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Punk Punk spawned from the 1970s as a subculture led by the youth—kids who were angry with the Establishment. The English strain of the movement was led by working-class youth sick of the mediocre economy and constant rise in unemployment; they couldn’t stand the wealthy people’s hypocrisy and notion of reform. Punks were enraged —they displayed their social dissent by their mannerisms, musical genre, and their outrageous attire. This was the beginning of the movement in England, a movement that later forced itself into the American lifestyle, and eventually gained notoriety for its scene. Punks sought to threaten what the rich and affluent supported most: class hierarchy, mainstream culture, patriotism, morals, and the royalty. These ideas are heard loud and jarringly in the Sex Pistols. In general, punks were apolitical, but bands like The Clash embraced the discordant and damning sides of politics through their music. The apocalyptic themes ring through “London Calling,” informing listeners of what was happening to the English working class. The social movement soon dwindled as the capitalists they despised learned how easy it was to make their message profitable—the media made punk a social commodity, with the mass distribution of the faux-hawk, and studded leather jackets. Today we forget what punk stood for: a subculture movement led by working-class youth fighting against powers that further fueled their anger and poverty in England. Today we listen to The Clash, but forget to pay attention to the underlying tones, the message, the description of scenes we are

fortunate enough to not have lived through. Most of us, myself included, merely think punk was a dissonant, three-chord genre created by musicians for the sake of making simple, oftentimes upbeat music to mosh to. We enter any store and find traces of the movement whose origin we’ve forgotten: a studded belt, combat boots, jeans with stylized tears. We listen to pop-punk (ex. Green Day), but forget that there were the founding punk fathers who sang their hearts out to illuminate the youth about the dangers of following the Establishment. Oftentimes we feel compelled to dress like the subculture because of the 80s films we’ve watched, or we think it would look cool to change our preppy look and opt for wearing “punk clothes.” Maybe we just want to hang out with the cool kids because we’re at that age where we cycle through different phases. These days, we see established fashion designers taking inspiration from punk—punk was first introduced to Chanel in 2011. The recent Met Gala’s theme was “punk.” The musical genre is still intact with a variety of subgenres under its belt. Yet we forget that the style we now seek, during its inception, meant something more than we’ve given it credit to.

OCTOBER 2013

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Stache October 2013  

Fashion issue with fashion illustrator Daryl Feril on the cover. Also featuring Sunny Gu, Karolina Debosz, articles on routines, introspecti...

Stache October 2013  

Fashion issue with fashion illustrator Daryl Feril on the cover. Also featuring Sunny Gu, Karolina Debosz, articles on routines, introspecti...

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