nature of Georgian development finance

Enhance appreciation of key landmark features and retain their presence withinh the stadium

Enhance appreciation of key landmark features and retain their COMMITMENT presence withinh the stadium

Maintain the visual homogeneity by applying limited pallette of colour tones

Promote pedestrian promenading through the public realm treatment


4.9 UNDERSTANDING THE SITE In addition to consideration of the city-wide scale, initial assessment has been undertaken around the site itself, recognising the different opportunities and constraints that will influence the design approach, and how the stadium facades interface with the context in different ways.

D ILL

K AN BL

ED IN EF

D SE I M RO P M CO

ED Z EE U SQ

Existing Condition

D GE GA EN

ED AT TIV AC

Through this review, Stadium for Bath have identified the opportunities that each side of the stadium presents, and the requirement for each to respond to their immediate context.

E IV S ON P S RE

RE D U T E FU OF O PR

New Opportunities DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

71


4.9.1 NORTHERN EDGE The northern edge of the Rec immediately abuts the residential area of Grade I Listed Johnstone Street, with its iconic gable ends. The design will seek to respond sympathetically to gables and seek to retain their presence within the Stadium.

There is also a significant level difference between the road level of Johnstone Street and the ground to the rear of the current north stand (7 metres).

JOHNSTONE ST PITCH LEVEL The historic feature of Grade II listed President’s Lounge within the site will be retained and care will be taken to enhance the access and appreciation of it. No permissive east-west public connection exists to the rear of the current north stand. There is an opportunity to enhance the environment through this area.

TH ER EC

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ER

72

RIV

As well as requiring a sensitive design response, consideration needs to be given to protecting residential amenity in this area. There are opportunities to resolve the existing pinch point in the north west corner, which causes issues with circulation and pedestrian access.


4.9.2 WESTERN EDGE The western, riverside edge of the Rec currently comprises of the enclosed west stand and related temporary seating permitted in 2016. The existing flood mitigation bund and tree planting impacts on views across the river, as does the radial gate. Pulteney Bridge and weir are important assets to be considered in the design of the new stadium, as are the Colonades on the western riverbank`, together with the opportunities presented for significant ‘bridge to bridge’ public realm enhancements in order to re-activate this frontage. A new or enhanced pedestrian crossing point across the river could be explored in further detail.

PULTENEY BRIDGE RADIAL GATE

EXISTING FLOOD

RESTRIC TS ACCES

MITIGATION

X

S TO RIVER EDGE

TO STADIUM FACADE

DEFINED DATUM COLONNADE

PUBLIC REALM PROPORTION

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4.9.3 SOUTHERN EDGE The southern side of the Rec is constrained by the recently refurbished Leisure Centre. Although this is currently not available for development it is important that the design does not proclude future redevelopment potential. Access along and from North Parade is currently challenging, and improved access routes will be required, as well as consideration of any heritage impacts to North Parade Bridge.

NORTH PA

NORTH PA

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4.9.4 EASTERN EDGE The current eastern side of the Rec comprises of the open area of the Rec, including the Grade II listed cricket pavilion and the turnstiles. There is an opportunity to engage this area and to facilitate its further use by relevant groups and users.

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5.0

DELIVERY AND IMPLEMENTATION 76

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DELIVERY AND IMPLEMENTATION

5.1 DESIGN PROCESS

5.2 PRE-APPLICATION DISCUSSIONS

This Development Brief has been through formal public consultation, and it will therefore be given weight as a material planning consideration in the planning determination process. It will form part of the framework to which a future planning application at the site will be assessed, alongside relevant planning policy and statute.

The Council, and other stakeholders, operate a system of pre-application advice. As detailed within the ‘Exploring the Opportunity’ document, Stadium for Bath will positively engage with this process leading up to the submission of a formal planning application.

There are however a number of further steps that are to be taken before a planning application can be submitted to the Council for formal consideration. This section briefly sets out those steps and the envisaged programme for this process.

1

There will be a requirement for discussions with individual Officers and statutory consultees, including the Environment Agency, Historic England, amongst others, alongside the formal Development Team process.

PRE-DESIGN

BANES CORE STRATEGY

There will also be a requirement to agree (in principle) any plans for the development of a new stadium with Bath Recreation Limited.

BANES PLACEMAKING PLAN BATH RECREATION LIMITED STRATEGIC VISION

5.3 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

BATH RUGBY EARLY STAKEHOLDER CONSULTATION DOC 2017 – EXPLORING THE OPPORTUNITY

2

CONCEPT DESIGN

BATH RUGBY OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS/ PLAN TECHNICAL, ISSUE SPECIFIC, BASELINE STUDIES

Key milestones to the design process are the four set out meetings with BANES as described below: • Meeting 1: Public Realm Activation

DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

Meeting 2: Making it work

EIA SCOPING

Meeting 3: Language and Materiality

Meeting 4: Concept Design Pre-App

DESIGN PROCESS

3

In terms of Bath and North East Somerset Council, a formal ‘Development Team’ pre-application process exists which is specifically designed to support major and / or complex schemes. This is an extension to the Council pre-application advice service which additionally provides expert and bespoke advice to ensure an applicant is in a strong position to address all the planning considerations before submission.

DETAILED DESIGN

The Council’s approach to community engagement is set out in its Statement of Community Involvement (October 2007) . This notes that planning applications for major development in Bath and North East Somerset require wider community consultation and a greater degree of community involvement. For major development it is advisable for community involvement to be initiated at the pre-application stage. Stadium for Bath are committed to undertaking at least one pre-submission public consultation event before any application is submitted. Further community interaction through the bespoke website and other forums will continue throughout the process. Details of any pre-application public consultation undertaken should be outlined alongside the planning application in the form of a consultation statement. The pre-application consultation will be organised, managed and funded by Stadium for Bath.

DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

5.4 LIST OF CONSULTEES

ENVIRONMENTAL STATEMENT INCLUDING TECHNICAL IMPACT ASSESSMENTS

Once a formal application is submitted, the Council will consult with a range of stakeholders and members of the public, in accordance with its normal procedures and requirements. A list of those proposed consultees is enclosed at Appendix 1, although this may be subject to amendment.

OTHER SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED WITH A PLANNING APPLICATION

The application will also be advertised in the local press and site notices will be displayed on site.

PLANNING APPLICATION SUBMISSION

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http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/sites/default/files/site documents/Planning-and-Building-Control/ Planning-Policy/LDFGeneral/StatementofCommunityInvolvement-AdoptedDocument.pdf

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The application documentation will also be available on the Council’s website (http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/services/planningand-building-control/view-and-comment-planning-applications) and the Stadium for Bath website (http://stadiumforbath.com/).

5.5 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT It is acknowledged that any planning application at this site will require the submission of an Environmental Statement.

At this time it is envisaged that the Environmental Statement will likely consist of the following chapters: • • • • • • •

The Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 2017 (“the 2017 Regulations”) came into force on 16th May 2017 with respect to EIA development and applications accompanied by an Environmental Statement submitted after that date.

These Regulations supersede The Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 2011(e) (“the 2011 Regulations”) and subsequent amending instruments. The key changes to the 2017 Regulations are to screening procedures, binding scoping opinions, environmental factors, use of competent experts, consultation timeframes, coordinated procedures and content of decision notices. Further information and advice on Environmental Impact Assessments can be found in the Planning Practice Guidance which has been updated to reflect these changes.

• •

Before the submission of a formal application and the preparation of the Environmental Statement, Stadium for Bath will submit a formal Scoping Request to the Council, in accordance with the Regulations. The Council will consider the request and details provided, and e content and scope of that document, and set out the Council’s requirements in that regard. It is not for this Development Brief to set out the scope and content of individual chapters.

• •

• • • • • • • • • •

1.0 Introduction 2.0 Site and Surrounding Area 3.0 Scope, EIA Methodology and Consultation 4.0 Background and Alternatives 5.0 The Proposed Development 6.0 Legislation and Planning Policy Context 7.0 Landscape and Visual Amenity (including Arboricultural Reports) 8.0 Cultural Heritage and Archaeology (including desk top archaeology report) 9.0 Ecology and Nature Conservation (including survey work) 10.0 Hydrology, Flood Risk and Surface Water Drainage (Flood Risk Assessment (as an appendix) 11.0 Hydrogeology and Hot Springs 12.0 Traffic and Access (incorporating public rights of way issues if relevant and Travel Plan and Transport Assessment) 13.0 Socio-Economic Effects (incorporating playing pitch assessment / Sport England response; Retail Assessment; and Economic Impact Assessment). 14.0 Air Quality 15.0 Noise and Vibration 16.0 Ground Conditions, Soils and Contaminates Land 17.0 Lighting and Light Pollution 18.0 Waste 19.0 Climate Change 20.0 Impact Interactions and Cumulative Effects 21.0 Mitigation and Monitoring 22.0 Residual Impacts and Conclusions Non-Technical Summary

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5.6 PLANNING APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS AND LISTED BUILDING CONSENT (INCLUDING CONSERVATION AREA CONSENT) Any planning application at this site will need to be accompanied by a range of application documents, alongside the Environmental Statement, many of which will form appendices to the Environmental Statement, as noted above. The Council has prepared a Local List of Planning Application Requirements which will inform, the submitted document, alongside advice and requests received through the Development Team pre-application process and other stakeholders. The list below sets out what is envisaged at this time, and this will be subject to further discussion in advance of the submission of the application. • Covering letter • Application forms and notices • Drawings (including demolition plans and materials schedules) • Design and Access Statement • Planning Statement • Statement of Community Involvement • Sustainable Construction Checklist • Club Operation Statement • Club Statement regarding existing facilities • Transport Assessment and Draft Travel Plan (included as Appendix to Environmental Statement) • Flood Risk Assessment (included as Appendix to Environmental Statement) • Economic Impact Assessment • CIL Additional Information Requirement Form • Local Flood Risk Standing Advice • Tree Survey

5.7 PLANNING OBLIGATIONS AND CIL Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, as amended by Section 12 of the 1991 Planning and Compensation Act, sets out the legislative background against which planning obligations may be sought. In addition, Regulations 122 and 123 of the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Regulations 2010 and the CIL (Amendment) Regulations 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014 are additional legislative regulations. Paragraphs 203 to 205 of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) (March 2012) set out Government policy in relation to planning obligations. The BANES CIL Charging Schedule was approved on 17th February 2015 and took effect on 6th April 2015. It was published in accordance with the Community Infrastructure Levy Regulations 2010 (as amended 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014) and Part 11 of the Planning Act 2008 (as amended by Part 6 of the Localism Act 2011). The current charging schedule identifies a £zero rate for the proposed stadium use, as ‘any other development’. Alongside this, Bath and North East Somerset Council adopted the revised Planning Obligations Supplementary Planning Document on 6th April 2015. Regulation 122 and Paragraph 204 of the NPPF set out the tests that must be satisfied in order for obligations to be required in respect of development proposals. A planning obligation must be: • • •

necessary to make the development acceptable in planning terms; directly related to the development; and fairly and reasonably related in scale and kind to the development

Relevant Heads of Terms and a completed CIL liability form will be submitted with any planning application.

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APPENDIX

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APPENDIX 1 APPLICATION CONSULTEES INTERNAL BANES CONSULTEES • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Arboriculture Archaeology Building Control (Hotsprings) CCTV Team Conservation Historic Environment Ecology Economic Development Environmental Health Environmental Protection Flood Risk Management and Drainage Land Contamination Landscaping Sport and Active Leisure Parks and Open Spaces Parking Services BANES Planning Policy PROW Tourism and Leisure Transportation and Highways Urban Design Waste Services

EXTERNAL • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Environment Agency Historic England Natural England National Trust Sport England Avon and Somerset Police Avon and Somerset Fire Bath Preservation Trust Bath Heritage Watchdog FOBRA Friends of the Rec Real Friends of the Rec PERA The Canal and River Trust Abbey Residents Association Ward Councillors ICOMOS-UK River Regeneration Trust CPRE Bath Group Bristol Avon Rivers Trust (BART) Avon Wildlife Trust.

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APPENDIX 2 RELEVANT ADOPTED AND EMERGING SPDS/SPG AND GUIDANCE NOTES FOR BATH AND NORTH EAST SOMERSET COUNCIL

DOCUMENT TITLE

HYPERLINK

Archaeology in Bath and North East Somerset SPG (2004)

Archaeology in Bath and North East Somerset SPG (2004)

Archaeology in Bath SPG (2004)

Archaeology in Bath SPG (2004)

Bath City-wide Character Appraisal (31st August 2005)

Bath City-wide Character Appraisal SPD (2005)

Bath Conservation Area Commercial signage and tables and chairs on the highway Design and Conservation Guidance (2016)

Bath Conservation Area Commercial signage and tables and chairs on the highway Design and Conservation Guidance (2016)

Bath Shopfronts: Guidelines for Design and Conservation (1993)

Part 1 (6 MB) Part 2 (6.3 MB) Part 3 (4.4 MB)

City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting Supplementary Planning Document (2013)

City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting SPD (2013)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidance For Listed Buildings and Undesignated Historic Buildings (2013)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Guidance For Listed Buildings and Undesignated Historic Buildings (2013)

External Building Materials: Local Design Guide

External Building Materials: Local Design Guide

Locally Important Buildings SPD (Consultation Draft, April 2008)

Locally Important Buildings SPD (Consultation Draft, April 2008)

Planning Obligations Supplementary Planning Document (April 2015)

Planning Obligations SPD (2015)

Rural Landscapes of Bath and North East Somerset: A Landscape Character Assessment Supplementary Planning Guidance ( April 2003)

Rural Landscapes of Bath and North East Somerset: A Landscape Character Assessment SPG (2003)

Streetscape Manual (April 2005)

Streetscape Manual SPD (2005)

Sustainable Construction and Retrofitting Supplementary Planning Document (February 2013)

Sustainable Construction and Retrofitting SPD (2013)

West of England Sustainable Drainage Developer Guide (March 2015)

West of England Sustainable Drainage Developer Guide (March 2015)

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BATH AND NORTH EAST SOMERSET CORE STRATEGY POLICY CODE

POLICY TITLE

DW1

District Wide Spatial Strategy

B1

Bath Spatial Strategy

B4

The World Heritage Site and its setting

SD1

DESCRIPTION •

Promote sustainable development, which includes, inter alia, focusing new community facilities in Bath, Keynsham, and the Somer Valley; and protecting, conserving and enhancing the district’s nationally and locally important cultural and historic assets.

Includes but not limited to ‘Natural and Built Environment’, ‘Economic Development’, ‘Tourism, Culture and Sport’ and ‘Public Realm’. Part 8 of the policy supports the provision of development at the Rec.

Strong presumption against development that would result in harm to the Outstanding Universal Value of the World Heritage Site, its authenticity or integrity.

The Council will take a positive approach that reflects the presumption in favour of sustainable development contained in the NPPF, and that planning applications that accord with the policies in the Core Strategy will be approved without delay.

Sustainable design and construction is integral to new development in Bath and North East Somerset, and requires all planning applications to include evidence that the standards set out in the policy will be addressed.

Development should contribute to achieving the following minimum level of Renewable Electricity and Heat generation by 2029

Development in the district to follow a sequential approach to flood risk management, avoiding inappropriate development in areas at risk of flooding and directing development away from areas at highest risk in line with the NPPF.

Ensure Bath and North East Somerset's environmental quality is fostered both for existing and future generations, specifically in relation to high quality design, historic environment, landscape, and nature conservation.

The distinctive quality, character and diversity of the district’s environmental assets will be promoted, protected, conserved or enhanced through high quality and inclusive design.

The integrity, multi-functionality, quality and connectivity of the strategic Green Infrastructure network will be maintained, protected and enhanced.

All new developments are supported by the timely delivery of the necessary infrastructure.

Developer contributions based on the Planning Obligations SPD and its successors.

New developments must be supported by the timely delivery of the required infrastructure to provide balanced and more self-contained communities.

Presumption in favour of sustainable development

CP2 Sustainable Construction

CP3 Renewable Energy

CP5 Flood Riks Management

CP6 Environmental Quality

CP7 Green Infrastructure

CP13 Infrastructure Provision

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PLACEMAKING PLAN: DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGY AND POLICIES POLICY CODE

POLICY TITLE

DESCRIPTION Places should be designed for people – to be safe, comfortable, varied and attractive. They should offer opportunities for interaction and delight. Developments should: • •

D1

General Urban Design Principles

enrich the character and qualities of places and should contribute positively to local distinctiveness, identity and history make connections – by foot, cycle, public transport and by car – in that order work with the landscape structure and should contribute positively to the characteristics of the settlement

Buildings and spaces should: • •

be flexible and adaptable should be designed to be energy efficient (e.g. consider natural light and passive heating and cooling) Developments that reflect these general urban design principles will be supported Development proposals will be supported where they contribute positively to and do not harm local character and distinctiveness. They should: •

D2

Local Character and Distinctiveness

• • •

positively responded to the site context, in particular the local character, including uses, landmarks, layout, streets and spaces, siting, spacing, set-back, building lines, roofscapes, materials, building forms and features Improve areas of poor design urban morphology, including consideration of historic grain – routes, block and plot patterns; mix of uses, building heights, massing and scale and local vernacular Respect locally characteristic architectural styles, patterns, rhythms and themes which reflect local proportions The development should reflect materials, colours, textures, landscape and boundary treatments that are appropriate to the area

Development should: •

D3

Urban Fabric

• • • • • • •

• • D4

Streets and Spaces •

Be designed for ease of walking and cycling and provide safe and high quality routes, ideally providing new green infrastructure; Be permeable, by offering a choice of routes through a site, Deliver perimeter block layouts wherever possible; Be designed to maximise natural surveillance of the public realm Have careful consideration to the design of corner plots - two active frontages Be designed with careful consideration of “edges” avoiding blank and inactive frontages. Active internal uses required at ground level. Create positive micro-climate effects (e.g. avoid pockets of cold, areas of overheating, heat, dazzle, wind or shade Be designed in a way that does not adversely prejudice existing/future development or compromise adjoining sites. New development must respect and contribute towards a clear hierarchy of streets and spaces The impact of parking provision on connectivity needs to be resolved to avoid poor quality routes and poorly defined streets. Parking arrangements should be integrated into the street scene and large areas of surface parking should be avoided. Signage, lighting and street furniture must avoid street clutter and be respond to the local context.

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PLACEMAKING PLAN: DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGY AND POLICIES POLICY TITLE

POLICY CODE

DESCRIPTION •

D5

Building Design

• •

• • Amenity

D6

• Infill and Backland Development

D7

Lighting

D8

Building facades, reveals and entrances must be well designed, all elevations must be well articulated and an appropriate building line and/ or boundary treatment should be maintained. Good modern, innovative design is supported. Historical styles are likely to be considered appropriate where the development is re-unifying lost compositions. Buildings and spaces should be designed to provide new or improved wildlife habitats and features

Allow existing and proposed development to achieve appropriate levels of privacy, outlook and natural light Not cause significant harm to the amenities of existing or proposed occupiers of, or visitors to, residential or other sensitive premises by reason of loss of light, increased noise, smell, overlooking, traffic or other disturbance Ensure communal refuse and recycling provision is appropriately designed, located and sized. Development has regard to the character and quality of the surrounding townscape Careful consideration to both the primary and the return frontage in relation to height scale, massing and design and relates well to the treatment of corner plots within the local context

Proposals for artificial lighting will only be permitted where • They would not give rise to an unacceptable level of illumination into the sky, open countryside, urban areas or villages • Can be demonstrated that additional lighting on site will have no detrimental impact on visual and residential amenity, the historic environment or local ecology; • Adverse impact of lighting proposals in all new development, including light spill and energy use, is minimised through design or technological solutions (including the use of SMART lighting techniques) or by controlling the hours of use

Advertisements and Outdoor Street Furniture

D9

The number of signs should be kept to a minimum, with only one advertisement on each principle frontage. • Hoardings, panels and posters will be granted where they are located within a commercial, industrial or mixed use area or within the open countryside (the later will be restricted to a short-term, specified time period) • The following criteria will be used to determine the suitability of advertising signage: Local Street Character / Location/Position Proportionate Size/ Position • Colour / Materials / Lettering/ Illumination/ Fixings •

D10

88

Public Realm

STADIUM FOR BATH

Designed to enhance the public realm and should contribute towards achieving public realm infrastructure improvements, in line with the Planning Obligations SPD, and successor documents. Development schemes must comply with the adopted public realm design codes


PLACEMAKING PLAN: DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGY AND POLICIES POLICY CODE

POLICY TITLE

DESCRIPTION •

NE2

Conserving and Enhancing the Landscape and Landscape Character

• NE3

Sites, Species and Habitats

• NE4

Ecosystem Services •

PCS1

Pollution and Nuisance

PCS2

Noise and Vibration

PCS3

Air Quality

PCS7

Water Source Protection Zones

PCS7A

• •

Development will be permitted where ecosystem services are protected and enhanced in order that their benefits and function are optimised with a particular focus on supporting, provisioning, regulatory and cultural services. Ecosystem measures proposed should be described in the Design and Access Statement and can be included within Green Infrastructure provision. no unacceptable risk from existing or potential sources of pollution or nuisance on the development, no unacceptable risks of pollution to other existing or proposed land uses arising from the proposal Development will only be permitted where it does not cause unacceptable increases in levels of noise and/or vibration that would have a significant adverse effect on health and quality of life, the natural or built environment or general amenity unless this can be minimised or mitigated to an acceptable level.

Where an air quality assessment is necessary to support an application, it should be proportionate to the nature and scale of development proposed and the level of concern about air quality.

Development proposals that would adversely affect the quality or quantity of water resources by means of pollution and/or derogation of the resource will not be permitted.

Developments which may result in increased nutrient load to sensitive watercourses should incorporate adequate mitigation measures in compliance with the requirements of the EU Water Framework and Habitats Directives. New developments will be expected to connect to the public sewer system and new sewers and associated infrastructure will be constructed to a standard adoptable by Wessex Water.

Foul Sewage Infrastructure

Bath Hot Springs

Development that would adversely affect, directly or indirectly, internationally or nationally protected species and/or their habitats will not be permitted. Development that would adversely affect, directly or indirectly, Internationally Important Sites will not be permitted except in exceptional circumstances

PCS8

Proposals with potential impact the landscape/townscape character of an area or views should be accompanied by a Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment undertaken by a qualified practitioner to inform the design and location of new development. Demonstrate that the whole scheme, including hard landscape and planting proposals, will contribute positively to the local area including reference to relevant existing landscape assessments supplemented by any additional assessments Conserves or enhances important views particularly those to significant landmarks and features and take opportunities to create new local views and vistas.

Development that has any adverse impact on the quality or yield of the Bath Hot Springs will not be permitted.

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PLACEMAKING PLAN: DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGY AND POLICIES POLICY CODE

LCR1

LCR2

LCR5

POLICY TITLE Safeguarding Local Community Facilities New or Replacement Community Facilities

New and Replacement Sports and Recreational Facilities

LCR7A

Telecommunications Development

ST7

Development involving the loss of land and/or building(s) valued as a community facility will only be permitted provided: Inter alia, alternative facilities of equivalent local community value will be provided in the locality

Development of new or replacement community facilities will be permitted provided the proposal is within or well related to the settlement

Development involving the loss of open space (amenity green space, parks and recreation grounds, outdoor sports space, outdoor sports space, play space for children and youth, accessible natural green space), land and buildings of value for sports and recreation as shown on the Policies Map, will only be permitted provided it can be demonstrated; inter alia, suitable replacement facilities of at least equivalent quality, quantity and community value are provided in locations accessible by sustainable transport modes.

Safeguarding Existing Sport and Recreational Facilities

LCR6

ST1

DESCRIPTION

Promoting Sustainable Travel

Transport Requirements for Managing Development

New or replacement sport and recreational facilities, or improvements and extensions to existing facilities, will be permitted within or adjoining a town or settlement, provided • complements the existing pattern of recreational facilities • is accessible by sustainable transport modes •

the siting and appearance of the proposed apparatus and associated structures minimises impact on the visual amenity, character or appearance of surrounding area

reduce the growth and the overall level of traffic and congestion by measures which encourage movement by public transport, bicycle and on foot, including traffic management and assisting the integration of all forms of transport give priority to pedestrian and cycle movements, and have access to high quality public transport facilities

Development will be permitted providing the following provisions are met, including but not limited to: • Highway safety is not prejudiced • Suitable vehicular access • No introduction of traffic of excessive volume, size or weight onto an unsuitable road system

PLACEMAKING PLAN: DISTRICT-WIDE STRATEGY AND POLICIES POLICY CODE

BD1

SB2

90

POLICY TITLE Bath Design Policy

Central Riverside and Recreation Ground

STADIUM FOR BATH

DESCRIPTION Ensures the design of new development within the city responds appropriately or sensitively to its context. It helps to ensure the delivery of high quality contextual development that can sustain, complement and enhance Bath’s historic environment, its townscape, landscape, assets and setting The design will respond appropriately and creatively to its sensitive context within the World Heritage Site, including the importance of open views for example from Grand Parade, Orange Grove and Terrace Walk to the hillsides beyond, and the iconic view from North Parade Bridge to Pulteney Bridge and Weir. • Development proposals will enhance and intensify the leisure offer with more variety and year round use. • Introduce measures that enhance Green Infrastructure including the biodiversity and character of the river, and the provision of habitats for important species. • Ensure no net loss of floodplain storage • Undertake a detailed historic environment assessment • Explore options for parking in this area or on adjacent sites.


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Stadium for Bath Draft Development Brief  

Bath and North East Somerset Council's adopted planning policy, within both the Core Strategy (July 2014) and the Placemaking Plan (July 201...

Stadium for Bath Draft Development Brief  

Bath and North East Somerset Council's adopted planning policy, within both the Core Strategy (July 2014) and the Placemaking Plan (July 201...