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Social Design

Stacy Asher


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Cover art photograph by Amanda Breitbach. “Design Justice / Design Change,� graphics by Carlos Velasco for the Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop. Social designer, Katharen Hedges.

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I design to engage participants in the visualization of social change.

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Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, September 2015 Joyce Bingeman demonstrates to Katharen Hedges how to screen print a graphic onto her jean jacket. Photograph by Amanda Breitbach.


Stacy Asher

Social Design Assistant Professor of Art Department of Art + Art History

Creative and Scholarly Research Tenure and Promotion Document for External Review University of Nebraska-Lincoln

06.22.2016

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Participants of the Design + Social Justice Symposium screen printing workshop learned methods to visually communicate while investigating how graphic design is at the core of social movements. University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, Sheldon Museum of Art, September 2015.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 11 Philosophy of Social Design

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Curriculum Vitae 21 Creative Research Statement

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Portfolio 39

Design + Social Justice Symposium

Collaborations / Socially Engaged Art + Design 119

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Design Exhibitions 141

Professional Appointments Commissioned Design

Social Design 187

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Social change is an alteration of cultural patterns and social structure.

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Introduction Visual communications and graphic design, are often components of social design. They make knowledge and information visible, tangible and shareable. I use art and design, in particular, social design, to stimulate conversation and focus attention on the environment, history, and civic engagement—with goals of raising awareness to social concerns, encouraging public participation, establishing connections and building community. I am a careful observer of the ways in which design shapes and is shaped by culture. The projects I facilitate as an educator, artist and activist are intended to reveal the role of design to the world, promote an understanding of the significance of design in society, and to celebrate design as art. Recent social design projects include the coordination of the Design + Social Justice Symposium held at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Collaboratively organized with my colleague, Aaron Sutherlen, the events and exhibitions of the symposium examined the role of graphic design as a tool for organizing action towards change. The visual communications, stories and portraits of revolutionary social movements from the 60’s and 70’s, including the Black Panther Party, active from 1966 until 1980, were featured as the primary case study. The graphic design artifacts presented revealed how design, in particular, visual communications, can be an essential tool in the organization of social movements. The exhibitions, discussions, and presentations of the symposium represented the role of art and visual communications as a revolutionary force and reveal how the visual arts can communicate a need for social change. The symposium examined the role of graphic and social design in creating messages that promote civil and human rights, preservation of the environment, and advocacy of equal opportunity. Currently, I am working collectively with a talented team of designers, historians, photographers and public relations experts in the launching of a publication design project and two exhibitions that stem from the Design + Social Justice Symposium. The exhibition openings and book launching will be held in the San Francisco Bay Area and will open in October to coincide with the 50th Anniversary of the formation of the Black Panther Party.

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Philosophy of Social Design My research investigates the role that social and graphic design play in creating change. Form, presence, and expression give meaning to content through a process of design. Design is a mode, vehicle or plan to organize. It is used to solve problems and to serve a function. Design is the art of arrangement. Creating contexts for ideas to evolve and situations to generate a shift in perception are methods of social design. These opportunities can produce dialogue, provide information, and encourage participation. Social design and visual culture can communicate a message, create community, educate, uplift and empower, sway opinion, change hearts and minds and foster a sense of identity and pride. Social design projects I facilitate are intended to explore the relationship of people with each other and to their surroundings, while focusing on civic engagement and responsibility. A social designer constructs educational opportunities; arranging situations for the demonstrating of skills, for the exchange of methods and strategies and for the sharing of knowledge. Social design, or social practices in art, is my primary mode of form-making, producing situations for public engagement with the goal of generating new knowledge and raising awareness for social causes. I use social design as a collaborative process that contributes to improving human well-being and livelihood. My projects seek to induce questioning and wonder in order to reveal systems of power and influence. They are intended to help people perceive different perspectives and think more critically while examining the meaning behind visual representation and patterns of human behavior.

“Revolution is a Process Not an Event�, graphic by Carlos Velasco for the Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, September 2015.

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Over 100 participants learned the basic skills of screen printing during the Design + Social Justice Symposium Screen Printing Workshop. Joyce Bingeman, artist, explains the process to attendees ready to print social justice related graphics on a re-purposed t-shirt. Photographs by Amanda Breitbach.

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Social designers are mindful of – The designer’s role in and responsibility to society. The use of design methods to create social change.

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Objectives of social design – Design situations to cause a shift in perception, produce dialogue, socially engage, share information, and encourage participation. Create moments for reflection. Create contexts for ideas to evolve. Inspire action.

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Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, September 2015. Joyce Bingeman demonstrates to Katharen Hedges how to print a graphic onto her jean jacket.

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A brief account of my education, qualifications, and experience.

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Curriculum Vitae

Contents Education 21 Faculty Appointments 21 Interests / Areas of Research

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Teaching Accomplishments

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Creative and Scholarly Research

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Published Works & Presentations 23

Exhibitions / National 25 Exhibitions / Regional 27

Commissioned Design Work

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Professional Appointments

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Creative Activity / Collaborations

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Grants and Awards and Research Grants

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Press Coverage / Scholarly Reviews

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Items in the Curriculum Vitae listed in pink are included in the Portfolio.

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Curriculum Vitae Stacy Asher (415) 312 7810 stacyasher@unl.edu

stacyasher.com

Education California College of the Arts. San Francisco, California MFA in Design [honors] 1999 Maine College of Art Summer Institute in Graphic Design. Portland, Maine 2002

University of Colorado. Boulder, Colorado Graduate coursework in printmaking and digital arts 1999

1991

University of Nebraska Medical Center. Omaha, Nebraska Biomedical Communications / Medical Illustration Post Baccalaureate Certificate

1989

University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, Nebraska Bachelor of Arts / Integrated Studies Biology and Fine Art [drawing emphasis]

Faculty Appointments 2013 – present

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Department of Art & Art History. Lincoln, Nebraska Assistant Professor of Art Advanced Graphic Design, Beginning Graphic Design, Typography, Advanced Design Research Methodologies, Design for Social Change

2011 – 2013

San Francisco State University Department of Design & Industry. San Francisco, California Part-Time Faculty Advanced Graphic Design, Principles of Design, Design Research Strategies

2008 – 2013

University of San Francisco Department of Art & Architecture. San Francisco, California Part-Time Faculty Design + Social Change [Design Seminar], Visualizing San Francisco: Exploring Signage & Public Spaces [First Year Seminar + Students in Transition], Typography, Design Media I, Design Media II Publication Design

2003 – 2008

Ohio University School of Art. Athens, Ohio Assistant Professor Typography, Design Principles/Introduction to Graphic Design, Junior/Senior Design Seminars, History of Design + Social Change, Senior Practicum, New Media and the development of Foundations courses

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Faculty Appointments [continued]

2002 – 2003

The University of Dayton. Dayton, Ohio Visiting Assistant Professor Form + Content, Visual Form, Multi-Media I [Final Cut Pro, Adobe After Effects, Sound Edit, DVD Studio Pro] Multi Media II [Flash, Dreamweaver], Video for Artists, and Design Processes and Concepts.

2000 – 2002

California College of the Arts [California College of Arts and Crafts] San Francisco, California Teaching Assistant [Undergraduate Design Department]

1998 – 2000

Metropolitan State College of Denver. Denver, Colorado Area Coordinator [Communication Design Department] Courses: Communication Design, Typography, Identity Design, and Advanced Publication Design

1996 – 1998

Colorado Mountain College. Steamboat Springs, Colorado Instructor: Beginning and Advanced Drawing, Color Theory, Design Elements and Principles.

Interests / Areas of Research Design + Social Change, Food Democracy, Food, Fuel, Water and the Changing Climate, Social Implications of Design, Pedagogy, Identity and Branding, Communication Theories, Cultural Consumption, Semiotics, Design Research and Methods, Sustainability and the Environment

Teaching Accomplishments Social Justice + Design

United Students Against Sweatshops faculty mentor of founding group, Co-directed the Design + Social Justice Symposium at UNL, Facilitated Revolutionary Art Screen Printing Workshops for over 200 participants, Spoke on the Sheldon Museum of Art’s, Living Activism Panel Discussion during Art + Social Justice Week, Spoke to over 100 Social Justice and Human Rights and the Media students about the role of visual communications in promoting human rights.

Environmental Art + Design

Pink Dot Experiment, DROUGHT Symposium, Collaboration with San Francisco State University Design & Industry to publish a booklet about the future of food and the implications of drought, Earth Day Screen Printing Shop, Prairie Pines Nature Preserve exhibition of art and design. Future of Water exhibition at UNL Innovation Campus during the Water for Food Institute Global Conference

Socially Engaged Art

UNL Social Practice Coalition faculty mentor of founding group, coordinate socially engaged art activities. The UNL Social Practice Coalition created successful public engaged activities, including the The People’s State of the Union through the US Department of Arts and Culture, Earth Day Print Shop, Design / Art + Social Justice Revolutionary Screen Printing Shops and a public screening of digital works in celebration of Women’s Week at the University of Nebraska.

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Creative and Scholarly Research

Published Works 2016

Crafting Stories About Water and the City: Transdisciplinary Design Collaboration for Social Impact, and Pedagogical Methods Co-authored an article that chronicles the collaboration between graphic design students from disparate cultures and geographies. Stacy Asher (University of Nebraska–Lincoln) and Joshua Singer (San Francisco State University) AIGA Design Educators Community Journal, Collaborative Design Education, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, 2017.

2013

Crafting Stories About Water and the City: Transdisciplinary Design Collaboration for Social Impact, and Pedagogical Methods Stacy Asher (University of Nebraska–Lincoln) and Joshua Singer (San Francisco State University) AIGA Design Educators Community Journal, 2014.

2007

What We Want is Free: Generosity and Exchange in Recent Art Contributed essays that addressed the role of art, social design and graphic design and principles of generosity. Edited by Ted Purves, State University of New York, SUNY Press, 2005.

Presentations 2016

2015

2015

2015

Designing Social Justice Open Engagement – POWER Oakland Museum of California Presented my research on the role of design in creating social change at this annual conference of social practice art. Themes of the conference were guided by keynote speakers Angela Davis, civil rights scholar and activist and Suzanne Lacy, artist and activist. Oakland, California Living Activism / Designing Change Women’s Week 2016 University of Nebraska-Lincoln As the key note speaker, I presented my research on the role of visual communications to inspire action and movement towards social change. Lincoln, Nebraska Designing Social Justice in the Heartland Visiting Artist / Designer San Diego State University / Design & Art Department Presented a talk on the role of art and design in promoting social justice. Sponsored by the AIGA Chapter of SDSU. San Diego, California Living Activism Sheldon Museum of Art Art + Social Justice Program University of Nebraska-Lincoln I spoke on a panel discussion that was open to the public about the role of art and activism. Lincoln, Nebraska

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Creative and Scholarly Research

Presentations [continued] 2013

Crafting Stories About Water and the City: Transdisciplinary Design Collaboration for Social Impact, and Pedagogical Methods AIGA: Head, Heart, Hand / Biennial Design Conference Joshua Singer (San Francisco State University Minneapolis, Minnesota

2012

Word / Image & Image / Word School of the Visual Arts Cultural Studies Conference Presented my research in curriculum design that incorporated the visualization of the city of San Francisco through the exploration of signage and public spaces. New York, New York

2012

Visualizing San Francisco: Exploring Signage & Public Spaces Presidio Lecture Series University of San Francisco San Francisco, California

2011

2011

2007

2006

2006

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The Pink Dot Experiment: Engaging Community + Environmental Awareness Green, Greener, Greenest: Romancing Nature Again The 24th Annual National Conference on Liberal Arts and the Education of the Artists. Presented my research in social design and aesthetic value of street art in contemporary culture. School of Visual Arts New York, New York Typography and You French American School, Department of Art Guest Lecturer / Visiting Artist Presented a talk about typography, identity and visual culture. San Francisco, California Pink Dot Experiment: Intervention in the Heartland Womens Studies Annual Conference Presented research documentation of my social design project at this annual national conference. Oakland, California World Through Wonder Centro | Design, Film, Television Visiting designer and guest lecturer at this school of design and emerging media. Activated social design project in a community workshop. Mexico City, Mexico Understanding the World Through Wonder National Bioethics Conference Presented my research on the function of commercial messages in contemporary culture. Chicago, Illinois


Creative and Scholarly Research

Exhibitions / National 2015

Emory Douglas: The Struggle Continues Sheldon Museum of Art Co-Curated and designed an exhibition of work by internationally recognized artist and AIGA medalist. Generated funding for the exhibition and for Emory Douglas to be artist in residence during the Design + Social Justice Symposium. Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Design + Social Justice Symposium Sheldon Museum of Art / UNL Love Library University of Nebraska-Lincoln Curated and designed exhibitions that examined the role of graphic design and art that promotes civil and human rights, preservation of the environment, and advocacy of equal opportunity. Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Pause AIGA Passion Project The American Institute of Graphic This social design project was selected from over 200 entries to be included in a juried exhibition of graphic design as art. Konkling Gallery / Minnesota State University Mankato, Minnesota

2014

Distraction 01 Artists Alliance Inc. My work was selected to be included in this works on paper exhibition at the 4th bi-annual Works on Paper Benefit held at Cuchifritos Gallery. New York, NY

2014

45 Minutes of Nothing Acre TV / Artists Made Television Invited to include a conceptual video art project that was aired daily on These Streams Program, a curated program of streamed digital art. Chicago, Illinois

2013

The Field Trip - The Abstraction of Politics and the Politics of Abstraction SFMOMA / San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Designed and published a printed field guide for an off site exhibition of social design facilitated by The Center for Tactical Magic. San Francisco, California

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Creative and Scholarly Research

Exhibitions / National [continued] 2012

Like Point of No Return Southern Exposure Exhibited a social design project in this juried show that was curated by Hesse McGraw. San Francisco, California

2012

Highlights San Francisco Urban Prototyping Gray Area Foundation’s Makeathon Festival & Exhibition Selected to participate in this collaboratively designed public installation to create a social space that is well lit and easy to navigate through. San Francisco, California

2012

Generosity City Design + Social Change Seminar Luggage Store Gallery / Streetopia Art Festival Invited to participate in this group exhibition. Posters designed in a social design project were distributed to attendees. San Francisco, California

2011

The Faces of Harvey Milk Performance Harvey Milk Center for the Arts / Pride Festival Parade Designed a street performance to celebrate gay rights leader, Harvey Milk. San Francisco, California

2008

Pink Dot Experiment Grounded: Southern Exposure Facilitated a social design project for this juried exhibition of public art. San Francisco, California

2006

Pink Dot Experiment Crafting a Vision for Art, Equity and Civic Engagement California College of the Arts Center for Art and Public Life Documentation was featured during this symposium and exhibition of social practices in art. Oakland, California

2006

Black Dot Project VERSION 06 Installation of my work was included in a juried exhibition for this annual conference for emerging social practice artists. Chicago, Illinois

2005

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Pink Dot Experiment New Genre Art Ohio University Art Gallery Activated my social design project and display documentation of it in this group exhibition that was curated by Jennifer Klein. Athens, Ohio


Creative and Scholarly Research

2005

Pink Arrows / Eros San Jose Works Queer Arts Festival: Body Commodities Exhibited in this group show of art and design. San Jose, California

2002

Black Dot: The Teaching Project Berkeley Unified School District Superintendents Building Exhibition of a one-year long project that I facilitated with 6th grade students at Berkeley Oxford School. Berkeley, California

1999

There is No More Water Galeria de Arte JosĂŠ Clemente Orozco de la Escuela National Preparatori Exhibited my environmental art project in this group exhibition of art as activism. Mexico City, Mexico

1999

Water, Water, Who has the Water? Galeria Rancho de Comate Cuitolco Collaborated in this environmental art project that raised awareness to water rights and sustainability. Tenango, Mexico

Exhibitions / Regional 2014

Stacy Asher and Daniel Coburn: New Work Metropolitan Community College Gallery of Art and Design Created an installation of design and art that asked participants to reflect on their own behavior in pubic space. Omaha, Nebraska

2014

DROUGHT Center for Great Plains Studies University of Nebraska-Lincoln Designed and curated a library of books that related to the possibility of drought and food scarcity. Lincoln, Nebraska

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Commissioned Design Work

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2016

Revolutionary Grain: Portraits and Stories of the Black Panther Party Collaborating with photographer Suzun Lucia Lamaina on the design and publishing of this book. An exhibition and book promotion of this body of work will be exhibited at the African American History Museum. Oakland, California.

2015

Black Panther Party Annual Conference Program It’s About Time Black Panther Party Designed and published a detailed program for the Black Panther Party that outlines the Party’s role as promoters of civil, human rights and organizers of public assistance programs. Oakland, California

2014

The Field Trip - The Abstraction of Politics and the Politics of Abstraction Field Guide SFMOMA [San Francisco Museum of Modern Art] Off Site Exhibition Designed and published this publication that served as a guide to the exhibition located on Angel Island State Park. San Francisco, California

2014

The University of Colorado Boulder Fine Arts Alumni Newsletter Designed the annual report and generated a web site using a content managed system so that news and social media feeds could be integrated by department and participants in the programs. Boulder, Colorado

2014

Walking in Sacred Woods / Islands of Life Bo Boudart Productions Designed a visual identity, title graphics, promotional materials and festival promotions for this film about the preservation of the environment. Distributed at international environmental film festivals. Both films explore the spectacular wildlife and habitats, rich history and vibrant culture of the people who live in these endangered places. San Bruno, California

2013

Forms of Identification Kristin Tieche Films Designed a visual identity, title graphics, promotional materials and festival promotions for this film about Lymes disease. A poster, DVD jacket and postcard was screen printed using re-purposed papers. San Francisco, California

2010

Earth from Above Collaborated with a team of designers on the content and interactivity of a promotional website that addressed the importance of sustainable development, requesting individuals to make responsible actions for the future of our planet. San Francisco, California


Commissioned Design Work

2010

Peralta Community College District Designed promotional materials for programs in Microscopy, Animation, Media Communications and Global Information Systems. Programs were designed for middle school aged students to generate interest in future career opportunities. Oakland, California

2009

Nebraska Regional Programs for Students Who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing Designed and published a web site and resource directory for this Nebraska Department of Education organization. The site provided parent trainings, support for professionals and promotion of scholarship and academic achievements. Hastings, Nebraska

2007

Trisha Brown Dance Company Collaboratively designed a promotional poster for a retrospective performance by internationally known dance company, Trisha Brown. The poster was for the Master Artist’s Series at the The University of South Florida Institute for Research in Art. Gainesville, Florida

2006

Stephen Burrow’s World Designed DVD collateral and promotions for documentary film about an renown African American fashion designer. The film is the basis of another documentary under development by Patrick di Santo and has been distributed at various international film festivals. New York, New York

2005

SFMOMA [San Francisco Museum of Modern Art] Retrospective Catalogue for Lynn Kirby Video Artist Designed and published an artist’s catalogue to illustrate a body of work related to the history of women in video art. Publication was distributed through SFMOMA’s bookstore during the exhibition. San Francisco, California

2005

Deeper Shades of Soul Designed graphics for apparel that was part of a line of clothing that was produced in collaboration with silk screen artists in Bali, Indonesia. The line of clothing was distributed at local boutiques and shops throughout California, Indonesia, Japan, and Hong Kong. Environmentally, socially responsible garments were produced to raise awareness to harsh working conditions in sweat shop factories. San Francisco, California

2001

Lars Müller Publishers Created a publicity campaign for a visiting designer lecture at the California College of Arts. The designer and publisher, Lars Müller requested copies of the promotional materials for his archive. The silk screened posters were produced without the use of a computer and used only re-purposed papers. San Francisco, California

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Professional Appointments

2000 - present

Artist / Designer Lincoln, Nebraska Designer / Creative Director / Artist Utilizing art and design as a bridge to connect communities in innovative and meaningful ways. Practice is founded on the belief that art and design can be a vehicle for social justice and greater civic engagement. Developing integrated collateral in support of client presence using online and traditional print and web production approaches.

2010 – 2011

San Francisco Recreation and Park Department San Francisco, California Visual Art / Digital Art Coordinator Made a critical contribution to the field of visual / digital arts and design through community arts administration and development. Participated in grant writing process to secure funding from Google for Digi-Mobile, a transportable, digital arts learning environment. Created design and social art practices [After School Art Program, Project Insight: Adaptive Recreation] that generated enriching experiences and introduced programs in the digital and visual arts to citizens of San Francisco.

2009 – 2010

Oakland Unified School District Oakland, California Academic Consultant Used art and design to assist kindergarten students from Spanish speaking homes in developing their English reading and writing skills as part of the U.S. Department of Education’s “No Child Left Behind” program. Developed curriculum to promote digital and visual literacy in after-school arts program.

2000 – 2002

Cabra Diseño San Francisco, California Designer / Research Assistant Coordinated research and development of public service campaign for the San Francisco Aids Foundation / Gay Life + Black Brothers of Esteem. Provided field research for the production of an extensive Public Service Campaign for HIV prevention situated in the Tenderloin District of San Francisco. Coordinated placement of outdoor signage systems in diverse neighborhoods throughout San Francisco. Developed collateral to promote HIV awareness.

1996 – 1998

Steamboat Springs Arts Council Steamboat Springs, Colorado Executive Assistant for Programs Assisted Development Committee of the Board of Directors in identifying and implementing special events fund-raising. Participated in partner projects that furthered the mission of SSAC to expand the role of educators and professional artists in the community.

1991 – 1997

International Fine Art Expositions Los Angeles, California/Stuart, Florida Exposition Manager [ART MIAMI], Chicago [ART CHICAGO], New York [ART NEW YORK], Hong Kong [ART ASIA-HONG KONG.] Collaborated with local art museums and groups to organize and direct education and community based components for the duration of the exhibitions. Director of Publications Directed the production of all marketing and promotional materials for international art expositions firm. Supervised creative staff of 5 and managed an annual operating budget $1.5 million.

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Creative Activity / Collaborations

University of Nebraska-Lincoln / Department of Art + Art History

2016

Impetus: Water, Food, Fuel and the Changing Environment Nebraska Innovation Campus Advanced Graphic Design and Typography students displayed works that communicated about a particular view, statement, or concept about climate change and the relationship to food, fuel, or water. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Owning It Lincoln’s Railyard Cube / UNL’s Love Library UNL Social Practice Coalition in collaboration with Women’s Week, co-curated exhibitions of 2D, 3D and digital art. A screening of digital film and video works was presented to the public on a giant projection screen. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Prairies Pines / Eyes Open Prairie Pines Nature Preserve College of Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resources Worked with advanced graphic design students to create a pop-up exhibition of design to promote a nature preserve located just outside Lincoln city limits. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Sovereign Native Youth Leadership Screen Printing Workshop Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs Coordinated art making and design workshop for over 80 youths. Students designed their own t-shirts with images that promote science and technology. Nebraska Innovation Studio / Maker Space University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Revolutionary Art and Design Screen Printing Workshops Sheldon Museum of Art Collaboration with the UNL Social Practice Coalition, UNL’s Center for Civic Engagement and the Design + Social Justice Symposium. Collaboratively facilitated a public event for participants to learn screen printing processes and create graphic t-shirts, posters and patches to promote social justice. Lincoln, Nebraska

2015

Lincoln Earth Day City of Lincoln Annual Earth Day Collaborated with UNL Social Practice Coalition to organize a public event to raise awareness of the impact t-shirt manufacturing has on the environment. Participants screen printed over 200 re-purposed t-shirts. The project demonstrated sustainable processes by utilizing only 5 gallons of water. Lincoln, Nebraska

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Creative Activity / Collaborations

University of Nebraska-Lincoln / Department of Art & Art History

2014

a2ru Conference The Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru) Facilitated the opportunity for three design students to participate in a two-day design research event. Collectively designed improvements to a public transit system that was inclusive and accessible to all. Virginia Commonwealth University Richmond, Virginia

2014

Visualizing Wellbeing in Tanzania, Africa College of Agriculture Sciences and Natural Resources Collaborated with students to design publications and visual communications that were used by large animal veterinarians and scientists to promote well being and serve the people of Tanzania. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska

2014

Essential Guide to Remote Viewing Collaborated with graphic design students to design and publish a book by Paul. R Smith, world renown remote viewing specialist. Students developed typographic and publication design solutions to meet client’s specifications. Lincoln, Nebraska

2012

Happiness Summit Center for Civic Engagement Advanced graphic design students engaged in the visualization of happiness and well-being which were on display during the event. University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, Nebraska

2013

Mappa Cibi et Aquae Drought Symposium Conducted a large collaborative project with the advanced graphic design classes at UNL and San Francisco State University. Students worked together on a design research project which investigated the themes and systemic connections between water for food within each class’s respective regions. The Water for Food Institute Lincoln, Nebraska

2013

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The Future of Water Worked with ARUP, a global civil engineering and design firm to collaboratively design a publication about the future of water in urban environments. Students researched one particular component about water systems and designed a chapter that was then published and distributed to ARUP engineers and designers. San Francisco State University San Francisco, California


Creative Activity / Collaborations

San Francisco State University / Design & Industry

2012

Mappa Mundi / Atlases of Food and Water Published an edition of 100 booklets that were distributed to environmental engineers and preservation groups to use as a teaching tool. San Francisco State University San Francisco, California

2012

Fusion: Process & Craft 24th Annual Design and Industry Student Design Exhibition Displayed research project for ARUP about the future of water. Exhibitions were interactive and were intended to educate, inform, and inspire people to become more aware of patterns of behavior that effect water consumption. San Francisco State University San Francisco, California

University of San Francisco / Art + Architecture Department 2011–2012

Design + Social Change Seminar University of San Francisco Designed seminars were open to the public and involved socially engaged art making. Various artists, designers and activists gathered to discuss the role of design for social change. University of San Francisco San Francisco, CA

2011

Generosity City Participants collaboratively designed a large scale poster and website that highlighted free resources in San Francisco. The posters were placed in public places and a web site and application was made to make the sites accessible through social media. University of San Francisco San Francisco, CA

2010

Garden Project / St. Cyprian’s Open Kitchen Project Participants designed signage and publication materials to promote the community garden project at USF. Foods made from community garden produce were offered for free as healthy alternatives to the foods available in city shelters. University of San Francisco San Francisco, CA

2010—2012

Visualizing San Francisco / Exploring Signage in Public Spaces Presented student work at the School of Visual Arts Conference, NYC. Students explored the various districts and neighborhoods in San Francisco by examining the signage from the past, present while considering the future of the neighborhoods. University of San Francisco San Francisco, CA

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Creative and Scholarly Research

Grants and Awards / Funded Research Grants

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2016

UNL’s Hixson-Lied Creative Research Grant Junior Faculty Achievement Award in Research and Creative Activity. All tenure-leading faculty are eligible for this College-wide award.

2016

UNL’s Hixson-Lied Faculty Development Grant Funding to present at Open Engagement, an international conference on socially engaged art

2015

UNL’s Hixson-Lied Faculty Development Grant Funding to present research at the AIGA annual conference

2015

Humanities Nebraska and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment Assistance with funding for Visiting Artist, Emory Douglas to speak at the Sheldon Museum of Art

2015

UNL’s Hixson-Lied Fine and Performing Arts Visiting Artist Program Funding for visiting artists to give talks and participate in the Design + Social Justice Symposium

2015

Faculty Senate Convocations Committee Assistance with funding for the production, promotion and facilitation of the Design + Social Justice Symposium at UNL.

2013—2016

Sheldon Museum of Art Visiting Artists Funding Funding for Assistance with travel and hotel accommodations for Emory Douglas, visiting artist at UNL.

2013—2016

Hixson Lied Creative and Professional Development Awards Travel to present creative research at conferences

2013—2016

Woods Travel Funds Awarded monies to travel to present scholarly activity and research.


Press Coverage / Scholarly Reviews

2016

“Owning It: Engendering Consciousness.” APTInstitute. Artist Pension Trust, 01 Mar. 2016. Web.

2016

Wolamont, Kent. “Emory Douglas, ‘Design + Social Justice’ Art Event of 2015.”, Lincoln Journal Star. 02 January. 2016. Web.

2015

Anderson, Kathe. “How Design Inspires People to Act: Design+Social Justice Symposium.” The Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru). Dec. 2015. Web.

2015

Valentine, Victoria L. “Fall Exhibitions: 42 Must-See Museum Shows Featuring Black Artists.” Culture Type. 15 Oct. 2015. Web.

2015

Kemerling, Justin. “Design + Social Justice.” JKDC. 20 Sept. 2015. Web. Hims, Annie. “Q&A: Suzun Lucia Lamaina on Black Panther Party Photography Project.” Daily Nebraskan. 15 Sept. 2015. Web.

2015

Wolgamott, Kent. “Black Panther Minister of Culture Emory Douglas on Graphic Art and Social Change.” Lincoln Journal Star. 11 Sept. 2015. Web.

2015

Zempleni, Flora. “Design + Social Justice Symposium to Hold Graphic Designer Panels, Exhibits.” Daily Nebraskan. 11 Sept. 2015. Web.

2014

Anderson, Kathe. “Advanced Graphic Design Students Partner for UNL Drought Symposium.” The Alliance for the Arts in Research Universities (a2ru). March. 2014. Web.

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I am interested in how social movements have used graphic design, visual communications, publication design, strategic use of media and social design to inspire people to act, promote justice and create change.

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Creative Research Statement The study of visual communications and how graphic design establishes identity and inspires people to act is the focus of my research. I work across disciplines and combine object-making, performance, research, writing and community-organizing into projects that integrate graphic design with social engagement in order to visualize change. Historically there have been social movements towards the realization of a world where all members of a society, regardless of background and ideologies, have basic human rights and equal access to the benefits of their society. I am interested in how these social movements have used graphic design, visual communications, publication design, strategic use of media and social design to inspire people to act, promote justice and create change. I am currently working on placing the lives and actions of the members of the Black Panther Party and other justice-seeking groups into historical context focusing on the examination and production of graphic design artifacts. Collaborating on the design of an exhibition and website interface that will display a digital archive of underground newspapers from the 1960’s and 70’s, including The Black Panther newspaper, is a component of my current research. With my colleague, Aaron Sutherlen, I am co-designing the website that will be launched at an exhibition of radical underground media that we are curating for San Francisco State University’s Design Gallery. We are also collaboratively designing the book Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating Portraits and Stories of the Black Panther Party, which will be published and promoted at an exhibition at the Oakland African American History Museum in Oakland, California. The coordination and production processes for these projects require the use of graphic design and reinforces notions of socially responsible story-telling, while examining the role of the visual arts as an action-driving device.

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Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, September 2015 Joyce Bingeman demonstrates to Katharen Hedges how to screen print a graphic onto her jean jacket. Photograph by Amanda Breitbach.

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Portfolio Contents Design + Social Justice Symposium

43

45

Emory Douglas, The Struggle Continues

Revolutionary Grain: Portraits and Stories of the Black Panther Party Publication 57 Exhibition 67

Design + Social Justice Panel Discussion

89

Radical Underground Newspapers

73

Digital Archive and User Interface

Stand Up for Justice

85

Public Reception

93

Social Justice Public Relations

97

Social Justice Screen Printing Workshops

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Collaborations / Socially Engaged Art + Design

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Sovereign Nation Youth Leadership Academy

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Designing Social Justice from the Heartland

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Design + Social Change Seminar

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Potluck Luncheon with Emory Douglas

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Generosity City

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Design Exhibitions

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Prairie Pines Nature Preserve 143

New Works by Stacy Asher and Daniel Coburn

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Pause Like / Point of No Return

Professional Appointment + Commissioned Design

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SF Recreation Park Department Visual Arts

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SF Museum of Modern Art Off Site Field Guide Field Trip

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Social Design 187 Pink Dot Experiment 189

Black Dot Project

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Social justice is human rights manifested in the lives of all people at every level of society.

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Design + Social Justice Symposium

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Graphic used to promote the Design + Social Justice Symposium that I co-organized.

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Design + Social Justice Symposium University of Nebraska-Lincoln September 15 – 16, 2015 Aaron Sutherlen and I co-organized, curated, planned and promoted the events and exhibitions of this public symposium. The visual communications, stories and portraits of revolutionary social movements were examined. Graphic design as a tool for organizing action towards change was explored. The graphic artifacts that were exhibited represented the role of art as a revolutionary force and revealed how art and design communicate about a need for social change. The symposium created a platform to dialogue about the role of visual communications in creating messages that promote civil and human rights, preservation of the environment, and advocacy for equal opportunity. Aspects of social design—gatherings for discussion, skill sharing, design workshops and public lectures—were free and open to the public and were integrated into the symposium to engage participants. Components of the Symposium

Emory Douglas, The Struggle Continues Sheldon Museum of Art

Revolutionary Grain: Portraits and Stories of the Black Panther Party Exhibition of photographs by Suzun Lucia Lamaina

Radical Underground Newspapers Alternative newspapers from the underground counterculture of the 60’s and 70’s from the collection of Billy X Jennings

Justin Kemerling, Stand Up for Justice Posters

Design + Social Justice Panel Discussion

Social Design Screen Printing Workshops

Promotional Materials + Public Relations

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Black Panther Party Newspaper art by Emory Douglas featured in the exhibitions of graphic design ephemera from the 1960’s and 170’s that I co-curated and designed for the Design + Social Justice Symposium, UNL, 2015.

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Emory Douglas

The Struggle Continues Revolutionary Art of the Black Panther Party Sheldon Museum of Art August 11 – January 03, 2016 The featured guest speaker and visiting artist for the Design + Social Justice Symposium was Emory Douglas, former Minister of Culture and graphic artist of the Black Panther Party. His work was exhibited at the Sheldon Museum of Art from mid-August through December. The exhibition, curated and designed with Aaron Sutherlen, was widely received and massively attended. The Black Panther Party was a revolutionary organization promoting social justice that was active from 1966 until 1980. Community social programs, such as free breakfast for school children, free health and dental clinics, sickle-cell testing, and voter registration assistance were primary activities of the Party. In addition, they formed alliances with other oppressed groups in the struggle for equality and social justice. Emory Douglas creates a vocabulary of images that exemplify how art can express political consciousness and function within an activist context. His imagery is accessible, powerful and inspires people to action. He is a revolutionary artist and agent of social change. The struggle for justice continues, and Emory’s art and what the Party fought for are as pertinent as ever.

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Design is simply a tool to help us connect to our communities and make a difference. Emory Douglas

Emory Douglas, “The Struggle Continues,� Sheldon Museum of Art, Design + Social Justice Symposium University of Nebraska-Lincoln. September 2015.

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“Emory Douglas, The Struggle Continues,” Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. September 2015.

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“Emory Douglas, The Struggle Continues,” Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. September 2015.

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Emory Douglas speaks to an overflowing audience in the Sheldon Museum of Art auditorium. Emory’s talk was one of the most attended events in the museum’s history. Design + Social Justice Symposium, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. September 2015.

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Emory Douglas Public Presentation Sheldon Museum of Art September 15, 2015 The featured guest speaker of the Design + Social Change Symposium and visiting artist Emory Douglas, former Minister of Culture and Artist of the Black Panther Party, spoke about his role as a revolutionary artist and how the struggle for justice continues. Douglas was the artist in residence in the Department of Art and Art History from September 14-16. Emory Douglas presented a free public lecture. Emory Douglas, created images that portrayed the conditions of why a revolution might be necessary, through a visual language that is understandable. His graphic designs, drawings and illustrations appeared on the front and back covers of most issues of the Black Panther Party newspaper. He discussed the role of art as a revolutionary force and how art serves as an agent for social change. This was the most attended lecture in recent history for the museum, and was a critical component for the Sheldon’s Art + Social Justice program that was developed in response to the Design + Social Justice Symposium.

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Evaluation from an attendee of the visiting artist lecture by Emory Douglas.

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Participants, wearing graphic t-shirts produced at the screen printing workshop chat with Emory Douglas after his visiting artist talk. Emory Douglas signs books at the Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. September 2015.

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Revolutionary Grain Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories Commissioned Publication Design Project June 2014 – present I am collaboratively designing and producing this book with my colleague Aaron Sutherlen. The publication organizes a collection of photographs and personal stories produced and collected by photographer, Suzun Lucia Lamaina, who has been documenting the former members of the Black Panther Party for several decades. The book includes portraits of the party members today alongside a narrative about what they did for the movement and how their struggle for social justice continues. The book will be an important tool to use as a reminder of the significance of the party’s founding members and will highlight the true mission of the party as a revolutionary force for social change. This projects relates to the larger goal of exploring ways of disseminating a clearer message to an audience – changing the perception of how the public remembers this part of history. While socially relevant, this work is also an example of how design and cultural history merge to create artifacts that are worthy of sharing.

“Fifty years after the founding of the Black Panther Party, photographer Suzun Lucia Lamania captures stunning images and moving words of party members who continue in new ways the important work of their youth. Involved in teaching, senior organizing, yoga, and youth work, to name a few of their activities, they carry on, with renewed determination, the work of serving the people.” Angela Y. Davis Distinguished Professor Emerita University of California, Santa Cruz

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REVOLUTIONARY GRAIN~

CELEBRATING THE SPIRIT OF

BLACK PANTHERS

THE

PORTRAITS & STORIES

IN

“With her new book Revolutionary Grain – Suzun Lucia Lamaina has delivered the message that we’ve been waiting for – for years, I’ve been asking someone to step forward and tell the story of the forgotten ‘rank & file’ members of the Black Panther Party. Photographer Lamaina has captured dynamic contemporary portraits coupled with insightful oral histories – finally the foot soldiers get to look back (and forward) and tell their story. Brilliantly presented!” Pat Thomas— author of Listen, Whitey! The sights and sounds of Black Power 1965-1975

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Revolutionary Grain Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories Commissioned Design Project I am collaboratively designing this book with my colleague Aaron Sutherlen. The book is a collection of contemporary portraits made by Suzun Lucia Lamaina, independent scholar, photo historian and photographer has documented the former members of the Black Panther Party for several decades. I have been collaborating with Aaron Sutherlen in the production of a formal publication of her work. The book includes portraits of the party members today alongside a narrative about what they did for the movement and how the struggle continues. The book will be an important tool to use as a reminder of the significance of the party’s founding members and will highlight the true mission of the party as a revolutionary force for social change. This projects relates to the larger goal of exploring ways of disseminating a clearer message to an audience – changing the perception of how the public remembers this part of history. While socially relevant, this work is also an example of how design and cultural history merge to create artifacts that are worthy of sharing. The coordination and production processes use graphic and communication design to reinforce notions of socially responsible story telling.

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Portrait of Kathleen Cleaver and her story, included in a publication spread from Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories.

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Emory Douglas, Artist, Minister of Culture, Black Panther Party, working on a cover design for the Black Panther Newspaper. San Francisco, CA, 1976, photographer unknown, image courtesy of Billy X Jennings of It’s About Time BPP.

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Š Ilka Hartman, 2003.

Kathleen Cleaver, Communications Secretary, Black Panther Party, speaking at a rally on Alcatraz Island, San Francisco, CA, 1976, photograph by Ilka Hartmann,

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Portrait of Emory Douglas and his story, included in a publication spread from Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories.

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Exhibition detail, portraits and stories, “Revolutionary Grain Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories�, Design + Social Justice Symposium, UNL, 2015

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Revolutionary Grain Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories An exhibition of photographs and personal stories produced and collected by Suzun Lucia Lamaina August 16 – October 30, 2015 UNL’s Love Library This exhibition I co-designed and curated relates to the larger goal of exploring ways of disseminating a clearer message to an audience – changing the perception of how the public remembers history. While socially relevant, this work is also an example of how design and cultural history merge to create artifacts that are worthy of sharing. The coordination and production processes use graphic and communication design to reinforce notions of socially responsible story telling. Suzun Lucia Lamaina, is an independent scholar, social documentary photographer, teacher and photographic historian. Her work focuses on portraiture that reveals the interconnectedness of her subject’s essence and the environments in which they live. A former colleague and student of Farm Security Administration photographer, John Collier, Jr., Suzun is acutely aware of the visual language of photography and the role it plays in providing a discourse about visual communications. Her forthcoming book, “Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panther Party in Portraits and Stories,” will be published and launched at an exhibition of her work at the Oakland African American History Museum that will open during the 50th Anniversary of the Black Panther Party celebration that will be held in October, 2016.

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What visual images come to mind when you think of the Black Panthers? Black berets and black leather jackets? Their militancy is portrayed in many of the photographs that were made of them during the 1960’s and 1970’s. They were beautiful, proud, brave, and oh so young. They were perhaps the most photographed of all the movements that shaped the tumultuous sixties. The historical photographs that we’re familiar with speak for themselves; they project charisma, passion and positive power, thanks to photographers Stephen Shames, Jeffrey Blankfort, Ilka Hartman, Pirkle Jones and many others who recorded the Panthers on film Some forty years later, as a photographer, I undertook a somewhat different project. For in spite of the depredations of the police and the FBI, many of the original Panthers are still with us today. Still beautiful, still proud. The past five years of my life have been spent in living rooms, kitchens, backyards, parks and on college campuses across the country, traveling by trains, planes and buses, photographing some of the most extraordinary individuals it has been my privilege to get to know. The Rank and File members were the foot soldiers and were central to the life of the Black Panther Party. They sold the newspapers, fed the children, educated the community about their legal rights, and ran the free busing, the free clothing, the free ambulance and the free health clinic programs. Although the Panthers are no longer making media headlines, they are still serving the people body and soul—as teachers, ministers, lawyers and community activists. They are what this book is about, their portraits and their stories, in their own words. The Black Panthers changed history. Black history, yes, but American history as well. We have all benefited from their dedication, their vision and their hard work. This book is my salute to them. Preface for “Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories” by Suzun Lucia Lamaina

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Photographs from “Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories� by Suzun Lucia Lamaina

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People don’t really understand what the Party really stood for because the media never gave the Party a chance to talk about its programs, the Party’s goals, the Ten Point Program. The media was talking about guns and militancy; not the survival programs, like Free Breakfasts for school children, free medical clinics, free buses to visit prisoners, free dental care, Sickle cell anemia testing and voter registration. These were programs designed to educate and organize people in the community. For instance, the breakfast program served both to organize people within the community and to feed their own communities. But what you would read about were police raids on Panther offices, or guns being found. Billy X Jennings, Historian of the Black Panther Party

“Black Panther Party in Formation” by Stephen Shames, photo courtesy of Billy X Jennings. Photograph of Billly X Jennings for “Revolutionary Grain: Celebrating the Spirit of the Black Panthers in Portraits and Stories” by Suzun Lucia Lamaina.

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Radical Underground Newspapers Alternative newspapers from the underground counterculture of the 60’s and 70’s from the collection of Billy X Jennings August 16 – October 30, 2015 UNL’s Love Library Black Panther Party historian and archivist Billy X Jennings presented an exhibition of radical underground newspapers from the 1960s and 1970s, which were on display at Love Library. Aaron Sutherlen and I curated and designed this exhibition and digital interface of historically significant underground newspapers. The graphic design ephemera that were on display represent a voice that was not in the mainstream media and examine the role of publication design or visual communications in radical social movements. The publications created an ethos around the struggle for equality, civic engagement and justice. Often authored, designed and published by university students, these publications offer insight into the underground press and its vast diversity of visual languages that were both accessible and powerful while inspiring people to action. Selections of these graphic design artifacts include, The Berkeley Barb, The East Village Other, Basta Ya, Berkeley Tribe, San Francisco Oracle, the Chicago Seed and many others. The exhibition will travel to the Design Gallery of the San Francisco State University It will open this October to coincide with city wide events centered around the 50th Anniversary of the Black Panther Party.

Participants access the archived newspapers that were included in the exhibition. These rare examples of graphic design ephemera exemplified how social justice seeking movements used publication design to communicate about the need for change. The following pages are front covers of newspapers from the exhibition.

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The Black Panther - Vol.II No.8

The Black Panther - Vol.II No.25

The Black Panther - Vol.III No.5

The Black Panther - Vol.IV No.25

The Black Panther - Vol.VIII No.5

The Black Panther - Vol.VIII No.10

The Black Panther - Vol.VIII No.26

The Black Panther - Vol.VIII N

The Black Panther - Vol.IV No.7

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Basta Ya! - November No. 19

Berkeley Barb - Issue 672

The Oracle - Vol.1 No.8

Seed - Vol.7 No.9

Seed - Vol.7 No.11

Berkeley Tribe - Vol.5 Issue 100

Catholic Worker - July/Aug.1968

The Oracle - Vol.1 No.11

The Other Vol.6 No.39

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An illustration of a nursing mother is featured on the cover of the Chicago “Seed�, Volume 07, No. 09, May 1970, an underground newspaper promoting counter culture. Participants accessed the underground newspapers, and had the opportunity to examine the typography, layout, use of imagery as well as print production techniques that were typical of the era the paper was published.

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Students participated in the Design + Social Justice Symposium and had the opportunity to review the graphic design ephemera from the Underground Newspaper exhibition. To the right is a photograph of The Black Panther Party newspaper being read by the National Guard on the street corner of Oakland, California, while they are monitoring the streets for riots that was on display in the exhibition. Photo courtesy of Billy X Jennings, It’s About Time Black Panther Party, ca, 1968, photographer unknown.

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Design + Social Justice Symposium Underground Newspaper Digital Archive and User Interface 2015 – present

A critical aspect of the exhibition included the digitization of the underground newspapers in order to facilitate the creation of a searchable archive. This opportunity enhances the goal of creating a longer lasting database/interface for creatively exploring these objects of graphic design. This project also will enhances the ability to find new ways of demonstrating the qualities of the artifacts as teaching/learning tools, and how best to communicate those qualities for others in related fields. Goals for this project are to find innovative ways of bringing accessibility to the symbolism represented within the underground papers, deconstruct the contents and contexts, relating its significance to each respective social movement. The design of this user-interface requires studying methods for cataloging and presenting digitally published historical artifacts to make them more accessible as a teaching tool. Documenting and producing an accessible database has the potential of acting as a model for other types of print-based graphic design ephemera.

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I am currently collaborating with Aaron Sutherlen and a team of UNL designers on the design of a website interface that will display an archive of digitized underground newspapers. This digital humanities project is part of an ongoing collaboration with Black Panther historian, Billy X Jennings.

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Social Cause Posters. Graphic Design Activism Moving People to Action, Justin Kemerling, Design + Social Justice Symposium, UNL, 2015.

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Justin Kemerling “Stand Up for Justice” Works from the annual poster show hosted by Nebraska Appleseed August 16 – October 30, 2015 UNL’s Love Library In order to connect the symposium with local designers, we invited Omaha’s, Justin Kemerling to participate and his work was curated into the exhibitions of the Design + Social Justice Symposium. Kemerling facilitates collaborative design projects that are boldly graphic and seek to move people to action. His work inspires and motivates artists, community-builders, activists, and entrepreneurs from all walks of life. Justin is a significant Nebraska artist working locally to create an impact and promote social justice. He spoke during the panel discussion on his role as a designer for social causes and how he uses visual communications to catalyze change and raise awareness. He also contributed to the symposium as a visiting artist where he facilitated a workshop about designing for social causes. Through Justin’s guidance and creative insight, participants created their own visual social cause posters

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Social Cause Posters Graphic Design Activism Moving People to Action. Justin Kemerling, Design + Social Justice Symposium, UNL, 2015.

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Design + Social Justice Symposium Panel Discussion September 16, 2015 UNL’s Love Library

An important component of the symposium that involved audience participation was a panel talk held during the symposium. The discussion was moderated by Patrick Jones, Associate Professor of History and Ethnic Studies, UNL. Emory Douglas, Billy X Jennings, Suzun Lucia Lamaina and Justin Kemerling discussed the role of visual communications in social movements for justice. This follow-up to the open reception held in Love Library gave the audience an opportunity to discuss key elements of their research and experiences working in the field of communication design for social change.

Bottom photo: From left, Emory Douglas, Suzun Lucia Lamaina, Billy X Jennings, Justin Kemerling, and Professor Patrick Jones, participate in a panel discussion, speaking to the role of design in promoting social justice, Design + Social Justice Symposium, UNL, 2015.

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Design + Social Justice Symposium Public Reception UNL’s Love Library University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Billy X Jennings, Suzun Lucia Lamaina and Justin Kemerling gave a brief presentation of their works and were available for questions and discussions. This event was sponsored by UNL’s Love Library, and provided another platform for interaction with the artists/historians, where each of them had time to speak to their roles in producing the work on display. Students especially found the experience worthwhile as they received an up close look at the artifacts, as well as a better understanding of how important the work was toward the struggle for social justice.

Billy X Jennings talks about his role in the Black Panther Party to a participant of the Design + Social Justice Symposium. Participants attended the reception prior to the panel discussion to review the artifacts on display and visit with the featured speakers. Photographs by Michael Reinmiller.

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Design + Social Justice Symposium Public Relations: Marketing and Press September and October, 2015 University of Nebraska-Lincoln Marketing played a very important role in making this event successful. Aaron Sutherlen and I created a poster and platform for discussion long before the event in order to raise awareness and create interest. Posters were personally delivered to potential audience and partners in order to ensure that they could work the details into curriculum, as well as allow patrons the opportunity to reach out prior to find out more information. Radio, print, web, social media, and email were all used to make certain audiences were able to find the details necessary to participate. In addition, we visited various classes to promote the event. Overall, the outreach, public relations and marketing was extensive and contributed to the success of the events, exhibitions and workshops.

Promotional materials that were designed and produced for the Design + Social Justice Symposium generated interest and participation in the events, workshops and exhibitions.

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Promotional pages for the Design + Social Justice Symposium were located on the Department of Art & Art History’s web pages that are displayed on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln web site.

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Facebook page and postings promoting the Design + Social Justice Symposium were an important tool for generating interest and participation.

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Article from the Daily Nebraskan spoke about the significance of the symposium in contemporary culture. The Design + Social Justice Symposium was featured in the Lincoln Journal Star and promoted the events and exhibitions.

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Article from Culture Type, an exploration of black art through vintage and contemporary books, magazines and catalogs.

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Feature article from the Lincoln Journal Star highlighting the Design + Social Justice Symposium, UNL, 2015.

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The Design + Social Justice Symposium was named best art event in 2015, Lincoln Journal Star, L. Kent Wolgamott.

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Design + Social Justice Art + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshops September and October, 2015 Sheldon Museum of Art

The UNL Social Practice Coalition facilitated two screen printing workshops. Over 100 people participated and produced screen printed t-shirts in the Design + Social Justice Symposium workshop. The following October, the workshop was held again during the Art + Social Justice program by the Sheldon Museum of Art. Participants learned methods to visually communicate while investigating how graphic design is at the core of social movements. After a short guided tour of “Emory Douglas: Power to the People, the Struggle Continues”, the UNL Social Practice Coalition facilitated screen printing workshops. Participants printed an ecofriendly, re-purposed t-shirts and made buttons. Designs were based on text and images created by the public over the course of the exhibition that were collected through crowd sourcing and submissions from student designers. The Art + Social Justice workshop was part of the month-long programming the Sheldon Museum organized as a follow-up to the Design + Social Justice Symposium. Both events, free and open to the public, were co-sponsored by UNL’s Department of Art and Art History, Sheldon Museum of Art, UNL’s Center for Civic Engagement, and Social Practice Coalition. .

Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, Sheldon Museum of Art, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, September 2015.

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Art + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop organized by the UNL Social Practice Coalition was featured during Art + Social Justice Week organized by the Sheldon Museum of Art, October 2015

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“The phrase ‘Revolution is a Process Not An Event’ illustrates the many steps of social design projects, from the t-shirt being re-purposed, to it being screen printed, and then going on to communicate visually to the possibility of changing attitudes and inspiring action. When designing this graphic, I was inspired by a phrase by a former Black Panther Party member, Yvonne King, that was included in one of the biographies of the Black Panther members featured in ‘Revolutionary Grain’ by Suzun Lucia Lamaina” that was on exhibition in UNL Love’s Library. The exhibition was designed by my professors, Stacy Asher and Aaron Sutherlen and was a component of the Design + Social Justice Symposium last semester. The events and exhibitions from the symposium have helped me realize that social change requires far more than a cool looking t-shirt.” Carlos Velasco, Designer of the “Revolution is a Process Not an Event’ graphic.

Carlos Velasco and a workshop participant discuss a strategy for designing a social justice messaging. The “Design Services” table was organized by the UNL Social Practice Coalition and was part of the Art+ Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop, Art + Social Justice Week, Sheldon Museum of Art, October 2015, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Robby Dyas of Lincoln, participant of the Design + Social Justice Symposium Screen Printing Workshop, UNL, lights a candle during the “We are Orlando” candlelight vigil outside of the Nebraska Union on UNL’s City Campus. Kristin Stress’s photograph was featured a story about the tragic event in the Lincoln Journal Star.

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Graphic t-shirts from the event showed up in social and mainstream media, illustrating how the Design + Social Justice Screen Printing Workshop was beneficial to groups seeking social change.

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Graphic design and visual culture can create community, educate, uplift and empower while fostering a sense of identity and pride

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Collaborations / Socially Engaged Art + Design

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Sovereign Native Youth Leadership Academy Screen Printing Skill Share July 27-31, 2015 Nebraska Innovation Studio, Maker Space Over 80 Native American Youth convened at the Nebraska Innovation Studio, Maker Space to learn how to screen print a t-shirt that promoted STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics] education and art production methodologies. Aaron Sutherlen and I shared our skills and demonstrated to participants how to screen print. Participants, empowered with the knowledge of the methodology of screen printing, were prepared to produce t-shirts for themselves with graphics that they design.

Aaron Sutherlen demonstrates screen printing techniques to 14–17 year old students during a Maker’s Event at Nebraska Innovation Studios Maker Space. Graphics were combined to author unique messages. Participants could select from a series of graphics and combine them according to their STEM interests. Dialogue about science, technology, engineering, mathematics occurred as the content of the graphics related to these topics and was a conversation point during the printing process=.

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Social Justice in the Heartland Visiting Artist Lecture and Workshop San Diego State University San Diego, California , November, 2015 Aaron Sutherlen and I discussed our role in organizing the Design + Social Justice symposium and the significance it had to the people of Nebraska. The symposium celebrated design as art while generating dialogue about the role of visual communications in inspiring people to action, swaying opinion and generating new perspectives on social change were goals for the project. We presented how we designed the experiences, exhibitions, and opportunities for discussion and talked about the limits or challenges to graphic design and visual culture as a vehicle for social change, particularly in a context of global mass-media, ubiquitous technology, extreme inequality and corporate dominance.

Graphics designs by San Diego State University students promote the ideologies of the seminar and initiated social practices in art while investigating history of design and social change. Participants learned the art of screen printing and became acquainted with SDSU’s printmaking facility.

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Graphics designed by San Diego State University students promote the ideologies of the seminar and initiated social practices in art while investigating history of design and social change. Participants learned the art of screen printing and became acquainted with their printmaking facility.

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Discussions and workshops examined the process of bringing the conversation of design for social change to UNL, and how the diversity in experience led to the conclusions of how best to explore the dynamic symbolism of the social movements presented. Diverse professional background and philosophies on the significance of graphic design in culture provided unique perspectives in the role of graphic design in contemporary society. Through this process, participants examined the role of graphic design in creating messages that promote social and environmental justice and equality. The presentation discussed the role design educators play in organizing a symposium of this nature in the heartland of America — Nebraska! Celebrating design as art while generating dialogue about the role of visual communications—inspiring people to action, swaying opinion and generating new perspectives on social change were goals for the presentation and workshop.

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Graphics to promote a seminar that initiated social practices in art while investigating the history of design and social change.

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Design + Social Change Seminar University of San Francisco San Francisco, CA September 2012

Designers and visual communicators can be culturally aware by creating work that is socially responsible and influences positive change in society. Designers in the forefront of social change are currently using their skills to develop and execute their own solutions to social problems—pushing the boundaries of what design can do. This seminar demonstrated to participants the power of design to leverage a sense of humanity and developed the ability to design a more humane and just world. Participants were assigned specific historical events or social movements to research and reveal relevant examples of how design can sway opinion, organize, inform, protect, and restore the environment. The seminar surveyed an array of visual styles, communications and design projects that date from the turn of the century to the present in the form of artistic posters, non-commercial advertisements, web sites, outreach and political propaganda. Participants engaged with San Francisco based designers that are socially responsible, local artist / activists that incorporate design into their propaganda and learned how the work they do is making a positive and significant impact on the world.

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Community Potluck Luncheon with Emory Douglas Design + Social Change Seminar University of San Francisco, May, 2013 Participants, of the Design + Social Change seminar I organized,hosted a community picnic prior to the visiting artist presentation of Emory Douglas, Minister of Culture and graphic artist of the Black Panther Party. The conversation at the table was provocative and insightful while Emory reflected on his involvement with the Black Panther Party as an artist and social change agent. The potluck luncheon and community engagement with Emory Douglas emphasized the social design aspect of the seminar and created a platform for dialogue.

“Art with vision, that reflects a people’s desire and aspirations, is an art that is guided by principle. It transcends borders, and thus becomes universal in its many creative expressions in support of the people’s movement for liberation against all forms of oppression and injustice.” Art Guided by Principle, Emory Douglas Copyright Wellington Media Collective and Emory Douglas 2013

Participants of the Design + Social Change Seminar and members of the public gathered for a potluck luncheon on the grounds of USF’s Lone Mountain Campus. .

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“Generosity City� screen printed poster. Participants worked collaboratively to produce a map of San Francisco that visually communicated where to find and access free resources.

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Generosity City

University of San Francisco Design + Social Change Workshop with Human Rights Activist, Kate Shearman May, 2013

This project I facilitated was created with participants at the University of San Francisco and examined the distribution of free goods and services as a medium for artistic production. Participants worked collaboratively to produce a map of San Francisco that visually communicated where to find and access free resources. The map, screen printed with graphics individually created by participants was distributed throughout the city. The project generated time for individuals to reflect on their own relationship to generosity and the significance of things that are free. The posters were distributed throughout the city in various public places. A stack of 100 posters were also given away at the Luggage Store Gallery located in downtown San Francisco during a public art event. In addition a web site for Generosity was created to further disseminate the contents of the project. This Design + Social Change Workshop was a collaboration with human rights activist, Kate Shearman, artist and editor of “Positive News� a locally distributed newspaper that promotes well being. The pop-up screen printing workshop was an opportunity for participants to learn methodologies to create visual communications while reflecting on the significance of what it means to be generous. Locating free goods and services in San Francisco required research and an understanding of city systems.

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I designed the main identity graphic for the Generosity City project while participants each designed a logo to represent a free resource. Thirteen participants were responsible for printing, publishing and disseminating the poster to a larger audience.

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Social design can– Create an opportunity for inquiry. Organize time for reflection. Inspire action.

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Design Exhibitions

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Eyes Open / Prairie Pines Nature Preserve Social Practices in Art / Social Design Lincoln, Nebraska, 2015 This project allowed participants to create visual artifacts inspired by the surrounding environment found at Prairie Pines. Immersing themselves in a preserve of nature was beneficial to participants as they connected with the landscape and further understood the significance of Prairie Pines and were then able to communicate about the benefits it offers to others. I integrated my work, “Pause,” and “Hello Moment,” into this pop-up exhibition and observed how the designed artifacts could be placed into diverse landscapes and situations, examining how context effects the meaning that is generated from the visual communications.

“Pause,” my pop-up installation of art and design, appeared at the Prairie Pines nature preserve. September 2015

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While the main goal was to create iconography that can be used for both branding and wayfinding, the projects were open enough to provide participants with the opportunity to explore their skills as visual communicators, and create projects that could be used for inspiration when developing future programs on the property. The goal was to create a variety of visuals and creative objects that capture the spirit of the environment, and allow allowing participants to harness their individual skills as creative authors, and work collectively to raise awareness to the value of a nature preserve. The purpose of Prairie Pines is to provide an environmental refuge, enhanced arboretum, and horticultural study area in northeast Lincoln, and eventually to integrate county extension services, community recreation, and wildlife research and education.

Graphic design collateral used to promote the Prairie Pines pop up exhibition, September 2015.

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Live music and tours of the arboretum, natural prairie grasslands and community garden training facility were offered. Aaron Sutherlen visits with Walt Bagley, originator of Prairie Pines. Graphic design collateral used to promote the Prairie Pines pop up exhibition.

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Prairie Pines was founded in 1959 by Walt and Virginia Bagley, who recently donated the property to the University of Nebraska. This 145-acre property has been transformed from farmland to an area of diverse woodland and grassland habitats. Included in this property are 20 acres of woodland containing more than 200 species of woody plants, 10 acres of virgin prairie, and 30 acres of seeded prairie grasses and wildflowers. Also present are field windbreaks and waterways. Prairie Pines is an affiliate site of the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum. Research Prairie Pines is available for research purposes.

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The pop up exhibition was attended by community members interested in the preservation of the environment and those acquainted with the history of Prairie Pines. Walking tours and hand screen printed collateral were available for free. UNL’s Chancellor, Professor Ronnie Green, tours the exhibition with Mike Hillis, President of the Friends of Prairie Pines. Chancellor Green used a photo of “Pause” for an upcoming presentation about the need to pause and reflect.

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Participants engaged in a walking tour of Prairie Pines where the fauna and flora were described and experienced.

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“Hello moment,� by Stacy Asher, vinyl graphic on barn siding, pop-up installation of art and design, Prairie Pines, Lincoln, Nebraska, September 2015.

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Announcement for an exhibition of new works by myself and Daniel Coburn, Metropolitan Community College Gallery of Art + Design, Omaha, Nebraska, June, 2014

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Stacy Asher and Daniel Coburn: New Work Metropolitan Community College Gallery of Art + Design June 08 —August 04, 2014

I was invited by Larry Gawel, Professor of Photography at Metro Community College in Omaha to co-jury their annual student art exhibition. Daniel Coburn, photographer, and I juried the student work and then received the opportunity to have an exhibition of our work on display in the gallery. The relation between forms, words, phrases, signs, symbols, and what value they have in human expression and communications was explored in my installation. I used art as a language that is socially meaningful and culturally critical, hoping to help participants to view their world with a more critical perspective, and with a greater sense of wonder. It was also my intention to celebrate design as art, consider the visual installation

The following pages are views of the installation of my work for the exhibition. Canvases painted fluorescent pink with non-toxic tempera paint, Distraction 01, Distraction 02, command attention while messages in typographic and symbolic form communicate how to act.

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“Hello Moment”, vinyl lettering, 72” X 8 1/4” 72” 8 1/4”

Hello moment.

“Hello moment... I am here.” Vinyl graphic lettering and offset printed cards. The printed cards are the same size as an iPhone 5 and serve as viewing guides.

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“Hello moment... I am here.� Vinyl graphic lettering and offset printed cards. The printed cards are the same size as an iPhone 5 serve as viewing guides.

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“Pause” at AIGA Project Passion Conkling Gallery, Mankato, Minnesota February 16 to March 4, 2015 I was selected to exhibit in this exhibition of non-client driven graphic design. Graphic designers throughout the US and beyond submitted 142 projects to be considered for the Project Passion exhibition. Jurors Kate Bingaman-Burt, Mikey Burton, and Phil Jones reviewed all submissions and selected “Pause” for inclusion in the show. Though the projects range from net-art explorations to children’s toys, the common thread is a passion for creating and pushing beyond the day-to-day challenges of client work. The text from the prospectus for the organizers of Project Passion stated, “As a whole, this exhibition represents the countless “off the clock” hours, focused experimentation and self-determination that can be found in all areas of the design profession. For such work, the only clients these designers need to impress are themselves. The only deadlines they need to meet are the ones they set. The only tools they have to work with are those within reach.” “Pause,” 3D letters, painted the same color as the gallery walls, was intended to highlight the role of design to the world, promote and understanding of the significance of design in society, and to celebrate design as art.

“Pause”, Vinyl graphic lettering, serving as a guide to place the 3D letters, was painted the color of the gallery walls. The 3D wood letterforms, also painted the color of the gallery wall, were included in AIGA Minnesota’s Project Passion.

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“Pause,� 3D letters, blends into the gallery walls to visually communicate an action.

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Participants wash their hands in front of “Like” at the “Point of No Return” exhibition at Southern Exposure. The graphic design artifact placed outside of the confines of the formal gallery were able to communicate on a more intimate level.

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Like Point of No Return Southern Exposure San Francisco, California, 2011 Vinyl graphics I designed were placed into the periphery of a group exhibition held at San Francisco’s Southern Exposure. The word, “Like,” enforced the popularity of the word and made an association to it’s relevance in contemporary culture. Placing the text in front of the sinks and on the mirrors mimicked how visual communications can colonize space and become disruptors of an everyday experience. The graphic for this project has since popped up in various environments and asks viewers to wonder about its meaning and to reflect on their own connection to it.

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Social design, or social practices in art, is my primary mode of form making, designing situations for public engagement, acts of inquiry and the generation of a different perspective.

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Professional Appointments / Commissioned Design

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Coordinator of Visual Art and Digital Art Programming San Francisco Recreation and Park Department Cultural Arts Division San Francisco, California, 2011 As Coordinator of Visual and Digital Art Programming, I developed a variety of social design programs: Urban Gardening, Open Source Web Design, Audio & Video Production for Youth, Exploring Sound in the World, Tween and Teen Fashion, Social Media for Seniors, Screen Printing, Soft Sculpture, Claymation, and Audio Production for Teens. Designing interactive arts and crafts promgrams and events involved collaborating with hundreds of art / recreation leaders to produce citywide SFRPD programs and events. In addition, I oversaw the design and production of the promotional materials for the citywide programs and events.

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Promotional collateral I designed for the citywide programs and events that I organized for the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department as Visual Arts Coordinator.

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Promotional collateral I designed for the citywide programs and events that I organized for the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department as Visual Arts Coordinator.

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Cover design of the field guide for “The Field Trip: the Abstraction of Politics and the Politics of Abstraction”

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The Field Trip: the Politics of Abstraction and the Abstraction of Politics Field Guide for the San Francisco Museum of Art Off Site Exhibition September, 2013 Created by the Center for Tactical Magic in partnership with SFMOMA and Angel Island California State Park, The Field Trip was led by Aaron Gach (co-founder of the Center for Tactical Magic), who was joined by an art curator (Dominic Willsdon), a park interpreter (TBD), a data visualizer (Josh Begley), an investigative journalist (Justine Sharrock), a former military remote viewer (Paul H. Smith), and an NSA whistleblower (Russ Tice) for a series of site-specific discussions, presentations, and exercises across the island. These multiple perspectives blurred the lines between seemingly disparate subjects. Participants explored the ways in which we, as individuals and as a society, represent information through technology, art, and facilitated visionary experiences. The “Field Trip Field Guide� publication I designed served as a directory, map and visual aid enabling participants to learn about the contents, objectives, ideologies and actions of the exhibition on Angel Island during the Off Site SFMOMA event.

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I designed this map locating sites on Angel Island State Park where presentations were made. The map was included in the “Field Trip Field Guide� publication to help participants navigate through the exhibition.

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The “Field Trip Field Guide� publication I designed served as a directory, map and visual aid enabling participants to learn about the contents, objectives, ideologies and actions of the exhibition on Angel Island during the Off Site SFMOMA event.

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Pages from the field guide for “The Field Trip: the Abstraction of Politics and the Politics of Abstraction”, designed for the Center for Tactical Magic for the SFMOMA Off Site Exhibition at Angel Island State park, San Francisco, CA. 2013.

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Hiding in plain sight, the San Francisco Bay’s Angel Island has served as a Civil War outpost, US Immigration Station, a Prisoner of War Processing Center, a Nike missile site, and currently, a California State Park. How do these rich historical narratives connect to current social debates? Experience the island like never before during this one-day, roving symposium speculating on contemporary politics, artistic abstraction, data visualization, and the military’s Cold War-era psychic spying program known as remote viewing.

The Field Trip: the Abstraction of Politics and the Politics of Abstraction Facilitated by the Center for Tactical Magic in partnership with SFMOMA and Angel Island State Park

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The Field Trip: the Abstraction of Politics and the Politics of Abstraction

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P U BL I C SPAC E

SO C I A L SPA C E

PERSONAL S PA C E INTIMATE S PA C E 1.5 ft (0.45 m) 4 ft (1.2 m)

12 ft (3.6 m)

25 ft (7.6 m)

“Proxemics,� this graphic by Edward Twitchell Hall, Jr., an American anthropologist and cross-cultural researcher, illustrates cultural and social cohesion and how people behave and react in different types of culturally defined personal space. I reference this graphic in order to consider how proxemics effects communication and social interaction. Hall was an influential colleague of Marshall McLuhan and Buckminster Fuller.

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Social Design

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Pink Dot Experiment Environmental Art / Social Design Athens, Ohio, San Francisco, California, Morehead, Kentucky 2005 – 2007 The black dots seen on the sidewalks throughout the city are spots of discarded chewing gum. The gum is permanently adhered to the concrete because it is mostly made of non-biodegradable plastics. Redesigning this refuse into a work of transient art, sidewalk gum was marked with pink paint to map awareness to a polluting practice that permanently blemishes the environment. I designed the Pink Dot Experiment to call attention to the way in which we take our external urban environment for granted as we pollute it with thoughtless, careless practices showing little concern for the landscape. As it involved public participation, this project encouraged citizens to recognize an obscure urban mapping of pollution and to reflect on their own actions as they affect public space adversely, allowing for the possibility of “waking people up to rethinking their attitudes and behaviors.” The pink dots were returned to black immediately after the first rain leaving people to wonder about the meaning behind the occurrence.

“Pink Dot Experiment,” Athens, Ohio, 2005. Black spots of gum are painted pink with non-toxic, biodegradable, tempera paint to highlight a pattern of human behavior.

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Newspaper clipping from the Athens News. Mary Lou Lavelle wrote a letter to the Editor of the newspaper championing the “Pink Dot Experiment.�

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“Pink Dot Experiment”, Participants in Athens, Ohio work together in the middle of the night to paint black spots of gum on the city sidewalks in a street art performance, 2005. Promotional card for “The Pink Dot Experiment: Crafting a Vision for Art, Equity and Civic Engagement”, California College of the Arts, Oakland, California, 2006.

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The Black Dot Project An exploration of how graphic design inspires people to act San Francisco, Berkeley, Athens 2001-2008 This social design project occurred over a period of 7 years. Goals for the project were to inform participants how marketing and branding works. Designers are image makers and mass media producers. In order to be effective communicators, they must consider the wants and needs of members of society. Enormous amounts of time, money and energy are expended by commercial companies to study what sells. Has culture grown dependent on responding to the messaging in order to maintain identities of inclusion? In turn, it seems that individuals are increasingly responding to commercial messaging as the primary way to form their own sense of identity. Ironically, our sense of individuality has been formed by the habits of mass consumption. I used a giant black sphere and media printed with a black circle or dot to engage people in acts of inquiry and to reflect on their actions, linking it to their behaviors of consumption. Participants interacted with a large, inflatable, black sphere and then became branded by the experience with a black dot t-shirt.

“Consumption is a Treatable Disease’, by Tibor Kalman featured in Adbusters Magazine, 2002 Illustration used as a teaching reference when designing the “Black Dot Project.”

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Understanding the World through Wonder, Promotions for a presentation I made about the Black Dot Project at Centro, Scchool of Design, Mexico City, Mexico, March 2007.

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Documentation from the “Black Dot Project”, Kennedy Museum of Art, Athens, Ohio, 2005.

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Participants engage with a large, black sphere and then become branded by the experience with a black dot t-shirt. Documentation from the Berkeley Oxford School social design project, Berkeley, California, 2002.

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Black Dot Project Berkeley Oxford School / Social Practice in Art Berkeley, California. April 2002 The role that popular culture and American commerce play in stimulating the imaginations of those who consume was the subject of of this social design project. At the time of the project, in 2002, the average person was subjected to over 3600 commercial impressions a day. Imagine how many it is today through constant engagement with social media? Commercial messaging inserts itself into almost every nook and corner of our lives; it is everywhere, and the designer’s touch marks the most banal aspects of everyday life. What impact do these graphic designed messages have on our culture and what type of system do they engender and then reiterate? Working with a group of 6th graders to simulate how branding and marketing works I explored these questions. Participants played with a giant black sphere and then became “branded� with a black dot t-shirt, a souvenir of their experience and a model of how marketing and commercial messaging functions.

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“The Black Dot Project�, documentation from the Berkeley Oxford School social design project, Berkeley, California, 2002.

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Thank you.

Please keep the Design Justice / Design Change tote bag and other promotional items from the Design + Social Justice Symposium as souvenirs.


Stacy Asher / Social Design / Creative + Scholarly Research  
Stacy Asher / Social Design / Creative + Scholarly Research  
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