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30 Endnotes 1

When the Jesuits first opened schools, they (by reason of their Constitutions) were not permitted to charge tuition. They could charge for the room and board only. Being able to charge tuition was changed almost 300 years later. In January 1833, St. Louis Bishop Rosati wrote to Rome asking that a dispensation be given to American Jesuit schools to allow tuition charges. He realized that America did not have nobility who could underwrite the schools. Schools in democratic America were intended for the many, not for the few. It was obvious to him that American Jesuit schools would not be able maintain financial viability for any length of time without being able to collect some kind of tuition fees. In February of that year, American Jesuit Provincials also wrote to Rome asking for a dispensation to charge tuition. Pope Gregory granted the request for American Jesuit schools. Fr. Roothan S.J., the Jesuit Father General at the time, concurred and added conditions, including: first, tuition fees should be similar or less than tuition charged by other similar schools of the area; and, second, that the poor were not to be turned away or neglected simply for financial reasons. McGucken, William J., S.J. The Jesuits and Education. Milwaukee: Bruce Publishing Co. 1932. Pg. 236. John R. O’Leary, The Historical Development of St. Xavier High School, Cincinnati, Ohio, University of Cincinnati, 1947, unpublished thesis. Pages 69-70. 2 Edited by Rueben Gold Thwaites, Jesuit Relations and other Documents 1610-1791, Vol. LXIX, pg. 304ff. 3 Flanagan, Sister M. Callista Flanagan, O.S.B., Jesuit Education in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati in the Last One Hundred Years, University of Notre Dame, 1940, (unpublished M.A. Dissertation ), pg. 22. 4 Lamott, John H., History of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, 1821-1921. New York: Frederick Pustet Co., 1921. pg. 13-14. 5 Ibid., Lamott, pg. 50 and 118. Also: Bennish, Lee, S.J., Continuity and Change, Xavier University 18311981. Loyola University Press, Chicago, 1981. Pg. 13. 6 Ibid., Lamott, pg. 115. 7 Ibid., Lamott, pg. 28 (citing the Propagation of the Faith Archives, America Centrale, Vol. III fol. 323-326, Catholic Historical Review, I, pg. 308.) 8 Op. Cit., O’Leary, pg. 23. 9 Op. Cit., Flanagan, pg. 15. Also: Garraghan, Gilbert J., S.J., The Jesuits of the Middle United States, Loyola University Press, Chicago. Vol. III, pg. 158. 10 Op. Cit., Lamott, pg, 49. 11 Ibid., Lamott, pg. 51-53. 12 Op. Cit., Bennish, pg. 13. 13 Op. Cit., Lamott, pg. 53. 14 Ibid., Lamott, pg. 124-5. 15 Op. Cit., Garraghan, Vol. III, pg. 159. 16 Op. Cit., O’Leary, pg. 28. 17 Hauck, Karl et al. A Century and a Half 1831-1981. St. Xavier High School, Cincinnati, Ohio 1981. Pg.15. 18 Ibid., Hauck, pg. 15, quoting from the 1924 Xavierian, pg. 17. 19 Goss, Rev. Frederick Charles, Cincinnati, the Queen City, 1788-1912, S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1912. Pg. 143. 20 Op. Cit., Lamott, op. cit., pg. 169. 21 Radel, Cliff, “Steamboats Made Cincinnati, so the city celebrates Tall Stacks,” from The Cincinnati Enquirer, October 12, 2003. And Lamott, pg. 124. 22 Fortin, Roger, Faith and Action, Ohio State University Press, 2002, pg. 66. 23 Rice, Timothy O., “Nicholas Longworth: Father of the American Wine Industry,” from Winery Insight, 2003. www.weekendwinery.com 24 Op. Cit., Goss, pg. 143. 25 Op. Cit., Garraghan, Vol. III, pg. 167. 26 Ibid., pg. 170. 27 Ibid.

History of St. Xavier (The Early Years)  

Early history of St. Xavier High School researched and written by Fr. Dennis Ahern, S.J.

History of St. Xavier (The Early Years)  

Early history of St. Xavier High School researched and written by Fr. Dennis Ahern, S.J.