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Community Report for 2018


A Personal Note “When you support St. Thomas University, you are also supporting our students, helping them to achieve their potential and fulfill their aspirations. You are demonstrating your confidence in our work, in the high quality of education at STU, and in the great student experience we provide. I know that you share my belief in the value of our work and in the promise of our students. On behalf of everyone at St. Thomas, I offer our thanks for your support over the past year.” – President Dawn Russell, BA’77

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Making Education Accessible Planned Gift Supports Students “As I have gotten older, I appreciate encounters with former students who tell me I made a significant difference in their lives. While the focus of my life shifted, my abiding interest and affection for the university remain.” – Professor Kay Robinson passed away on May 19, 2017 and left a significant planned gift to the university to fund the Kay Robinson Award. “Fond Memories of STU” by Kay Robinson appeared in Connections in 2010.

The Alice Doyle Bursary Mary McIllwraith, whose husband Tom, sisters Anne Doyle and Joan Doyle, and brother Harry Doyle all graduated from STU, presented President Russell with a cheque for $10,000 to endow the Alice Doyle Bursary in honour of their mother, who started taking courses at STU following her retirement. The Alice Doyle Bursary is an annual award for a mature student.

New Funding for Bursaries The Joyce Family Foundation has generously pledged $500,000 over the next two years to establish bursaries for entering and current students for whom funding is not otherwise available. We are grateful to the Joyce Family Foundation as we strive to ensure every young person has the opportunity for a university education.

Every Gift Matters “Even the smallest scholarship or bursary can provide financial and moral support to students, for they not only help financially but also provide the kind of validation that encourages students to keep going. I see my contributions to St. Thomas as a way of giving back to the university community that has given me so much.” – Dr. Elizabeth McKim is a retired professor from the Department of English Language and Literature. Over many years, her gifts have made a real impact in the lives of STU students.

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Gifts in Action Conference Towards Reconciliation

STU hosted a Conference Towards Reconciliation, a three-day event that included keynote speakers, panel discussions, breakout sessions, and a celebration of Indigenous culture. The conference is part of a series of events to address how St. Thomas University can participate in the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Special thanks to the Harrison McCain Foundation for their generous support, as part of their investment in St. Thomas University’s Indigenous programing. This event was also funded in part by the Access and Success Program of New Brunswick’s Department of Post-Secondary Education.

Harrington Hall Renovations After a year of extensive renovations, students living in Harrington Hall now have a bright, modern, and accessible residence to call home. The layout of the building has remained the same, but walls, floors, and heating systems have been updated. The newly renovated Harrington also includes upgraded residence rooms, a kitchenette, modernized lounge and study areas, and improved washroom layouts, as well as gender neutral washrooms. The renovations were made possible in part thanks to a generous donation from the Sir James Dunn Foundation.

New Research Chair

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A new Health Research Chair in Community Health and Aging was established at STU. Potential areas for research include community health, senior-friendly communities, the perception of the aging population, healthy living, social wealth, and the impact of social isolation on emotional and physical well-being. The chair is being funded by The McCain Foundation and the New Brunswick Health Research Foundation, who are together contributing $1 million over multiple years.


Supporting a “Feisty” Moot Court Program “It is almost inconceivable that students from a small undergraduate liberal arts university without a law school could compete against the best and brightest students around the world and win. I can’t think of a better way of honouring my feisty assistant than by supporting this feisty Moot Court team.” Hon. Frank McKenna and his wife, Julie McKenna, on establishing the Ruth McCrea Endowment Fund. This fund will help to support the STU Moot Court Team.

Record Year for STU Moot Court Six STU teams qualified for the American Moot Court National Championships while a seventh team travelled to the championships in Dallas as an alternate. Two STU teams – Emma Walsh and Brianna Workman and Dominique Goguen and Jarrod Ryan – earned bids into the second day of competition. Walsh and Workman placed ninth while Goguen and Ryan finished 17th out of 80 teams. The ninth-place finish is the highest placement ever achieved by a STU team. Moot Court is a simulation of the U.S. Supreme Court where students make legal arguments before judges. STU is the only Canadian university to participate in the event, competing against other universities, many of them law or graduate schools.

STU Finishes Second in International Moot Court Competition For the second consecutive year, students from St. Thomas University were among the best at the Nelson Mandela World Human Rights Moot Court Competition at the Palais des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. Emily Williams and Camille Xavier finished second at the international competition, falling to Buenos Aires University in the final round. “I’m incredibly proud,” Williams said. “We worked hard to prepare and we’re glad it paid off. It’s incredible that STU has been in the final for two years in a row.” Last year, students Abbie LeBlanc and Navy Vezina were crowned champions at the event after defeating Buenos Aires University. 

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Meaningful Student Experience Travel-Study to Italy Allows Julia Pazzano to Learn about her Heritage Julia Pazzano was part of a group of St. Thomas students who travelled to Italy to participate in a three-week travel-study experience. “My grandparents on both sides came from Italy. I wanted to learn more about where I come from and the culture and history of the country my family calls home,”she said. The multi-city travel experience is part of the Introduction to Italian Literature and Civilization course. “We explored the culture and beautiful scenery that Italy has to offer,” Pazzano said. “As a student it was an amazing learning opportunity. What better way to study the history and language than to experience it?”

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Being Black in Canada

Presenting on a Global Scale

This panel discussion was organized by student Husoni Raymond and provided perspective on stereotypes, privilege, systemic oppression, responding to racism, and responsible allyship. The panel included Pascale Diverlus, Haitian-born journalist and one of the co-founders of Black Lives Matter Toronto; Alexa Joy Potashnik, founder of Black Space Winnipeg and a CBC Future 40 Under 40; Mary Louise McCarthy, former president of the NB Black History Society; and STU student William Leek.

Political Science students Charlotte Schwarz and Kathleen Rankin travelled to Japan to present their research at a studentcentered international seminar on the Arctic in Asia. Rankin presented her paper, “Resolutions through Research: Negotiating Canadian-Danish Sovereignty Claims to the North,” which analyzed the dispute over the ownership of Hans Island. Schwarz presented her paper, “Canada’s Arctic Policy and its Relations with Russia: Must Ideology be Set Aside for the Sake of Cooperation?”


STU Cares: Day of Action Students examined homelessness and food security in Fredericton during the STU Cares Day of Action. This one-day event connected participants with local organizations working on homelessness, including the Fredericton Community Action Group on Homelessness, the Community Kitchen, and Liberty Lane.

Eagle Feather Ceremony

Model United Nations

In a ceremony that was the first of its kind in Canada, graduating Indigenous students were gifted with an Eagle Feather, which identify the carrier as a messenger for respect, truth, courage, and wisdom. Each student carried their Eagle Feather as they received their degrees at Convocation.

Students gained valuable experience in public speaking and negotiation at the Harvard National Model United Nations. Representing Iran in the simulation, the students joined more than 3,000 delegates to work toward resolutions of global issues. Founded in 1955, the Harvard National Model United Nations is the largest and most prestigious conference of its kind. STU has sent a team to the annual competition for over two decades.

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Student Success Student and Prof Publish Article on ‘Trumpism’ Kayla Preston, BA’18, and Dr. Gul Çaliskan, wrote “Tropes of Fear and the Crisis of the West: Trumpism as a Discourse of Post-Territorial Coloniality,” which has been published by the Postcolonial Studies Journal. “I was able to learn the ropes of academic publishing and the process of peer review, which will be invaluable to me as I progress through my studies,” Preston said.

April Paul Completes Large-scale Mural in Fredericton Fine Arts student April Paul was commissioned by the St. Mary’s First Nation Community Planning to create a large-scale mural in Fredericton. The mural is located on the outside of the overpass on Two Nations Crossing. Art by Paul can be seen in numerous places throughout St. Mary’s, including the Band Office and the Entertainment Centre.

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Elijah Matheson Receives Red Cross Power of Humanity Award

Student Elijah Matheson was the recipient of a 2017 Red Cross Power of Humanity Award for their work as an advocate for the LGBTQIA+ community. “The Red Cross recognizes there are different ways to help humanity and to be a humanitarian,” Matheson said. “It’s great that a big organization known for their humanitarian work recognizes that queer rights activism is as important as other humanitarianism. I think that’s meaningful.”

Students Recognized for Shinerama Campaign Thanks to the work of campaign leaders Emily DesRoches and Victoria Da Silva, STU has been recognized as one of Shinerama Canada’s most improved campaigns. A much-anticipated Welcome Week event, Shine Day takes place as new and returning students hit the streets of Fredericton to flip burgers, sing, and wash cars to raise awareness and money for Shinerama, Canada’s largest postsecondary fundraiser in support of Cystic Fibrosis Canada.


Dollars Make a Difference When student Ruth Hadgu saw news of the bombings in Syria, she felt compelled to help. She began to fundraise on campus and sent the money to the Preemptive Love Coalition, an organization working to provide relief efforts and job creation for refugees. “A dollar from here can make a huge difference there – five dollars can buy an emergency kit to help families,” Hadgu said. “I’d like to make this an annual effort and raise funds through events each year.”

Grads Selected as Venture for Canada Fellows Andrea Lopez, of El Salvador, and Jimy Beltran, of Venezuela, were selected from hundreds of applicants to join Venture for Canada, a not-for-profit that recruits and trains top graduates to work with start-ups across the country for a twoyear fellowship. After the two-year fellowship, Lopez is hoping to pursue work in project management, while Beltran will pursue graduate studies.

Grad and Professor Published in Law Review Matthew LeBlanc’s list of achievements is growing. The recent graduate – a Francis M. McLaughlin Scholarship recipient, former Vice-President Administration for the Students’ Union, member of Theatre St. Thomas and STU Jazz, and Moot Court competitor – is now also a published scholar. LeBlanc, along with Dr. Tom Bateman of the Department of Political Science, co-authored “Dialogue on Death: Parliament and Courts on Medically-Assisted Dying” which was published in the Supreme Court Law Review and Assisted Death: Legal, Social, and Ethical Issues after Carter.

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Celebrating Community Success David Adams Richards Appointed to the Senate of Canada

Alumnus and award-winning author David Adams Richards was appointed to the Senate of Canada and is representing New Brunswick in the Red Chamber. “David’s selection by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is inspiring,” said President and Vice-Chancellor Dawn Russell. “He will be a fine representative for a province he has written about so movingly for more than four decades.”

Honouring Inspirational Canadians At Spring Convocation, honorary degrees were bestowed on the Rt. Honorable Brian Mulroney, Canada’s 18th Prime Minister, and his wife Mila Mulroney, a longtime volunteer for charitable causes. At Summer Convocation, an honorary degree was presented to Elizabeth Weir, a respected parliamentarian and international development expert.

Carolyn Layden-Stevenson Distinguished Alumni Award Prominent jurist Jack Walsh, BA’75, nationally recognized Aboriginal law expert Tom Isaac, BA’87, and human rights activist Michelle Arévalo, BA’04, were honoured with the Carolyn Layden-Stevenson Distinguished Alumni Award at STU’s Gala Dinner on October 14th. The award recognizes the accomplishments of alumni who have earned prominence as a result of their outstanding professional achievements and/or service to society.

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Faculty Success Dr. Tony Tremblay’s New Brunswick Literature Curriculum in English, is a free web resource for teachers, students, and others interested in learning about New Brunswick literature. Designed for use in New Brunswick high schools, the curriculum features 44 authors and poets who were from, lived in, or wrote about the province, such as modernist poet Elizabeth Brewster and Miramichi author Ray Fraser. It includes selected readings, biographical information, and strategies for teachers to use the material in their classrooms. www.stu.ca/nblce

NB Innovation Foundation Funding Dr. Clive Baldwin and the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research on Narrative earned $50,000 from the New Brunswick Innovation Foundation to develop a program on narrative care. The research team, consisting of Dr. Baldwin, Canada Research Chair in Narrative Studies, Dr. Bill Randall (Gerontology), Dr. Gul Çaliskan (Sociology), Dolores Furlong (UNB Nursing), Dr. Marcea Ingersoll (School of Education), and Dr. Matte Robinson (English), is working to develop a program that will bring the benefits of narrative care or life-story work to health care providers.

Constructing Digital STEM Literacies Dr. Shaunda Wood wants to bring coding to elementary schoolaged children – especially for students who do not often have this opportunity. The School of Education professor was awarded a National Science and Research Council’s PromoScience Grant, valued at $54,630, for her coding program research, “Wasis k kisihtohtit (Children Made It). Coding, learning, and constructing digital STEM literacies: Families and communities becoming creators.” Wood also received a STU Research Grant, Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of NB funding, and a New Brunswick Innovation Foundation-Research Assistantships Initiative grant for the project. e

New Brunswick Literature Curriculum in English

Preparing Students to Teach Internationally Education professor Dr. Marcea Ingersoll, who teaches in the School of Education, is conducting research to better prepare students in Canadian teacher education programs for work at international schools. Ingersoll, along with Dr. Mark Hirschkorn, Dr. Alan Sears, and Dr. Jeff Landine of the University of New Brunswick, earned a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council Insight Development Grant of $72,504 for their project.

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Where Are Our Students From? Full-time Students by Province 2017-18 Awards Disbursed 2017-2018 l 8.0% ationa Intern % 3.5

PE I

DN rC he Ot

O N

3. 4% 2.8 %

Number Value

Scholarship - Entrance Scholarship - Upper Year

422

$ 953,253.00

47 $ 58,306.00

Scholarship - Renewals

274 $ 1,001,736.26

Total Scholarship

743

Bursary - Entrance (Undergraduate)

205 $ 242,091.66

$ 2,013,295.26

N S 9.5 %

NB 72.8%

Bursary - Upper Year

90 $ 63,314.33

Bursary - Post-Baccalaureate

22 $ 20,200.00

Bursary - Renewals

32 $ 64,104.00

Total Bursary

349

$ 389,709.99

Other Awards

98

$ 302,917.71

Total Other Awards

98

$ 302,917.71

GRAND TOTAL

1190 $ 2,705,922.96

Excludes B143 International Bursary (processed as tuition waiver) and B163 Exchange Travel Bursaries

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Donations at STU

Where is your Money Going?

Who is Giving to STU?

Operations 1%

s 3% 4% Athletic eed st N ate Gre

Alumni 8% Friends 15%

Student Experience 14%

Student Awards 60%

Academic Initiatives 18%

Organizations and Foundations 77%

Academic Initiatives 18%

What Our Students Say In the 2017 National Survey of Student Engagement, 92% of fourth-year students rate their overall experience at STU as good/excellent.

STU students were significantly more likely than students at other Canadian/ Maritime universities to report greater gains in their knowledge, skills, and development by learning how to: • Think critically and analytically • Write clearly and effectively • Speak clearly and effectively • Solve complex, real-world problems • Become an informed, active citizen

Students also gave STU higher grades for social and civic engagement such as: • Including diverse perspectives in discussions or assignments • Emphasizing events that address important social or political issues • Connecting learning to societal issues

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STU Budget at a Glance 2018-2019 Budgeted Revenues 2018-2019 Budgeted Expenses

Other $0.97M 4%

Operating Grant $14.4M 48%

Tuitions and Fees $14.4M 48%

Student Services Computing Services $1.7M Fiscal Transfer $1.1M 5.6% to UNB 3.6% $1.9M 6.3%

Ph ys i $2 cal P . 7.3 2M lan t % Administration and General $5.3M 17.5%

Economic Contribution of STU • • • • •

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Attracts 102 full-time faculty to the city Employs 81 part-time faculty Employs 90 full-time staff members Educates 2,000 students every year Granted 6,097 credentials since 2008

Academic $18M 59.7%


Beyond 2018: STU Shaped Today’s Leaders Maria Jose Burgos, BA’17 Journalist at CBC, winner of two Atlantic Journalism Awards this year, including the Jim MacNeill New Journalist Award “One of the most valuable things I learned at STU was to be confident enough to talk to an audience (even with an accent). Surrounded by role models, I learned at STU that young women can be powerful, no matter the scenario. And this is something I carry with me every day to work. I also learned that migrants can find a new place they can comfortably call home. Just like I did.”

Nova Pelletier, BA’15 Team Lead at Disney Interactive “One of the most beneficial experiences from my time at STU was having the opportunity to interact with diverse individuals. With the class sizes so small, I had the opportunity to speak and interact with people who I might not have had the chance to in a different setting. These communication skills have carried over, and have helped me in my career as I communicate with people from all over the world, each and every day.” Justin Caines, BA’11 Lawyer at Cox & Palmer NFLD “My liberal arts background has been invaluable in my career. I strongly believe that a liberal arts education provides much more than knowledge. It provides a way of thinking and a way of dealing with issues. It is the ability to recall my experiences and apply those on a daily basis. I am grateful for my liberal arts background and believe it benefits my practice every day.”

Sawyer Hannay, BA’17 Creator/President at Country Liberty “My education taught me to think critically about diverse issues which is important when running a business. I didn’t realize how much I didn’t know until going to STU. Working through such varying subjects forced me to put myself in very different shoes all the time, broadening my ability to think on different subjects.”

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Ex officio Most Rev. Robert Harris, BA, LTh, JCL – Chancellor Dawn Russell, BA’77, LLB, LLM – President and Vice-Chancellor Kim Fenwick, BSc, MA, PhD – Vice President (Academic and Research) Appointed Tammy Augustine, BA’92, LLB Tanya Chapman, BA’90, BEd David Farrar, BA’82, LLB David Ferguson, BA Peter R. Forestell, QC, BA’73, LLB – Chair Krista Han, CPA, CA, FEA Tom Isaac, BA’87, MA, LLB, LLM Carolyn MacKay, BN, MBA Daniel McCarthy, BComm, FCPA Rev. Douglas R. McNeill, BA’77, BTh, MDiv Claire Morris, BA, MSW (2010-2018) Graydon Nicholas, BSc, LLB, MSW Phillippe Ouellette, BA‘04, MA Vaughn Sturgeon, BA’91, CPA, CMA Stephen Ward, BA’73, MA, PhD Bill Whalen, BA, APR, FCPRS

Faculty Tom Bateman, BA, MA, PhD (2016-2018) Dawne Clarke, BA’95, MA, PhD Karla O’Regan, BA’98, MA, JD, LLM, PhD Jean-Philippe Ranger, BA, MA, PhD Alumni Francis McBrearty, BA’06, LLM, JD Marg Tracy, BA’75 Observers Jeffrey Carleton, BA, MA – Associate Vice-President, Communications Lily Fraser, BSc, MHA, CPA, CGA – Vice-President, Finance and Administration Jodi Misheal, BA, BEd – Vice-President, Advancement and Alumni Relations Brianna Workman, BA’19 – President, Students’ Union

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Board of Governors

Profile for St. Thomas University

St. Thomas University Community Report for 2018  

St. Thomas University Community Report for 2018