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2 and his companions travelled through Lakes Erie and Huron and then around Lake Michigan (Charlevoix, a town on the western shore of Lake Michigan was named for him) to what today is Chicago They headed down the Fox River to the Mississippi River, and on to New Orleans. From there, Fr. Charlevoix sailed to France, wrote his government report, and returned to teach in Quebec.2 4. In 1749 Joseph Pierre de Bonnecamps S.J., a cartographer and mathematician at the University of Quebec, was sent with a group of French soldiers to map the Ohio River area from Pittsburgh through Cincinnati. Completing this, he returned up the Great Miami River to Detroit, and then went back to Quebec. He is said to have celebrated the first Mass in Ohio at the confluence of the Muskingham and Ohio Rivers. He stayed for four days in Cincinnati and was the first European to draw a map of the Cincinnati area. The French soldiers on the trip with him laid claim to the Ohio River valley land for France. Soon French trappers and traders came through the St. Lawrence River to the Great Lakes region. Later English trappers and traders from Pennsylvania arrived and plied their trade in the same area. The Ohio River valley territory was given to the British by treaty in 1763 at the end of the French and Indian (the Seven Year) War.3 While Jesuit missionary work was expanding in the New World, Jesuits who ministered in Europe were facing grave difficulties of their own. Jesuit educational and pastoral endeavors had become very successful. They brought power and influence to the Society, but along with it came resentment and envy. The Jesuits became targets. The Society of Jesus was banned first in one European country then in another. In 1773, Pope Clement XIV suppressed the Jesuits worldwide. Russia was the only country not to enact the Suppression. For 40 years, Jesuit churches, schools, and libraries were emptied and confiscated. Jesuits fled for their lives. Some came to Catholic Maryland, where they worked quietly as missionaries. Among them was John Carroll S.J. He and five others formed the Catholic Gentlemen of Maryland and opened what eventually would become Georgetown University in

1789. People began to arrive in Cincinnati from Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 1788. A number were Revolutionary War veterans who were paid in land for their wartime services.4 John Cleves Symmes (a former New Jersey congressman who served in the Continental Congress) was granted a federal patent to develop one million acres of land along the Ohio River, between the Little and Great Miami Rivers. With his family he settled in North Bend, near the mouth of the Great Miami River. The majority of the settlers were Presbyterian, Methodist or Baptist. A few Catholics came from Maryland and Pensylvania.5 That same year, a group of 27 settlers from Pennsylvania and New Jersey arrived here. Benjamin Stites led them to a site, near today’s Lunken Airport, which they called Columbia. Eleven families journeyed to a site across from the Licking River which they named Losantiville. Arthur St. Clair, the first governor of the Northwest Territory and a member of the Cincinnatus Society, changed the name of the area to Cincinnati in 1790.6

History of St. Xavier (The Early Years)  
History of St. Xavier (The Early Years)  

Early history of St. Xavier High School researched and written by Fr. Dennis Ahern, S.J.