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The Keys

October 2013

of St. Peter

No matter who you are or where you are on your spiritual journey, you are welcome here!

“When black cats prowl and pumpkins gleam, May luck be yours on Halloween.” —Author Unknown


The Corner Office Musings by Mother Susan

Of all the times of year that seem most appropriate for contemplation, this time of year – autumn – seems to me most appropriate. It’s when my soul feels most called to slow down, to look back over the past year and consider any changes in course, or shifts in priorities. This slower pace is reflected in the physical world; flowers are losing their bloom, vegetable gardens their glory, the light from the sun is softer, and the trees, if their leaves aren’t turning, at least have the good sense to look tired after a long season of growing. But the pace in the world of people has suddenly quickened; meetings, conferences, and planning for the coming new year demand our attention and insist we get moving. The holidays are looming and some of us have become slightly obsessed with thoughts of ‘crafts’. We tend to miss the nudge of this mellow, gentle season and allow ourselves to slow down, enjoy, and reflect on the ‘fruits of our labor’ from the past year. It is a time too, for familiar spirits. In the fall, this world seems closer to the next one and whatever it is that separates us from that world seems thinner to me. It’s no accident that All Hallow’s Eve, All Saint’s Day and All Soul’s Day are this time of year. I love that we are restoring the tradition of honoring our beloved familiars, who have passed on, with memorials and candles and Day of the Dead altars. I also love that we are honoring our other familiars, our beloved animal companions, with blessings on St. Francis Day. Though for the moment I am without the comfort of feline companionship, it is the first time since I was 6 years old that I have been without such blessed company. My cats have been celebrities (Tiger was featured in the local paper for being able to ring the doorbell), have flown to and lived in foreign countries, slept in the babies’ cribs and have always been the most delightful and wisest of companions. They have always graciously allowed me to live in their home. This season of mellow fruitfulness is a splendid time to curl up and contemplate a bit. There are lots of familiar spirits you might want to have with you, but the cat is the only one who will work out exactly how to lay so as to cause you the most inconvenience. And still, you wouldn’t dream of moving them away. Susan+

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A Familiar Tale “I ain’t superstitious, but a black cat crossed my trail…” —Willie Dixon Isn’t it interesting that children begin their first spelling lesson with C-A-T? You’d think D-O-G would be easier. Well, reading and writing are mysteries to the uninitiated, and cats and mysteries fit hand-in-glove. Consider all the feline superstitions. Cats can be symbols of good luck—they always land on their feet, they have nine lives, et cetera, et cetera. Cats can be symbols of bad luck, too, and at this time of year black cats are slinking around everywhere. The fundamental truth about cats is that we can’t always tell whether they’re wishing us well or wishing us dead. Self-containment is the nature of the beast. If there was a cat at the table, those poker-playing dogs would be broke. “C is for Cat” goes back a long way. In the first American textbook, the New England Primer, feline ambiguity was part of every Colonial schoolchild’s ABCs:

If you think about it, that’s a pretty cold lesson for a five-year old. Back in the Middle Ages, when people took their superstitions seriously, it was widely held that a skillful magician could summon a demon or fairy to take the form of an animal and act as a kind of assistant or doppelganger. These animal assistants were called familiar spirits, or simply familiars. Although familiars could be any kind of creature, you can see where the mysterious, self-contained cat would fill the bill perfectly. Thus cats and witches came to be associated with one another, and the cat became a Halloween staple. One of the best-known familiar spirits of modern times is Pyewacket the cat in John van Druten’s play, “Bell, Book and Candle,” a summer stock favorite. James Stewart and Kim Novack were the stars of the 1958 movie. Pyewacket went uncredited. Several of the animals in the Harry Potter books act as familiar spirits. One example is Hermione Granger’s intelligent cat Crookshanks, who has a knack for fingering the untrustworthy. October 2013

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We’re not acquainted with any practicing witches or wizards, so we can’t say with precision what sorts of tasks are typically on a familiar spirit’s job description. But we can guess. Since witchcraft and wizardry are more or less solitary pursuits, encouragement during times of worry, friendship during times of loneliness, sympathy during times of unhappiness, and comfort during times of disappointment are likely to be high on the list. Thinking about the concept broadly, all of us have familiar spirits… not always benevolent. We mortals, being human, look for encouragement, friendship, sympathy, and comfort in all kinds of places. When we look in the wrong places, sometimes all we find is more worry, loneliness, unhappiness, and disappointment. Alcohol is certainly a familiar spirit in every sense of the word—and, as they say in AA, there’s a reason they call them spirits. Along similar lines gambling, drugs, and other bad habits can be malevolent familiars. But perfectly legitimate pursuits can have the same effect when carried to extremes. The office can become a familiar spirit—we all know people whose job provides all the contact and meaning in their lives. Other obsessions? Sometimes the same story. Fortunately, many of us have benign familiar spirits to help us when we need encouragement, friendship, sympathy, or comfort. A good friend can be a familiar spirit, as can close family. And praise the Lord for pets! Friends and family lead their own lives, but a pet is completely yours, dependent on you for food and shelter, and happy to provide unconditional devotion and affection in return. Though they may look self-contained and aloof to outsiders, cats love their owners and their owners know it. This issue of the Keys contains a gallery of some of the nation’s finest cats, all of them benevolent familiars, and at least one a certified prize-winner. You’ll see many of them in person at the Blessing of the Animals on Sunday the 6th. Familiarize yourself! Speaking of which, we’ll close with a reminder that there’s a place where everyone can always find a familiar Spirit whose love is unconditional. But you knew that already. See you Sunday!

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The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


October 2013

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THE DEACON’S BEACON By Dn. Skip Bushee

We have all heard the phrase, “It is better to give than to receive.” True. But the opposite can also be true. Sometimes it can be a real gift to be able to humbly and graciously receive a gift from someone else. I was reminded of this fact during a conversation with a fellow deacon today. In dealing with her aging father who is in a nursing home and felt that his life no longer had any value, she responded by telling him of some issues that she was dealing with in her life and asking for his advice. In giving that advice, her father saw that his life still had value because he could still provide love and counsel to his daughter. By being willing to accept the gift of advice and succor from her father she helped him see that his life still mattered. During my recent bout with cancer, so many of you gave me your love and prayers and showed your concern. That was a gift of incalculable value because it was that love and those prayers that really healed me, both physically and emotionally. At first I felt that I was supposed to be the clergy person and that my role was to offer prayers and succor to those in need, not the other way around. Frankly, it was hard to find the tables turned. But once I was able to let go and accept the gift you were giving me, the healing really began. I believe that we are all ailing in some way and can all use the gift of healing. Unfortunately, most of us tell ourselves that our problems are really nothing compared with those of others. We men especially have been raised to be the strong silent ones, never needing a kind word or a shoulder to cry on. Nonsense. Every Sunday at the 10:30 service, I am at the healing bench during communion. There is usually a small group of people who are willing to come there and receive a healing prayer but I would suggest that we could all do with some of that. It is not even necessary to share what your concerns are or you could ask for a prayer for someone else. Sometimes people come up and wish to offer a prayer for my 6

The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


continued healing. It’s all good. The point is to be willing to humble yourself to come forward to receive the gift of healing. I promise you will feel better. In addition, you will be giving me the gift of healing because I have found that whenever I pray for someone else, some of that healing energy ends up with me Why not give it a try some time?

Dn. Skip

October 2013

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The Cats in our Congregation A few photos of the felines of St. Peter’s

Mona Dena sent us this photo of Lucy and OJ: “Lucy (left) is our stoic older cat…She mainly lays around the house in places such as the windowsills, the couch, and any warm lap. She tolerates our kitten O.J. (right) who enjoys pouncing on her when she least expects it. O.J. is a playful kitten who enjoys taking showers and crawling under the couch in the hammock-like pocket. He also enjoys playing with his laser pointer and strings, and is an excellent jumper. We love our cats!” Maggie Wright wrote to us about Kitty, who “…has been visiting us Nieman-Wrights for a few years---often several times daily. He mews or bangs on the back door to let us know he wants to come in. He comes by to be admired, fussed over, and patted; rarely will he nibble on a bite of salmon or take a drink of milk at our house. Because he is so handsome and never interested in our food, we know he must live with another family in our neighborhood who feeds him and sees to his vet bills. Kitty is not our kitty, but we love him dearly, and we think he feels the same way about us.”

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From Su Boocok, in memory of Pussy Willow: 1989-2009. “She decided there was nothing interesting in the paper bag!”

Pat & Jim McCarty sent us photos of their “…two wonderful friends, Petunia (2-1/2) (above) and Lightnin’ (1-1/2) (below). They are both adopted from Nine Lives Shelter in RWC. Though they didn’t know each other before moving to our house, they have bonded and have a great time several times each day presenting us with Kitty WWF, wrestling with great drama all over the house. We are very blessed to have such cute, loving and entertaining family members.”

These are James and Beth Sharpe’s cats, Gollum and Smeagol. Both came from Humane Society in 2006 as a pair; had been there for 3.5 months. Their Lord of the Rings-inspired names came with them.

The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


Kathryn & Rod Marconi provided us with photos of the 3-M’s. Here’s Moo-Moo, who came to them from Pets in Need…

Here are two photos from Sue Walker: “Willow ‘Walker’ (above) is lounging in her cat post. She is a sweet kitty who does two things well....eating and sleeping! Second picture is Willow’s son ‘Smokey’ (below) who was a wonderful pet. Sadly he died when he was only five, but we think of him often.”

…then they got Murphy, who was the pick of the litter (and the only boy; he had five sisters). Murphy is very smart, and can be seen here holding Dad’s hand.

Megan Goulden sent this photo of Callie, along with the explanation: “She posed for the picture! Our calico kitty is quite the divashe loves having her belly rubbed, but hates the dog and loud children (uh-oh!)”

Finally, the Marconi family adopted Mandy, from Animal Humanity. She had been dumped into a creek in San Carlos. Mandy is very loving; she purrs a lot and licks hair.

October 2013

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Sunday

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September 29 10:30 a.m. one service only immediately followed by Block Party to welcome Mother Susan to St. Peter’s!

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Blessing of the Animals 10:30 a.m. one service only SPY: St. Peter’s Youth 6:00-7:30 p.m.

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Choir Rehearsal 9 a.m.

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SPY: St. Peter’s Youth 6:00-7:30 p.m.

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14 Columbus Day

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28 Deadline for November issue of The Keys content

Choir Rehearsal 9 a.m.

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Wednesday

St. Simon and Jude

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Staff Meeting 1-2 p.m. Vestry Room

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Staff Meeting 1-2 p.m. Vestry Room

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Crafty La 10:30 a.m. Librar

Crafty La 10:30 a.m. Librar

Crafty La 10:30 a.m. Librar

Crafty La 10:30 a.m. Librar

All Hallow The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


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All Saints Day All Souls Day Veterans Day Christ the King Thanksgiving Day St. Andrew

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A Retreat Round-Up

Great spot… great company… great fun! Labor Day may be summer’s last hurrah, but it was the best weekend of the year for many parishioners who headed off to the Bishop’s Ranch for the annual Parish Retreat. We ran into Dave Goulden the other day, and he told us that this year’s retreat—the fourth his family has attended—was the perfect way to finish up summer. “It’s a great time to connect on a deeper level with the other members of St Peter’s, especially as a family with three kids where everyday life is hectic. We can just sit by the pool and talk with folks, and also enjoy meals together where everything is handled. You just sit back and enjoy good food and good conversation.” Dave said that the Goulden kids’ favorite spot was the swimming pool. “The kids would stay in the pool day and night if we let ’em. As it is they are in there most of the day anyway.” Dave must have dragged them from the water eventually, because he told us that his family enjoyed lots of other activities. “I enjoyed doing an art project with my youngest, Sydney, along with other kids. It was fun to work together and hang out just the two of us. A few of the guys also went on an early morning bike ride through the vineyards. It was a great ride—beautiful surroundings and good conversation.” We asked him what he thought the the main benefit of the retreat was. He said it was strengthening the bonds in the St. Peter’s community. But he added that there’s a spiritual side to the retreat, too. “It’s always very spiritual being in that beautiful environment. The property is gorgeous. It is definitely God’s country. In addition, this year, Susan did a fabulous job with the Sunday service. She took the opportunity to make it more informal, but also very personal, which was a perfect way to celebrate in that setting.” We’ve always been curious how it works sharing the space with the Church of the Epiphany in San Carlos. Dave says the two parishes play well together. “They’re a great group of people. We always mingle at the pool and share one Happy Hour together. Over the years, I’ve gotten to know a few folks from seeing them at the Ranch each year. It’s a good balance of time to connect deeper with our own Parish and time to meet others.” Planning for this year’s retreat was coordinated by Becky Schenone, who tells us, “St. Peter’s had a wonderful group of families join the retreat this year. The weather was glorious, the pool was cool and a good time was had by all.” 12

The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


From the Vestry The most recent Vestry meeting was on Wednesday, September 18, and a host of items claimed your Vestry’s attention. Finances. Through August, 2013 the church is off budget by roughly $3,000. Actual

Budget

Variance

Income

$ 171,626

$ 173,584

$ -1,957

Expense

182,088

180,920

-1,168

-7,336

$ -3,126

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$

-10,462

$

It may be worth noting that pledging and collection plate receipts are lower than budgeted by about $10,000, and that gifts and bequests are higher than budgeted by about $7,600. Priest in Charge. Mother Susan reported on several items, including: -The new “Second Saturday” women’s group has been well received. -Ideas for streamlining the liturgy are welcome. -Interested parties are invited to weekly staff meetings on Tuesdays at 1:00 PM. -This year’s stewardship campaign will be held during November. Senior Warden. Mary Esther Schnaubelt reported that the Vestry and Priest in Charge will collaborate on a review of parish goals as outlined in the Parish Profile. Education. Mother Susan has begun holding confirmation classes. A new year of Godly Play is underway, with Cari Pang Chen coordinating a broad range of engaging activities. Buildings and Grounds. Junior Warden Darryl Race reported on several items, including: -Completed landscaping improvements on the Clinton Street side: decomposed granite under the bike rack and elsewhere, shrubbery removal, and drainage improvements.. -Proposals for landscaping on the Brewster Street side: Ideas are welcome. -Church locks and keys will be updated, probably in October. -Used furnishings have been acquired for the Vestry Room and Library. October 2013

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Apartment. The Vestry approved an expenditure for new carpets in one of the duplex apartments. Sanctuary. Bids are being solicited for work on the sanctuary flooring. With regret the Vestry accepted resignations from two members: David Householder and Steven Azar. Next scheduled Vestry meeting: October 9. Please address questions and concerns to any member of the Vestry.

A Church Garden, submitted by Sue Walker Three rows of squash— 1.) Squash indifference 2.) Squash criticism 3.) Squash gossip Three rows of turnips— 1.) Turn up for meetings 2.) Turn up with a smile 3.) Turn up with a guest Three rows of lettuce— 1.) Let us love one another 2.) Let us truly worship God 3.) Let us give liberally 14

The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


Noted in Brief Peet’s for St. Pete’s

Our monthly coffee sponsorship program is running full steam ahead! Many thanks to Julie Harvey Park for her sponsorship of Peet’s Coffee for October; lift your cup to Julie at coffee hour! If you would like to sponsor a month, please write denise@stpetersrwc.org

Come to think of it, the parish hall doesn’t lead anywhere.

An anonymous correspondent observed to us the other day: “When the room by the kitchen had books in it, it was called the Lounge. Now it is called the Library and it has no books in it. But then, bicyclists ride on the sidewalk and runners run on the road..!”

We’re szarry he’s gone. We’ve received word that former parishioner Bill Szarowicz’s new address is: 10155 Peppermint Circle #27 Jamestown, CA 95327

Musicians on Jazz Sunday

Sue Walker with Acolytes

October 2013

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Baton Notes –James Sharpe

The Real Luxury of Rehearsal There are many ways in which we learn a song, hymn or choir work. For some, it is easiest to hear a melody and words and then copy. Others prefer to use a score to recreate the music. For most, the process lies somewhere in between and those who lead constantly adjust so that all are comfortable. The real benefit of a choir rehearsal, especially when it happens right before our worship, is that it extends the length of the time in which we are engaged in fellowship with each others, and with the Spirit. There is no question that music opens the heart to another Voice, the leader’s job is to be a facilitator and make certain this Voice can be heard. The quality of the music, how we stand, where we sit, when we process, etc., all pale besides this. I personally am so grateful that those who sing work diligently to learn music. But I am most impressed with how welcoming all are to each other. In the past nine months, my rough count is that nearly twenty congregants have sung in our choir. I have no concern over saying “All are welcome” for I know that all will be welcomed, not only by each other, but by that other Voice. Experience the real luxury of rehearsal. Join us at 9:00 am on the second and fourth Sundays. Walk-ins welcome.

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The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


Finding Your Way Are you looking for a new way to get connected or help out at St. Peter’s? Wondering what your ministry might be within our community? There may be more going on than you realize and more chances to get involved that you know. Think about one of these ministries and if something interests you, get in touch with the contact person listed below. • Choir—contact James Sharpe at JSharpe@stpetersrwc.org • Parish Governance (Vestry, Deanery, Finance or Buildings & Grounds)— Sr. Warden Mary Esther Schnaubelt at meschnaubelt@gmail.com • Lay Eucharistic Ministers, Acolytes and Lay Readers—contact Sue Walker at davtronr@aol.com • Godly Play (Sunday School)—contact Cari Chen at caripangchen@gmail.com • Altar Guild—contact Barbara Naas at gladbarb@comcast.net • S.P.Y. (Youth Group)—contact Susan at susandparsons@aol.com • Hopkins Manor Nursing Home Ministry—contact Deacon Skip Bushee at gsbushee@gmail.com • Maple Street Shelter Ministry—contact Pat McCarty at pat_mccarty@sbcglobal.net • ECW (Episcopal Church Women)—Su Boocock (650) 591-9395 or Kathryn Marconi (650) 365-8861 • W.O.W. (Women of Wisdom)—Lori Castellucci at loriange1551@sbcglobal.net • Crafty Ladies (ECW)—contact Midge Bobel at (650) 364-0195 • Brotherhood (Men’s Group)—contact JD Davidson at jdconstruction_2000@yahoo.com Of course, if you have an interest in starting a fellowship group or ministry at St. Peter’s, don’t hesitate to contact a member of the Vestry so we can assist and support you in that effort. October 2013

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Rites of Passage October Birthdays

October Anniversaries

Stefani O’Leary�������������������������������������10/2 Patricia Rogers��������������������������������������10/4 Katie Scioscia����������������������������������������10/8 Colleen Householder����������������������� 10/12 Juan Duke�������������������������������������������� 10/15 David Goulden����������������������������������� 10/15 Caroline Arnold��������������������������������� 10/17 Midge Bobel���������������������������������������� 10/17 Erik Chen�������������������������������������������� 10/18 Lauren Higgins����������������������������������� 10/20 Sarah Redman������������������������������������ 10/25 Charlene Wieser������������������������������� 10/27

Deborah & Jim Runyeon���������������������10/10 Kathryn & Rod Marconi���������������������10/13 Stacey Redman & Al Cunningham����10/18 C.J. & Jim Redman��������������������������������10/24 George Price & Tim Finnegan�����������10/25

“What greater gift than the love of a cat.” — Charles Dickens

“Cat’s don’t expect birthday presents, they think they already own everything.” — Unknown

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Please contact the church office to make sure we have YOUR birthday or anniversary date to celebrate. The Keys, St. Peter’s Episcopal Church


Join us for the Blessing of the Animals! October 6th, 10:30 a.m. St. Peter’s Episcopal Church 178 Clinton Street, Redwood City Bring your pet on a leash or in a carrier, or even just a photo of your pet or a beloved stuffed animal to this special service. ALL animals are welcome. After the service, there will be refreshments for BOTH you and your animal friends. For more information, visit us online at www.stpetersrwc.org, or call (650) 367-0777.

I can has blessing?

The Next Page A cheerful reminder to every member of the St. Peter’s family—this is your newsletter. Do with it as you will! We welcome your thoughts, your gripes, your prayers, and your dreams… whatever crosses your mind. We’re always looking for contributions in any form or flavor. We accept controversy and convention. Go nuts or stay sane—but let us hear from you, whichever you choose. Please note that any member of the parish family can be Celebrity Guest Editor for one issue of the Keys. Imagine…such privilege, such power! If there’s something happening that you think the parish should know about, you’ve got a theme you’d like to visit, or a vision you’d like to share, drop us a note (hutchinp@comcast.net) or give Denise a call at (650) 367-0777. October 2013

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St. Peter’s Episcopal Church 
 St. Peter’s Episcopal Church 178 Clinton Street 178 Clinton Street Redwood City, 94062 Redwood City, CACA 94062 www.stpetersrwc.org www.stpetersrwc.org

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St. Peter’s Episcopal Church

St. Peter’s Episcopal Church Worship Schedule:

Holy Eucharist: Sundays 8:00 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays 12 Noon in the Chapel

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Worship Schedule: Holy Eucharist: Sundays 8:00 & 10:30 a.m.

The Rev. Marc Andrus
 Bishop of the Diocese of California The Rt. Rev. Marc Andrus Bishop of the Diocese of California The Vestry: Mr. Steven Azar Clergy & Lay Staff: The Rev. Susan D. Parsons, Priest in ChargeMs. Adina Badia The Rev. Skip Bushee, Deacon Mr. James A. Sharpe, Music Minister Ms. Denise Delaney, Parish Administrator Mr. Marco Picon, Sexton & Facilities Manager

Officers of St. Peter’s: Ms. Mary Esther Schnaubelt, Senior Warden Mr. Darryl Race, Junior Warden Mr. John Lessar, Treasurer Mr. Peter Hutchinson, Clerk of the Vestry

The Vestry:

Ms. Adina Badia Mr. Ted Hardie Ms. Lori Castellucci Mr. Dave Householder Mr. Peter Hutchinson Ms. Susan Mitchell Mr. Peter Hutchinson Ms. Nancy Oliver Mr. Arthur Lloyd Mr. Darryl Race Ms. Nancy Oliver Ms. Mary Esther Schnaubelt Ms. Mary Esther Schnaubelt Mr. Scott Turner

The Keys is published monthly for members and friends of St. Peter’s Episcopal The Keys is published monthly members and be friends of St. Episcopal Church. News items Church.for News items may emailed toPeter’s denise@stpetersrwc.org. Next deadline: th Keys online at October 28; pictures welcome! You can find The may be emailed to office@stpetersrwc.org. Next deadline: November 5 – pictures welcome! www.stpetersrwc.org and www.issuu.com/st_peters_episcopal_church


The Keys, October 2013