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The day after Orientation I grabbed a new friend to explore the site with. All I wanted was what any 21-year-old female American in Australia wanted- to see the kangaroos. And knowing that I would be taking my irst photojournalism course at this university, I already had my irst subject picked out. I was Eliza Thornberry. And this Sanctuary would be my next big adventure. An adventure it was, but not in the ways I was most expecting.

The sanctuary irst opened its gates in 1967, but any visitor today can see the land has many nods to a rich history before that. Cases in point are the magniicent redwood “scar” trees that blanket the bushland. These trees are named so because Aboriginal Australians in the 1800s used their wood to make canoes and other tools. The indigenous people knew if they cut the trees in such a way it would not kill them, but only leave a scar.

“I was Eliza Thornberry.” Over the next four months, the sanctuary’s staff, rangers, volunteers, and workshop leaders graciously let me follow them around and document their work. While I didn’t see as many animals as I had initially hopedthe 30 hectares of bushland turned out to be a much larger hiding place for them than I could’ve guessed I learned so much about them, and the rest of the sanctuary, that I felt my experience had much more value.

Another main attraction to the sanctuary is the workshops it offers to primary through high school students from nearby schools. Students can come spend anywhere between a few hours to an entire day at the sanctuary, learning how to call frogs, identify water plants, and use nesting boxes to monitor animal behavior, among other things. There is even a nighttime guided tour for people looking to spot a sugar glider or two.

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Artboard

Culture

We had been given a great title to work with: “The Last Farmer In Gullah Land”, and this became our jumping of point for design. Taking into account the title’s elusivity, the irst thing we all agreed on was to utilize silhouettes in our layout, as an iconic representation of the “Last Farmer”.

For our slideshow animation, which was to be the bulk of the homepage, we focused on including shots that enforced community and diligencetwo necessary traits that have kept the Gullah culture alive in St. Helena.

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Color

Team 8 fo’ 3

possible pattern?

Type

1 2 3 We drew from our experiences interacting with Gullah people, online research, and photos provided by the directors, to come up with our Artboard- a compilation of our inspirations for the site. You will see our board relected in our inal site’s color scheme, laid-back typeface, and earthy textures.

Symbols

Textures


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We experimented with diferent variations of our initial design to ind one that suited the ilm’s tone the best. Two design techniques we were hoping to use, vibrant colors and pluf mud texture, did not translate well when put in place, so we adjusted accordingly.

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rollingstone.com Issue 1234 November 1, 2012 >>$4.50

®

SUPERSTORM

SANDY How Her Destruction Will Affect the Election

DJ DANIEL SHELLEY’S FALL MUSIC PLAYLIST

PLUS

TAYLOR CHIULLI HEATS UP FALL WITH NEW GRAPHIC DESIGNS

REAL LIFE 21 JUMP STREET ACTOR WOODY HARRELSON UNDERCOVER AS “PROF. VAN KORNEGAY” AT USC

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SJMC

School of Journalism and Mass Communications University of South Carolina

Student Services Majors Opportunities

“This trip gave me the chance to bond with my fellow J-schoolers while sharing our expertise through this hands on experience in another country. “

Stephen Bandstra | Visual Communications ‘14 Studied abroad in Munich, Germany as part of the J-school’s Multimedia Project class

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Pick a channel. annel. el. Visual Communications Our graduates work as art directors, graphic designers and webmasters in agencies, nonproďŹ ts and corporations. Others are photojournalists for a variety of print and broadcast media. Your classes will focus on advanced design, writing, media law and ethics, photojournalism, information graphics and portfolio production.

Print Journalism Our graduates work in print and online media, including magazines and daily and nondaily newspapers. Classes include principles, research, media law and ethics, reporting, copyediting, feature writing and design. Students in their senior semester publish the Carolina Reporter online and in print.

Mass Communications Our newest major, mass communications prepares students to work in an array of media-related jobs or go on to further their educations in graduate programs. Classes focus on theory, research, media history, media law and ethics and media criticism.

Advertising Advertising graduates are prepared to challenge traditional thinking, to create inspiring work and to work for a wide range of businesses including agencies, media outlets and branded organizations.

Public Relations Our graduates work in all areas of public relations and integrated communications practice, including agency, corporate, healthcare and nonproďŹ t. Your courses will focus on principles, strategic writing, media law and ethics, research, public relations management and public relations campaigns.

Electronic Journalism Our graduates are reporters, anchors and producers in multiple broadcast platforms all across the country and beyond. In your classes, you’ll learn principles, media law and ethics, research, reporting, editing and production. Students in their senior semester produce Carolina News, a daily 30-minute live newscast seen campus-wide.

Majors

SJMC

School of Journalism and Mass Communications University of South Carolina

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What’s the

? a e T big deal t e e about S w

A crash cour se on Southe rn culture for our out-o f-state Game cocks

DATES Aug. 20th

2pm-4pm

Russell House Ballroom

Aug. 26th

6pm-8pm

Columbia Hall Classroom

Sept. 3rd

6pm-8pm

Patterson Classroom 103

Sept. 11th

6pm-8pm

Bates West Social Room

Student Success Center University of South Carolina SSC OUTSTAT1 4/13

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Stacie Rodriguez Online Portfolio