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E X P LO R I N G TH E O PP O RTU N IT Y


FOREWORD Bath is an exc eptional cit y. St e e p e d in h ist o r y a n d g lo b a lly renowned for its g ran d a r ch it e ct u r e, t h e cit y is a u n iq u e plac e to liv e, with a r ich a n d v ib r a n t cu lt u r a l o ffe r in g , a thriv ing and entr e p r e n e u r ia l b u sin e ss co m m u n it y, a proud sporting he r it a g e, a n d o u t st a n d in g e d u ca t io n and rese a r ch e st a b lish m e n t s.

We are immensely proud of the role we play in the local community, that we are able to play our rugby in the heart of the city, and to be part of the cultural fabric of Bath. We believe there is an opportunity to create something exceptional in the heart of Bath, something which reflects the ambition and rich heritage of this unique city, and which is a source of pride and inspiration for everyone. At the core of this opportunity is the development of a new stadium at the Recreation Ground, and a new home for Bath Rugby. However, we believe that development also offers the chance for a much broader contribution to the city which extends beyond rugby and respects everything that is so special about Bath.

In order to maximise the opportunity for the city we must collaborate. Our approach is inclusive engagement not just with statutory, technical and planning stakeholders, but also with local residents and the wider community in Bath. The challenge is to use the development of a new stadium as a catalyst for creating a destination which revitalises the riverside, which benefits and enhances the community, which encourages sporting participation, which co-habits respectfully with near neighbours and which complements the city and its architecture. We embrace this challenge. We are guided by a sense of great opportunity and we invite everyone in the city to engage in this process and help create something exceptional in the heart of Bath.

Tarquin McDonald CEO Bath Rugby


CONTENTS

PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT 2 DESIGN JOURNEY SUMMARY 3 PROJECT GROUP 4 P R O J E C T S TAT U S 6 ENGAGEMENT 7 S E C T I O N 1 T H E C I T Y O F B AT H A N D I T S H E R I TA G E A C I T Y O F C U LT U R E , R E C R E AT I O N A N D S P O R T A PL ACE TO LEARN AND A PL ACE TO DO BUSINESS A W O R L D H E R I TA G E C I T Y B AT H C O N S E R VAT I O N A R E A T H E R E C R E AT I O N G R O U N D A N D I T S C O N T E X T

8 13 17 18 21 22

SECTION 2 LISTENING 1. DESIGN 2. ENVIRONMENT 3. TRANSPORT AND ACCESS 4 . M ATC H D AY E X P E R I E N C E 5 . C O M M U N I T Y , S P O R T I N G P A R T I C I P A T I O N A N D W E L L- B E I N G 6. ECO N O M IC I M PAC T 7. A C C E S S I B I L I T Y

26 30 37 40 42 44 46 47

SECTION 3 THE OPPORTUNITY DESIGN PHILOSOPHY H E R I TA G E P H I LO S O P H Y THE DESIGN JOURNEY A M B I T I O N S O F S TA D I U M F O R B AT H P R O J E C T G R O U P S TA D I U M D E S I G N S TA N D A R D S A N D C O N S I D E R AT I O N S LEAD ARCHITECT APPOINTMENT

48 52 54 58 64 68 70

SECTION 4 APPENDIX

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STADIU M FO R B AT H CONT E NTS

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PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT In advanc e of a formal D ev e lo p m e n t B r ie f, t h is d o cu m e n t se r v e s a s a n of f i cial rec ord of the key co n sid e r a t io n s e x p r e sse d b y a wid e r a n g e of s t a kehold ers ac ross the cit y, wh ich will b e co n sid e r e d in t h e d e sig n pr oce s s. I t is the primary d ocu m e n t t h a t will b e u se d t o b o t h a p p o in t a n d inform the lead a r ch it e ct a n d wid e r d e sig n t e a m .

The next stage of the project will be the appointment of a lead architect and wider design team to commence work on new proposals for redevelopment at The Recreation Ground (the Rec). This document comprises the following sections:

OVERVIEW

THE OPPORTUNITY

Introduces the project and provides background to Stadium for Bath, articulates the purpose of the document, and sets out the broad array of stakeholders already consulted regarding the project and whose feedback informs this document.

Provides further context to the project, articulates the intended design philosophy together with specific information regarding the heritage philosophy, sets out the key milestones for the design journey, and conveys the ambitions of Bath Rugby, Bath Rugby Foundation and Arena 1865 for the project. The opportunity also summarises key criteria for the appointment of the lead architect, drawing on feedback from the pre-design workshops, and provides more information regarding the Stadium for Bath project group.

CONTEXT Considers the City of Bath and its heritage summarising the history and heritage of the City along with its architecture, together with the broader cultural context of the city which also informs the design process.

APPENDICES LISTENING Sets out the key themes arising from the pre-design workshops and summarises the feedback from various stakeholders who attended those workshops. It also provides comments on areas of consideration for the project which may not have been raised during the workshops, but which will need to be considered as part of the formal design process.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH P UR P O S E O F T HIS D OCU MENT

Includes detailed feedback from the pre-design listening consultations.


DESIGN JOURNEY SUMMARY The d ev elopment o f a n e w sp o r t in g , cu lt u r a l a n d le isu r e stad ium at the Rec is su p p o r t e d b y lo ca l d e v e lo p m e n t p o licy, in b oth the ad opted C o r e St r a t e g y a n d P la ce m a k in g P la n . Below is a summa r y o f t h e ke y d e sig n st a g e s a n d co r e d oc uments that will b e p r o d u ce d a s p a r t o f t h e co lla b o r a t iv e d e sig n p r o ce ss.

T h e n e xt p h as e w i l l s e e t h e p r o du c t i o n o f a De v e l o p m ent Bri ef, i n l i ai s o n w i t h t h e ke y s t akehol ders an d B A N ES , t o p r o v i de t h e detai l ed fr am e w o r k fo r t h e e m e r gi n g desi gn fo r t h e n e w s t adi u m . F o l l o wi ng t h i s an d aft e r e xt e n s i v e p ubl i c c o n s u l t at i o n , t h e de s i gn t e am wi l l s u bm i t t h e p l an n i n g ap p l i c a ti on fo r t h e fi n al de s i gn . T h e p l anni ng ap p l i c at i o n w i l l be ac c o m p ani ed by a range of technical documents, including an Environmental Statement.

PRE-DESIGN

A Desi gn and Access Statem ent wi l l be subm i tted whi ch ex pl ai ns how the proposal s com pl y wi th and respond to the Devel opm ent Bri ef, pl anni ng pol i cy and com m ents recei ved throughout the process.

CONCEPT DESIGN

E XPLORING THE DE VELOPMENT BRIEF OPPORTUNITY

D E TA I L E D D E S I G N

DESIGN AND ACCESS S TAT E M E N T A N D OTHER PL ANNING DOCUMENTS PLANNING A P P L I C AT I O N SUBMISSION

STADIU M FO R B AT H DE SI G N JOURN E Y SU M M A RY

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PROJECT GROUP The St adi um fo r Bat h p r o je ct g r o u p co m p r ise s t h e t h r e e found ing memb ers who will d e liv e r t h e p r o je ct : B a t h Ru g b y, Bath Rug b y Fo u n d a t io n a n d A r e n a 1 8 6 5.

B AT H R U G B Y The Club has an unrivalled heritage of success, innovation and flair and has been part of the city’s DNA for over 150 years. Formed in 1865, the Club was unlike other teams, which were selected based on educational or vocational credentials. Bath comprised players from all walks of life including labourers, builders and miners. Bath Rugby was the first rugby club to develop bespoke player fitness programmes (1901), the first club to appoint a female president (Molly Gerrard, 1971) and was the first club to arrange kit and match sponsorship deals (1977). During the 1980s and 1990s, under the guidance of the Head Coach, Jack Rowell, the Club pioneered the development of a high performance culture, many elements of which have now become standard in sport. During this period the Club won six domestic league titles, 10 domestic cup titles (including four doubles), and was the first English Club to win the European Cup in 1998.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH P R OJEC T G R O U P

Since 1894 the Club has played at the Rec, in the heart of Bath, becoming part of the city’s vibrant cultural lifeblood. In 2010 the Club moved its training and administrative operations to a purpose-built, state of the art facility at Farleigh House, some eight miles south east of Bath. This Grade II listed estate demonstrates the level of ambition at the Club and provides evidence of its ability to provide worldclass, cutting edge training and corporate facilities in an exceptional heritage environment. The focus for the Club is now at the Rec and the delivery of an exceptional stadium, which provides world-class facilities, riverside regeneration, enhanced sporting participation and wider community benefits for the City of Bath.


B AT H R U G B Y F O U N D AT I O N Bath Rugby Foundation is the charitable arm of Bath Rugby set up to empower vulnerable children and young people in Bath and the surrounding areas to succeed. The Foundation uses the values of rugby and professional sport to inspire young people and help them achieve a brighter future. 1 in 5 young people in Bath are living in poverty. The city has some of the country’s most deprived areas located side by side with some of the country’s most affluent areas. Statistics show that young people, born in these deprived areas, receive a poorer standard of education and can expect to live a staggering 9.3 years less than a child born just one mile away in a more affluent neighbourhood.

Bath Rugby Foundation works to support these young people in their everyday environments, focusing on the four key areas of need which fundamentally underpin social success: Health, Education, Employability and Inclusion. The Foundation delivers £0.5m of highimpact social programmes in and around Bath annually. The new stadium will serve as a hub for investment in the community by the Foundation and it is intended that redevelopment will enable Bath Rugby Foundation to quadruple its impact in and around Bath. Bath Rugby Foundation will be focused on delivering a long-lasting community-focused legacy as part of the redevelopment project. *Statistics correct at date of publish. Source: Bath Rugby Foundation

ARENA 1865 Arena 1865 was established to deliver Bath Rugby’s elite training facility and headquarters at Farleigh House. Its primary focus is now the delivery of a new stadium at the Rec, fulfilling the vision to create something exceptional in the heart of Bath: a world-class home for Bath Rugby and the creation of wider sporting, cultural and community benefits for the city.

Arena 1865 employs an excellent core staff team, supplemented with industry leading consultants in areas such as architecture and engineering, to provide an exceptional project team for the delivery of Stadium for Bath. Arena 1865 has a successful track record of working closely with Bath Rugby, Bath Rugby Foundation, BANES, Historic England and other key stakeholders in Bath.

STADIU M FO R B AT H PROJE CT G RO UP

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P R O J E C T S TAT U S A new stad ium at the Re c is su p p o r t e d b y lo ca l p la n n in g polic y within the Core St r a t e g y (a d o p t e d Ju ly 201 4 ) a n d t h e Plac emakin g P la n (a d o p t e d Ju ly 201 7).

In the past there have been a number of different proposals for permanent redevelopment at the Rec. The most recent of these was a draft scheme designed by Wilkinson Eyre in 2013/14. The context for redevelopment has since changed. The site is owned and operated by Bath Recreation Ground Trust which leases land to a number of tenants, notably Bath Rugby and BANES in relation to the Leisure Centre. In December 2016 it was clarified by a ruling of the FirstTier Charity Tribunal that Bath Recreation Ground Trust has the ability to lease additional land for the redevelopment of the stadium. Stadium for Bath is a new beginning and will bring forward new proposals for the redevelopment of the Rec. Whilst the approach is a fresh start, Stadium for Bath will benefit from the experience of previous proposals, from lessons learned regarding the site, and from established relationships with key statutory and non-statutory stakeholders including local residents. The fresh start will enable Stadium for Bath to adopt its approach of inclusive engagement throughout the project, commencing ahead of the formal design process, whilst also maximising the opportunities for the city and the community in terms of creating something exceptional in the heart of Bath.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH P R OJEC T STAT US

The Stadium for Bath internal project team, drawn from senior management at Bath Rugby, Bath Rugby Foundation and Arena 1865, commenced work early in 2017. Over the course of spring 2017, a series of independently facilitated pre-design listening workshops were held. The workshop groups comprised representatives of the city and wider community in Bath: local residents (including those who may not support the Club or the principle of redevelopment); local ward councillors; supporters of Bath Rugby including those with specific accessibility needs; statutory stakeholders; technical planning stakeholders. In advance of each workshop, attendees were invited to consider the unique challenges and character of the stadium location including the proximity of and interaction with near neighbours, the potential opportunities provided by redevelopment of the site including wider sporting, community and city benefits, and specific stadium considerations. The themes for the workshops were set by the attendees of each session to ensure that discussion focused on their primary areas of importance. The output from these workshops informs this document, with the detailed workshop outputs included as an appendix.


ENGAGEMENT T hi s d oc ument has b een pr e p a r e d in co n su lt a t io n wit h a b r o a d a r r a y o f s t a kehold ers, inc lud ing loca l r e sid e n t s a n d o t h e r cit y r e p r e se n t a t iv e s. We would like to thank ev e r y o n e wh o h a s g iv e n t im e t o e n g a g e d u r in g t he pre-d esig n phase and w e lo o k fo r wa r d t o co n t in u e d co n su lt a t io n a s t he formal d esig n proc ess b e g in s. B e lo w a r e so m e o f t h e g r o u p s t h a t hav e e n g a g e d wit h u s so fa r.

B AT H C R O Q U E T CLUB

B AT H R U G B Y MINIS

C YC L E B AT H

B AT H C I T Y FORUM

THE ABBEY RESIDENTS A S S O C I AT I O N ( TA R A )

STADIU M FO R B AT H E N GAG E M E NT

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SECTION 1 T H E C I T Y O F B AT H A N D I T S H E R I TA G E 8

STA D IUM F O R B ATH THE C ITY O F B ATH A ND ITS H ER ITAGE


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T H E C I T Y O F B AT H A N D I T S H E R I TA G E Bath is an exc eptional cit y a n d it is im p o r t a n t t h a t t h e le a d arc hitec t and wid er d e sig n t e a m r e co g n ise t h e h ist o r ic, arc hitec tural and c ul t u r a l co n t e xt o f t h e cit y t h r o u g h o u t the d e sig n p r o ce ss.

Bath lies on the River Avon on the edge of North East Somerset, twelve miles south-east of Bristol. Bath has been described as the ‘most nobly placed and best-built city in all England’. From its legendary creation by Prince Bladud in 860 BC, through the Roman era, the unrest of the medieval period, its Georgian revival though to the modern day it has been a city of highs and lows. The lows have seen decline, poverty and disease. In contrast the highs have been significant times of prosperity, growth and large scale construction, delivering a rich culture of recreation, sport and enjoyment.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH THE C ITY O F B ATH A ND ITS H ER ITAGE

The highs have seen Bath become a focus for health and relaxation, initially with the Roman Baths, then via the healing properties of the spa water, and now as a beautiful city to visit, attracting tourists from around the world, thriving on its unique cultural heritage and its beautiful buildings and public spaces. The city is steeped in ancient history and legend, from Sulis, whose sacred hot springs gave Bath its global fame; to Minerva, the Roman Goddess of Wisdom, whose sacred pool and legend brought pilgrims from across the globe.


Travelling forward through time the main feature of Tudor Bath is the impressive Bath Abbey – often heralded as one of the finest examples of Perpendicular Architecture to be found in the country. The site of the Abbey originally dates back to Anglo-Saxon times and subsequently the Norman period. An extensive building programme in the early 16th Century was interrupted by the dissolution of the monasteries in 1539, whereafter the Abbey lay in ruins for approximately 70 years. In 1616, it was repaired and used as a church once more. The ornate Abbey we see today however was completed over two hundred years later, by local architect George Manners, who added new pinnacles and flying buttresses to the exterior. The Victorian Gothic vision was realised much later in 1874 by Sir George Gilbert Scott who completely transformed the inside of the Abbey to conform with his vision of the future.

Stepping further forward to the Bath we all know today and it is the building work undertaken by architects and patrons such as the two John Woods, Ralph Allen, Thomas Baldwin, John Pinch and Richard Nash that predominates. The Circus, Royal Crescent and Pulteney Bridge are a few of the must-see landmarks across the city. In 1987 the city was inscribed as a World Heritage Site in recognition of its unique heritage and to protect its natural and cultural landscape; further information regarding Bath’s status as a World Heritage City is on page 18.

STADIU M FO R B AT H T HE CI T Y OF BAT H AN D I TS HE RITAG E

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH A C ITY O F C ULTU R E, R ECR EATION A ND SPORT


A C I T Y O F C U LT U R E , R E C R E AT I O N A N D S P O R T Bath is a unique p la ce t o liv e wit h a r ich a n d v ib r a n t c ultural offering , ext e n siv e r e cr e a t io n a l o p p o r t u n it ie s, and an exc ellent sp o r t in g p e d ig r e e u n d e r p in n e d b y a pr o u d sp o r t in g h e r it a g e.

A C I T Y O F C U LT U R E From the highly-regarded literature, film, music and art festivals that take place annually to its theatres, art galleries and renowned museums, Bath is a city at the forefront of culture. A year round calendar of festivals has evolved in Bath which includes programmes for literature, children’s literature, music, film and folk. The festivals include events which involve renowned writers and artists, attracting ever-increasing audiences from further afield both nationally and internationally, and have become entwined in the character of the city. Bath is well served by the Theatre Royal which boasts the Main House, the Ustinov Studio and the Egg which provide a mix of more established productions which have been or are heading to performances in London, new and exciting plays often written or produced by young and emerging new talent, and productions aimed specifically at children and young adults.

This broad offering is complemented by the range of artistic productions at the Mission Theatre which is owned by BANES and leased to a local arts company which operates the site as a theatre, arts centre and multi-purpose facility for community activities and performances. The city also boasts a broad range of museums and curated historical sites, together with a number of art galleries, which play a significant role in attracting visitors from around the world. These sites are of course located within the World Heritage Site of the city alongside the Roman remains, Georgian architecture and Neo-Classical buildings which provide a unique setting.

STADIU M FO R B AT H A CI T Y OF CULT URE , RE CRE AT I ON AN D S P O RT

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The Roman Baths and the Bath Abbey sit adjacent to each other in the heart of the city, surrounded by history and legend. The Baths particularly are thought to be some of the most important and complete remains left from the Roman Empire (north of the Alps), and provide by far the most visited museum site in the city. These historical sites are complemented by the opportunity to enjoy the use of some of the Neo-classical buildings, such as dining at the restaurant in the Pump Room by the Roman Baths, or visiting the Fashion Museum or evening events located at the Assembly Rooms. The range of offerings includes regular exhibitions and events at the city’s museums and galleries, which extend beyond the most famous sites and which serve to enrich the cultural offering. These events have often included works by renowned artists such as the exhibition of Grayson Perry tapestries at the Victoria Art Gallery in Bath.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH A C ITY O F C ULTU R E, R ECR EATION A ND SPORT

A C I T Y O F R E C R E AT I O N Bath is undoubtedly a city of recreation, a theme that runs through its Roman and Georgian history and continues in the city today. The world-renowned Thermae Bath Spa – which re-opened in 2006 with a significant new spa building designed by Grimshaw Architects – provides Britain’s only naturally heated, mineral-rich water spa in the centre of the city attracting over a quarter of a million visitors per annum. The city also features a number of excellent parks including Sydney Gardens, Parade Gardens, Henrietta Park and most notably Royal Victoria Park which includes formal and informal gardens, botanical gardens, extensive children’s play areas, tennis courts, bowling greens, mini-golf and cafés. The centre of the city is a place to enjoy in itself, and visitors can meander through the city via the numerous small interconnecting passageways and cobbled streets or stroll along the large main thoroughfares, enjoying the stunning visual impact of architectural set pieces as they approach the likes of the Abbey, Queen Square and the Baths.


Throughout the city centre, visitors are treated to an extensive retail experience, a broad array of dining options, a strong café culture, and an array of pubs and cocktail bars to enjoy after the sun has gone down. Bath has become a retail destination, in stark contrast to the modern and often soulless shopping centres which have been developed in and outside town centres over recent decades, the city is itself the destination and provides a wide range of designer and boutique outlets, high street chain retailers, and an array of independent retailers. This is complemented by the annual Christmas Market which provides over 200 ‘chalets’ selling a broad range of products sourced primarily from Bath and the South West. The city’s food scene provides everything from independent fine dining establishments to street food, gastro pubs, delis and diners. There is also a strong café and bar culture with an eclectic mix of cafés, traditional coffee-houses, cosy pubs and cocktail bars, some with beautiful terraces and gardens to enjoy whilst others are hidden in the vaults under the city.

A CITY OF SPORT Sport is a significant part of the city’s identity. The city boasts the second oldest professional rugby club after Sale, a semiprofessional football team, a racecourse, and a university that provides some of the best sporting facilities in the UK which are home to a number of world-class Olympic athletes. In addition, the University also hosts Team Bath, whose netball team boast more Superleague title wins (06, 07, 09, 10 and 13) than any other Club in the UK. Bath is also home to significant annual massparticipation events including Bike Bath and the Bath Half Marathon. Bath is of course home to Bath Rugby which plays Premiership and European Cup rugby in the heart of the city at the Rec. The Club is the primary elite sporting team in the area, with the nearest top flight rugby otherwise being played in Bristol (currently playing in the Championship) and Gloucester, and the nearest top flight football teams being located in Southampton and Swansea.

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Bath City FC have played at Twerton Park since 1932. The ground is located about a mile and a half from the city centre, providing facilities with a capacity of around 9,000 primarily in terraces. The team play in the National League South (sixth tier of professional football in England) and were positioned 9th out of 22 teams in the 2016/17 season. In 1811, a local family named the Blathwayts held the first major meet at Bath Racecourse. During this period, the racecourse usually only held one, two-day meet a year. Today, this has increased to 23 meets and the biggest race is named the Somersetshire Stakes. On Good Friday 2017, its richest-ever racing card was staged, with £175,000 of prize money available. The racecourse is located on Lansdown Hill on the north east outskirts of Bath and has recently undergone a transformation with the development of the new three tier Langridge Stand, enabling the racecourse to expand its conferencing and events business alongside the core racecourse activities.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH A C ITY O F C ULTU R E, R ECR EATION A ND SPORT

The University of Bath has enjoyed a strong sports pedigree ever since it gained its Royal Charter status in 1966. It boasts an alumni of sports men and women who have achieved success at the highest level both nationally and internationally. In 1968 the university’s first Olympian, David Hembrow, represented Great Britain in swimming at the Mexico City games. The success has continued and numerous Olympic medal winners have been associated with the university including Amy Williams (Skeleton), Colin Jackson and Jason Gardner (athletics), Stephanie Cook (Modern Pentathlon), Sasha Kindred and Matt Walker (Paralympic Swimming), Kate Howey (Judo) and Siobhan-Marie O’Connor (Swimming). Bath was the first UK university to offer sporting scholarships to sporting students in 1976, and was recently named as the UK’s top sports university (The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018). The university’s Sports Training Village is a world-renowned centre for performance sport, with state-of-the-art sport and fitness facilities, world class coaches and sectorleading sport scientists and physiotherapists. Over 250 international level athletes and more than 20 regional or national sport squads have based themselves at this unique training environment.


A P L ACE TO LE A R N A N D A P L ACE TO DO BUS I N ESS As well as b eing a u n iq u e p la ce t o liv e, B a t h p o sse sse s a thriv ing and entre p r e n e u r ia l b u sin e ss co m m u n it y, a n d outstand ing ed uca t io n a n d r e se a r ch e st a b lish m e n t s.

The city has a significant hospitality, leisure and entertainment economy servicing the tourist and student markets as well as more local resident populations. The sector has enjoyed a number of successes with locally based entrepreneurial businesses establishing themselves in the market alongside more nationally recognised business names. Increasingly Bath is developing its status as a place for high tech, digital and creative businesses. The city forms a key part of the ‘Bristol & Bath Cluster’ which has a 700,000 strong workforce recognised as the most skilled of any region in England. More people are employed in knowledge based intensive businesses in Bristol and Bath than in Oxford and Cambridge combined, and the area has the highest number of new business startups in the UK after London, seeing a 22.8% increase in the last 10 years (Centre for Cities, Cities Outlook Report, 2015). The University of Bath’s Innovation Centre is recognised as the leading university business incubator globally. There has been recognition locally that Bath is at risk of becoming a dormitory town servicing Bristol and London, and that there is a need for prime office space to encourage businesses

to locate in Bath and especially those which have started locally. The local council is currently driving development programmes at Bath Quays North and South which will deliver up to 30,000 m2 of prime office space and shared creative workspace, providing a platform to drive economic growth. Bath boasts a wide choice of excellent schools at both primary and secondary levels, in both the state and independent sectors. Between them these schools provide outstanding opportunities in all areas from the sciences, humanities and arts to sport. The city also provides two excellent universities in the University of Bath and Bath Spa University. The University of Bath is recognised in particular for its engineering, management and sporting pedigree, and has a strong focus on research. The university has overall been ranked as the 5th best university in the UK (the Guardian University Guide 2018), with its MBA programme being ranked 6th best in the UK ( The Economist, 2016). Bath Spa University has been named as one of the five best creative universities (Which? University Student Survey 2016).

STADIU M FO R B AT H A PL ACE TO L E ARN AN D A PL ACE TO DO BUS INE S S

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A W O R L D H E R I TA G E C I T Y St adi um fo r Bat h has a p p o in t e d a n in d e p e n d e n t h e r it a g e expert (Peter Stewart) t o le a d t h e d e fin it io n o f t h e h e r it a g e philosophy for this pr o je ct , a lo n g wit h ke y st a ke h o ld e r s, and to prov id e g uid an ce a n d ch a lle n g e t o t h e p r o je ct t e a m reg ard ing h e r it a g e co n sid e r a t io n s.

The City of Bath was inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1987. According to the World Heritage convention, World Heritage sites can be ‘Cultural Heritage’ or ‘Natural Heritage’. Cultural heritage can be monuments or structures, groups of structures or unusually they can be whole sites where the special interest arises from the ‘historical, aesthetic, ethnological or anthropological’ characteristics of the whole area. This is the case in Bath and so unusually the whole city forms part of the World Heritage Site. When a structure, place or site becomes a World Heritage Site the reasons for inclusion are defined as its ‘Outstanding Universal Value’ (OUV), meaning the characteristics of it that are internationally exceptional and of common importance for present and future generations.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH A WO R LD HER ITAGE CITY


H E R I TA G E D E S I G N AT I O N S The principal historic environment designations and associated documentation, relevant to the site are set out below. The historic environment chapter of the environmental statement for the project will set these matters out in more detail, including statements of significance, and assessments of contribution of the Rec to heritage significance. These assessments will inform the stadium design. Policies and guidance for the World Heritage Site are set out in two principal documents: • City of Bath World Heritage Site Management Plans, 2010-2022 • City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting Supplementary Planning Document, August 2013. An updated version of the World Heritage Site Management Plan, 2016-2022, has been endorsed by the Council for submission to Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and then to UNESCO. The significance of the World Heritage Site is set out in a Statement of Outstanding Universal Value (OUV). The principal aspects of the OUV of Bath can be summarised as:

• The Georgian city reflects the ambitions of John Wood Senior (1704-1754), Ralph Allen (1693-1764) and Richard ‘Beau’ Nash (1674-1761) to make Bath into one of the most beautiful cities in Europe, with architecture and landscape combined harmoniously for the enjoyment of the spa town’s cure takers. • The Neo-classical style of the public buildings (such as the Assembly Rooms and the Pump Room) harmonises with the grandiose proportions of the monumental ensembles (such as Queen Square, Circus and Royal Crescent) and collectively reflects the ambitions, particularly social, of the spa city in the 18th century. • The individual Georgian buildings reflect the profound influence of Palladio (15081580) and their collective scale, style and the organisation of the spaces between buildings epitomises the success of architects such as the John Woods (elder 1704-1754, younger 1728-1782), Robert Adam (1728-1792), Thomas Baldwin (17501820) and John Palmer (1738-1817) in transposing Palladio’s ideas to the scale of a complete city, situated in a hollow in the hills and built to a picturesque landscape aestheticism creating a strong garden city feel, more akin to the 19th century garden cities than the 17th century Renaissance cities.

• The Roman remains, especially the Temple of Sulis Minerva and the baths complex are amongst the most famous and important Roman remains north of the Alps, and marked the beginning of Bath’s history as a spa town.

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The World Heritage Site Management Plans 2010-2022 notes the prospect of development coming forward at the Rec, stating at paragraph 5.2.31 that ‘Bath Rugby Club play at the Recreation Ground in the heart of the city and their presence provides civic pride and identity, plus a boost to the economy (especially in winter months when tourist numbers are low). The rugby club are looking to increase their capacity to accommodate spectators, and provide a new stadium on their current site within the city.’

In respect of contemporary development and contemporary architecture, the Management Plan notes at paragraph 5.2.32 that ‘there are now some notable examples of contemporary architecture within the site, including the Thermae Bath Spa, the Bus Station, Milsom Place and the Holburne Museum. Previous references in this Plan and the UNESCO Mission report have indicated that high quality contemporary architecture is a desirable method of design for new buildings.’

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH A WO R LD HER ITAGE CITY


B AT H C O N S E R VAT I O N A R E A Like the World Heritag e Sit e, t h e B a t h C o n se r v a t io n A r e a (CA ) c ov ers most of the Cit y a n d so m e o f t h e u n d e v e lo p e d a r e a around it, although it s b o u n d a r y is d iffe r e n t fr o m t h a t of th e Wo r ld H e r it a g e Sit e.

There is a Bath city-wide Character Appraisal 2005 which covers the whole of the CA; more recently the Council have produced more detailed appraisals for sub-areas of the CA, of which several are relevant to the Rec and its setting. These include Pulteney Road (which covers the Rec), City Centre, and Bathwick. The Pulteney Road appraisal states of the existing rugby ground stands that ‘Their scale and materials make a negative contribution to the highly sensitive environs of Great Pulteney Street, Pulteney Bridge and the riverside setting of Bath Abbey. At the same time their social significance and contribution to the sporting life of Bath is recognised. Sports buildings of this type are rarely of more than utilitarian design and materials.’ However, it goes on to state that ‘Proposed development work to Bath Rugby Club’s facilities at the Rec offers the opportunity for new architecture which may enhance the special qualities of the surroundings rather than working against them.’

LISTED BUILDINGS The Rec is an aspect of the setting of many listed buildings in the area around the site, including some highly-graded buildings. Some of the important ones for the project will be: • Pulteney Bridge (Grade I) • Bath Abbey (Grade I) • Houses in Johnstone Street (Grade I) • Presidents’ Lounge (Grade II) • William Street turnstiles (Grade II) • The Pavilion (Grade II) • North Parade Bridge R EG IS TER ED PA R KS AND GARDENS The site lies across the river from the Grade II registered Parade Gardens.

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T H E R E C R E AT I O N G R O U N D AND ITS CONTEXT CONTEXT OF THE SITE

In the same way that careful consideration must be given to the special context of the City of Bath, the design process must also reflect appropriately on the particular context of the Rec. One notable feature of the Rec is that its context is made up of a wide variety of different and often contrasting elements. These include: • The iconic gables of Johnstone Street, representing in stark physical terms the point at which the Georgian building boom came to an end – some distance short of the planned end of the street which was designed to extend to the bend in the river beyond North Parade. This northern side is also predominantly residential, with some commercial uses adjoining the river and on Argyle Street. This is relevant not just in terms of the cultural context but also the need for the stadium design to be responsive to neighbour concerns. • Pulteney Bridge and Weir – Robert Adam’s bridge completed in 1774, which even today is a great rarity in terms of being ‘inhabited’ with shops and cafés on either side, set above the weir which was re-shaped to its current form in the early 1970s. Collectively one of Bath’s most photographed features, the bridge and weir epitomise the Georgian city. The site and sound of the weir adds subliminally to

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH THE R E C R EAT I ON GR OU ND A ND ITS CONTEX T

the atmosphere of its surroundings as an ever-changing expression of a living river which has been central to the City since its origins. • The River Avon defines the western boundary of the Rec. Its dynamic nature in theory brings life to the riverside, however, Bath is a city that has to some extent turned its back on the river contrary to trends in many other cities where riverside space has been a source of regeneration. Spatially the River Avon creates a substantial buffer between the Rec and the centre of the city, free of buildings or forms; although Pulteney Weir provides an aesthetic connection across the river. The stretches above and below the weir are popular for boat tours and for recreational use. Below the weir, the navigation connects with the Kennet and Avon Canal, and the Avon itself flows on to Bristol, linking to the Severn via the floating harbour. In recent years, the river bank adjacent to the site has been kept free of moored boats but clearly the opportunity exists to create several managed moorings, even if only for visiting boats.


• There are a number of listed buildings adjacent to the Rec and care is required to preserve or enhance their setting. Only three exist within the Rec all of which are Grade II, these being a building known as the President’s Lounge at the end of Johnstone Street, and the turnstiles and small pavilion building close to the end of William Street. The most directly affected by any new development will be the President’s Lounge. Designed to be absorbed into the street and never seen, the structure represents the very point at which the Georgian boom ended. In listed building terms, unlike the pavilion or turnstiles, the President’s Lounge is not of visual architectural interest so much as historic significance.

• The Leisure Centre, built by the council in 1975, dominates the southern edge of the site. It is a large building very much of its day. Some consider it to be dated although current internal refurbishment work will update the facilities so that they continue to be available as a sport and recreational asset for use by the local community for years to come. In recent years the possibility of redeveloping the Leisure Centre as part of a new stadium development was considered, and whilst this could have created the opportunity for a different site-wide masterplan the opportunity has been superseded by the refurbishment and long-term operating contract now in place for the continued running of the Leisure Centre over many years hence. • Neighbouring uses on the eastern site of the Rec are primarily residential, ranging from newly constructed student accommodation, to a convent and several hotels, and other sporting uses.

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T H E R E C R E AT I O N G R O U N D AND ITS CONTEXT CHARACTER OF THE SITE

The character of the Rec is rooted in sport, leisure and recreation dating back to Georgian times when Spring Gardens (which is in essence now the Rec) was a place for people to come and enjoy the company of other people, to promenade, picnic and enjoy the pleasure gardens. The engagement in a variety of sporting and recreational uses at the Rec represents a major cultural component of modern Bath – a city founded on recreation and enjoyment, originally of the hot springs, and later of the wider city. The site is owned and operated by Bath Recreation Ground Trust – a registered charity – which leases land to a number of tenants, notably Bath Rugby and BANES in relation to the Leisure Centre. The income received enables Bath Recreation Ground Trust to provide land and property for use as outdoor recreation facilities in or near Bath for the benefit of the public. The Rec site also supports a great deal of community and charitable work undertaken by other organisations including Bath Rugby Foundation. The site is of course home to Bath Rugby, which has played its rugby at the Rec for over 120 years. However, it is also home to amateur minis rugby, the Bath Half Marathon, school sports days and many other sporting and recreational activities.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH THE R E C R EAT I ON GR OU ND A ND ITS CONTEX T

Beyond the site itself the Rec has a tangible effect on the cultural makeup of the city. The atmosphere of match days permeates the centre of Bath, creating a tangible sense of excitement that even those unaware of the reason can feel. The Romans called it ‘genius loci’, which means the spirit of place. The same spirit can be felt at other events including the Bath Half Marathon where the Rec acts as a hub for wider sporting engagement as both runners and spectators enjoy something that somehow seems to be especially ‘Bath’.


S I T U AT I O N O F T H E S I T E

The heritage considerations relevant to the situation of the site have been set out previously in this document. In terms of access, the Rec lies within 600 metres of the city’s main railway and bus stations, including those serving Bath’s Park and Ride sites.

There is a certain amount of city infrastructure below the site, most notably Wessex Water sewers including a pipe crossing below the river and various storm drains. The water supply into the existing buildings has very limited capacity and pressure, but significant city water infrastructure exists nearby to serve the potential new stadium.

The whole of the Rec site has been assessed for its archaeological potential and this is considered to be very low owing to the lack of evidence of any prior development on the site. Ground conditions vary but typically comprise a shale layer. The naturally high water table and the possible presence of culverts and outfalls associated with the city’s hot springs will require careful substructure design in due course.

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SECTION 2 LISTENING 26

STA D IUM F O R B ATH LIST E N IN G


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LISTENING This sec tion is a r e co r d o f t h e p r e -d e sig n list e n in g c onsultation proc ess u n d e r t a ke n d u r in g sp r in g 20 1 7.

It also includes further considerations which will be included as part of the design process either because they are a planning requirement, or because they have been identified as requiring consideration despite not being discussed in the pre-design workshops. Further information regarding the workshops, and detailed stakeholder feedback is included in the Appendices.

1. DESIGN 1 . A H E R I T A G E 1 . B D AY L I G H T 1.C ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING 1.D SOUND 1.E INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES 1 . F S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y 1.G TECHNOLOGY

Throughout the process seven core themes emerged. These are set out below, together with expanded sub-headings for areas which require further consideration, but which may not have been discussed during the pre-design workshops. The comments, questions and suggestions included from the pre-design listening workshops are reproduced verbatim.

2 . E N V I R O N M E N T 2.A TREES 2.B AIR QUALITY 2 . C G E O L O G Y & H O T SPRINGS 2.D FLOOD 2.E ARCHAEOLOGY 3 . T R A N S P O R T A N D A C C E S S 4 . M A T C H D A Y E X P E R I E N C E 5 . C O M M U N I T Y , S P O R T I N G PA R T I C I PAT I O N A N D W E L L- B E I N G 6 . E C O N O M I C I M P A C T 7. A C C E S S I B I L I T Y

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH LIST E N IN G


‘Nothing is going well with the current setup. It ’s noisy and a huge nuisance to t h o s e t h a t l i ve c l o s e by. The Club need to contain everything within the stadium and not spill out o n t o t h e r e s t o f t h e R e c .’

NEAR NEIGHBOUR OF THE REC

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1. DESIGN National planning policy e m p h a sise s t h e n e e d fo r d e sig n quality, howev er i t la y s d o wn fe w fixe d a sp ir a t io n s in terms of site spec ifi c d e sig n r e sp o n se s. It d o e s h o we v e r d esc rib e the b road p o licy o n d e sig n r e q u ir e m e n t s in relation to d ev elo p m e n t a ffe ct in g h e r it a g e a sse t s.

1 . A H E R I TA G E Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Achieve an inspired design which people buy into • Pursue inspired/ambitious design • Discussion over wording – bold, brave, imaginative, thoughtful? • Create a building we can all be proud of • Minimalist design – we don’t want a barrier to views but the building does need to provide cover – consider materials • Key elements of stadium design – height to avoid destroying views of the setting; lightness/ideally transparency of the roof; roof shape (cf. the Irish stadium) • Light, cutting edge glass, not pastiche

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 1. D E S I G N

The stadium proposals will have special regard to the statutory duties contained at Section 66(1) and 72 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (see Appendix 1). Special attention shall be paid to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of the conservation area. Proposals should respect and embrace the City’s Outstanding Universal Value which define it as a World Heritage Site and reflect best practice guidance on development within designated sites. It should reflect a full understanding of the cultural significance of the Rec, and should enhance and add to the rich cultural essence of the city.


Stadium for Bath will adopt the approach set out in the project heritage philosophy which is informed by the considerations arising from the workshops noted below. H E R I TA G E S TA K E H O L D E R WORKSHOPS These comments have been drawn together by Stadium for Bath’s independent heritage expert. Two round-table discussions have been held with a number of the organisations with responsibility for or an interest in Bath’s historic environment: • Bath and North East Somerset Council (BANES), the planning authority. • Historic England (HE), the government’s statutory advisor on the historic environment. • Bath Preservation Trust (BPT), an independent local charity which exists ‘to preserve for the benefit of the public the historic character and amenities of the City of Bath and its surroundings’.

After discussion and a tour of the site and its environs, several themes emerged: • The treatment of the riverside edge of the site, and the role of tree planting as an aspect of the design, will be of considerable importance. There is a positive opportunity to create a greater sense of openness on the immediate Rec side of the river which is currently quite restricted, to improve the green landscape and the quality and amenity of this area more generally and to enhance the conservation area. • In respect of the settings of listed buildings, the most important considerations are: • The setting of Pulteney Bridge, particularly as seen from North Parade. • The setting of the terraces of houses on Johnstone Street, with their distinctive unfinished stub ends facing the Rec.

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• A further consideration with respect to the character and appearance of the Bath Conservation Area is the open character of the Rec. Given the scope for improving on the quality of the existing rugby club buildings, and enhancing the riverside space adjoining the Rec, there is opportunity to enhance the conservation area. • In respect of the Outstanding Universal Value of the Bath World Heritage Site, the inter-relationship between the developed part of the city and the wooded slopes around it, and the views from centre to edge and vice versa, were acknowledged to be an important characteristic relevant to the Rec project. The importance of specific viewpoints was noted, such as those from the Grand Parade area, together with recognition of the need to consider views in a dynamic sense together with the broader context of viewpoints across the city which collectively inform the World Heritage Site as a whole.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 1. D E S I G N

• In respect of views into the city, the new stadium is likely to be visible in many of the elevated views from the wooded slopes around it. Given that these are generally views from some distance away and looking over the whole city, there is an opportunity for the new stadium to integrate positively with the cityscape provided that careful consideration is given during design development to what will be seen from these views, particularly in respect of materials. Other organisations who have been or will be consulted during the development of the design include the National Trust, who are responsible for some of the surrounding countryside which affords elevated views into the city centre; and ICOMOS, the body which advises UNESCO on the conservation of World Heritage Sites.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Respect heritage as well as leave a legacy design • Design in the context of a unique setting which leads into the city • Design sympathetic and complements the heritage area • Survey views and vista and impact minimised on sightlines • Minimise harm to the city • Respond positively to World Heritage status and historic environment • Coherent design which fits in the place • Retains and enhances World Heritage status • Understand views and vistas • World Heritage Site front of mind in plans • You must have a Heritage plan • Design a sympathetic building that complements the Heritage in the area • Totally respect the Heritage and beauty of the city • Preserve the view of the city and surroundings


1 . B D AY L I G H T The design will take account of daylighting in relation to the growing requirements for the playing surface, the orientation of the pitch, ‘low sun’ implications for players and the comfort of spectators.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: None – this topic was not mentioned by stakeholders at the workshops.

1.C ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING The design will need to incorporate pitch floodlighting to the current illumination levels required for televised sport. It will need to do so to best practice guidance in terms of uniformity and glare reduction whilst avoiding excess light spill beyond the playing surface and avoiding light falling on nearby residential properties. Therefore external lighting, due to dark skies and light spill will need to be considered.

Lighting itself should be, as far as possible, industry leading technology to proven standards of low energy consumption and long life, and allow for future upgrades as lamp technology continues to develop. Stanchions and supports will need to be integrated into the design, with mindful consideration of the impact they have on the building silhouette. Lighting elsewhere in the building is to be designed to accommodate different types of event, typically utilising low energy dimmable LED fittings. Lighting along the riverside will be required to maximise pedestrian safety whilst minimising light spill that might affect bats and/or other wildlife over the river itself. The design should explore the options for exterior lighting of the building itself.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: It was suggested verbally in a workshop that the current flood lights increase the level of light pollution. Near residents would benefit from newer LED lights being installed. These would be instant to switch on and off, unlike the archaic lights currently in place that need time to warm up and cool down.

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1.D SOUND Sound is a key component of stadium atmosphere and experience for both spectator and participants. Sound can also amount to intrusion and nuisance if it is unwanted with the potential to affect the lives of near neighbours. Many consultees commented on the need to balance the positives of the stadium experience with the need to respect nearby residents. They noted that in general the crowd sound was rarely intrusive, but that the base note from amplified music and the sound of the existing public address system can be a nuisance. The design of the stadium will seek to create the optimum balance between desirable and undesirable sound. It should consider opportunities to enclose all associated public spaces within the built structure and such that sound from them is, as far as possible, contained within the stadium. It should consider the opportunity to deliver an even coverage of high quality PA related sound, but seek to minimise the spill of such sound outside of the stadium.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 1. D E S I G N

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Look to solve matchday issues that impact on the neighbours – traffic, noise, inconvenience – and that the new stadium will help with this objective • Continue to involve neighbours in the planning of the project • Must appreciate the impact on neighbours’ quality of life • Family-type atmosphere, night-time economy controls • Focus access through minimal residential area, eg. North Parade and riverside Sound is particularly relevant to near neighbours, with workshop feedback including general sound management comments, together with operational comments and a recognition that the temporary nature of current facilities contribute to sound leakage: • Make other groups aware of impact on residents • Enjoy event and get back to normal as quickly as possible • Extended period of impact – set up/extended weekend (Fri, Sat & Sun) • Noise restrictions/limits • Two-way communication – more than lip service • Maintain code of practice • Contain within stadium limits (marquee – get rid) • Limits of large events • Define footprint of stadium to consider the effect of additional structures (Swift Half) on other users/neighbours


1.E INFRASTRUCTURE & UTILITIES The design will need to have regard to the technical constraints of existing infrastructure on or near the site, for example avoiding building over underground services, or preserving access for maintenance, including for example, the adjacent Radial Gate structure. If the design is compromised in doing so the opportunity to adapt or re-provide infrastructure should be assessed.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Temporary power/ toilets/ drainage to be supplied to remove costs, noise, inconvenience etc. of temporary services for other events

1 . F S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y Stadia as a building type present relatively limited opportunity for beneficial returns on sustainability investment. Nonetheless the new stadium should seek to be as energy and resource efficient as possible, both in construction and in use. As part of establishing an appropriate design review process the design team will be required to establish a methodology and target criteria for assessing the sustainability of the emerging design. The design itself should take account of the sustainability of materials used to minimise environmental impact in production and delivery, maximise durability and energy efficiency in use, and promote low impact disposal/recycling at the end of the building’s life. The design should consider opportunities for minimising energy losses from the building, reducing mains water use eg. for pitch irrigation and toilets etc, and should explore the opportunity to extract heat from ground water associated with hot spring flows below the site.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Showcase environmental/sustainable practices • 21st century green solution – causing minimum disruption

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1 .G TECH NO LOGY Stadium technology is a rapidly evolving area with recent innovations in player safety, match administration, stadium safety and spectator experience. The expectation is that technological developments will continue to evolve in all aspects of the stadium throughout its life. The project team will be required to seek expert input into the pragmatic integration of current technologies for the new stadium and also guidance to inform the building in terms of flexibility to accommodate future opportunities.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • We would love the new stadium to be completely connected. To be able to offer a personal experience for everyone that visits

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 1. D E S I G N


2. ENVIRONMENT Prev ious stu d ie s h a v e sh o wn t h e Re c it se lf to b e of limited e co lo g ica l v a lu e in t e r m s o f h a b it a t , the larg e area of mo wn g r a ss a n d t h e u r b a n lo ca t io n b e in g of little in t e r e st t o m o st wild life.

The river has the greatest contribution to wildlife, most notably for bats which use the river corridor as a flightpath. It is designated as a Site of Nature Conservation Interest. The stadium design will be informed by updated ecology studies, and will need to pay special regard to adjacent bat activity.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Showcase environmental/sustainable practices • Environment a key consideration in brief • Improved riverside environment

2.A TREES The Rec includes a number of trees along its boundary with the riverside comprising mainly tulip trees which are approaching maturity. These trees are protected by virtue of being in the conservation areas. They should be retained unless in accordance with national and local policies on the protection of urban trees. The stadium will, as noted above, create the opportunity for a reappraisal of its landscape context, guided by the defining landscape characteristics of the World Heritage Site.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Trees hide sports centre • Trees are currently retained

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2.B AIR QUALIT Y The stadium is unlikely to significantly affect the status quo in terms of air quality in Bath. Consideration will be given to travel and access during the planning process, in part with reference to impact on air quality. Consideration will also be given to the provision of services to the stadium, and the potential for green energy technologies and/or reduced emissions.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: Verbal comment was made in a workshop session regarding the number of cars driving through the city on matchdays.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 2 . EN V IR O N M ENT

2.C G EO LO GY A N D H OT S P R I N G S The design will need to be considered within the constraints of ground conditions and geology and especially in relation to the city’s famous hot springs. Whilst existing site information will allow for working assumptions in the early stages of the design process, detailed site investigations will be required once likely foundation requirements are known.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: None – this topic was not mentioned by stakeholders at the workshops.


2. D FLOOD The Environment Agency’s flood modelling for Bath, which predicts the effect and likelihood of flood events around the river, takes account of the Rec operating as a floodplain in the event of flood conditions. The stadium design will need to take account of the impact on the flood characteristics of the site, such as the volume of water storage during a potential flood event, and the risk of potential flood events in the lifetime of the building. The potential for flood also affects the choice of pitch surface. The design team will consider options in terms of pitch surfaces which support both Premiership rugby and other potential sporting and community uses. Where there is consideration of a surface which includes some form of artificial substrate and/or playing surface, the specification must take account of performance in flood. In the council’s Strategic Flood Risk Assessment, part of the application site is identified as falling within Flood Risk Zone 3a*. The Environment Agency will be consulted as part of the process. In addition the County of Avon Act 1982 – section 33, gives Bath and North East Somerset Council powers to protect the natural thermal springs that arise under artesian pressure in

the centre of Bath, from damage that could result from excavations, piling operations or bore holes in the Bath area. *www.gov.uk/guidance/flood-risk-and-coastalchange#flood-zone-and-flood-risk-tables

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Get serious technical advice before design – flood plain, grade 1 surrounding buildings etc. • Create a piazza-like environment and replan the whole riverside area, create flood barrier • River frontage – to add something to benefit many Bath residents/tourists but careful to avoid noise across the river late evenings. Can the monstrous ‘gate’ be removed at the same time? • Better use of river, long lasting solutions

2. E ARCHAEO LOGY Past surveys and desk-based assessments of the Rec suggest a very low likelihood that archaeological remains will be discovered as a result of building the stadium. To further reduce the risk consideration will be given to updated surveys utilising recently developed geotechnical techniques that were previously unavailable.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: None – this topic was not mentioned by stakeholders at the workshops.

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3. TR ANSPORT AND ACCESS Bath has a b alanc e to st r ike in t e r m s o f t r a n sp o r t . It is a destination c ity, v isited a s it h a s b e e n sin ce it s b e g in n in g s b y hug e numb ers seeking r e cr e a t io n a n d e n jo y m e n t . It is a cit y o f promenad ing whic h o we s m u ch t o it s st r e e t s a s p la ce s fo r people and as the set t in g s fo r it s b e a u t ifu l a r ch it e ct u r e.

The Rec is not easily accessed by vehicles, with little parking available, limited level pedestrian access and narrow staircases and paths. Existing car parking ‘on site’ is limited to approximately 130 spaces at the Rec by the cricket pavilion and 60 spaces at Bath Sports and Leisure Centre (under an agreement with BANES Council). Stadium deliveries and other vehicles such as broadcast trucks arrive either at the William Street end of the ground, or at the leisure centre end through a restricted accessway. Pedestrian access down to the riverside is restricted at both Pulteney Bridge and North Parade bridge, and there are limitations around the site for those with specific accessibility needs. The new stadium provides the opportunity to improve the current access restrictions, and to ensure the best city-wide benefit. The project team will need to work with BANES and other key stakeholders, with close regard for the transport strategy for Bath. In addition, the existing Travel Plan for the site will be reviewed in terms of the change in capacity, the physical changes on site in terms of better access, and the evolving opportunities for improved sustainable transport links.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 3 . T R A N S P O RT A ND ACCESS

Transport Access is also a consideration for the construction phase of the stadium as it will inevitably involve the removal of demolition materials and the delivery of new components and bulky items. The design proposals are to be assessed for ease of construction and wherever possible adapted to ensure the least disruptive and most sustainable solutions are brought forward. If a successful planning application is achieved, the project team should consider and assess the possibility of using the River Avon as a means of transporting building materials to and from the site.


Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Please improve pedestrian access to stadium • Fund extra parking wardens and tow-trucks on matchdays to support near residents • Build a new bridge over the river to create a new access point for those walking to the ground (verbal comment from final feedback session) • Consider delivery traffic – being confined to North Parade, not Pulteney Mews. The noise causes nuisance to near neighbours • Better management of coaches is needed, plus they should not leave their engines running • Parking – non-existent • Dedicated parking • Buses – same timetable as non-matchdays Need increased capacity • Ensure accessibility needs are included in planning/ council negotiations – benefit to all • Provide easily accessible parking and subsequent ground entry • Ensure surfaces are properly designed for access • Not enough entry/exit points • Sports centre exit too narrow/too many people • Bath Rugby should encourage the use of public transport • North Parade steps onto road

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4 . M ATC H D AY E X P E R I E N C E T he new stad ium is the ca t a ly st fo r r e d e v e lo p m e n t a t t h e Re c, and b oth the stad ium an d t h e co r e sp e ct a t o r e x p e r ie n ce m u st b e world -c lass, wheth e r t h e y a r e wa t ch in g a p r o fe ssio n a l g ame or a lo ca l co m m u n it y e v e n t .

The lead architect and design team will explore fundamentals (seating, sightlines, access to seats/toilets etc.), site specific characteristics (eg. what makes the Rec special in terms of an intimate atmosphere and a unique sense of being in Bath), and opportunities (eg. technology advances such as in-seat ordering, replays, match statistics etc.). It is important to clarify that a ‘world-class experience’ differs from one person to the next. Opinions are polarised as are spectator needs.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 4. M ATC HDAY E XP ER IENCE

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: What’s not going so well? • Poor seat views, seat space, accessibility • No roof • The supporter ‘journey’ from scanner to seat is poor • Toilet facilities – currently a different gender experience, needs improving • T.V screens, PA needs improving • Boxes, Clubhouse and bar do not look ‘high end’ What do we wish we could do? • The design maintains closeness to the pitch • Improve sightlines throughout the ground • Look at toilet queue management • Screen visibility from all areas eg. :two • Weather protection – roof • Continue current progress towards a world-class facility • Have a range of provisions to meet the needs of a diverse range of expectations • Consult a wide range of ‘experts’ to learn from other stadia/facilities • Plan and design for the future • View of pitch for all • Start again with a blank canvas • Have a wider gap between seats • Have sufficient capacity to meet demand • Keep the view [from my seat] • Design the supporter journey from beginning to end • Improved acoustics for supporters and players • Take in the surrounding riverside as part of the experience • Effective of additional structures (Swift Half) on other users/neighbours


Bath Rug b y surv ey e d it s su p p o r t e r b a se (Se a so n T icke t Hold ers, Premium Me m b e r s a n d M e m b e r s) r e g a r d in g m a t ch experienc e and the st a d iu m d e v e lo p m e n t , t o o b t a in a n in it ia l und erstand ing of ho w t h e v a r io u s fa ct o r s r a n ke d in t e r m s of importanc e to th e m . T h e b e lo w list r a n k s t h e ir t o p 20 c onsid erations for rede v e lo p m e n t fr o m t h e 1 6 1 3 r e sp o n d e n t s.

RANK

CATEGORY

FACTOR

1

At your seat/terrace

Clear sightlines of all areas of the pitch

2

At your seat/terrace

Clear sightlines of big screen(s)

3

Before kick off

Effective queue management

4

Before kick off

Friendly, social atmosphere

5

At your seat/terrace

Clear audio for announcements and music

6

At your seat/terrace

Design of stadium bowl for maximum crowd acoustics/ atmosphere

7

In and around the stadium

Multiple entry points to the complex

8

Before kick off

The Riverside setting and view of Bath

9

In and around the stadium

Ease and speed of entry into stadium

10

At your seat/terrace

Roof/covered seating/terracing

11

Factors for development

For the stadium to play a key role in city events/programmes

12

In and around the stadium

Knowledge and expertise of stewards

13

Factors for development

To inspire people to take up sport

14

Before kick off

Friendliness of staff

15

In and around the stadium

Ease and speed of time to/from seat during a match/half time

16

At your seat/terrace

Increased leg room/space between seats/rows

17

Factors for development

To be a platform to promote the history of Bath Rugby

18

In and around the stadium

Ease and speed of exit time after a match

19

At your seat/terrace

Comfort of seat improved

20

Factors for development

To be a case study for environmental best practice/sustainability

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5 . C O M M U N I T Y, S P O R T I N G P A R T I C I P A T I O N A N D W E L L- B E I N G The new stad ium should b e a fo ca l p o in t fo r t h e co m m u n it y. T he rev italisation of the r iv e r sid e a n d t h e cr e a t io n o f a r iv e r sid e d estination prov id es a n o p p o r t u n it y t h e wid e r co m m u n it y c an e n jo y a n d sh a r e.

In terms of more focused community uses, Stadium for Bath will continue to engage with Bath Recreation Ground Trust to ensure that the stadium design considers current sporting, recreational, event-based and community uses of the Rec. The design team will be tasked with incorporating opportunities not only to support but also to enhance these various uses. The design team will need to consider the possibility for the new stadium to be used for events other than professional rugby matches. Such consideration must be undertaken in collaboration with stakeholders, and particularly local residents who have expressed legitimate concerns regarding the potential impact on them of such activity.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 5 . C O M M UN I T Y, SP ORTING PA RTICIPATION A ND W EL L-BE I N G

Bath Rugby Foundation will be the driver of focused community activity and the creation of a long-lasting community legacy. The stadium will provide facilities for Bath Rugby Foundation to focus on its mission to empower more young people in Bath and the surrounding areas to succeed in life. This mission is underpinned by the four pillars of Health, Education, Inclusion and Employability. The new stadium will facilitate expanded delivery in each of these areas: for example additional classroom, event and training space in the centre of Bath to facilitate the delivery of educational programmes; enhanced sporting facilities for activity based sessions promoting health; consideration of employability opportunities being addressed within mentored stadium employment roles.


Stadium for Bath will also review opportunities for enhanced sporting participation in rugby and other sports. This will include consideration of support facilities such as changing rooms and potential options for the pitch surface which support both professional rugby and other uses. It is the ambition of Stadium for Bath to develop a social, sporting and community legacy strategy as part of the formal design process.

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Have a year-round calendar of activities which are facilitated by: • 4G pitch • Community space/café for all • Can start some of this now • Continue to expand reach and connections to voluntary community sector throughout BANES • A number of successful groups currently using Bath Rec • Voluntary sector flourishing but need a hub to develop further (the stadium?) • Design to incorporate maximum community use of both the new stadium and outfield on non-matchdays – both established and new users. By community use we mean sports other than rugby, voluntary sector (community hub), community events, schools and residents’ groups. • Multipurpose facilities for all • Improved access onto and around the site • Temporary power/toilets/drainage to be supplied to remove costs, noise, inconvenience etc. of temporary services for other events • Year-round calendar of events – target disadvantaged communities? • Rec is a destination, open all week • Integrated part of wider sporting network • Inspire young people to exercise/take up sport

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6 . E CO N O M I C I M PAC T As part of the d esig n p r o ce ss se v e r a l fe a sib ilit y st u d ie s will b e c ompleted , inc lud in g a so cia l a n d e co n o m ic im p a ct st u d y.

The Economic Strategy for Bath and North East Somerset 2010–2026 states that the overall aim of the City’s Economic Strategy is ‘To improve the prosperity and well-being of Bath and North East Somerset residents through a more productive, competitive and expanded economy by 2026.’ The retail, tourism and leisure sectors are particularly strong sectors in Bath and North East Somerset, comprising roughly one in five jobs in the area. The report states that Bath has built a strong reputation for its high quality independent retail offer alongside national and international brands due to offering over 90,000sqm of floor-space and over 600 retail and service units. It is widely believed that this generates a unique character not present in other centres and virtually impossible to recreate. The new stadium must be commercially viable over the medium to long term to secure Bath Rugby’s future sustainability, and to maximise the opportunities for the benefits that development can bring to the city and the community. Importantly, the new stadium will provide a much enhanced contribution to the city’s economy in terms of increased employment; enhanced income to restaurants, bars, cafés, hotels, shops, taxis and other businesses; and providing an attraction which supports the wider tourist economy in Bath.

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH 6 . E C O N O M IC I M PACT

Pre-Design Listening Workshop Commentary: • Overarching we need to exploit possibly more fully than we do now, the economic potential (and social gains but that is for another group) • A stadium that can operate more than 16 matches a year. This has implications for the design of the pitch (durability) and the undercover facilities • Exploit the Rugby brand to enhance the city brand and vice versa. Key improvements could be made to the riverside both aesthetically and for access • The design of stadium offers an opportunity to create an aesthetically pleasing feature building that could be a memorable image throughout the globe • The stadium needs to provide a long term sustainable future for the rugby club. If not we risk losing (at some point) this valuable economic asset • To understand positive and negative impact to the city: if we do nothing Bath Rugby could leave the City, if we build a stadium the economy could grow • Support Bath city economic development plan • Income-generating facilities which benefit community and city • Rec income only on matchdays (liability, not asset) • Strategic vision for sustainable Bath Rugby within Bath • Make better use of the river as well as the riverfront (riverfront not just for rugby days) • Design a tourist attraction


7. A C C E S S I B I L I T Y ‘An ind iv id ual only be co m e s d isa b le d b e ca u se o f t h e so cia l, attitud inal and env iron m e n t a l b a r r ie r s t h a t t h e in d iv id u a l fa ce s – this is known a s t h e so cia l m o d e l o f d isa b ilit y ’

The above quote is taken from Level Playing Fields, a charity whose efforts are focused on removing these barriers in all sports. Its ethos is: • All fans should enjoy an equal experience at live sports events • All stadia and sports venues are fully accessible and inclusive The new stadium will provide the opportunity for significantly enhanced accessibility provision. The current facilities fall far short of the level Bath Rugby would like to provide, driven in particular by the significant constraints arising from the temporary facilities at the site. The design team will consider accessibility provisions at each stage of the design journey.

The Club held a specific workshop with their Accessible Users Group to hear their thoughts, hopes and concerns. Three core themes emerged from this session including: Access Inside and Outside of the Stadium, Matchday Experience and Stadium Facilities. See below for the outcomes: • Food facilities are over gravel, grass and mud – ‘we cannot use them’ • Disabled toilets limited and used by everyone • PA system poor, ‘I can’t hear anything’ • Family with wheelchair user can’t enjoy the experience together ‘I have to sit alone’ • Accessible facilities needed – food, drink, programmes • Wheelchair user position should be elevated – ‘when people stand up, I can’t see’ • Better quality/quantity of disabled toilets – MOBILOO ‘sometimes we need somewhere to change if something happens’ • TV monitors to reproduce large screen • Have a roof • Stairs need to be standard with better rails. Think about sight impaired using standard stairs • If surfaces were improved, disabled supporters could have access to the off-pitch entertainment (you try getting into the Swift Half with the band playing) • Steward training – ‘we wish they knew more about our needs’ • Steward point of contact ‘if something happens – who do I call that I can rely on?’ • Accessibility built into the whole ground, not just ‘disabled area’ • Fully integrate with rest of the crowd/friends • Priority/safe access/egress points • Incorporate lifts

STADIU M FO R B AT H 7. ACCE S S IB ILIT Y

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SECTION 3 THE OPPORTUNITY

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STA D IUM F O R B ATH THE O P P O RT UNITY


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THE OPPORTUNITY The Rec is the historic a n d sp ir it u a l h o m e o f B a t h Ru g b y, with the Club hav ing p la y e d it s fir st m a t ch t h e r e in 1 8 9 4 . The Rec is one of the m o st ico n ic a n d r e co g n ise d r u g b y g round s in world rugb y a n d sh o wca se s t h e C it y o f B a t h to a g lo b a l a u d ie n ce.

Bath Rugby’s facilities occupy approximately one quarter of the Rec which is owned and operated by Bath Recreation Ground Trust, an independent charity. The remaining three quarters of the Rec is dedicated to Bath’s leisure centre and associated parking facilities, croquet lawns, all weather five-aside football pitches and open grassed land used for sports and other events. The purpose of the Bath Recreation Ground Trust is the provision of property in or near Bath for use in outdoor recreational facilities for the benefit of the public. The income received from its primary tenants (Bath Leisure Centre and Bath Rugby), enables the charity to continue investing in the provision of a wide range of sporting and recreational facilities including events at the Rec, and more widely across Bath. Redevelopment would secure Bath Rugby as a long-term tenant and provide a long-term source of funding for Bath Recreation Ground Trust in furthering its charitable activities.

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Bath Rugby’s current facilities comprise a mix of permanent buildings and stands dating as far back as the 1950s, together with a series of temporary stands. The stadium experience falls well below the standards expected in the professional game, and the facilities are considered by some to be a blight on the architectural landscape of Bath. The adjoining riverside area, which could be a jewel in the city’s crown, is likewise in desperate need of revitalisation. Whilst there has been recent appetite and ambition to redevelop the site, it has been necessary to clarify the potential parameters for any redevelopment. The ruling of the Charity First-Tier Tribunal in December 2016 regarding the Rec has finally provided clarity over the site. Following this decision, the powers of Bath Recreation Ground Trust have been clarified, including its ability to lease the Club additional land for redevelopment.


‘The Recreation Ground should be a globally recognised destination for the City of Bath, with multi-use facilities available to everyone, that are open all week. New development at the Recreation Ground can suppor t the cit y’s economic development plans and inspire more y o u n g p e o p l e t o t a ke u p s p o r t .’ B AT H R U G B Y S U P P O R T E R

STADIU M FO R B AT H T HE OPPORT UNIT Y

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DESIG N PH I LOSO PH Y The emerg ing d esig n p h ilo so p h y se t s o u t b r o a d p r in cip le s whic h will g uid e the early co n sid e r a t io n o f p o t e n t ia l co n ce p t s b y the lead arc hitec t , o n ce a p p o in t e d . It is in t e n d e d t o prov id e a b road framewo r k , b u t n o t t o co n st r a in t h e a b ilit y o f the lead arc hitect t o d e v e lo p co n ce p t u a l id e a s.

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The rich historic context of the Rec will be an important influence on the design of the new stadium. This lies within Bath’s World Heritage Site, within the Bath Conservation Area, and within the settings of nearby listed buildings and registered parks and gardens.

FORM

The following statements regarding the design philosophy are informed by feedback received from stakeholders during the pre-design listening consultations, in particular the technical and planning stakeholder group, and provide an emerging sense of what the new stadium should look and feel like.

SITING

STA D IUM F O R B ATH D E S I G N P HILO S OP H Y

The stadium will be a focal point, a destination and centre of activity. The building should be a clear and bold expression of this whether it is a ‘one building’ design or a series of buildings in an overall composition.

The stadium should be appropriate to its significance in the city. The internal relationship between seating and pitch should be matched by a clear and expressed relationship between the building and its context. The River Avon, Pulteney Bridge, Parade Gardens and Johnstone Street must all benefit from positive intentional relationships with the architecture of the stadium.


M AT E R I A L S

EXPERIENCE

Bath’s characteristic palette of materials is rich, durable and universally appealing. The stadium should harmonise with them. It should avoid overtly alien colours or textures where they do not achieve a sense of harmony.

The stadium should influence and inspire. It should be the best possible environment to experience cultural and sporting excellence. It should be on every tourist’s itinerary. It should be outwardly a focal point, a backdrop, a place to walk, to meet, to dine out. It should be inwardly a venue, a place for playing and watching sport, to enjoy performance and to culturally enrich the city. It should acknowledge the role it plays in infusing the city with the excitement and atmosphere of large events. It should equally contain that atmosphere where it might otherwise adversely affect near neighbours.

ORDER Bath’s Roman and Georgian architecture is well composed, often symmetrical with an intentional hierarchy and aesthetic balance between elements. The stadium should be based on an equivalent degree of intentional architectural expression – not a copy of historic forms, but a building which is equally bold yet harmonious.

SCALE The stadium must relate to its context. It should be expressed as an important building in the city. It must also relate to the people who experience it and the system of order and proportion adopted must acknowledge both ‘city’ and ‘human’ scale.

LANDSCAPE Bath’s Outstanding Universal Value as a World Heritage Site highlight the importance of landscape in the city. The Georgian inner city landscaping works to complement the city’s wider rural setting. Nonetheless, much of the landscape of modern Bath falls short of the Georgian ideals. The stadium design should be informed by a proper understanding of its landscape context in terms of technical condition and its townscape contribution. Where possible the design should take up opportunities to enhance the landscape of the Rec and its context, for example reinforcing the setting of the green river corridor. The stadium should be ‘as if meant to be’ and not merely ‘best fit’.

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H E R I TA G E P H I L O S O P H Y Heritag e is a fund amen t a l co n sid e r a t io n fo r a n y d e v e lo p m e n t in Bath and for this reaso n t h e h e r it a g e p h ilo so p h y a d o p t e d b y St adi um fo r Bat h is a r t icu la t e d se p a r a t e ly t o t h e b r o a d e r d e sig n p h ilo so p h y.

Stadium for Bath has appointed an independent heritage expert (Peter Stewart) to lead the definition of the heritage philosophy, along with key stakeholders, and to provide on-going challenge to the lead architect and wider design team during the formal design process. The following statements regarding the heritage philosophy are informed by feedback received from stakeholders during the pre-design listening consultations, in particular the technical and planning stakeholder group. Stadium for Bath’s aspiration is to build a new stadium of world-class quality which will be an asset to the World Heritage Site and of which the Club and the City of Bath can be proud. This aspiration is supported by adopted Council planning policies; by the World Heritage Site Management Plan and the conservation area appraisal. As is appropriate for a major project on a sensitive site, the project will therefore come forward as an example of plan-led development.

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In ‘The Historic Urban Landscape’ (2012)1 , the authors note in their conclusion that ‘the partition between what is ‘historic’ and what is not is increasingly seen as an artificial one, as every city is densely layered as a series of ‘episodes’, where heritage is viewed as the flow and mix of these events rather than as an arbitrary selection of some urban parts defined as ‘historic’.’ This is highly relevant to a city such as Bath, and it reflects the spirit in which the design of the new stadium should be approached. Key extracts from the World Heritage Site Management Plan are cited in detail in Appendix One, which can also be read as reflecting the same spirit.

1 ‘The Historic Urban Landscape’, by Francesco Bandarin and Ron van Oers, Wiley Blackwell, 2012. This book, recommended to The Recreation Ground project team by Christopher Pound who is an advisor to BANES on WORLD HERITAGE SITE issues, is an influential overview of intellectual developments in urban conservation. The authors are leading figures in World Heritage Site management: Francesco Bandarin is UNESCO Assistant DirectorGeneral for Culture and the late Dr Oers was a programme specialist for Culture at the UNESCO World Heritage Centre.


‘Leisure’, as the modern term has it, underpins the importance of the Roman phase and of the Georgian phase of Bath’s development, which are the principal sources of the Outstanding Universal Value (OUV) of the World Heritage Site. The baths and the spa were integral to civic life. Rugby is a more recent example of a recreational pursuit – present in the city for over 150 years – that with the success of Bath Rugby in recent years has become central to the civic life of the city and a source of pride to those who live there. The Thermae Bath Spa project and the Holburne extension are recent examples of imaginative and high quality civic buildings which have added positively to the quality of the World Heritage Site, exemplifying the ‘episodic’ view cited left. The project for the Rec clearly has the potential to match the success of these projects in a similar spirit.

National policy on the historic environment and Historic England guidance both emphasise the importance of developing an understanding of the historic character and context of a site, and the contribution of a site to heritage significance, in order to inform development proposals. This will be an integral part of the process of developing designs for the Rec. The development of the design of the stadium will proceed in parallel with, and be informed by, the ‘clearly expressed and nontechnical narrative argument that sets out ‘what matters and why’ in terms of the heritage significance’, as suggested by Historic England in its guidance on setting, but applicable to heritage significance more generally. The new stadium will be a significant new civic building for Bath. While sensitivity to and responsiveness to the historic setting should inform the design of the stadium from the outset, its status should be celebrated rather than suppressed.

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The design will be informed by and respond to a thorough understanding of the site’s historic character, and by its immediate and its city-wide context. The site’s historic setting should enrich the project rather than constrain it. The architecture of the stadium should be inspired by and should belong to Bath; it should not be a design that could have been built anywhere.

Visual impact assessment will be an integral part of the design process from the outset. Viewpoints important to the project and important to heritage assets will be identified, and the developing design will be tested using digital modelling. Photographs of winter and summer views will also be included as part of the iterative process of developing the design.

Effects on the historic environment are not limited to visual impact, but visual impacts will be an important consideration in developing the design for the new stadium. Policy SB2 (Page 42, BANES Placemaking Plan,* Volume 2) identifies some significant views in the text, and viewpoints are also shown on the associated Diagram 5 in the Placemaking Plan. The Inspector’s modifications to the Placemaking Plan added to SB2 the stipulation that ‘The range of views is to be agreed through the Development Brief and Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment process.’

However, it is important to recognise that the experience of townscape and views is for the most part dynamic rather than static (that is, experienced while walking around rather than standing still).

STA D IUM F O R B ATH HE R I TAGE P HI LOSOPH Y

*http://www.bathnes.gov.uk/services/ planning-and-building-control/planningpolicy/placemaking-plan


While it is possible that the new stadium may affect heritage assets, there are considerable opportunities for it to deliver a variety of public benefits; section 12 of the NPPF sets out the ways in which public benefits can be weighed against any harm to the historic environment in reaching a decision about a project. This major project clearly has the potential to make a positive contribution to all three of the dimensions of sustainable development set out in the NPPF: economic, social and environmental.

Benefits to heritage significance of this kind, as part of a range of public benefits, the new stadium will be an asset to the city. Stadium for Bath are confident that it will be possible to design such a project.

A new stadium at the Rec is supported as a matter of principle by BANES within its Development Plan. As well as wider public benefits, there is the potential for the project to deliver benefits to heritage significance, as an aspect of more general environmental enhancement of the present site. For example, the project could bring about major improvements to the riverside, enhancing the settings of Pulteney Bridge and Parade Gardens, to which the present west stand makes a negative contribution; and more generally, the replacement of the existing structures by a new stadium of high architectural quality will in itself be an enhancement of the site, and therefore of the World Heritage Site and the conservation area and the settings of nearby listed buildings.

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THE DESIGN JOURNEY PRE-DESIGN T his i s t h e r o adm ap fo r i de n t i fyi ng opportuni ti es and constrai nts, and devel opi ng v is io n an d i de as i n t o de t ai l e d p lans ready f or f orm al consi derati on by stakehol ders a nd th e l o c al p l an n i n g au t h o r i t y. The key stages of the Cl ub’s col l aborati ve desi gn p r oc e s s ar e s e t o u t be l o w. T h e ti m i ngs of speci f i c stages wi l l be conf i rm ed and an n o u nced duri ng the process.

PRE-DESIGN

PRE-DESIGN LISTENING

PRE-DESIGN LISTENING WORKSHOP

E XPLORING THE OPPORTUNIT Y

This is an important project not only for Bath Rugby but for the City of Bath. We recognised the need to start the design process by listening.

Throughout the spring of 2017, the Club worked closely with key stakeholders including near neighbours, local businesses, schools, community groups, city stakeholders and technical and planning stakeholders to understand what matters most to them regarding this project.

This is an important document which captures everything we have been told by stakeholder groups, in relation to delivering the vision for a stadium at the Rec. It is an important milestone bridging the pre-design listening consultation, with the preparation of the Development Brief and then moving on to the formal design process.

The first stage of the design journey was therefore a pre-design consultation process where we listened to key stakeholder groups, including local residents, and identified their key considerations for the project.

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The stakeholder feedback would then be used to inform this document, the appointment of the lead architect, and the subsequent design process.

This documents key considerations, challenges and the opportunities afforded by redevelopment, together with key criteria for the appointment of the lead architect. This document will be used to inform the lead architect and design team.


THE DESIGN JOURNEY CONCEPT DESIGN

CONCEPT DESIGN

APPOINT LEAD ARCHITECT AND DESIGN TEAM

P R E PA R AT I O N O F F O R M A L DE VELOPMENT BRIEF

E N V I R O N M E N TA L I M PA C T BASELINE STUDIES/SURVEYS

The role of the lead architect is particularly important for the project, both in terms of its design capability and its skill in responding to the site context and the key considerations of stakeholders.

At this stage of the process the Stadium for Bath consultant team, in liaison with the key stakeholders and BANES, will prepare a draft Development Brief as set out in policy SB2 of the Placemaking Plan. It is envisaged that this would be submitted to BANES and be subject to public consultation. Consultation responses would be reported to BANES Development Management Committee as part of the Council’s formal feedback on the document.

It is a core part of the design and planning process that Stadium for Bath understands the feasibility as well as the social, environmental and economic impacts to inform the emerging concept design. These baseline studies and surveys are an important first part of this process.

For this reason, the selection process is being undertaken after the pre-design listening phase.

The purpose of the Development Brief is to complement the planning policy framework and provide more detail and clarification on key issues as well as guidance on development parameters. It will clearly articulate the sensitive environmental and historic context importance of the site, drawing on informed by Bath’s Design Values and the attributes of World Heritage Site. It will be a key document for the Stadium for Bath consultant team in formulating their proposals.

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THE DESIGN JOURNEY CONCEPT DESIGN

CONCEPT DESIGN

INITIAL DESIGN RESPONSE TO THE DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

EMERGING CONCEPT DESIGN

EMERGING CONCEPT DESIGN C O N S U LTAT I O N

The vision for the project and the key considerations documented in this document start to be realised for the first time. It is anticipated that the lead architect and the design team will develop a number of early stage concepts in this initial emerging design phase, and consider different design options.

The lead architect and design team will focus on the emerging design which provides the best possible solution for the site, the best response to the Development Brief and the best outcome for the city.

The lead architect and design team will have considered different design responses to the Development Brief, and will have developed the emerging concept design which they consider provides the best solution for the site and for all stakeholders.

The project team will test the emerging design options against the Development Brief, and will also review progress with stakeholders.

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This will be the time to share the design journey taken thus far, together with details of the emerging concept design, with key stakeholders including local residents and the wider Bath community. This consultation will provide stakeholders with the opportunity to feedback on key elements of the emerging concept design.


THE DESIGN JOURNEY D E TA I L E D D E S I G N

D E TA I L E D D E S I G N

D E V E LO P I N G D E TA I L E D DESIGNS The feedback from the emerging concept design consultation will now be used by the lead architect and design team to refine, evolve and develop the designs in more detail.

SPECIFIC STUDIES/SURVEYS Stadium for Bath will update the social, economic and environmental assessments and impact studies based on the specification of the detailed designs. The project team will continue to discuss progress with stakeholders (formal and statutory planning consultees).

D E TA I L E D D E S I G N C O N S U LTAT I O N The lead architect and design team will have developed detailed designs including detailed layout plans and visual representations of the design. Stadium for Bath will present the detailed designs to the public and stakeholder groups, including local residents and the wider Bath community. This consultation will provide stakeholders with the opportunity to comment on key elements of the detailed designs.

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THE DESIGN JOURNEY D E TA I L E D D E S I G N

D E TA I L E D D E S I G N

FINALISING THE D E TA I L E D D E S I G N The lead architect and design team will finalise the detailed designs, based on feedback from the consultation, in order to finalise the design.

FINAL DESIGN PUBLIC EXHIBITION

FINAL DESIGN AND PLANNING A P P L I C AT I O N S U B M I S S I O N

The final designs will be presented in public ahead of submission of the planning application.

Following extensive consultation, Stadium for Bath is now ready to submit the planning application for the final design. The planning application will be accompanied by a range of technical documents, including an Environmental Statement. A Design and Access Statement will be submitted which explains how the proposals comply with and respond to the Development Brief, planning policy and comments received throughout the process.

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‘A s p a r t o f t h e d e v e l o p m e n t we would like to create a piazza-like environment, replan the whole riverside area to deliver a family atmosphere and make bet ter u s e o f t h e r i v e r.’

NEAR NEIGHBOUR OF THE REC

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A M B I T I O N S O F S TA D I U M F O R B AT H P R O J E C T G R O U P We b eliev e there is a n o p p o r t u n it y t o cr e a t e so m e t h in g exc eptional in the hear t o f B a t h , so m e t h in g wh ich r e fle ct s the amb ition and ric h h e r it a g e o f t h is u n iq u e cit y, a n d whic h is a sourc e of p r id e a n d in sp ir a t io n fo r e v e r y o n e. The 8 areas of oppo r t u n it y we se e fo r t h e p r o je ct a r e :

1. NEW HOME FOR B AT H R U G B Y

3. WORLD CLASS ARCHITECTURE

The catalyst for this project is the creation of a new home for Bath Rugby. Not only will this secure the long-term future of the Club in the City centre, but it will enable the development of an exceptional stadium and the opportunity to create the most amazing place in the world to watch rugby.

The unique setting provides an opportunity to create a stadium unlike any other in the world. Whilst the ‘in stadium’ experience must be exceptional for rugby, the external façade (particularly the west/riverside façade) requires a unique architectural response which is specific to the City of Bath. There is an opportunity for a bold yet respectful response which complements the city’s existing architecture and World Heritage status, and provides a new set piece of which the city can be proud.

2. RIVERSIDE R E G E N E R AT I O N The riverside has been a focus of regeneration in cities across the country but in Bath, although Pulteney Weir is one of the iconic images of the city, the riverside itself is not a focal point. This project provides the opportunity to breathe new life into the riverside, to create a destination with fantastic views back to the city, to provide an active river frontage which links in with other riverside regeneration projects in Bath and which could serve as a jewel in the city’s crown.

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4. SOCIAL BENEFIT TO B AT H The new development will provide enhanced employment opportunities, which will provide a social benefit to the city, and it will also provide facilities for Bath Rugby Foundation to expand both its operations in the centre of Bath and its fundraising capabilities. This will enable Bath Rugby Foundation to deliver enhanced social benefits by empowering more young people to succeed in life.


5. SPORTING PA R T I C I PAT I O N Bath Rugby already invests in grass roots rugby through its community team. However, Stadium for Bath is not limited to rugby and will explore opportunities with a range of stakeholders to encourage sporting participation across a wide range of sports.

6. ECONOMIC B E N E F I T TO B AT H Rugby matches already provide one of the most significant visitor attractions in Bath, with spectators making a significant contribution to the local economy with particular regard to restaurants, cafĂŠs, bars, hotels, shops and taxis. Stadium for Bath will provide a much enhanced contribution to the local economy, as well as providing an opportunity for significantly enhanced employment opportunities in the centre of the city. This contribution will be independently assessed as part of the planning process.

7. C O M M U N I T Y U S E Stadium for Bath believes that the stadium should be significant for everyone in Bath in so far as it should provide a range of community uses besides rugby. This could be through the creation of fantastic riverside space to enjoy, or through more targeted community uses. Opportunities for community use will be explored further during the early emerging design phase.

8. LEGACY FOR THE CIT Y Stadium for Bath believes that the stadium should be significant for everyone in Bath insofar as it should provide for community use beyond rugby. This could be through the installation of a pitch that allows year round usage or via the creation of fantastic riverside space to enjoy. Opportunities for community use will be explored further during the early emerging design phase.

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Alongside these opportunities, we have identified a number of underlying ‘givens’ which underpin the project and which will be emphasised to the lead architect and wider design team. Firstly, whilst the project can act as a catalyst for significant opportunities and benefits, at its core is the development of a new rugby stadium. The experience of spectators in the new stadium should be second-to-none, it should provide an exceptional venue for hosting rugby matches. Secondly, it is important to recognise that the stadium is located in close proximity to our near neighbours, and careful consideration should be given to them not only during the design phase, but also in terms of consideration of the potential construction phase and subsequent operations post-opening. This will include an array of legitimate and important concerns such as matters of noise, nuisance and access.

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In addition, Stadium for Bath believes that the solution for the site must feel unique to Bath. It should not be a design which could inhabit another location. As part of that unique solution, the design will be tested against the charitable scheme, issued by the Charity First-Tier Tribunal in December 2016, which clarified the objectives and powers of Bath Recreation Ground Trust. Finally, the new stadium is about both securing Bath Rugby’s long term financial stability as well as retaining its significant contribution to the city’s economy. The development project, and the benefits it delivers, must be delivered on a basis which is viable over the long term.


‘The stadium needs to provide a long term sustainable future for the rugby club. If not we risk losing (at some p o i n t ) t h i s v a l u a b l e e c o n o m i c a s s e t .’ C I T Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E

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S TA D I U M D E S I G N S TA N D A R D S A N D C O N S I D E R AT I O N S T he lead arc hitec t and wid e r d e sig n t e a m will in co r p o r a t e ke y stad ium d esig n c onsid e r a t io n s in t o t h e co r e o f t h e d e sig n proc ess where they will b e co n sid e r e d a lo n g sid e a ll o f t h e other key c onsid er a t io n s su ch a s t h e sit e co n t e xt .

We think it is important that we articulate those elements of stadium design which we would like the lead architect and design team to explore alongside the various other key design considerations. The ‘in stadium’ experience should be second-to-none in a venue which provides an exceptional matchday experience. Access into the stadium, and therein to seats should be easy and straight forward. All seats, terracing and hospitality positions should have an unimpeded view of the pitch and big screen(s). It is our intention to provide roof covering to as many spectators as possible, although we acknowledge that the unique characteristics of the site will mean it is challenging to provide overhead cover to all spectators.

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Our ambition is to develop a stadium with a capacity of 18,000 including terracing, seating and hospitality provision. We would consider terracing comprising a similar proportion of total capacity as is currently the case. We currently accommodate some hospitality guests in locations outside the ground, whereas our ambition is that we are able to fully accommodate hospitality guests within the new stadium. We would not expect to reduce the level of hospitality provision within the new stadium, and we will be doing further work with current and potential hospitality customers to understand the nature of hospitality provision which appeals to them, and which would be best suited to the new stadium. It is our ambition to provide a full sized pitch in the new stadium (70m x 100m) and, despite constraints over space, to enhance the dead ball and run off areas over the current provision. The stadium will comply with all relevant legislation including the Green Guide, and effort will be made to provide the best possible facilities for players, support staff, match officials, media, medical staff and other people working on matchdays. Consideration will also be given to the flexibility of facilities eg. the potential use of pitch and support facilities outside matchdays such as for other sporting or community uses.

It is our ambition to consider the latest opportunities in terms of stadium technology. This includes investment in lighting and PA systems which maximise the ‘in stadium’ experience whilst mitigating the impact of potential leakage outside the stadium bowl. We will also consider innovations in terms of connectivity and data, not just during the match but also to assist in other ways such as way-finding and transport and access management. It is our intention, subject to site constraints, to provide all spectators with a clear view of a big screen on matchdays. Despite the ambition for an enhanced capacity, we recognise that there is a uniquely intimate matchday atmosphere at the Rec. It is our intention that this should be protected in the new stadium and that, whilst spectators are focused on the rugby, there remains a sense within the ground that one could only be in Bath. We recognise that all of these considerations will need to be explored and tested against the many other important considerations for the design process.

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LEAD ARCHITECT APPOINTMENT The appointment of th e le a d a r ch it e ct , t o le a d t h e d e sig n team and c ommenc e t h e fo r m a l d e sig n p r o ce ss, is a n important milestone f o r t h is p r o je ct . T h e u n iq u e n a t u r e o f t his projec t and its settin g r e q u ir e a sp e cia l d e sig n a p p r o a ch , w hic h is reflec ted in the se le ct io n p r o ce ss we a r e u n d e r t a k in g for this role. A shortlist o f ca n d id a t e s will b e d r a wn u p a n d we will eng ag e with th e m in b o t h in fo r m a l a n d m o r e fo r m a l setting s. The selec tio n p r o ce ss a n d e m p h a sis o n ce r t a in selec tion c riteria is b ase d o n fe e d b a ck fr o m t h e p r e -d e sig n workshop phase, with p a r t icu la r r e g a r d t o co m m e n t s fr o m tec hnic al an d p la n n in g st a ke h o ld e r s.

We hav e id entified t h e fo llo win g ke y a r e a s t o a sse ss: 1 . W H AT T H E Y D O 2. WHO THEY ARE AND HOW THEY INTERACT 3. HOW THEY WORK

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St adi um fo r Bat h w ill e n g a g e in fu ll wit h t h e sh o r t list e d c and id ates in b oth in fo r m a l wo r k sh o p s a n d m o r e fo r m a l setting s in ord e r t o su p p o r t t h e se le ct io n p r o ce ss.

W H AT T H E Y D O Is a reference to the past design work undertaken by the architect. Stadium for Bath is particularly interested in how potential architects will address the unique nature of the site and the key elements of quality architecture, heritage, sport and destination or place-making. It is also important that candidate architects can demonstrate an openness in terms of architectural aesthetic, as the best solution will involve a blend of responses to the various factors identified in this document as opposed to imposing a certain design on the site.

WHO THEY ARE AND HOW THEY INTERACT Emphasises the importance of human factors in the design journey. It is important to understand who at a candidate architectural practice will lead the project and to understand that person and their team. We believe that a successful outcome is as much about the interaction with key stakeholders through the design journey, as it is the pure design work. The selection process will therefore focus as much on the individuals who would lead the design process, as evidence of their past work.

HOW THEY WORK Is a reference to the design process that the candidate architects propose to undertake in order to travel the design journey and find the best solution for the site. This is a unique opportunity, and a unique setting, and the design approach of the candidate architects must reflect that accordingly.

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SECTION 4 APPENDICES 72

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CONTENTS APPENDIX 1 TOWNSCAPE AND PL ACEMAKING L AW, PO LICY AND GUIDANCE N AT I O N A L P O L I C Y A N D G U I D A N C E HISTORIC ENGL AND LOCAL POLICY AND GUIDANCE

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APPENDIX 3 PRE-DESIGN LISTENING WORKSHOPS – FINDINGS 80 C I T Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S 80 CO M M U N IT Y A D D E D VA LU E 80 DELIVERABLE DESIGN 81 ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT 82 NEAR NEIGHBOURS 83 H E R I TA G E 8 3 NOISE AND NUISANCE 84 R I V E R F R O N TA G E A N D P E D E S T R I A N A C C E S S 85 TRANSPORT AND ACCESS 86 D E S I G N O F F A C I L I T I E S A N D M ATC H D AY E X P E R I E N C E 87 S U P P O R T E R S A C C E S S I B I LT Y 88 A C C E S S A N D E G R E S S I N S I D E T H E S TA D I U M 88 A C C E S S A N D E G R E S S O U T S I D E T H E S TA D I U M 89 M ATC H D AY E X P E R I E N C E 90 S TA D I U M FA C I L I T I E S 91 SEASON TICKET HOLDERS AND SUPPORTERS 92 C O M M U N I T Y, C I T Y A N D E C O N O M I C R E S O U R C E 92 D E S I G N O F F A C I L I T I E S A N D M ATC H D AY E X P E R I E N C E 93 TRANSPORT AND ACCESS 94 B AT H R U G B Y S U P P O R T E R S U R V E Y 95 WIDER COMMUNITY 96 COMMUNITY 96 DESIGN 97 ECONOMY 98 NEIGHBOURLINESS 99

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APPENDIX 1 TOWNSCAPE AND PLACEMAKING

Bath and North East Somerset Council has an excellent range of documents which describe the city’s adopted policy on townscape issues, often with specific relevance to the Rec. The stadium design should have regard for this guidance, noting in particular: • The Core Strategy • The Placemaking Plan • The Bath Pattern Book •T  he Public Realm and Movement Strategy documents •T  he City of Bath World Heritage Site Management Plan • The Bath Brand • The City of Bath World Heritage Site Setting Supplementary Planning Document

The BANES Core Strategy sets out in very specific terms the aspiration for a recreational, sporting and cultural stadium at the Rec. The subsequent Placemaking Plan provides more detail on the specifics of this aspiration and the associated Bath Pattern Book gives excellent guidance on the fine details of appropriate architectural and landscape responses in the city. Supplementary planning guidance for Bath, though not policy, provides valuable advice on aspects such as the city’s World Heritage status, the treatment of its listed buildings and of the Conservation Area. This reinforces the importance of a robust and reasoned heritage approach as the basis for the design philosophy – both to protect the city’s precious features and values and to ensure that the new stadium enhances its rich overall heritage make up. The Rec is of particular importance in BANES Creating the Canvas for Public Life in Bath, Section 2: A refashioned Streetscape and Riverscape. In this it is mentioned that ‘The Recreation Ground would need improved pedestrian connections and access from The River Corridor walkway, a new footbridge crossing and connections to Laura Place will help to tackle pedestrian congestion related to major sporting events and support new initiatives to broaden the activities hosted at these venues.’

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L AW, POLICY AND GUIDANCE S TAT U TO R Y D U T I E S Sections 66(1) and 72 of Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 set out statutory duties concerning the conservation of listed buildings and conservation areas respectively. The duties in respect of world heritage sites are covered in the 1972 World Heritage Convention. County of Avon Act 1982 – section 33, gives Bath and North East Somerset Council powers to protect the natural thermal springs that arise under artesian pressure in the centre of Bath, from damage that could result from excavations, piling operations or bore holes in the Bath area.

N AT I O N A L P O L I C Y AND GUIDANCE National policy and guidance on the historic environment are set out in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) and the associated national Planning Practice Guidance. Section 12 of the NPPF deals with the historic environment; paragraphs 128-140 of that section set out development management policies. Paragraphs 133 and 134 deal with ‘substantial harm’ and ‘less than substantial harm’ respectively, and set out the circumstances in which planning permission may be granted where the public benefits of proposals are determined to outweigh any harm to heritage significance. Such decisions have to be taken in the light of the statutory duties referred to above.

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H ISTORIC ENG L A N D A number of Historic England guidance documents will be relevant to the redevelopment of the Rec, in particular: • Historic Environment Good Practice Advice in Planning Note 2: Managing Significance in Decision-Taking in the Historic Environment (2015). • Historic Environment Good Practice Advice in Planning Note 3: The Setting of Heritage Assets (2015).

LOC A L PO LICY AN D GUIDANCE The building of a new stadium at the Rec is supported in local planning policy. Local planning policies for Bath are set out in the Core Strategy for Bath and North East Somerset Council (BANES), adopted in 2014. As part of the Council’s spatial strategy, Policy B1 8(b) sets out the following strategy in respect of the Recreation Ground: ‘At the Recreation Ground, and subject to the resolution of any unique legal issues and constraints, enable the development of a sporting, cultural and leisure stadium.’ The Council’s draft Placemaking Plan for Bath, 2015, (the ‘PMP’) provides more detail in support of this policy. Policy SB2 – Central Riverside & Recreation Ground sets out site specific guidance in respect of the Recreation Ground.


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APPENDIX 2 C O N S U LT A T I O N W O R K S H O P S – S U M M A R Y O F P R O C E S S WHICH FED INTO THIS DOCUMENT

A number of facilitated workshops were held during the Spring of 2017 with a broad range of city representatives and stakeholders with a diverse range of interests in this project. The purpose of these workshops was to provide a forum for the various interested parties and stakeholders in the project to articulate the matters important to them in relation to the proposed redevelopment. These workshop groups were broken down as follows: • Near Neighbours/ Local Residents including individuals who either do not follow rugby or who are opposed to the principle of redevelopment • City representatives, including representatives from The University of Bath, St Michaels Without, Bath Chronicle, Bath and North East Somerset Council and Bath Recreation Ground Trust • Wider community, including representatives from Bath Half Marathon, Bath Croquet Club, Bath Minis, Bath Rugby Foundation, Bath City Forum, Bath and North East Somerset Councillors and Cycle Bath • Supporters accessibility • Supporters being primarily season ticket holders and including representatives from Bath Rugby Supporters Club and the administrator for the Supporters’ FaceBook page

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• Planning and technical design stakeholders, including representatives from Historic England, Bath Preservation Trust and BANES The workshop sessions were facilitated by an independent facilitator whose name was proposed by a local residents’ association, and who had previous experience of facilitating workshops including the council, local residents and other local stakeholders. The independent facilitator also managed an internal workshop at the Club which involved staff, players and coaches and which will be used to help inform the design process once it is underway. The participants were asked to consider matters important to them in advance of the workshops, and were invited to submit information and key considerations in advance of the workshops. These submissions were discussed during the workshops, and the facilitator encouraged the participants to decide on those themes and matters for discussion that were important to them i.e. the outputs from the workshops were all decided, refined and determined by the participants. In some instances, for example with the local residents workshop group, where there was someone who was unable to attend the workshop but who had voiced opinions then those opinions were incorporated into the workshop by written submission.


The participants of the workshops selfdetermined the themes for discussion and for advice to the redevelopment project team which is captured in this document. The themes were determined by the workshop groups as follows: C I T Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S • Community Added Value • Deliverable Design • Economy and Environment NEAR NEIGHBOURS • Heritage • Noise and Nuisance • River frontage and Pedestrian Access • Transport and Access • Design of facilities and Matchday experience

SEASON TICKET HOLDERS AND SUPPORTERS • Community, City, Economic Resource • Design of facilities and Matchday experience • Transport and Access • Survey Results WIDER COMMUNITY • Community • Design • Economy • Neighbourliness PLANNING AND TECHNICAL D E S I G N S TA K E H O L D E R S • Design philosophy • Heritage philosophy

SUPPORTERS ACCESSIBILITY • Access and Egress inside the Stadium • Access and Egress outside the Stadium • Matchday Experience • Stadium Facilities

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APPENDIX 3 PRE-DESIGN LISTENING WORKSHOPS – FINDINGS

C I T Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S City representatives attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

C O M M U N I T Y A D D E D VA LU E

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Improvements to outfield = improved uses • Trust’s willingness to work with other organisations • Facilities for community use • Creating opportunities to engage and use • Positive ‘listening’ process – allows people to interact • Non-BRFC big games/varsity programme/ combination cup • Opportunity to raise funds, led by Bath Rugby Foundation WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Marketing/promotion of space – ‘closed’ site, no-go pitch area • Disruption caused by stand being put up and down/ rugby club operations • Clarity on what boundaries for discussion area (eg. now legal ruling) • Opposition to more events • Lack of access to site • Pre-set negative position • Could be more non-BRFC events WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Year-round calendar of events – target disadvantaged communities? • Community use focus – wider use • Develop trust that everyone working on this has integrity and wants the best • Outward-facing development • Generating funds for charity?

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WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Be ambitious • Greater role and profile for the Rec Trust • Independent stadium operator? • 4G surface • Ground share with Bath City FC (or others?) • ‘Wow’ factor • Prestige of the site – inspiring, make more of this SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • More than just Bath Rugby • ‘People like me’ go there • I’ve helped make this happen • A city which is proud of the Rec OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Have a year-round calendar of activities which are facilitated by: – 4G pitch – Community space/cafe for all – Can start some of this now • Consider operating model – Ambitious – Community focus – Outward-facing – Prestigious • Continue to expand reach and connections to voluntary community sector throughout BANES


C I T Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S City representatives attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

DELIVERABLE DESIGN

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Design, views, neighbours all being considered • Setting is fantastic, current views out are ok • Legal agreement changes the game • Current capacity is manageable – East Stand arrangements? • Not used all year – is this a negative? • Better communication with neighbours • Good rugby – great atmosphere • Great TV coverage WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Not enough space or fit-for-purpose facilities • Objections to previous schemes • Not enough understanding of impact on neighbours • Disruption from creation and removal of temporary structures • Current design of stadium is a poor mish-mash • Congestion at access points feels dangerous • Views into the Rec are poor • Suggested designs have been undeliverable • Endless legal delays • Stakeholders not aligned with club?

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Create a stadium of inspired design, capable of year-round multi-use eg. schools, amateurs, community events • Ensure the consequences of mixed use is designed in OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Clear design brief for the way the stadium will be used • Make a decision • Design competition – pros and cons • Should there be a plan B? • Clarify/challenge residents on what they want • Pursue inspired/ambitious design • Building to be proud of • Minimise harm to the city

WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Achieve an inspired design which people buy into • 21st century green solution – causing minimum disruption • Make more noise than the tiny minority of opponents • Design in the context of a unique setting which leads into the city WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Make a decision • Get an agreement • Purpose-built stadium with sufficient capacity • International design competition with clear views in the brief • Be realistic – it won’t be able to do everything • Have a plan B in case it can’t be done

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C I T Y R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S City representatives attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

ECONOMY AND ENVIRONMENT

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Club in listening mode – ready to listen • Heritage in a good current position? • Good planning policy platform (current)? • Great backdrop/views – very special open views • Economic benefits • Increase profile of Bath WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Poor riverside • Access routes in – transport • Untapped potential – risk of losing city centre activity • Room for improving current buildings WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • A stadium to be proud of • Discussion over wording – bold, brave, ambitious, imaginative, thoughtful? • Strong link between city and club/stadium • Not in its own bubble • Give it a front door (let it have many doors!) WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Give a voice to majority views • Design from the outside in • Remember our unique selling points which include community added value • Decide and define what is needed/deliverable • Aim to enhance the city

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SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Understand positive and negative impact to the city: doing nothing, building a stadium for Bath leaving the city • Business model that delivers for 12 months rather than just 16 matches a year – accessibility • Not in a bubble, physically or otherwise OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Stadium to be proud of • Environment a key consideration in brief • Respond positively to World Heritage status and historic environment • Design outside in – not focussed entirely on users • Improved riverside environment • Socially and economically productive/successful


NEAR NEIGHBOURS Near neighbours attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

H E R I TAG E

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Relatively low • Trees retained • Tree hide sports centre WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Temporary buildings of poor quality • Disjointed • Does not fit with Grade 1 buildings • Poor riverside • Marquees – outside spread WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Coherent design which fits in the place • Retains and enhances World Heritage status • Question can the stadium be kept at current size 14.5K

FURTHER COMMENTS RELATING TO THIS THEME: • It fits in perfectly with its historical surroundings – it does not dominate the area • Effect on heritage value of key city location • Impact on the views, dominance of the building and the impact on the World Heritage Status • Preservation of the view to the surrounding hills over the top of any development • Development appropriate for its setting in a World Heritage Site while increasing amenities (river front) while preserving and enhancing landscape views • Design must be in keeping and sympathetic to Georgian sandstone city. Visual appearance and effect on sight lines must be a big consideration

WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Understanding views and vistas • Height limits • WHS front in plans SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • The stadium has not detracted from the beauty of the centre of the city • The stadium will not threaten WHS OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Survey views and vista, and impact minimised on sight lines • Height restricted (current level?) • Heritage plan • Design sympathetic and complements the heritage area • Note issue of covered stand

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NEAR NEIGHBOURS Near neighbours attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

NOISE AND NUISANCE

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Nothing • Many are concerned about the issue WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Commercial drivers outweigh everything • Extended period of impact – set up/extended weekend (Fri, Sat & Sun) • Inconsiderate use beyond Rugby • Sheer volume • Music – bass and drums WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Make other groups aware of impact on residents • Enjoy event and get back to normal as quickly as possible • Avoid further commercialisation beyond rugby dates WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Noise restrictions/limits • Two-way communication – more than lip service • Maintain code of practice SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Not ignored • Not battered OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Maintain existing code of practise – club to take ownership • Two-way communication – not just lip-service • Contain within stadium limits (marquee – get rid) • Limits of large events

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FURTHER COMMENTS RELATING TO THIS THEME: • It is not used too regularly for noisy outdoor events in an attempt to recuperate the costs • Improving rather than harming the amenities of local residents • Nuisance to local residents •E  nsuring design and planned use helps the rugby club be good neighbours, seeking to minimise and manage adverse impact where possible (noise, street parking etc.) • Limit the impact on the local area • Increase in noise/inconvenience • Impact on the local community: noise, lighting, access, pollution, anti-social behaviour, flood-risk


NEAR NEIGHBOURS Near neighbours attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

R I V E R F R O N TAG E A N D P E D E S T R I A N AC C E S S

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Access not a problem • Nothing • Unspoilt • Access to and from currently smooth WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Run down • Ugly • Remove the current, ugly gates • Access is still through heavily residential street

FURTHER COMMENTS RELATING TO THIS THEME: •E  nhancing the Bath economy • Adding to the economic and cultural vibrancy of this part of the city. Using the Rec to support communities and businesses that add interest and value to the area • Redevelopment of river frontage • River frontage – to add something to benefit many Bath residents/tourists but careful to avoid noise across the river late evenings. Can the monstrous ‘gate’ be removed at the same time? • Recognising impact on local residents – gives back, eg. improved riverside

WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Start again • Create a piazza-like environment • Replan the whole riverside area • Family-type atmosphere • Better use of river • Focus access through minimal residential area, eg. North Parade and riverside WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • All of it • Work with river authority on better use of river SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Night time economy controls • Long lasting access solutions OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Main access from North Parade and riverside • Reducing access from William Street • Tasteful family/community-led development • Make better use of the river as well as river front (river front not just for rugby days only)

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NEAR NEIGHBOURS Near neighbours attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

TRANSPORT AND ACCESS

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • No parking provided at stadium (ie: not a central magnet for traffic) • A relatively high proportion of fans use public transport • A lot of fans actually arrive at the stadium on foot WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • People driving around endlessly looking for parking • Too many people arrive by car • Lots of illegal parking and inadequate policing • Too often clash with other events • Serious pedestrian congestion around stadium WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Bath Rugby should engage more seriously in encouraging public transport • Should drive public transport and Park & Ride use by other incentives eg. £1 off ticket or beer voucher WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Bath Rugby should fund extra parking wardens • Tow-away trucks (as was done at Bristol stadium) SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • No comments OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Encourage greater use of public transport and P&R scheme by offering incentives (beer voucher, discount on tickets) • Improve pedestrian access to stadium • Fund extra parking wardens and tow-trucks on matchdays • Limit extra capacity to not more than 20,000 • Design brief considers delivery traffic – being confined to North Parade, not Pulteney Mews) • Management of coaches plus not leaving engines running

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FURTHER COMMENTS RELATING TO THIS THEME: • Being swamped by hordes of spectators • Access and security – the Rec should currently be locked at dusk but never is which is already a security concern. Access and security timings from the riverside and William Street need consideration within the design ‘thinking’ • Bath’s parking problem • Traffic flow • Local traffic and noise increase •A  voiding any increase of parking and traffic in the vicinity of stadium •C  ar parking


NEAR NEIGHBOURS Near neighbours attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

D E S I G N O F FAC I L I T I E S A N D M AT C H DAY E X P E R I E N C E

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Very little • Not as high as could be for 18,000 capacity so people can see setting • Communication with residents • Potential private funding could be good for Bath and the design • Current height is acceptable WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Ugly view • Not enough roof cover to avoid fines • Stadium a shambles – no permanent seating – taking it up and down • Not fit for purpose • A generator for nuisance WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Something to be proud of • Private funding could be good for design and stadium • Continue communicating with residents • An acceptable height • Minimalist design – not a barrier to views but does provide cover • Win-win solution • Light, cutting edge class, not pastiche WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Stadium design competition with international participants • Serious technical advice before design – flood plain, grade 1 surrounding buildings etc.

OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Must use the best architects and engineers • International design competition for architect(s) • Design a tourist attraction • Height must fit into setting and not disrupt sight lines FURTHER COMMENTS RELATING TO THIS THEME: • Height/ footprint of stadium •S  ize and height • Access •T  he height and dominance of this design proved unacceptable and I am pleased it has been abandoned • Innovative, world-class design with stand-out architecture – the pride of Bath • Avoiding impact of stadium on WHS sight lines and removing current obstruction of views of Pulteney Bridge from Bathwick, Widcombe • Improve the river frontage • Iconic design • Structural impact, including foundations of adjacent properties as a result of works • Fragility of the structure of houses in Johnstone Street, especially end houses • No commercial signage for name of stadium • Current views from some flats/ houses to Sham Castle acceptable but in danger of being blocked by new development • Community availability • Outfield use/ damage • Key elements of stadium design – height to avoid destroying views of the setting; lightness/ideally transparency of the roof; roof shape (cf. the Irish stadium)

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Want people to visit Bath for this type of design as well as Georgian heritage • Pride in the end result • Satisfaction that nuisance factors are addressed

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SUPPORTERS ACCESSIBILIT Y Club supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

ACCESS AND EGRESS INSIDE T H E S TA D I U M WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Aisle seating • Recognition of need for change • Karen Gill • Stewards are helpful

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Matchday experience • Feel safe/not hassled • Welcome

WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Steep ramp in South stand • Half-time crowds – getting to the toilet, knocking wheelchairs • Support rails • Stairs • Surfaces – gravel, mud, grass – no bubble flooring, white marks on step edges • Narrow gangways

OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Steward training • Accessibility built into the whole ground, not just ‘disabled area’ • Fully integrate with rest of the crowd/friends • Priority/safe access/egress points • Incorporate lifts • Survey

WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Fix all of the above • Priority access for all disabled • Plan disabled seating around the pitch – co-ordinating with priority/wide access and visibility WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Large lift • Surfaces which are low slip and tactile • Visible lines on edges of stairs

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SUPPORTERS ACCESSIBILIT Y Club supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

ACCESS AND EGRESS OUTSIDE T H E S TA D I U M WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Tennis court parking • Karen’s support • Lift in the leisure centre allows safe access from North Parade

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Improved matchday experience • Everyone welcome/caring • Hassle-free

WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Very limited disabled parking (about 7 in leisure centre car park, none at other end?) • Stewarding/gate access • Priority/safer/jostle-free access • Quality of surfaces – even • Wheelchair access from street level • Variability of stairs/surfaces

OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Ensure accessibility needs are included in planning/ council negotiations – benefit to all • Provide easily accessible parking and subsequent ground entry • Undertake full survey to understand all • Ensure surfaces are properly designed

WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Park easily • Priority access/egress • Stewards guiding to specific parking • More than one disabled entrance – 4 entrances with access for disabled people to get around each area easily • Close to the ground for disabled drivers WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Understand supporters’ needs – proper survey • Level, smooth access, well lit surfaces around the ground • Clear, high visible lines on each edge of any stairs • Clear, highly visible ambiguous signage

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SUPPORTERS ACCESSIBILIT Y Club supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

M AT C H DAY E X P E R I E N C E

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Depending on seats, view goes from good to very poor • Atmosphere • Depending on seats, protection from elements goes from good to non-existent • Certain ‘excellent’ stewards • Close to the pitch and therefore the action WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Family with wheelchair user can’t enjoy the experience together • Full team don’t always do a lap of the ground – some are great, wave to all audience, others talk between themselves or perhaps wave to the hospitality boxes and ignore fans below • PA system abysmal • Lighting • Overcrowding in wheelchair area • Radio Bristol always have poor visibility for commentary – sometimes signal blocked • Big screen abysmal, depending on where you sit • Toilets and refreshment areas quite dangerous where they are currently situated and difficult to access • Slippery surfaces • Toilets used by everyone and as storage WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Have as good a view as the one from the hospitality suite • Always see the big screen and small monitors (see Principality Stadium) • PA system, always clear and can hear everything • Great protection from the elements • Wheelchair users with family/carers all together • Somewhere to ‘hold’ drinks with easy access for immobile. Level is important • All areas accessible to everybody

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WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Signage needs to be coloured/sized – contrast yellow on dark blue • Stewards with knowledge and training – outside the ground and inside • Raised views for wheelchairs • Large lift access • Better and more toilet facilities • Speak and consult to sight impaired and hearing impaired fans and specialist ‘gadgets’ that enable them to hear and see everything – James Dyson?! SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • To feel safe, inclusive, to have had a great time with no obstructions, where everything went smoothly. • To feel you would definitely come back • To feel part of the crowd, part of the atmosphere • If a medical emergency occurred, that the staff/ stewards/medics are trained and efficient in acting quickly – knowing that everything possibly could be done • Medical facility close OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Get unrestricted viewing with full PA system working • Be able to sit down with friend/family • Continue interaction with these groups and feedback


SUPPORTERS ACCESSIBILIT Y Club supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

S TA D I U M FAC I L I T I E S

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Not a lot WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • No low bar levels throughout stadium • Food facilities are over gravel, grass and mud • Disabled toilets limited and used by everyone • PA system poor • South stand – incline too steep, not D.D.A compliant • Current wheelchair seating – not possible to have family near • Supporters in front stand up and block view • Not enough separation between seating and bar • Certain locations don’t allow visual access unless wheelchair is at an angle – review where wheelchair spaces are located

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Better visual enjoyment with elevated and better located wheelchair seats and dedicated aisle seats – would allow positioning of TV monitors, pull-up tables and positioning of better located disabled loos • Minimise discomfort and frustration • Accessible bars, food stations and programmes • If surfaces where improved, disabled supporters could have access to the off-pitch entertainment (you try getting into the Swift Half with the band playing) OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Have a point of contact on matchdays • Do away with Samba band

WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Have a better view • Accessible facilities – food, drink, programmes • ‘Pull up tables’ at own height to rest drinks, food etc. on • Wheelchair user position should be elevated • Better quality/quantity of disabled toilets – eg. MOBILOO! • T V monitors to reproduce large screen • Have a roof! • Stairs need to be standard with better rails. Think about sight impaired using standard stairs WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • All of the above • Better access, facilities for drinking, eating, socialising OUTSIDE of the ground

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SEASON TICKET HOLDERS AND SUPPORTERS Season ticket holders and supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

C O M M U N I T Y, C I T Y, E C O N O M I C R E S O U R C E

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Matchday income – Rec and city/shops • Bath Rugby city synonymous – corporate pride • Rugby-focussed community/youth activity • Club/staff are inclusive – communicate well (residents, community, supporters’ groups) • Range of commercial sponsors • Stadium is full, waiting list WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Rec income only on matchdays (liability, not asset) • Not welcoming to ‘outside’ users – only rugby • No restaurants/retail/other facilities • Move to Farleigh affected profile of club/Rec, including universities • No front door focus points ‘The Wreck’ • Not enough youth engagement? • No link to leisure centre – not integrated into city infrastructure WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Multi purpose facilities for all • Integrate with city events/programme • Rec is a destination, open all week • Support Bath city economic development plan • Engage positively with all stakeholders • Better promote history of the club • Showcase best environmental/sustainable practice • Inspire young people to exercise/take up sport • Adopt and exploit best practice from elsewhere

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WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? •B  e an outward-facing organisation • International-standard facilities • Rugby first • Multi purpose facilities for all • Integrate with city events/programme • Rec is a destination, open all week • Support Bath city economic development plan • Engage positively with all stakeholders • Better promote history of the club •S  howcase best environmental/sustainable practice • Inspire young people to exercise/take up sport • Adopt and exploit best practice from elsewhere SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Proud • Engaged • Valued • Included • Safe and comfortable • Inspired • Satisfied OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Have international-standard rugby facilities • A welcoming facility, open all week • Income-generating facilities which benefit community and city • Integrated part of wider sporting network • Showcase environmental/sustainable practices • Strategic vision for sustainable Bath Rugby within Bath


SEASON TICKET HOLDERS AND SUPPORTERS Season ticket holders and supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

D E S I G N O F FAC I L I T I E S A N D M AT C H DAY E X P E R I E N C E WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Improved facilities eg. access to toilets/drinks • Being able to use terraces? • Good social atmosphere and entertainment • The current view from the ground?? • The emotional ‘feel’ • The opportunity – blank canvas and permission to change WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Poor seat views, seat space, accessibility • No roof • The supporter ‘journey’ from scanner to seat x2 • Toilet facilities – different gender experience • T V screens, PA • Clubhouse and bar ‘high end’ • Boxes do not look ‘high end’

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Part of Bath/integrated with Bath (city and club) • Valued as ‘customers’ and supporters • Have a good/great matchday experience • Want to come back • World class OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Preserve the view of the city and surroundings • Continue current progress towards a world-class facility • Improve accessibility in all respects • Have a range of provision to meet the needs of a diverse range of expectations • Consult a wide range of ‘experts’ to learn from other stadia/facilities • Plan and design for now and the future • View of pitch for all

WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Start again with a blank canvas • Have a wider gap between seats x2 • Have sufficient capacity to meet demand • Keep the view? • Design the supporter journey from beginning to end • Improved acoustics for supporters and players • Take in the surrounding riverside as part of the experience WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Consider impact on Bath residents x2 • Threaten to move if key needs not being met • Make sure every supporter budget is being met • Use interim time to try out/practise supporter experience options • Design the flow of people to meet available time (eg. half term)

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SEASON TICKET HOLDERS AND SUPPORTERS Season ticket holders and supporters attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

TRANSPORT AND ACCESS WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Train links (most of the time) • Park & Ride • People obeying stewards • Season ticket entrance (although needs to be bigger) • Club promoting public transport • Bike racks WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Time to exit East Stand (time consuming and dangerous) • Not enough exits • Sports centre exit too narrow/too many people • North Parade steps onto road • Tunnel behind terrace • Parking – non-existent • Park & Ride access – too hard? Need increased capacity • Buses – same timetable as non-matchdays. Need increased capacity • Lack of steward training – not enough and not enough powers WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Larger season ticket access • P&R just for club • Dedicated parking • Get out quickly and easily – especially the East Stand • More comfortable seats – people might stay in them! • Ban smokers • Be able to leave early and not block sight lines (stand design)

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WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Liaise with BANES/GWR at start of season re: transport • Easy access to stands and Rec • Access – always consider safety (what would happen in a fire?) SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • That a day at the rugby will be easy and safe • Organised and in control • Welcoming to all • Feels like a great day out, not a chore OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Access to Rec and stands is quick, easy and safe (re: current arrangements with East Stand) • Club liaises with BANES/GWR/First Bus at start of season – put on extra services if possible • Consider safety in ground and Bath • Consider how increased capacity will have a knock-on effect • Parking at sites like Lambridge (we used to be able to park at Lambridge and walk, why not any more?)


Following on from the workshops facilitated with the supporters and supporters’ accessibility groups, we issued a survey to the wider supporter base taking account of the key matters raised during the workshops. Whilst the survey required a simplification of key matters into individual themes or items, it enabled us to obtain a ranking of the relevant importance of key items from a very broad x-section of supporters. The table (right), shows each concept ranked in order, with 1 being the most important to the majority of supporters. The results are based on a total of 1613 survey responses. RANK

CATEGORY

FACTOR

1

At your seat/terrace

Clear sight lines of all areas of the pitch

2

At your seat/terrace

Clear sight lines of big screen(s)

3

Before kick off

Effective queue management

4

Before kick off

Friendly, social atmosphere

5

At your seat/terrace

Clear audio for announcements and music

6

At your seat/terrace

Design of stadium bowl for maximum crowd acoustics/atmosphere

7

In and around the stadium

Multiple entry points to the complex

8

Before kick off

The Riverside setting and view of Bath

9

In and around the stadium

Ease and speed of entry into stadium

10

At your seat/terrace

Roof/covered seating/terracing

11

Factors for development

For the stadium to play a key role in City events/programmes

12

In and around the stadium

Knowledge and expertise of stewards

13

Factors for development

To inspire people to take up sport

14

Before kick off

Friendliness of staff

15

In and around the stadium

Ease and speed of time to/from seat during a match/half time

16

At your seat/terrace

Increased leg room/space between seats/rows

17

Factors for development

To be a platform to promote the history of Bath Rugby

18

In and around the stadium

Ease and speed of exit time after a match

19

At your seat/terrace

Comfort of seat improved

20

Factors for development

To be a case study for environmental best practice/sustainability

21

At your seat/terrace

Width/size of seat improved

22

Getting to and from the stadium

Extra train and bus links on matchdays

23

Before kick off

A range of bars to suit different tastes

24

Factors for development

A multi purpose site, open all year round

25

Factors for development

Ability to host other events (eg. music concerts)

26

Factors for development

Ability to host sporting occasions other than rugby

27

Factors for development

Availability to community groups

28

Before kick off

Wide range of food available

29

At your seat/terrace

Availability of terrace for safe standing

30

Before kick off

Digital connectivity/wi-fi

31

Factors for development

Availability to local businesses and university

32

At your seat/terrace

LED screens and lighting to build atmosphere

33

Getting to and from the stadium

Park & Ride service

34

Before kick off

Matchday restaurant(s) (non-hospitality)

35

In and around the stadium

Improved access from the city centre to the stadium perimeter

36

Before kick off

General eg. Concourse TV

37

Before kick off

Bath Rugby retail outlets

38

Getting to and from the stadium

Park & walk service

39

At your seat/terrace

Positioning of players tunnel

40

Before kick off

Dedicated family area

41

Getting to and from the stadium

Car parking near stadium

42

In and around the stadium

Dedicated areas for different audiences eg. family

43

Before kick off

Live entertainment pre and post-match

44

Before kick off

Rugby related eg. Q&A

45

At your seat/terrace

Pre-match and half-time entertainment

46

At your seat/terrace

At-seat technology (such as pre-ordering or radio commentary)

47

Before kick off

Music

48

In and around the stadium

A dedicated ‘front door’ entrance to the complex

49

Before kick off

Designated meeting points and photo backdrops

50

Getting to and from the stadium

Car parking at stadium

51

Getting to and from the stadium

Bicycle racks

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WIDER COMMUNITY Members of the wider community attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

COMMUNITY

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Open public access to Rec on non-matchdays • Physical facilities recently improved significantly (Rec) • Recently improved use of outfield and Pavilion for schools and community groups • A number of successful groups currently using Bath Rec • Voluntary sector flourishing but need a hub to develop further (the stadium!) • Communication and relationship improved between users and Rec Trust WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Ugly structure • Stadium has minimal use outside of rugby games • Damage to outfield of Swift Half inhibiting other use eg. Lacrosse • Poor access to site eg. disabled, public vehicles WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Follow lead of Bath City FC to improve/build community facilities (good working practice) • Community groups able to use stadium as a hub • Address all of TWO • Provide clarity of purpose – resolution – get on with it! WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Minimise disruption during build period • Ensure continued use for current users following development • Design to include maximum community use facilities eg. voluntary sector • Improve site access SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • The Rec provides facilities for all in Bath and not just related to rugby • The stadium is a hub that can be used by the community throughout the year

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OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Design to incorporate maximum community use of both the new stadium and outfield on nonmatchdays – both established and new users. By community use we mean sports other than rugby, voluntary sector (community hub), community events, schools and residents’ groups. • Improved access onto and around the site • Temporary power/toilets/drainage to be supplied to remove costs, noise, inconvenience etc. of temporary services for other events • Define footprint of stadium to take into account the effect of additional structures (Swift Half) on other users/neighbours


WIDER COMMUNITY Members of the wider community attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

DESIGN

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Close to the pitch/players • Atmosphere/ambience pre-game • Access to the stadium • Use of the Rec post-match (outfield) WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Toilet facilities (too many queues) • Circulation within the ground • Weather exposure • Stadium under utilised • Match info during game – 2 screens • Sight lines from seats? WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Other users for the stadium • Improve sight lines from all seats • Flow between facilities and seats • Blend corporate facilities with other stands • DDA (disability) access and area

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • That the stadium is integral to the community • That people have some pride in the club and the design of the stadium • Local residents don’t feel like it’s a constant irritation • Users of the Rec aren’t inconvenienced during the build OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • The design maintains closeness to the pitch • I mprove sight lines throughout the ground •L  ook at toilet queue management • Screen visibility from all areas eg. two • Weather protection – spectators • Increased community use •D  DA accessibility and seating • Totally respect the heritage and beauty of the city

WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Lower the pitch! (subject to archaeology) • Allow access around the ground

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WIDER COMMUNITY Members of the wider community attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

ECONOMY

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Existing facilities bringing more people into the city = more money, (possible displacement of locals) • Lots of new developments • Tourism – Christmas market • Student numbers impacting local economy • Increase in numbers of SMEs • On matchdays the city is clearly very busy WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Too many students affecting economic development • Increased business rates – empty shops • Lack of affordable housing • Park & Ride • Rail development • Current poor Rec facility WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Build the stadium tomorrow – help economic growth • Resolve Park & Ride issues • Electrify the railway • Balanced economy which would enhance the economy? WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Planning developments for economic growth • Build a 21st century stadium • Resolve transport issues • Help reduce business rates

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SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • A stadium that reflects the heritage of the city • A design that allows for stadium use all year round OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Build a stadium that enhances the economic growth of the city • Link Park & Ride with matchdays + incentives • Do some analysis of uplifts and negative market impact to retailers on matchdays (ask Bath Bid?)


WIDER COMMUNITY Members of the wider community attended our pre-design listening workshop. Their responses to various questions are reproduced verbatim below.

NEIGHBOURLINESS

WHAT’S GOING WELL NOW WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Brexit established • Bath Rugby commitment to local community eg. school rugby • Dissemination of information (proactive) • Reacting to neighbours’ complaining eg. noise disturbance and alcohol • Tangible evidence of investment on the Rec eg. Pavilion WHAT’S NOT GOING SO WELL WITH THIS KEY THEME? • Unsure future for some Rec users • Traffic congestion • Poor quality of current environment eg. constant building site • Threat of another legal challenge (time, money) WHAT DO WE WISH WE COULD DO? • Build a world-class stadium for major tournaments • Not an eyesore! Keen focus on heritage • Vibrant riverside • Decent team/winning ways? • Return on investment – more for neighbours • Integration of sport centre and Pavilion (demolish and enlarge scheme)

SO THAT PEOPLE IDEALLY THINK AND FEEL THE FOLLOWING THINGS: • Reassured • Confident that they have been involved • Valued • Looking forward to the future • Positive about change OUR RECOMMENDATIONS ARE THAT WE… • Looking to solve matchday issues that impact on the neighbours – traffic, noise, inconvenience – and that the new stadium will help with this objective • Looking to use this opportunity to improve the Rec environment and provide facilities (sporting and non-sporting) • Continue to involve neighbours in the planning of the project • Must appreciate the impact on neighbours’ quality of life!

WHAT SHOULD WE SERIOUSLY CONSIDER DOING? • Consider wider use of facilities for ‘non-rugby’ neighbours • Robust business planning • Wide consultation with neighbours – local and beyond • Pre-empt any criticism

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S TA D I U M F O R B AT H . C O M

Stadium for Bath: Exploring the Opportunity  

Creating something exceptional in the heart of Bath