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2018‐2019


ST. THERESA CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOL School Directory Principal ............................................................................................................. Mrs. C. Smith-Dewey Vice-Principal ....................................................................................................... Mrs. C. Landry-Kyte Department Heads Communications .......................................................................................................... Mr. J. Brintnell Guidance / Math ............................................................................................................ Mr. D. Mulder Health and Physical Education ................................................................................... Mr. P. Koughan Science / Business / Technology ................................................................................... Ms. A. Barrett Religion / Arts ................................................................................................................. Mr. S. Roach Social Sciences........................................................................................................... Mr. K. McGuire Student Services / Student Success ............................................................................... Mr. B. Power Telephone Directory Main Office: 613-968-6993 Fax:613-968-9470 School Website www.alcdsb.on.ca\school\thss Email: flhpthss@alcdsb.on.ca Sir James Whitney: 613-967-2823

____________________________________________________________________ The Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board 151 Dairy Avenue, Napanee, Ontario, K7R 4B2 1-800-581-1116 Website – www.alcdsb.on.ca Mr. Jody DiRocco, Director of Education David Giroux, Superintendent of School Effectiveness

Gavin Cosgrove, Trustee

Theresa Kennedy, Superintendent of School Effectiveness

Tom Dall, Trustee

Karen Shannon, Superintendent of School Effectiveness

Brian Kerby, Trustee

Terri Slack, Superintendent of School Effectiveness

Wendy Proctor, Trustee

Bob Koubsky, Superintendent of Finance & Business Services Erin Walker, Assistant to the Director

Greg Speagle, Trustee Catharina Summers, Trustee

John Brisbois, Chair of the Board

Kathy Turkington, Trustee

Terry Shea, Vice-Chair of the Board

George Hinin, Student Trustee

Sean Kelly, Chair of the Finance and Operations Committee i 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

ST. THERESA COMMUNITY ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 1 MISSION STATEMENT ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 2 EXPECTATIONS OF THE ONTARIO CATHOLIC SCHOOL GRADUATE .......................................................................................................................... 3 INFORMATION FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS Organization of St. Theresa’s School Programs .................................................................................................................................................. 4 Communication with Parents ................................................................................................................................................................................ 4 Course Selection and Changes ............................................................................................................................................................................ 4 Course Transfers During the Year ....................................................................................................................................................................... 5 THE PATH TO SUCCESS.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 CODE OF CONDUCT .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 DRESS REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6 ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT Evaluation and Examination Policies ................................................................................................................................................................ .. 7 THE ONTARIO STUDENT RECORD................................................................................................................................................................................ .. 7 THE ONTARIO STUDENT TRANSCRIPT ......................................................................................................................................................................... . 8 SCHOOL COUNCIL ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 8 TRANSPORTATION............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 8 PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA Pastoral Services ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Student Services/Guidance ................................................................................................................................................................................. 9 Students and the Youth Counsellor .................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Individual Pathways Plan ................................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Experiential Learning Opportunities ................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Student Success Strategies .......................................................................................................................................................................... 11-12 EOS .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Communications Technology ............................................................................................................................................................................. 13 D2L ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 The St. Theresa Learning Commons ................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Business Partnership ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Cafeteria ............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Programs for Students with Special Needs (Special Education)........................................................................................................................ 14 Exceptional Students .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Individual Education Plan ................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC) ...................................................................................................................................................... 15 Cooperative Education ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP) ................................................................................................................................................ 16 Definition of a Credit ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Graduation Literacy Requirement ...................................................................................................................................................................... 18 40 Hours of Community Involvement ................................................................................................................................................................. 19 The Ontario Secondary School Certificate ......................................................................................................................................................... 19 The Certificate of Accomplishment ..................................................................................................................................................................... 19 Substitutions for Compulsory Credits………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………19 French Certification of Achievement………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..19

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PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT AND RECOGNITION (PLAR) Challenge for a Credit Diploma ...................................................... 20 Alternative Ways of Earning Credits Towards The Ontario School Diploma ........................................................................... 20 COURSE INFORMATION FOR OSS STUDENTS Definitions of Types of Courses .............................................................................................................................................. 21 Grade 9 and 10 - Overview ........................................................................................................................................ 21 Grade 11 and 12 – Overview ..................................................................................................................................... 22 COURSE INFORMATION FOR OSS STUDENTS – DESTINATION OPTIONS University/College Preparation ................................................................................................................................................ 23 University Preparation .............................................................................................................................................................. 23 COURSE CODING SYSTEM ................................................................................................................................................................. 24 A GUIDE TO DESTINATION PATHWAYS........................................................................................................................................ 25-26 COURSES OFFERED AT ST. THERESA Grade 10-12.......................................................................................................................................................... 27-67

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES ................................................................................................................................................. 70-77 COURSE OFFERINGS…. ..............................................................................................................................................................…78-79

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CURA ET AUDAX VIRTUTE COURAGE AND SERVICE THROUGH VIRTUE St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School is a community of scholars, stewards and disciples. Through our daily prayer, liturgical celebrations and our social justice initiatives, we strive to live each day in the likeness and image of God. St. Theresa is an inclusive Catholic faith community which supports all persons in choosing a pathway with an openness to God’s calling. St. Theresa students consistently demonstrate high academic results with outstanding EQAO results, excellent credit accumulation as well as one of the best graduation rates in the province. Our goal is to serve all students needs by offering a variety of programs such as Specialist High Skills Major, Dual Credits and Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Programs. Engagement in school extends beyond the classroom through a wide variety of co-curricular activities. Students who are looking for an opportunity to become involved in our school or in the global community can find their niche at St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School. Our varsity sports, intramural activities, clubs and leadership groups give students the opportunity to be involved in the community. We look forward to helping our students along their journey to develop their faith, meet educational goals and build relationships. Mrs. C. Smith-Dewey

Mrs. C. Landry-Kyte

Principal

Vice Principal

“Lord, it is good for us to be here.” Matthew 17:4 1



ONTARIO CATHOLIC SCHOOL GRADUATE EXPECTATIONS Distinctive expectations for graduates of Catholic Schools are determined and shaped by the vision and destiny of the human person emerging from our faith tradition. This Christian anthropology or world view reveals the dignity and value of the person. Our tradition tells us that God creatively and lovingly calls each of us into the wonder of life, sustaining us by the power of the Holy Spirit, throughout the human journey, into life eternal. We acknowledge that the journey includes moments of brokenness and sin. We recognize in the person of Jesus, the risen Christ, the human face of God sharing our life in order to heal us of our brokenness and liberate us from sin. This Christian vision of the human journey is best understood within the context of relationship. It is accomplished in community, in solidarity with brothers and sisters in the Church and beyond. Catholic education views human life as an integration of body, mind, and spirit. Rooted in this vision, Catholic education fosters the search for knowledge as a lifelong spiritual and academic quest. The expectations of Catholic graduates, therefore, are described not only in terms of knowledge and skills, but in terms of values, attitudes and actions.  

THE GRADUATE IS EXPECTED TO BE: 1.

A discerning believer formed in the Catholic Faith community who celebrates the signs and sacred mystery of God’s presence through word, sacrament, prayer, forgiveness, reflection and moral living.

2.

An effective communicator, who speaks, writes and listens honestly and sensitively, responding critically in light of gospel values.

3.

A reflective, creative and holistic thinker who solves problems and makes responsible decisions with an informed moral conscience for common good.

4.

A self-directed, responsible, lifelong learner who develops and demonstrates their God-given potential.

5.

A collaborative contributor who finds meaning, dignity and vocation in work which respects the rights of all and contributes to the common good.

6.

A caring family member who attends to family, school, parish and the wider community.

7.

A responsible citizen who gives witness to Catholic social teaching by promoting peace, justice and the sacredness of human life.

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INFORMATION FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS ORGANIZATION OF ST. THERESA’S SCHOOL PROGRAMS St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School operates on a two semester timetable. Students take four courses from September to January (Semester One), and then take four different courses from February to June (Semester Two). In years one, two and three, students are expected to carry a full course load (4 credits per semester) to ensure favourable progress in accumulating specified requirements for their Ontario Secondary School Diploma (O.S.S.D.).

COMMUNICATION WITH PARENTS Through the co-operation of parents, teachers and the parishes, we can ensure the successful development of all our students. The best results are obtained when all the partners in Catholic education communicate regularly. We have an introductory meeting in the fall, individual parent/teacher interviews to discuss students’ progress after the October and March reports, and two other written reports. We welcome parental requests for interviews at any time. By working together, we best serve the interests of our students and your children. In an effort to communicate with students and parents concerning attendance and progress, we have a number of reporting times. Semester 1

Semester 2

Interim Reports

early October

early March

Midterm Reports

mid November

mid April

Final Reports

early February

early July

Newsletters and upcoming events are posted regularly on St. Theresa’s website www.alcdsb.on.ca\school\thss

COURSE SELECTION AND CHANGES It is the RESPONSIBILITY OF ALL STUDENTS TO MAKE CERTAIN THEY EARN CREDITS IN COURSES WHICH WILL ENABLE THEM TO MEET THEIR LONG-TERM GOALS. Students are urged to consult with teachers, counsellors and parents in order to determine the proper course and/or stream best suited to their success. All students are expected to register for a full timetable. COURSES CAN BE OFFERED ONLY WHEN SELECTED BY A REASONABLE NUMBER OF STUDENTS AND AT THE DISCRETION OF THE PRINCIPAL. Some courses, therefore, may not be offered even though they appear in the calendar’s descriptions. A list of these cancellations will be made available as early as possible.

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INFORMATION FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS COURSE TRANSFERS DURING THE YEAR Course transfers are possible if made early in the semester. Students are expected to follow the timetable that has been built in response to their choices. However, at times, adjustments are made if post-secondary and career choices are affected. Any transfers are dependent upon available space in appropriate classes, and it being feasible to timetable the change. All course/stream changes made after two weeks into the semester shall require the written approval of the teacher, principal, parent/guardian and teacher counsellor. It is imperative that courses be chosen with prudence and forethought to post-secondary destinations. Students need to research Apprenticeship, College and University calendars and websites to ensure correct course requirements.

THE PATH TO SUCCESS Education is a team effort involving students, family, parish and the school, which is strengthened by our communication links. If at any time parents or guardians have questions about students or the school, please do not hesitate to contact the Principal, Vice-Principal, Guidance/Resource Teacher or the subject teacher. Students are urged to strive to achieve their highest potential. In order to achieve this success, students are expected to attend classes on a regular basis, to be punctual and to be prepared for each class with all required materials and with assigned work completed. A copy of the school’s attendance policy is distributed to each student in September and is published in the St. Theresa agenda book.

CODE OF CONDUCT & THE SAFE SCHOOLS POLICY The Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board and the St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School community are committed to a Code of Conduct and the Safe Schools Policy. The central tenets are as follows: We see a school community in which Christ’s teachings and our Catholic faith have a central place. We see a school community which is in a cooperative and supportive relationship with the Home, Parish and other members of its broader constituency. We see a school community which provides an education that is of the highest quality which is demanding, supportive and which promotes confident, hopeful, life long learning in all students. We see a school community which enables students to develop an awareness of their individual gifts and talents in order to be truly responsible to themselves and others. A complete copy of the Code of Conduct is available each year to parents and students on the school website www.alcdsb.on.ca\school\thss The Safe Schools Policy is available at the Ministry of Education site for the government of Ontario (www.edu.gov.on.ca) as well as the St. Theresa website under mission statement. Students are expected to strive for a high standard of personal conduct and to treat their staff and fellow students with respect and courtesy at all times. Students are also expected to attend all of their classes and to arrive punctually and be prepared to participate. Many of these expectations are essential habits to help foster academic success.

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SCHOOL DRESS CODE AT ST. THERESA CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOL The uniform has several purposes and benefits: it reduces the cost of clothing over the years at secondary school; it creates a sense of belonging to the school community; it creates a feeling of self-worth and personal pride; it reduces the competition for brand name clothing; and it creates an atmosphere suitable for the business of learning.

FEMALE

MALE



School blue or white golf shirt (long or short sleeved) or white dress shirt



    

School turtleneck Undershirts must be white or navy blue Kilt, school dress pant or school shorts School sweater or school vest Socks or tights – navy, burgundy, black or white – no pattern Footed tights must be worn with kilt Black or Brown shoes

School blue or white golf shirt (long or shortsleeved); or dress shirt (tucked in) with St. Theresa tartan or navy crested tie

    

School turtleneck Undershirts must be white or navy blue School dress pants or school shorts School sweater or school vest Black/Brown shoes including laces and sole

  NOTE

A school shirt MUST be worn under both the sweatshirt, the vest and sweater for both male and female uniforms. Long sleeved shirts under short sleeve shirts is NOT part of the dress code.

To order uniforms or view styles available, please visit www.mccarthyuniforms.ca  Uniform store located on the second floor, top of the main staircase. Store hours Tuesday/Thursday 9:00am-2:00pm. 613-968-6993 ext. 2215 Civvies Day occurs on the last Friday of each month.  A Successful Life: To laugh often and much; to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children; to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others; to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch or a redeemed social condition; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived. Ralph Waldo Emerson

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ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION OF STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to improve student learning. Information gathered through assessment and evaluation helps teachers to identify students’ difficulties as well as to detect weaknesses in programming. Assessment and evaluation are important tools for adapting curriculum and instructional approaches to meet students’ needs and for determining the overall effectiveness of programs and classroom practices. Assessment is the process of gathering information from a variety of sources (including assignments, demonstrations, projects, performances, and tests) that accurately reflects how well students are achieving the curriculum expectations. As part of assessment, teachers provide students with descriptive feedback that guides their efforts towards improvement. Evaluation is the process of judging the quality of a student’s work on the basis of established achievement criteria, and assigning a value to represent that quality. In Ontario secondary schools, the value assigned will be in the form of a percentage grade. Assessment and evaluation will be based on the provincial curriculum expectations and the achievement levels outlined in the secondary curriculum policy documents. These documents can be accessed at the Ministry of Education website: www.edu.gov.on.ca and link to Secondary Curriculum. Evaluation is based on the level of achievement that the student demonstrates in the skills and knowledge covered in a course. Seventy per cent of the evaluation is based on classroom work and may be determined through a variety of methods such as ongoing class demonstrations, presentations, essays, performances and classroom tests and quizzes. Thirty percent of the evaluation is based on a final summative evaluation that may be determined through a variety of methods in the latter portion of the course. These could include a portfolio, essay, examination and/or demonstration. This final evaluation reflects the range and level of student skills and knowledge towards the conclusion of the course. At the beginning of every course, each student is given a course outline indicating assessment and evaluation procedures for the course. Course outlines are available upon request in the Administrative Office.

THE ONTARIO STUDENT RECORD The Ontario Student Record is the official school record for a student.

Every Ontario school keeps an OSR for each student enrolled at that school. The OSR contains achievement results, credits earned and diploma requirements completed, and other information important to the education of the student. Students and their parents/guardians (if the student is not an adult) may examine the contents of the OSR upon request to the Principal. The Education Act and Freedom of Information legislation protect these records.

“All of us do not have special talent but all of us should have an equal opportunity to develop our talents.” John F. Kennedy

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THE ONTARIO STUDENT TRANSCRIPT The Ontario Student Transcript (O.S.T.) provides a comprehensive record of a student’s overall achievement in high school. The credits that a secondary school student has earned towards fulfilment of the requirements for the graduation diploma will be recorded on the O.S.T. The Ontario Student Transcript is an official and consistent summary of a student’s achievement in Ontario secondary school credit courses. A current, accurate and complete copy of the O.S.T. will be included within the Ontario Student Record. The transcript, which is part of the Ontario Student Record (OSR), will include the following information: 

The student’s achievement in Grades 9 and 10, with percentage grades earned and credits gained for successfully completed credit courses;



A list of all Grade 11 and 12 courses taken or attempted by the student, with the percentage grades earned and the credits gained;



Identification of any course that has been substituted for one that is a diploma requirement;



The student’s final result on the provincial secondary school literacy test or course; the completion of community service hours;



An indication of any extraordinary circumstances affecting the student’s achievement in a Grade 11 or 12 course.

The Ministry of Education and Training has a policy of full disclosure. This policy states that all grade 11, 12 and OAC courses attempted by students must be recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript. Full disclosure does not apply to students in grades 9 or 10. Any grade 11 or 12 course completed, dropped or failed will appear on a student transcript along with the marks earned in the program. Full disclosure will take effect five (5) instructional days following the issue of the mid-term Provincial Report Card.

SCHOOL COUNCIL This council is actively involved in providing support and services for the students of St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School. All parents/guardians are eligible to run for school council. We welcome your participation. This council initiates activities and programs in the following areas: spirituality, guidance, career education, positive growth, communication and fund raising. The work of the council will bring significant benefit to the school community. For more information and meeting minutes please visit the school website www.alcdsb.on.ca\school\thss

Parent/Community School Council

TRANSPORTATION If you have questions or concerns regarding your son’s or daughter’s school transportation, please contact the Tri-board Transportation Authority at 1-866-569-6638 ext. 315.

www.triboard.ca

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA PASTORAL SERVICES Our Pastoral Services Team is comprised of our priest chaplain, a department head teacher, and the coordinator of Pastoral Care Services who work together to assist members of our school community in their spiritual growth through morning prayer, prayer services, retreats, celebration of the sacraments, organizing liturgies, counselling, providing and supporting opportunities for social justice initiatives, pro-life participation, charitable activities and serving as a liaison between our students and the Archdiocese of Kingston, the Archbishop and our Parish Priests. A Christian view of life permeates all subjects in Catholic schools. Education in religion is also taught as separate courses, and the Board requires that all students enrol in a religion course in each year of secondary school. Students are also expected to live the Christian message through prayer, attendance at school liturgies, and through service to others. CAREER AND GUIDANCE EDUCATION (STUDENT SERVICES) The Guidance and Career Education Program is a vital and integral part of the secondary school program. Through this program, students will acquire the knowledge and skills that they require in order to learn effectively, to live and work co-operatively and productively with a wide range of people, to set and pursue education and career goals, and to carry out their social responsibilities. The program is delivered through various means, including classroom instruction, orientation and exit programs, completion of the Individual Pathways Plan, career exploration activities, and individual assistance and short-term counselling. The goals of the guidance and career education program are outlined in the policy document entitled Creating Pathway to Success: An Education and Career Life planning program for Ontario schools (2013) Guidance staff assists students with: Individual Counselling

About courses, careers, college, university and apprenticeship opportunities and personal concerns.

Interest Inventories

To learn more about yourself and potential career opportunities.

Career Cruising/myBlueprint.ca Computer information about jobs and careers.

Hard & Soft Copy Information

About careers, colleges, universities, apprenticeships and other opportunities. Records of total credits earned towards graduation.

Special Programs

Scholarship and Financial Aid

Information on special programs such as dual credits, Specialist High Skills Majors.

Information, applications and planning.

Group Sessions On job search techniques, post-secondary planning, study skills, life skills, and personal issues. 

Peer Tutoring / Peer Mentoring Provided by student volunteers.

Registration and Orientation

For next year, workplace, college, apprenticeship or university destinations.

Appointments can be requested by downloading QR Reader and scan or Log in to D2L and select Guidance Icon.

St. Theresa’s Student Services Department encourages students and parents/guardians to participate fully in the programs, workshops, lessons and individual sessions intended to assist students in moving successfully toward their post-secondary destinations. In addition, students are assisted in accessing the following community agencies & resources: St. Theresa Chaplain Services

Local Police Service

Children’s Mental Health

Youthhab

Hastings & Prince Edward County Health Unit

Job Connect

Children’s Aid Society

Addiction Assessment Counselling

Attendance Counselling


PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA STUDENTS AND THE YOUTH COUNSELLOR

St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School has a Child and Youth counsellor to assist students who may be experiencing some of the following difficulties:   

Poor attendance or academic difficulties Considered at risk of dropping out Self-esteem and emotional issues

  

Problem solving and decision making Social skills and behaviour management Personal or family crises which impact

See a counsellor for a referral. INDIVIDUAL PATHWAYS PLAN

From Kindergarten to Grade 12, teachers encourage their students to set goals to improve their work and to review the success of their personal efforts and choices. Starting in Grade 7, students also track the growth of their career development competencies and plan for their future in an Individual Pathways Plan (IPP; formerly called the Annual Education Plan). The Individual Pathways Plan for students in Grades 9 to 12 will identify:    

the student’s goals for academic achievement; the student’s course selections for the following year; the extracurricular activities, Cooperative Education programs and work experience opportunities in which the student will be participating both in and outside school; a range of possible post-secondary goals.

Beginning in Grade 10, students should consider and research the requirements for continued study at a college or university or private vocational school; apprenticeships or internships; or direct entry into the work force. The plan will be reviewed twice a year. Excellent websites to assist in this plan:

www.myBlueprint.ca Students/Parents log in through myalcdsb.on.ca and then link to St. Theresa Guidance. EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

Planned learning experiences that take place in the community, including job shadowing, Take Our Kids to Work day, job twinning, Mission Employable, work experience, virtual work experience, and cooperative education, provide students who are enrolled in courses of all types and in all disciplines with the opportunity to enhance their school programs. Experiential learning can assist all students who are bound for university, college, apprenticeship, or the workplace, in making career decisions as well as in developing the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are essential in today’s society. All forms of experiential learning are a valuable complement to students’ academic experience and preparation for the future. When organized in a sequential fashion that meets career development needs, experiential learning can maximize student growth and development, and is encouraged. See a counsellor regarding any of these types of experiential learning opportunities.

“Whatever your discipline, become a student of excellence in all things. Take every opportunity to observe people who manifest the qualities of mastery.”

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Tony Buzan


PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA STUDENT SUCCESS STRATEGIES Every student learns differently. Now there are exciting new ways for them to participate in high school and earn the credits they need. Student Success Teams work with school staff, students, parents and the wider community to ensure that, together, we help more students earn the credits necessary to graduate. A new addition to secondary schools is the Student Success Teacher who advocates for and mentors students, monitors students, and develops interventions for struggling students. Such interventions may include credit rescue, credit recovery, and other opportunities. The Credit Recovery Program (CRP) is designed for students who are most at risk of falling behind in their credit accumulation and leaving school without an Ontario Secondary School Diploma as a result. The CRP provides a student who has failed a credit, a second opportunity to meet grade level expectations to achieve the same credit. Eligibility of a student to participate in CRP will be determined by the factors which impacted on the student’s lack of success the first time through the credit, the student’s program pathway, the student’s overall academic performance, and the principal’s direction. Specialist High Skills Major offers an opportunity for students who have a career path in mind an opportunity to customize their learning. Students take “bundles” of six to twelve courses that help them prepare for specific employment sectors, such as hospitality and tourism, arts and culture, construction, manufacturing, and primary industries. St. Theresa Specialist High Skills Major Students can enrol in the following industry specific High Skills Majors at St. Theresa: Hospitality & Tourism Information & Communication Technology Transportation Social Justice—Pending Ministry Approval Sports: Fitness & Management Systems Students have an opportunity to develop skills and gain valuable work experience and complete industry valued certifications (i.e. WHIMIS, First Aid, Customer Service, etc.). In addition, partnerships with post-secondary institutions give students reach ahead opportunities. Transitions Students who have difficulty making the move from elementary to high school will get the support they need through increased individual attention, monitoring, and programming tailored to fit their individual situation. Secondary schools work closely with their elementary counterparts to gather information that will assist them in ensuring a successful transition for students. Cooperative Education is a great way to learn skills and gain experience from the workplace, and get a “head start” with building a resumé. Students can now include two co-op credits within the 18 compulsory credits that they need to graduate.

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA Dual Credit Programs The Dual Credit Program provides secondary students with the opportunity to earn up to four, non compulsory dual credits by participating in apprenticeship training and post-secondary courses that count toward both their secondary school diploma and their post-secondary diploma or apprenticeship certification. The course codes for dual credit classes differ from the course codes delivered at the home school. Dual Credits are one example of programming that supports the Learning to 18 mandate of the Ministry of Education to improve the graduation rate, address the achievement gap and to increase confidence in public education. Dual credit programs are intended to assist secondary students in the completion of their OSSD and create a successful transition to college and apprenticeship programs. All dual credit programs involve a dedicated role for secondary school teachers ranging from direct instruction to support and supervision of students. All Dual Credit delivery models are approved and funded by the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Training, Colleges, Universities through School/College/Work Initiative (SCWI). Our board is using the following delivery approaches: dual credit based on college-delivered level 1 apprenticeship involving a dedicated role for secondary teachers, dual credit based on college-delivered course involving a dedicated role for secondary teachers, dual credit based on team-teaching of matched college and secondary curriculum. Consult your Guidance Counsellor for details. Dual Credit Offerings

* Dependent on enrolment, All offerings change from year to year.

Automotive Service Technician – OYAP

- Sem II, February – April

Loyalist

Brick and Stone Mason Apprenticeship – OYAP

- Sem II, February – April

St. Lawrence

Carpentry Apprenticeship – OYAP

- Sem II, February – April

St. Lawrence

General Carpentry (SHSM)

- Sem II, February – June

Loyalist

Cook/Culinary Arts – OYAP

- Sem II, February – June

Loyalist

Early Childhood Education

- Sem II, February – June

Loyalist

Child & Youth Worker

- Sem I & II

Loyalist

Esthetics and Nails

- To be announced

Loyalist

Hairstylist – OYAP @ SLC

- Sem I & Sem II

St. Lawrence

ROOTS

- Sem I & II

Loyalist

Addictions

- Sem II

St. Lawrence

Principles of Learning

- Sem I & II

Loyalist

Opportunities for Dual Credits also occur in Summer Session – i.e. Nails and Lights, Camera, Action. For more information, contact your high school Guidance Department.

ST. THERESA ALTERNATE EDUCATION EOS – Education, Opportunity, Success Our alternative school-based program is designed to aid and support students who have experienced difficulty in the traditional mainstream high school setting. Programs are designed specifically to meet individual student’s needs. Programs usually involve a combination of credit courses (credit recovery and/or new credits including blended learning modules) and work placement experiences in an area of career interest and which are monitored and evaluated by staff from the program. The St Theresa alternate education program is an integral component of the partnership which includes the students, parent and the business community. It allows students the opportunity to succeed academically in an informal setting with a routine structured to meet their individual needs, goals and career aspirations. A Youth Worker is also available to provide support for students enrolled in the program.

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY St. Theresa is extremely proud of its advances in communication technologies. With four computer labs and access to computers in the library as well as many classrooms, students become involved and competent in the many areas of computer literacy. All students entering grade 9 are introduced to Information Technology in September and perform electronic research in the grade 9 programme.

D2L All boards in Ontario have the ability to use the provincially funded Learning Management System (D2L) tool for both a blended learning or a eLearning experience. This means that online tools such as discussion threads, chats and dropboxes will be available for students enrolled in traditional face-to-face classes or for classes taken completely online. Students should contact the Student services department for more information about online offerings. If your child’s teacher offers online class resources (blended learning) they will find those courses in their Virtual Commons under the “My Courses” tab.

THE ST. THERESA LEARNING COMMONS The St. Theresa Learning Commons continues to transition from its former "Library Information Centre" to a more welcoming space for all. It is staffed by teacher-librarians Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Genee-McKinney. They are available to assist students with their research, writing and presentations or to pick out a great book for leisure reading. They work in collaboration with subject teachers to teach research and literacy skills, to promote print literacy and to encourage a love of reading. Our Learning Commons space continues to evolve, with new tables and chairs arriving last school year along with comfortable seating areas for collaboration. We look forward to having our booth seating arrive shortly as well as a TV for patrons to keep track of world events. We look forward to your feedback on our transition, including your suggestions for your Learning Commons. We continue to add new print and electronic resources to meet the needs of the school population. Our fiction includes audio books, graphic novels and many different genres. Magazines and newspapers are a popular choice for leisure reading. All of our library resources may be accessed by way of our online catalogue, OPAC. From the Virtual Commons, students can select eLibrary Services to access a number of online databases. They can also access a number of ebooks for research by clicking on STSS Resources, then selecting Learning Commons Resources. The databases and ebooks are all available both at school and from home. The St. Theresa Learning Commons is open from 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. on Friday (including lunch hour daily). Come and explore our facilities!

BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP St. Theresa has forged partnerships with local businesses and industry to allow students to apply their skills and knowledge in the context of actual circumstances.

Cafeteria The cafeteria, located in the spectacular Great Hall, offers a full menu of food and beverage items. It is run by St. Theresa in partnership with Brown’s Fine Foods. Healthy food choices are offered daily including salads, subs, wraps and sandwiches, as well as hot choices.

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA PROGRAMS FOR STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS Special Education Special Education teachers provide support to students with various learning needs. In collaboration with classroom teachers, Special Education teachers may offer:

       

assistive technology support literacy and numeracy assistance support for EQAO testing support in all subjects time management and study habit strategies an alternate setting for test and exam writing recommendations for accommodations and/or modifications to the expectations recommendations for Queen’s On-Line To Success and/or other enrichment activities

Exceptional Students A student may be identified as an exceptional learner requiring an enriched, modified or accommodated program and evaluation. The student’s exceptionality and placement are subject to review each year through the IPRC process. An exceptional student’s needs may be met by the regular subject teacher(s) working in partnership with the Special Education teacher(s). Students may receive assistance in a number of ways, such as:

   

regular program within the classroom by the teacher withdrawal support in the Special Education Resource room indirect support through programming assistance provided to the subject teacher by the Special Education teacher Special Education class with partial integration (Life Skills Developmental Centre) Planning and support is based on close co-operation between the subject teacher, the Special Education teacher(s) and parents. Parents can obtain the Board’s Special Education Parent Guide - Policies and Programs through the school’s Special Education Department or through Student Services at the Board office, Napanee.

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA Individual Education Plan (IEP) An Individual Education Plan (IEP) is developed for every student who has been identified as exceptional by an Identification, Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC). Accommodations and modifications to programming are described in the plan. If your child has modifications to programming, you will see a check mark in the IEP box on the report card for every course to which the modifications apply. If you are a parent/guardian of a child who has been identified exceptional, you will receive a copy of the current Individual Educational Plan for your son/daughter within 30 days of placement. Students who have not been formally identified as exceptional but who have special needs and are receiving special education services may also have an IEP.

Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC) The Board’s Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) makes recommendations to the Board regarding establishment and development of Special Education Programs and Services for the exceptional pupils of the Board. Information regarding SEAC and its nomination process can be obtained through the Principal or the Board’s Student Services Department.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION WHAT IS CO-OP?

Cooperative Education is a program that offers senior students the opportunity to extend classroom learning into supervised learning experiences in the community while earning two or four credits. Students will gain further knowledge of a subject area through practical experience. Co-op can be related to any course that the student has taken or is taking while enrolled in the Co-op program, regardless of whether the student is bound for college, university, apprenticeship or the workplace. WHY CO-OP?

If you have always wondered about your future career, then Co-op makes the choice easier. The Co-op candidate has the opportunity to try out a possible career and see if the career is right for them. Each student also has the chance to hear about what other students are doing through integration classes during the semester where students reflect and share so you can learn first hand about many different careers.

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PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AT ST. THERESA THE SKILLED TRADES Apprenticeship is an agreement between a person who wants to learn a skilled trade and an employer who needs a skilled worker. Eighty to ninety percent of training occurs on the job, where the apprentice learns by watching, practising and performing tasks. Ten to twenty percent is theoretical, in-school training, delivered by an approved agent. The average age of a trades person in Canada is over 48 years old. This means in the next seven to ten years, there is going to be almost 100% turnover in the skilled trades. Frequently there is a huge demand for journey people in a variety of trades and students of St. Theresa should consider a trade as a career. The theory component for the following apprenticeships will be offered through OYAP: Automotive Service Technician Cook Child Development Practitioner Construction Craft Worker Hairdresser Carpenter

Loyalist College, Belleville Loyalist College, Belleville Loyalist College, Belleville Life Long Learning Centre, Cobourg St. Lawrence College, Kingston St. Lawrence College, Kingston

These programs allow secondary school students to complete Part One of the theoretical components needed for all apprenticeship training. To be successful, the student will be required to meet the training requirements of the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The student will complete secondary school Cooperative Education credits in conjunction with the College or approved Training Centre program. The Automotive, Construction Craft Worker and Cook apprenticeships require students to have a full semester for the combined Co-op/Theory programs. The Hairdresser, Early Childhood Educator and Carpenter apprenticeships require the students to be registered as apprentices with an employer. For timetabling requirements contact the Co-op office. If you have an interest in a trade other than those listed above, see your Guidance Counsellor or Cooperative Education Teacher since every apprenticeship program can be individually tailored for students.

The Algonquin Lakeshore Technology Centre (Off site) The Algonquin & Lakeshore Catholic District School Board and Sir James Whitney School have formed a partnership in order to provide technological training for their students. Course offerings include Transportation, Construction, Hairstyling & Aesthetics and Hospitality & Tourism. These courses will be provided off campus in two credit blocks. Please consult the course calendar under the Technology sections, grade 10 through 12, for specifics on these course offerings.

For more information and details, see your Guidance Counsellor and/or Cooperative Education Teacher regarding the Application Procedure for all Cooperative Education and Apprenticeship Programs 16 


ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA Definition of a Credit: Recognizing the successful completion of a course for which a minimum of 110 hours is scheduled, a credit is granted to a student by the principal of a secondary school on behalf of the Minister of Education. Partial credits may also be offered in certain designated courses and those open courses where a minimum of 55 hours is scheduled. In order to earn an OSSD a student must:

  

earn 30 credits (18 compulsory and 12 optional credits) complete 40 hours of community involvement activities successfully complete the provincial Literacy Test or Ontario Literacy Course 18 Compulsory Credits



4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)*  3 credits in mathematics (at least 1 credit earned in Grade 11 or 12)  2 credits in science  1 credit in Canadian history  1 credit in Canadian geography  1 credit in the arts  1 credit in health and physical education  1 credit in French as a second language  0.5 credit in career studies, 0.5 credits in civics Plus one credit from each of the following groups: Group 1

Group 1: additional credit in English, or French as a second language, ** or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education**

Group 2

Group 2: additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language, ** or cooperative education**

Group 3

Group 3: additional credit in Science (Grade 11 or 12) or technological education, or French as a second language, ** or computer studies, or cooperative education**

In addition, students must complete:               

12 optional credits

40 hours of community involvement activities

The provincial literacy requirement

* A maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD) may be counted towards the compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course. ** In groups 1, 2, and 3, maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from Group 1 and one from either group 2 or Group 3. *** A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits. The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.

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ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA GRADUATION LITERACY REQUIREMENT All students are required to meet the literacy graduation requirement in accordance with Ministry of Education policy. Most students will meet the requirement by successfully completing the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) or the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC). Some students may be allowed to meet the requirement by successfully completing a special adjudication process.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) The OSSLT is based on the expectations for reading and writing throughout the Ontario curriculum up to and including Grade 9. Its purpose is to determine whether students have the skills in reading and writing that they will need to succeed at school, at work, and in daily life. Students who are working towards their diploma will normally take the OSSLT when they are in Grade 10. Those who do not take the test in the year following the year in which they enter Grade 9 will require a deferral. Once students have successfully completed the literacy test, they may not retake it. Students working towards a certificate are not required to complete the OSSLT. A student will take the OSSLT in the language of instruction of the school in which he or she is enrolled at the time of test administration.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). To be eligible for the course, a student must have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least once. Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation.

The Adjudication Process In June 2004, the Ministry introduced an adjudication process. School boards may now establish adjudication panels at the end of the school year to provide certain students with an additional opportunity to meet the literacy graduation requirement. These students include those who would otherwise be eligible to graduate in June but, through no fault of their own, have not been able to take advantage of the normal opportunities to write the OSSLT and/or have not been able to enrol in or complete the OSSLC, owing to unforeseen circumstances. Also eligible for the adjudication process are students who were receiving special education programs or services, and who had an IEP documenting required accommodation, but, owing to unforeseen circumstances, did not have access to these accommodations when they were taking the OSSLT. Please contact your Guidance Counsellor to determine if you are eligible for the Adjudication Process.

“There is a brilliant child locked inside every student.” Marva Collins

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ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL DIPLOMA 40 HOURS OF COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT Students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of community involvement as a requirement of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. These 40 hours may be completed at any time during the student’s high school years and may take place in a variety of settings, including not-for-profit organizations, business, public sector institutions and informal settings. Students, in collaboration with their parents, will decide how they will complete the community involvement requirement. Students may complete any number of eligible activities as outlined in the Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board Community Involvement pamphlet available in the Guidance office. Activities must be completed outside of normal instructional school hours, may not be a part of a credit program and students may not receive pay for their community involvement activities. Students will maintain a record of their community involvement activities on their COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT COMPLETION FORM. The purpose of community involvement is to encourage students to develop an awareness and understanding of civic responsibility and of the role they can play to contribute to their communities. Examples of community involvement activities include: activities within the school such as Student Council committee work, helping an elderly neighbour, volunteering at a local hospital, helping at a community event and tutoring an elementary school student. Community Service form available in Guidance or on the St. Theresa website www.alcdsb.on.ca\school\thss (Student Services Tab)

THE ONTARIO SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATE The Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario Secondary School Diploma, provided they have earned a minimum of 14 credits distributed as follows: 2 credits in English 1 credit in Canadian Geography or Canadian History 1 credit in Mathematics 1 credit in Science 1 credit in Health and Physical Education 1 credit in the Arts or Technological Education Optional Credits (total of 7)

THE CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT The Certificate of Accomplishment may be granted on request to students who leave school before earning the Ontario School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate. There are no compulsory courses required for this certificate.

ALCDSB FRENCH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE COMPLETION CERTIFICATES In order to promote and support the Ministry of Education goal to “increase the percentage of students studying French until graduation”, the Algonquin & lakeshore catholic District School Board will provide certificates of accomplishments/completion for all graduating St. Theresa students who successfully complete Core French (four credits) in Grade nine through 12.

SUBSTITUTIONS FOR COMPULSORY CREDITS To meet students’ individual needs, the Principal may substitute up to three compulsory credit courses with courses from the remainder of those that meet the compulsory credit requirements. The decision to make a substitution for a student should be made only if the student’s educational interests are best served by such substitutions. The Principal will determine whether or not a substitution should be made in consultation with parents or the adult student and appropriate school staff. Each substitution will be noted on the student’s Ontario Student Transcript.

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Nelson Mandela 19


PLAR - Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (Challenge for Credit) PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT AND RECOGNITION Prior Learning includes the knowledge and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside secondary school. Students may have their knowledge and skills evaluated against the expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. Because young people benefit in many ways from the learning experiences offered in secondary school, PLAR has a specific, limited function in the Ontario secondary school program. For students who are under the age of eighteen, or who are eighteen or over but haven’t been out of the high school system for more than a year, a maximum of four credits may be granted through the challenge process for Grade 10, 11, and 12 courses, with no more than two in one subject area. Challenge applies only to courses offered by the Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board.

ALTERNATIVE WAYS OF EARNING CREDITS TOWARDS THE ONTARIO SCHOOL DIPLOMA While the majority of students will earn credits in secondary school, some may consider alternative ways of obtaining credit. These include correspondence through the Independent Learning Centre, continuing education, on-line learning, summer school, private school and recognized institutions such as conservatories of music. See a guidance counsellor or administrator to find out the availability and accessibility of the courses in each school area. One of the newest initiatives from the Ministry of Education is eLEARNING Online learning, or eLearning, is the delivery of programs using the internet. It is a form of learning that is becoming more popular with secondary school students, post-secondary learning institutions and professional learning situations world-wide. Most students will encounter online learning at some point in their academic and/or career future. Online learning provides a different learning experience for students. Online learning:  allows students to learn in a more independent environment  enables students to learn in a more flexible learning environment  supports inquiry and project-based learning  increases their technology skill set for future learning  assists students in developing the skills needed for the 21st Century The Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board has an expanded selection of eLearning courses available. Students take these courses as part of their regular schedule. They remain at their home school and access eLearning at a time most convenient to them and their learning style. For more information, please see a Guidance Counsellor. 20


COURSE INFORMATION FOR OSS STUDENTS DEFINITIONS OF TYPES OF COURSES OVERVIEW:

Grades 9 and 10

In these years, students select from academic, applied, essential skills, and open courses in order to add to their knowledge and skills base, explore their interests, and determine the type of educational program they are best suited to undertake in Grades 11 and 12. Students are not required to make binding decisions about a particular educational and career path. Types of Courses Four types of courses are offered in grades 9 and 10: open, essential skills, applied and academic. Open Courses: Courses are designated to prepare students for further study in a subject, and to enrich their education generally. Open courses comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students. Courses include: Religion, Art, Drama, Music, Dance, Guitar, Learning Strategies, Hockey, Hospitality, Computers, Physical and Health Education, and Technology in Grade 9.

A GUIDE FOR CHOOSING ACADEMIC OR APPLIED IN GRADES 9 & 10 The following information will assist Grade 8 teachers, students and their parents in choosing appropriate Grade 9 course types. An Alternative Course is a non-credit course. The course expectations as an alternative course are individualized for the student and generally focus on preparing the student for daily living. Essential Skills Compulsory Courses were designed to meet the needs of students who may be unable to meet the expectations of the academic and applied courses in Grades 9 and 10. Like other types of courses, there is a standard curriculum. A student may count no more than 6 such essential skills courses as compulsory credits. An Applied Course covers the essential concepts of a subject. Knowledge and skills will be developed through both theory and practical application, but the focus will be on practical application. In applied courses, familiar, real-life situations will be used to illustrate ideas, and students will be given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts being studied. Likely destinations are apprenticeships, world of work, and some college programs. In an Academic Course, students will learn the essential concepts of a subject and explore related materials as well. Although knowledge and skills in the subject will be developed through both theory and practical application, the emphasis will be on theory and abstract thinking as a basis for future and problem solving. Likely destinations are university and some college programs. Students choose academic or applied types of courses in the core subjects only: Mathematics, Science, Geography, English, French and History.

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” Marie Curie 21


COURSE INFORMATION FOR OSS STUDENTS Â

OVERVIEW: Grades 11 and 12 In Grades 11 and 12, students will focus more on their individual interests and identify and prepare for initial post-secondary goals. In these grades, there also more opportunities than in Grades 9 and 10 for learning experiences beyond the school, including cooperative education, work experience, apprenticeship and schoolwork transition programs. In Grades 11 and 12, courses are arranged according to post-secondary destination. The four destination-related types of courses are: Workplace College College/University University All destination courses are based on provincial curriculum expectations and will emphasize development of both independent research and learning skills. Courses will require students to demonstrate that they have developed these skills.

A GUIDE TO CHOOSING COURSES: Open courses in Grades 11 and 12 allow students to broaden their knowledge and skills in a particular subject that may or may not be directly related to their post-secondary goals, but that reflects their interests, curiosities or concerns. These courses are appropriate for all students regardless of post-secondary destination. These courses are designed to provide students with a broad educational base and to equip them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university or college programs or the workplace in mind. Workplace Preparation Courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need for direct entry into the workplace or for admission to some apprenticeship programs and other training programs offered in the community. The range and content of the courses will allow students to prepare for a variety of jobs, training programs and careers. College Preparation Courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for college programs. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for most college programs and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize concrete applications of the theoretical material covered in the course, and will also emphasize the development of critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. The Ontario Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Admission Information has been provided by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and University. Colleges may request courses at the M (University/College) level or the C (College) level. They cannot require courses at the U (University) level except for programs that lead to a degree through a joint agreement with a university. E (Workplace Preparation) courses may be used in a limited number of programs as described in college calendars. Specific course requirements are defined in each college calendar. Prerequisite courses are usually applied level courses from Grades 9 & 10. Complete information on all programs is available at http://www.ontariocolleges.ca 22Â


COURSE INFORMATION FOR OSS STUDENTS DESTINATION OPTIONS A GUIDE TO CHOOSING COURSES cont’d. University/College Preparation or M courses include content that is relevant for both university and college programs. These courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific university and college programs. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for college and university programs and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize both theoretical aspects and related concrete applications of the course content. Prerequisite courses are usually applied or academic courses from Grades 9 & 10. University Preparation Courses or U courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. The range of courses offered and the content of these courses will allow students to prepare for university programs and related careers. Teaching and learning will emphasize theoretical aspects of the course content but will also include concrete applications. Information from the Ontario University Council on Admission has provided guidelines for university admission. Completion of the Ontario Secondary School Diploma is required. In addition, all Ontario secondary school applicants are required to present a minimum of six Grade 12U or M courses, including all program specific prerequisites. Note that ENG4U is a prerequisite for all programs. Prerequisite courses are usually academic courses from Grades 9 & 10. Complete information on all programs is available at http://www.ouac.on.ca or electronicinfo.ca.

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COURSE CODING SYSTEM

Course Codes The Course Code Iden fies:                               

The course  The year of study  The Level 

CGC1D1

Course Code Explanations Course Codes: 

First three characters indicate the area of study and subject course code as indicated in the Ministry of Education Common Course Codes and/or The Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 and 12 Course Descriptions and Prerequisites.



Fourth character indicates the grade 1 = grade 9 2 = grade 10 3 = grade 11 4 = grade 12



Fifth character indicates the course type O = Open courses (Grades 9 - 12) D = Academic (Grades 9 & 10) P = Applied (Grades 9 & 10) L = Essential Skills compulsory courses (Grades 9 &10 ) - LDCC U = University destination courses (Grades 11 & 12) C = College destination courses (Grades 11 & 12) M = University/College Destination courses (Grades 11 & 12) E = Workplace Destination courses (Grades 11 & 12) 24


ST. THERESA CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOL A Guide to Destination Pathways

A student’s program pathway consists of a comprehensive and integrated set of courses, supports and experiences that can be spread over a number of semesters or years that will lead a student toward post-secondary destinations that include apprenticeship, college, workplace, community living or university. A program pathway should reflect the goals that motivate the student to complete secondary school. Personalizing a school-designed program pathway by including courses of interest and areas of specialization can maximize student engagement, build confidence and assist in planning for success. “Pathways thinking” signals a new way to engage in the course selection process. Students and parents are encouraged to “begin with the end in mind” and investigate, select, and sequence courses, supports, and experiences in ways that maximize students’ opportunities for a successful outcome. Program pathways provide students and their families with a greater variety and a wider range of program options than have been previously available. School-designed program pathways have built-in flexibility and transition points so that students can move from one course type to another or from one program pathway to another. Students may change or revise their program pathway as appropriate to their developing needs and interests. Program pathway information is available in all Guidance Offices of the Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School board.

* Students who complete the course will meet provincial literacy requirement for graduation ALCDSB offers locally developed courses (Essential Skills), which are used to meet the compulsory credit requirement in these grades. Applicable also to Math and Science these courses prepare students for success in workplace preparation.

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26Â


Courses offered at St. Theresa  2017‐2018 

Grade 10‐12  27 


Course Descriptions for the Arts: Grade 10 GUITAR

D R A M A T I C A R T S - DRAMA Grade 10

Open

ADA2O1

This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms, conventions, and techniques. Students will explore a variety of dramatic sources from various cultures representing a range of genres. Students will use the elements of drama in creating and communicating through dramatic works. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences. PREREQUISITE: NONE

Grade 10

Open

AMG2O1

The focus of this course is to enable the student to develop their guitar playing for personal development and life long enjoyment. This course id designed for students who have learned the basics of playing guitar and wish to improve their skill level and understanding of the guitar. The students will learn advanced guitar theory that will allow them to develop and improve their playing technique. The students will investigate and develop knowledge of advanced chords, chord structure and scales. Students will develop their playing with a focus on performance with a group, duos, and as a soloist. PREREQUISITE: NONE

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC Grade 10

Open

AMU2O1

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of music at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures. PREREQUISITE: NONE

M U S I C - STRINGS Grades 10

Open

AMS2O1

The focus of this course is to enable the student to play string instruments for personal development and lifelong enjoyment. This is a beginner course designed for students who have not played violin family instruments or have limited playing experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will investigate and develop knowledge of standard notation, music theory, playing conventions, accents and markings. Students will be exposed to various forms of music and the contributions of various composers and virtuosos. PREREQUISITE: NONE

DRAMATIC ARTS– PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY Grade 10

Open

ADD201

This course provides opportunities for students to explore the technical and production elements of performance, such as lighting, sound, set and production. Students will apply their learning to live events such as masses, liturgies, assemblies and stage performances. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences. Students will hone their organizational abilities and apply their learning in practical performance settings. They will use a variety of technological tools to enhance the impact of performance and communicate for specific audiences and purposes. This course focuses on Drama Technical Production. Prerequisite: None

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Course Descriptions for the Arts: Grade 10

VISUAL ARTS Grade 10

Open

DANCE AVI2O1

This course enables students to develop their skills in producing and presenting art by introducing them to new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation. Students will apply the elements and principles of design when exploring the creative process. Students will use the critical analysis process to reflect on and interpret art within a personal, contemporary, and historical context.

Grade 10

Open

ATC2O1

This course emphasizes the development of students’ technique and creative skills relating to the elements of dance and the tools of composition in a variety of performance situations. Students will identify responsible personal and interpersonal practices related to dance processes and production, and will apply technologies and techniques throughout the process of creation to develop artistic scope in the dance arts.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Course Descriptions for Business: Grade 10 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS Grade 10

Open

BBI2O1

This course introduces students to the world of business. Students will develop an understanding of the functions of business, including accounting, marketing, information and communication technology, human resources, and production, and of the importance of ethics and responsibility. This course builds a foundation for further studies in business and helps students develop the business knowledge and skills they will need in their everyday lives. PREREQUISITE: NONE

“ Educa

on is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to the people who prepare for it today.” ‐ Malcolm X 29


Course Descriptions for Canadian and World Studies: Grade 10 Canadian History since World War I Grade 10

Academic

Canadian History since World War I CHC2D1

Grade 10

Applied

CHC2P1

This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.

This course focuses on the social context of historical developments and events and how they have affected the lives of people in Canada since 1914. Students will explore interactions between various communities in Canada as well as contributions of individuals and groups to Canadian heritage and identity. Students will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating the continuing relevance of historical developments and how they have helped shape communities in present-day Canada.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Civics and Citizenship Grade 10

Open

Aboriginal Peoples in Canada CHV2O5

Grade 10

Open

NAC2O1

This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy school, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of the political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.

This course emphasizes historical and contemporary issues that affect the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and Canadian government. Students examine legal, political, social and economic issues: key aspects of the Indian Act and its revisions that have an impact on the daily lives of Aboriginal persons: the different types of relationships that Aboriginal peoples have established throughout history: and the methodology of historical inquiry.

NOTE: THIS IS A COMPULSORY HALF CREDIT COURSE PAIRED WITH CAREERS.

NOTE: THIS COURSE IS AN ELECTIVE AND IS NOT THE COMPULSORY CANADIAN HISTORY REQUIREMENT.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

The whole object of education is to develop the mind. The mind should be a thing that works. - Sherwood Anderson

30


Course Descriptions for English: Grade 10 Grade 10

Academic

ENG2D1

Grade 10

This course id designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the course.

ENG2P1

This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in secondary school and daily life. Students will study and create a variety of informational, literary, and graphic texts. An important focus will be on the consolidation of strategies and processes that help students interpret texts and communicate clearly and effectively. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 college or workplace preparation course. PREREQUISITE:

PREREQUISITE:

ENGLISH, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

ENGLISH, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

Grade 10

Applied

Essential Skills

ENG2L1

In this course, students focus on extending their literacy and communication skills to prepare for success in their daily lives and in the workplace. The course is organized by strands that extend listening and talking skills, reading and viewing skills, and writing skills. In all strands, the focus is on refining foundational literacy skills and in using language clearly and accurately in a variety of authentic contexts. Students build on their strategies and engage in the processes involved in talking, listening, reading, viewing, writing, and thinking, and reflect regularly upon their growth in these areas.

It is the writer who might catch the imagination of young people, and plant a seed that will flower and come to fruition. – Isaac Asimov

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

Course Descriptions for French as a Second Language Core French, Grade 10

Academic

FSF2D1

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate in French about personally relevant, familiar, and academic topics in real-life situations with increasing independence. Students will exchange information, ideas, and opinions with others in guided and increasingly spontaneous spoken interactions. Students will continue to develop their language knowledge and skills through the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. They will also increase their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will continue to develop the skills necessary to become life-long language learners. PREREQUISITE:

CORE FRENCH, GRADE 9 ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

- French Certificate available, see Page 19 for more information

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Course Descriptions for Guidance & Career Education: Grade 10 Career Studies Grade 10

GLC2O5

Open

This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their Interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores post-secondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan. NOTE:

(This is a compulsory, half-credit course usually paired with Civics)

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time. - Thomas A. Edison

Course Descriptions for Religion: Grade 10 Grade 10 Open HRE201 This course examines the relationship between the person and message of Christ and the dominant attitudes of contemporary culture. Beginning with the Gospel narratives as a foundation, students acquire a deeper and more systematic knowledge of Christ, his message and his Church. Connections between the living Church and contemporary culture are explored in terms of what it means to be a responsible adolescent developing within a community of disciples in the context of secular, pluralistic world. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood and interpersonal relationships. PREREQUISITE: NONE

“I am the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the ending, says the Lord God” -Revelations 1:8a 32


Course Descriptions for Health & Physical Education: Grade 10 It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

Healthy Living and Personal Fitness Activities Grade 10

Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 10

Open

Open

PAF2O1

This course emphasizes regular participation in a variety of physical activities that promote lifelong healthy active living. Through the achievement of the Ministry and the Ontario Catholic School Graduate expectations the student will apply movement principles to refine skills; participate in a variety of activities that enhance personal competence, fitness and health; examine issues related to healthy sexuality, healthy eating, substance use and abuse; and apply informed decision making, conflict resolution, and social skills in making personal choices. The focus of this course is to improve one’s individual level of fitness, set and achieve personal goals through reflection, and participate in a variety of fitness activities.

PPL2O1

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively. PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Hockey Skills Course Grade 10

Open

PAL2O1Y

The Hockey Skills course is open to males and females regardless of their hockey ability level. Students will receive close to 50 hours of on-ice instruction. The latest and most innovative training techniques and equipment will be utilized during both the on-ice and off-ice component. eg., radar guns, slide boards, attack triangles, skate weights, floor ball, etc. In-class instruction will cover all components of the Healthy Active Living course profile at this level. There will be a student activity fee to cover some of the costs associated with programming. PREREQUISITE: NONE

Note: The hockey fee must be remitted by the end of the second week of the semester or the student may be removed from this course and placed in an alternate program.

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Course Descriptions for Math: Grade 10 A SCIENTIFIC  CALCULATOR IS A REQUIREMENT FOR ALL MATHEMATICS PROGRAMS   Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10

Academic

Foundations of Mathematics, MPM2D1

Grade 10

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relations, extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relationships and their applications, solve and apply linear systems, verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry, and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically as they solve multi-step problems. NOTE:

MFM2P1

This course enables students to consolidate their understanding of relationships and extend their problemsolving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and hands-on activities. Students will develop and graph equations in analytic geometry: solve and apply linear systems, using real-life examples: and explore and interpret graphs of quadratic relationships. Students will investigate similar triangles and the measurement of three-dimensional objects. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

Grade 10 Academic math is required for students planning on taking College Technology programs at most Ontario Community Colleges. Students should have achieved at least 70 – 75% in MPM1D1.

PREREQUISITE:

Applied

PREREQUISITE: APPLIED

MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR

MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR

APPLIED

Mathematics Grade 10

Essential Skills

Mathematics is the music of reason.

MAT2L1

This course emphasizes the extension of mathematical knowledge and skills to prepare students for success in their everyday lives, in the workplace, and in the Mathematics Grade 11 and Grade 12 Workplace Preparation courses. The course is organized by three strands related to money sense, measurement, and proportional reasoning. Students have opportunities to extend their mathematical literacy and problem-solving skills and to continue developing their skills in reading, writing, and oral language through relevant and practical math activities.

PREREQUISITE:

- James Joseph Sylvester

MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC , APPLIED OR ESSENTIAL SKILLS

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Course Descriptions for Science: Grade 10 Grade 10

Academic

SNC2D1

Grade 10

This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants, chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid-base reactions: forces that affect climate and climate change, and the interaction of light and matter.

Applied

SNC2P1

This course enables students to develop a deeper understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science in real world situations. Students are given opportunities to develop further practical skills in scientific investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into everyday problems and issues related to human cells and body systems; chemical reactions; factors affecting climate change; and the interaction of light and matter.

PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

The Science of today is the technology of tomorrow. - Edward Teller Grade 10

Essential Skills

SNC2L1

This course emphasizes reinforcing and strengthening science-related knowledge and skills, including scientific inquiry, critical thinking, and the environmental impact of science and technology, to prepare students for success in everyday life, and in the workplace and in the Science Grade 11 Workplace Preparation course. Students explore a range of topics including science in the media, interactions of common materials, interdependence of organisms in communities, and using electrical energy. Students have the opportunity to extend mathematical and scientific process skills and to continue developing their skills in reading, writing, and oral language through relevant and practical science activities. PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC, APPLIED OR ESSENTIAL SKILLS

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Course Description for Technology Education Part A: Broad-based Technology: Grade 10 Communications Technology Grade 10

Open

Hospitality and Tourism TGJ2O1

Grade 10

This course introduces students to communications technology from a media perspective. Students will work in the areas of TV/video and movie production, radio and audio production, print and graphic communications, photography, and animation. Student projects may include computer-based activities such as creating videos, editing photos, working with audio, cartooning, developing animations, and designing web pages. Students will also develop an awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and explore secondary and postsecondary education and training pathways and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields.

Open

This course provides students with opportunities to explore different areas of hospitality and tourism, as reflected in the various sectors of the tourism industry, with an emphasis on food service. Students will study culinary techniques of food handling and preparation, health and safety standards, the use off tools and equipment, the origin of foods, and event planning, and will learn about tourism attractions across Ontario. Students will develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues and will explore secondary and postsecondary pathways leading to careers in the tourism industry.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

NOTE: This course will be recorded to TFJ3C1 so students may be able to benefit from SHSM opportunities (page 12).

Technology Course Offerings at Sir James Whitney – See Pages 63 - 64

Course Description for Computer Studies: Grade 10

Introduction to Computer Studies Grade 10

Open

TFJ2O1

ICS20

This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts, and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware configurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies, and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers.

Prerequisite: None

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Course Descriptions for the Arts: Grade 11 Dramatic Arts - Drama

Music: Strings Grade 11

Grade 11

University/College Preparation & Open

University/College Preparation & Open ADA3M1/301

AMS3M/301

This course requires students to create and perform dramatic presentations. Students will analyse, interpret, and perform dramatic works from various cultures and time periods. Students will research various acting styles and conventions that could be used in their presentations, and analyse the functions of playwrights, directors, actors, designers, technicians, and audiences.

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of strings music, at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures.

PREREQUISITE: DRAMA, GRADE 9 OR 10 OPEN

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Instrumental Music

Media Arts

Grade 11

Grade 11 University/College Preparation

University/College Preparation & Open

AMU3M1/301

ASM3M1/3O1

This course provides students with opportunities to develop their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music, including traditional, commercial, and art music. Students will apply the creative process when performing appropriate technical exercises and repertoire and will employ the critical analysis processes when reflecting on, responding to, and analysing live and recorder performances. Students will consider the function of music in society and the impact of music on individuals and communities. They will explore how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers.

Four organizing principles guide the creation of media artwork: hybridization, interactivity, duration, and point of view. This course focuses on the development of media arts skills through the production of art works involving traditional and emerging technologies, tools, and techniques such as new media, digital media, digital photography, digital film making and web environments. Students will explore the evolution of media arts as an extension of traditional art forms, use the creative process to produce effective media art works, and critically analyse the unique characteristics of this art form. Students will examine the role of media artists in shaping audience perceptions of identity, culture, and values. Units will be designed to include studies of film, photography, internet, digital media and music as well as other integrated media arts. Contemporary and historical examples will be presented throughout the course.

PREREQUISITE: MUSIC, GRADE 9 OR 10 OPEN

PREREQUISITE: NONE

37Â


Â

Course Descriptions for the Arts: Grade 11 Visual Arts Grade 11

Dance AVI3M/3O1

Grade 11

ATC3M1/3O1

University/College Preparation & Open

University/College Preparation & Open

This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emergent technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (e.g. photography, video, computer graphics, information design).

This course emphasizes the development of technical, composition, and presentation skills in one or more world dance forms. Students will acquire and refine dance skills; compose and present increasingly complex dance works; interpret and evaluate a variety of dance presentations; and student the historical development of various dance forms and the function of dance in a specific cultures. PREREQUISITE: DANCE GRADE 9 OR 1O OPEN

PREREQUISITE: VISUAL ARTS, GRADE 9 OR 1O OPEN

DRAMATIC ARTS, PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY Grade 11

Open

ADD301

This course provides opportunities for students to explore the technical and production elements of performance, such as lighting, sound, set and production. Students will apply their learning to live events such as masses, liturgies, assemblies and stage performances. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences. Students will hone their organizational abilities and apply their learning in practical performance settings. They will use a variety of technological tools to enhance the impact of performance and communicate for specific audiences and purposes. This course focuses on Drama Technical Production. Prerequisite: None

38Â


Course Descriptions for the Business: Grade 11 Entrepreneurship Grade 11

Open

BDP3O1

In a world of accelerating change, where both challenges and opportunities abound, students need to learn how to live and work in an enterprising way, either as entrepreneurs who take the initiative to create new ventures or as enterprising individuals who apply their skills, attitudes, and abilities while working within the various organizations that contribute to our society. The need to be enterprising is further emphasized by the exponential growth of e-commerce and the economic opportunities it presents. Students will be opportunities to acquire the knowledge, skills, and attributes of entrepreneurs and of entrepreneurs and enterprising employees by organizing an event, planning a school-based business, or completing a venture plan with an e-commerce component. Students will use these skills to learn how to live and work as creative problem solvers who welcome and successfully manage change. Note: This course may be combined with Marketing for one half credit each PREREQUISITE:

NONE

ACCOUNTING

MARKETING

Financial Accounting Fundamentals,

Marketing: Goods, Services, Events,

Grade 11

University/College Preparation

BAF3M1

Grade 11

College Preparation

BMI3C1

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and current issues and ethics in accounting.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research, develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice.

PREREQUISITE:

Note: This course may be combined with Entrepreneurship for one half credit each.

NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

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Course Descriptions for Canadian & World Studies: Grade 11 HISTORY

LAW

American History/ World History

Understanding Canadian Law, Grade 11,

Grade 11,

University/College Preparation CLU3M1

University/College Preparation CHW3M5 Running concurrently, this course offers half-credits in both Grade 11 American History (U) and Grade 11 World History (M). For American History, students will examine the social and political history of the United States from 1700 to the present, as well as studying the United State’s impact on the global community with comparison to the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. For World History, students will investigate a range of factors that contributed to the rise, success, and decline of various ancient societies throughout the world with specific focus on Egypt, Greece and Rome. PREREQUISITE: Grade 10 Canadian History since 1914, Academic or Applied (CHC2D/P)

This course explores Canadian law, with a focus on legal issues that are relevant to the lives of people in Canada. Students will gain an understanding of laws relating to rights and freedoms in Canada; our legal system; and family, contract, employment, tort, and criminal law. Students will develop legal reasoning skills and will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process when investigating a range of legal issues and formulating and communicating informed opinions about them. Trips to local Courts and to Supreme Court in Ottawa are an experiential component of this course. PREREQUISITE: CANADIAN HISTORY SINCE WORLD WAR I, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

Course Descriptions for Computer Studies: Grade 11 Introduction to Computer Science

Introduction to Computer Programming

Grade 11,

Grade 11, University Preparation

College Preparation ICS3U1

ICS3C1

This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends.

This course introduces students to computer programming concepts and practices. Students will write and test computer programs, using various problem-solving strategies. They will learn the fundamentals of program design and apply a software development life-cycle model to a software development project. Students will also learn about computer environments and systems, and explore environmental issues related to computers, safe computing practices, emerging technologies, and postsecondary opportunities in computer-related fields.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

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Course Descriptions for English: Grade 11 Compulsory Courses Grade 11,

Grade 11, University Preparation

College Preparation ENG3U1

ENG3C1

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will study the content, form, and style of a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from Canada and other countries, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 college preparation course.

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC/ APPLIED

Grade 11,

Grade 11, Aboriginal Voices, Contemporary  Workplace Preparation

University & College ENG3E1

Preparation  

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in the workplace and in daily life. Students will study the content, form, and style of a variety of contemporary informational, graphic, and literary texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical purposes. An important focus will be on using language clearly and accurately in a variety of formal and informal contexts. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 workplace preparation course.

NBE3U/3C    of This course emphasizes the critical thinking, and skills through the study of works in English by Aboriginal the analysis of texts and media works, students will develop an of the wealth and complexity of Aboriginal Students research and analyze the will also write persuasive and literary and analyze the relationship between media forms audifocus will be the further ences. An of of usage and

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 10, APPLIED OR ESSENTIAL SKILLS

PREREQUISITE:

41

ENGLISH, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC  


Course Descriptions for English & French: Grade 11

Course Descriptions for Guidance & Career: Grade 11

OPTIONAL COURSES Core French,

Leadership and Peer Support,

Grade 11

Grade 11, University Preparation

Open FSF3U1

GPP3O1

This course offers students extended opportunities to speak and interact in real-life situations in French with greater independence. Students will develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and exploring a variety of oral and written texts. They will continue to broaden their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary for life-long language learning

This course prepares students to act in leadership and peer support roles. They will design and implement a plan for contributing to their school and/or community; develop skills in communication, interpersonal relations, teamwork, and conflict management; and apply those skills in leadership and/or peer support roles – for example, as a student council member or a peer tutor. Students will examine group dynamics and learn the value of diversity within groups and communities.

PREREQUISITE: DEMIC

CORE FRENCH, GRADE 10, ACA-

* French Certificate Available. See Page 19 for more

PREREQUISITE: Academic proficiency in the tutoring subject area (75% minimum average) as well as entrance interview.

Course Descrip on for Coopera ve Educa on Grade 11  Creating Opportunities through Co-op Grade 11

Open

DC030 This course consists of a community-connected experience and a cooperative education curriculum focused on developing skills, knowledge, and habits of mind that will support students in their learning at school and beyond, today and in the future, as well as in their education and career/life planning. Within the context of the communityconnected experience, students will apply skills, knowledge, and habits of mind that will protect and promote their health, safety, and well-being and that will strengthen their inquiry, decision-making and leadership skills. Students will create and implement a learning plan that meets their particular interests and needs, reflect on their learning, and make connections between their experience in the community and other aspects of their lives. Prerequisite: None

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Cooperative Education Linked to a Related Course Grade 11 Open Coop 2/Coop 4 This course consists of a community-connected experience and a cooperative education curriculum that incorporates relevant expectations from the student’s related course (or courses). Students will develop skills, knowledge, and habits of mind that will support them in their learning at school and beyond, today and in the future, as well as in their education and career/life planning. Within the context of the community-connected experience, students will apply, extend and refine skills and knowledge, an habits, of mind that will protect and promote their health, safety, and well-being. They will create and implement a learning plan that meets their particular interests and needs, reflect on their learning, and make connections between their experience in the community and other aspects of their lives. Prerequisite: None Two and four Credit options are available.


Course Descriptions for Health & Physical Education: Grade 11 Healthy Active Living Education,

Health for Life

Grade 11,

Grade 11,   Open

Open   PPL3O1

PPZ3C1  

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities and exposure to a broader range of activity settings, students enhance their movement competence, personal fitness, and confidence. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.

This course enables students to examine the factors that influence their own health practices and behaviours as well as those factors that contribute to the development of healthy communities. It emphasizes the concept of wellness, which addresses all aspect of well-being -- physical, cognitive, emotional, spiritual, and social – and promotes healthy eating, physical activity and building and maintaining a positive sense of self. Students will develop the skills necessary to make healthy choices and create a personal wellness plan. They will also design initiatives that encourage others to lead healthy, active lives. The course prepares student of college programs in health sciences, fitness, wellness, and healthy promotion.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Everything I did in hockey I worked for, and that’s the way I’ll be as a coach. - Wayne Gretzky Hockey Skills Course,   Grade 11,    Open   PAL3O1Y  The Hockey Skills course is open to any student enrolled in grades 11 or 12 who have taken a minimum of one previous course in physical education. This co-ed hockey course available to all students regardless of their current ability level. Students will be on the ice three out of five days per week. Employing the most current and innovative training techniques and equipment, students will develop their skating stride and improve their level of fitness and hockey playing ability. There will be a student activity fee assessed to cover some of the costs associated with programming.

PREREQUISITE: NONE Note: The hockey fee must be remitted by the end of the second week of the semester or the student may be removed from this course and placed in an alternate program.

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Course Descriptions for Mathematics: Grade 11 Functions,  

Functions and Applications,  

Grade 11,  

Grade 11,   University Preparation   

University/College Preparation

MCR3U1  

MCF3M1  

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; and develop facility in simplifying polynomial and rational expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

This course introduces basic features of the function by extending students’ experiences with quadratic relations. It focuses on quadratic, trigonometric, and exponential functions and their use in modelling real-world situations. Students will represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; simplify expressions; solve equations; and solve problems relating to financial and trigonometric applications. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.

PREREQUISITE:

PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC

PREREQUISITE:

NOTE: Students should have a minimum average of 70 – 75% in MPM2D1

Foundations for College Mathematics

PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC, or FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMAT ICS, GRADE 10, APPLIED  

Mathematics for Work and Everyday Life,  

Grade 11,  

Grade 11,   College Preparation 

Workplace Preparation  

MBF3C1 

MEL3E1

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as a problem-solving tool in the real world. Students will extend their understanding of quadratic relations, as well as of measurement and geometry: investigate situations involving exponential growth: solve problems involving compound interest: solve financial problems connected with vehicle ownership: and develop their ability to reason by collecting, analysing, and evaluating data involving one and two variables. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as it is applied in the workplace and daily life. Students will solve problems associated with earning money, paying taxes, and making purchases: apply calculations of simple and compound interest in saving, investing, and borrowing: and calculate the costs of transportation and travel in a variety of situations. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking.

PREREQUISITE: MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, ACADEMIC or FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 9, APPLIED or A MINISTRYAPPROVED ESSENTIAL SKILLS GRADE 10 MATHEMATICS COURSE  

PREREQUISITE: FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS, GRADE 10, APPLIED OR PRINCIPLES OF MATH, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC

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Course Descriptions for Science: Grade 11

BIOLOGY Grade 11,  

Grade 11, University Preparation  

College Preparation  

SBI3C1

This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity: evolution: genetic processes: the structure and function of animals: and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.

This course focuses on the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will learn concepts and theories as they conduct investigations in the areas of cellular biology, microbiology, genetics, the anatomy of mammals, and the structure of plants and their role in the natural environment. Emphasis will be placed on the practical application of concepts and on the skills needed for further study in various branches of life sciences and related fields.

SBI3U1

PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC

45


Course Descriptions for Science: Grade 11 CHEMISTRY Grade 11, University Preparation SCH3U1 This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds: chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions: solutions and solubility: and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment. PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC

PHYSICS Grade 11, University Preparation SPH3U1 This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with the emphasis on linear motion: different kinds of forces: energy transformations: the properties of mechanical waves and sound: and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyse the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment. PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC

Learning never exhausts the mind. ‐ Leonardo DaVinci 46


Course Descriptions for Religion: Grade 11 RELIGION World Religions: Beliefs, Issues, & Religious

World Religions: Beliefs and Daily Life,

Traditions

Grade 11,

Grade 11,

Open University/College Preparation

HRF3O1 HRT3M1

This course provides students with opportunities to explore various world religions and belief traditions. Students will develop knowledge of the terms and concepts relevant to this area of study, will examine the ways in which religions and belief traditions meet various human needs, and will learn about the relationship between belief and action. They will examine sacred writings and teachings, consider how concepts of time and place influence different religions and belief traditions, and develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of human expressions of belief.

This course enables students to study world religions and belief traditions in local, Canadian, and global contexts. Students will explore aspects of the human quest for meaning and will examine world religions and belief traditions as exemplified in various sacred teachings and principals, rites, and passages. They will also study the interaction throughout history between society and various belief traditions, and will have opportunities to develop research and inquiry skills related to the study of world religions and belief traditions.

PREREQUISITE: NONE PREREQUISITE: NONE 

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Course Descriptions for Social Science: Grade 11 INTRO TO ANTHROPOLOGY/ PSYCHOLOGY/ SOCIOLOGY Introduction to Anthropology/Psychology/Sociology Grade 11, Open HSP3U1/3C1 This course introduces the theories, questions, and issues that are the major concerns of anthropology, psychology, and sociology. Students will develop an understanding of the way social scientists approach the topics they study and the research methods they employ. Students will be given opportunities to explore theories from a variety of perspectives and to become familiar with current thinking on a range of issues that have captured the interest of classical and contemporary social scientists in the three disciplines.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

Course Descriptions for Technological Education, Part A: Broad-based Technology: Grade 11 COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY Computer Engineering Technology

Computer Technology

Grade 11,

Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Workplace Preparation TEJ3M1

TEJ3E1

This course examines computer systems and control of external devices. Students will assemble computers and small networks by installing and configuring appropriate hardware and software. Students will develop knowledge and skills in electronics, robotics, programming, and networks, and will build systems that use computer programs and interfaces to control and/or respond to external devices. Students will develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues, and will learn about college and university programs leading to careers in computer technology.

This course enables students to develop knowledge and skills related to computer hardware, networks, operating systems, and other software. Students will use utility and application software, and learn proper procedures for installing, maintaining, and troubleshooting computer systems and networks. Students will develop an awareness of environmental and societal issues related to the use of computers, and will learn about apprenticeships and other employment opportunities in the field of computer technology that they may choose to pursue after graduation.

PREREQUISITE: NONE PREREQUISITE: NONE 

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Course Descriptions for Technological Education, Part A: Broad-based Technology: Grade 11 COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY Photography and Digital Imaging, Grade 11, University/College Preparation TGP3M1 This course examines communications technology from a media perspective. Students will develop knowledge and skills as they design and produce media projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. These areas may include TV, video, and movie production,: radio and audio production: print and graphic communications: photography: digital imaging: broadcast journalism: and interactive new media. Students will also develop an awareness of related environmental and societal issues and explore college and university programs and career opportunities in the various communications technology fields. PREREQUISITE: NONE

HOSPITALITY & TOURISM Hospitality and Tourism,

Hospitality and Tourism,

Grade 11,

Grade 11, College Preparation

Workplace Preparation TFJ3C1

TFJ3E1

This course enables students to develop or expand knowledge and skills related to hospitality and tourism, as reflected in the various sectors of the tourism industry. Students will learn about preparing and presenting food, evaluating facilities, controlling inventory, and marketing and managing events and activities, and will investigate customer service principles and the cultural and economic forces that drive tourism trends. Students will develop an awareness of health and safety standards, environmental and societal issues, and career opportunities in the tourism industry.

This course enables students to acquire knowledge and skills related to the food and beverage services sector of the tourism industry. Students will learn how to prepare, present and serve food using a variety of tools and equipment and will develop an understanding of the fundamentals of providing high quality service to ensure customer satisfaction and the components of running a successful event or activity. Students will develop an awareness of health and safety practices, environmental and societal issues, and career opportunities in the food and beverage services sector.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

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Course Descriptions for the Arts: Grade 12 Drama,

Visual Arts,

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

University/College Preparation ADA4M1

AVI4M1

This course requires students to experiment individually and collaboratively with forms and conventions of both drama and theatre from various cultures and time periods. Students will interpret dramatic literature and other text and media sources while learning about various theories of directing and acting. Students will examine the significance of dramatic arts in various cultures, and will analyse how the knowledge and skills developed in drama are related to their personal skills, social awareness, and goals beyond secondary school.

This course focuses on the refinement of students’ skills and knowledge in visual arts. Students will analyse art forms; use theories of art in analysing and producing art; and increase their understanding of stylistic changes in Western art, Canadian (including Native Canadian) art, and art forms from various parts of the world. Students will produce a body of work demonstrating a personal approach. PREREQUISITE: VISUAL ARTS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION

PREREQUISITE: DRAMATIC ARTS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION OR OPEN

Instrumental Music

Vocal Music: Strings

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

University/College Preparation AMU4M1

ASM4M1

This course enables students to enhance their musical literacy through the creation, appreciation, analysis, and performance of music. Students will perform traditional, commercial, and art music, and will respond with insight to live and recorded performances. Students will enhance their understanding of the function of music in society and the impact of music on themselves and various communities and cultures. Students will analyse how to apply skills developed in music to their life and careers.

This course emphasizes the creation and performance of string music, at a level consistent with previous experience. Students will develop musical literacy skills by using the creative and critical analysis processes in composition, performance, and a range of reflective and analytical activities. Students will develop their understanding of musical conventions, practices, and terminology and apply the elements of music in a range of activities. They will also explore the function of music in society with reference to the self, communities, and cultures.

PREREQUISITE: INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC, GRADE 11,

PREREQUISITE: NONE

UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION

DRAMATIC ARTS, PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY Grade 12

Open

ADD4M1/4O1

This course provides opportunities for students to explore the technical and production elements of performance, such as lighting, sound, set and production. Students will apply their learning to live events such as masses, liturgies, assemblies and stage performances. Students will assume responsibility for decisions made in the creative and collaborative processes and will reflect on their experiences. Students will hone their organizational abilities and apply their learning in practical performance settings. They will use a variety of technological tools to enhance the impact of performance and communicate for specific audiences and purposes. This course focuses on Drama Technical Production. Prerequisite: Grade 11 Dramatic Arts/ Production Technology 50


Course Descriptions for Business: Grade 12 International Business Fundamentals

Accounting

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

University/College Preparation BBB4M1

BAT4M1

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for post-secondary studies in business. Student will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course further develops accounting methods for assets and introduces accounting for partnerships, corporations, and sources of financing.

PREREQUISITE:

PREREQUISITE: NONE

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FUNDAMENTALS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION

Course Descriptions for Canadian & World Studies: Grade 12 GEOGRAPHY

ECONOMICS

World Issues: A Geographic Analysis,

Analysing Current Economic Issues, Grade 12,

Grade 12,

University Preparation

University Preparation CGW4U1

CIA4U1

This course looks at the global challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. Students will explore a range of issues involving environmental, economic, social, and geopolitical interrelationships, and will examine governmental policies related to these issues. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues, including their impact on natural and human communities around the world.

This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation, and public spending. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, as well as economic models and theories, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, economic trade-offs, growth, and sustainability and related economic issues.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/ COLLEGE PREPARATION

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/ COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN 51


Course Descriptions for Canadian & World Studies: Grade 12 HISTORY World History: Since the Fifteenth Century,

Canada: History, Identity, and Culture,

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University Preparation

University Preparation

College Preparation

CHI4U1

This course traces major developments and events in world history since approximately 1450. Students will explore social, economic, and political changes, the historical roots of contemporary issues, and the role of conflict and cooperation in global interrelationships. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate key issues and assess societal progress or decline in world history. CHY4C1 covers the same with an emphasis on investigating key turning points in world history.

This course traces the history of Canada, with a focus on the evaluation of our national identity and culture. Students will explore various developments and events, both national and international, from pre-contact to the present, and will examine various communities in Canada and how they have contributed to the development of Canadian identity and heritage. Students will develop their sense of Canada’s national identity and how and why it has changed throughout the country’s history. They will extend their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, as they investigate the people, events, and forces that have shaped Canada.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES, ENGLISH, OR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES, ENGLISH, OR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

CHY4U1/4C1

LAW Canadian and International Law,

Grade 12, CLN4U1

University Preparation

This course explores a range of contemporary legal issues and how they are addressed in both Canadian and international law. Students will develop an understanding of the principles of Canadian and international law and of issues related to human rights and freedoms, conflict resolution, and criminal, environmental, and workplace law, both in Canada and internationally. Students will apply the concepts of legal thinking and the legal studies inquiry process, and will develop legal reasoning skills, when investigating these and other issues in both Canadian and international contexts.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES, ENGLISH, OR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

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Course Descriptions Computer Studies: Grade 12 COMPUTER & INFORMATION SCIENCE Computer Science,

Computer Programming,

Grade 12

Grade 12, University Preparation

ICS4U1

College Preparation

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field.

ICS4C1

This course further develops students’ computer programming skills. Students will learn object-oriented programming concepts, create object-oriented software solutions, and design graphical user interfaces. Student teams will plan and carry out a software development project using industry-standard programming tools and proper project management techniques. Students will also investigate ethical issues in computing, and expand their understanding of environmental issues, emerging technologies, and computer-related careers.

PREREQUISITE: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION

PREREQUISITE: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE, GRADE 11, COLLEGE PREPARATION

Course Description for Cooperative Education Grade Cooperative Education Linked to a Related Course Open

Coop 2/Coop 4 This course consists of a community-connected experience and a cooperative education curriculum that incorporates relevant expectations from the student’s related course (or courses). Students will develop skills, knowledge, and habits of mind that will support them in their learning at school and beyond, today and in the future, as well as in their education and career/life planning. Within the context of the community-connected experience, students will apply, extend and refine skills and knowledge, an habits, of mind that will protect and promote their health, safety, and well-being. They will create and implement a learning plan that meets their particular interests and needs, reflect on their learning, and make connections between their experience in the community and other aspects of their lives. Prerequisite: None Two and Four Credit Options are Available.

Be the living expressions of God’s kindness - kindness in your face, kindness in your eyes, kindness in your smile. - Mother Teresa 53


Course Descriptions for English: Grade 12 COMPULSORY COURSES Grade 12,

Grade 12, University Preparation

College Preparation ENG4U1

ENG4C1

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical purposes. An important focus will be on using language clearly and accurately in a variety of formal and informal contexts. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

This course emphasizes consolidation of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a variety of informational and graphic texts, as well as literary texts from various countries and cultures, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for practical and academic purposes. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for college or the workplace.

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 11, COLLEGE PREPARATION

PREPARATION

Grade 12,

Books are the carriers of civilization.

Workplace Preparation

Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and

ENG4E1 This course emphasizes the consolidation of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in the workplace and in daily life. Students will analyse informational, graphic, and literary texts and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms for workplace-related and practical purposes. An important focus will be on using language accurately and organizing ideas and information coherently. The course is intended to prepare students for the workplace and active citizenship.

speculation at a standstill. - Barbara Tuchman

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 11, WORKPLACE PREPARATION

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Course Descriptions for English / French: Grade 12 OPTIONAL COURSES The Writer's Craft,

The Writer's Craft,

Grade 12,

Grade 12,

University Preparation

College Preparation EWC4U1

EWC4C1

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will analyse models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to produce a range of works; identify and use techniques required for specialized forms of writing; and identify effective ways to improve the quality of their writing. They will also complete a major paper as part of a creative or analytical independent study project, and investigate opportunities for publication and for writing careers.

This course emphasizes knowledge and skills related to the craft of writing. Students will investigate models of effective writing; use a workshop approach to write a variety of works; and make considered decisions for improving the quality of their writing. They will also complete a creative or analytical independent study project, and investigate opportunities for publication and writing careers.

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 11, COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY PREPARATION

PREREQUISITE: ENGLISH, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course, Grade 12, Open OLC4O1 This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a literacy portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.

The credit earned for successful completion of this course may be used to meet either the Grade 12 English compulsory credit requirement or the Group 1 additional compulsory credit requirement, or may be used as an elective credit.

PREREQUISITE: Students who have been eligible to write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test are eligible to take this course.

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Course Descriptions for English / French: Grade 12 OPTIONAL COURSES Core French, Grade 12, University Preparation FSF4U1 This course provides extensive opportunities for students to speak and interact in French independently. Students will apply language-learning strategies in a wide variety of real-life situations, and will continue to develop their creative and critical thinking skills through responding to and interacting with a variety of oral and written texts. Students will also continue to enrich their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities and to develop the skills necessary for life-long language learning. FSL Certificate is available—see Pg 19 for more information. PREREQUISITE: CORE FRENCH, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION

Course Descriptions for Guidance & Career Education: Grade 12 Skills for Success After Secondary School, Grade 12, Open GLE4O1 This course continues to improve students’ learning and personal management skills, preparing them to make successful transitions to work, training, and/or post-secondary education destinations. Students will assess their learning abilities and use literacy, numeracy, and research skills and personal management techniques to maximize their learning. Students will investigate trends and resources to support their post-secondary employment, training, and/or education choices and develop a plan to help them meet their learning and career goals.

PREREQUISITE: NONE

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Course Descriptions for Guidance & Career Education: Grade 12 Interdisciplinary Studies Grade 12, IDC4U1/IDC4O1 This course will help students develop and consolidate the skills required for and knowledge of different subjects and disciplines to solve problems, make decisions, create personal meaning, and present findings beyond the scope of a single subject or discipline. Students will apply the principles and processes of inquiry and research to effectively use a range of print, electronic, and mass media resources; to analyse historical innovations and exemplary research; and to investigate real-life situations and career opportunities in interdisciplinary endeavours. They will also access their own cognitive and affective strategies, apply general skills in both familiar and new contexts, create innovative products, and communicate new knowledge. A key aspect of this program is the mentoring of students in Grade 9, during which time, the senior students apply the theory they learn. Students who are at risk as identified in grade 8, are paired with senior students, and through the mentoring process, they improve their literacy, numeracy, communication, and planning skills and become more independent and successful learners. Limited Enrolment – Essay and/or Interview Required

Course Descriptions for Health & Physical Education: Grade 12 Healthy Active Living Education

Introductory Kinesiology

Grade 12,

Grade 12, Open

University Preparation PPL4O1

PSK4U1

This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices. It places special emphasis on how students can maintain the habits of healthy, active living throughout their lives as they make the transition to adulthood and independent living. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities in a variety of settings, students can enhance their movement competence, personal fitness, and confidence. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creativity.

This course focuses on the study of human movement and of systems, factors, and principles involved in human development. Students will learn about the effects of physical activity on health and performance, the evolution of physical activity and sport, and the physiological, psychological, and social factors that influence an individual’s participation in physical activity and sport. The course prepares students for university programs in physical education and health, kinesiology, health sciences, health studies, recreation and sports administration. PREREQUISITE: ANY GRADE 11 UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN SCIENCE, OR ANY GRADE 11 OR 12 OPEN COURSE IN HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PREREQUISITE: NONE

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Course Descriptions for Health & Physical Education: Grade 12 Hockey Skills Course,   Grade 12,    Open   PAL4O1Y  The Hockey Skills course is open to any student enrolled in grades 11 or 12 who have taken a minimum of one previous course in physical education. This co-ed hockey course available to all students regardless of their current ability level. Students will be on the ice three out of five days per week. Employing the most current and innovative training techniques and equipment, students will develop their skating stride and improve their level of fitness and hockey playing ability. There will be a student activity fee assessed to cover some of the costs associated with programming.

PREREQUISITE: NONE Note: The hockey fee must be remitted by the end of the second week of the semester or the student may be removed from this course and placed in an alternate program.

Everyone has the desire to win, but only champions have the desire to prepare. - Unknown

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Course Descriptions for Health & Physical Education: Grade 12 Recreation and Healthy Active Living, Grade 12, University/ College Preparation PLF4M This course enables students to explore the benefits of lifelong participation in active recreation and healthy leisure and develop their interest in various life-long activities through participation in a variety of outdoor activities (survival skills, orienteering, etc.). Students will also explore and develop proper skill development and technique within various high risk sports/activities. The course will also focus on the leadership and coordination skills needed to plan, organize, and safely implement recreational events and other activities related to healthy, active living. The course will prepare students for university programs in physical education and health and kinesiology and for college and university programs in recreation and leisure management, fitness and health promotion, and fitness leadership.

PREREQUISITE*: Any health and physical education course. *Students must also complete and submit an application form to be considered for entry into this course. Cost: Price will be determined and made available prior to the course registration. Note: Students will be expected to participate in a number of half day, full day, and overnight activities.

Course Descriptions for Mathematics: Grade 12 Foundations for College Mathematics,

Mathematics of Data Management,

Grade 12,

Grade 12, College Preparation

University Preparation MAP4C1

MDM4U1

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of real-world applications of mathematics. Students will analyse data using statistical methods; solve problems involving applications of geometry and trigonometry; simplify expressions; and solve equations. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for college programs in areas such as business, health sciences, and human services, and for certain skilled trades.

This course broadens students' understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability, and statistics; and carry out a culminating project that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

PREREQUISITE: FOUNDATIONS FOR COLLEGE MATHEMATICS, GRADE 11, COLLEGE PREPARATION

59

PREREQUISITE: FUNCTIONS AND APPLICATIONS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION, OR FUNCTIONS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION


Course Descriptions for Mathematics: Grade 12 Mathematics for College Technology,

Calculus and Vectors,

Grade 12,

Grade 12 College Preparation

University Preparation MCT4C1

MCV4U1

This course enables students to extend their knowledge of functions. Students will investigate and apply properties of polynomial, exponential, and trigonometric functions; continue to represent functions numerically, graphically, and algebraically; develop facility in simplifying expressions and solving equations; and solve problems that address applications of algebra, trigonometry, vectors and geometry. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. This course prepares students for a variety of college technology programs.

This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors, and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, rational, exponential, and sinusoidal functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who plan to study mathematics in university and who may choose to pursue careers in fields such as physics and engineering.

PREREQUISITE:

FUNCTIONS AND APPLICATIONS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION

Note: The new Advanced Functions can be taken concurrently with or can precede Calculus and Vectors.

PREREQUISITE: MCR3U AND MHF4U

Advanced Functions,

Mathematics for Work and Everyday Life

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University Preparation

Workplace Preparation MHF4U1

MEL4E1

This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students who plan to study mathematics in university and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.

This course enables students to broaden their understanding of mathematics as it is applied in the workplace and daily life. Students will investigate questions involving the use of statistics; apply the concept of probability to solve problems involving familiar situations; investigate accommodation costs and create household budgets; use proportional reasoning; estimate and measure; and apply geometric concepts to create designs. Students will consolidate their mathematical skills as they solve problems and communicate their thinking. PREREQUISITE:

PREREQUISITE: FUNCTIONS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION, OR MATHEMATICS FOR COLLEGE TECHNOLOGY, GRADE 12, COLLEGE PREPARATION

60

MATHEMATICS FOR WORK AND EVERYDAY LIFE, GRADE 11, WORKPLACE PREPARATION


Course Descriptions for Science: Grade 12 BIOLOGY Grade 12, University Preparation SBI4U1 This course provides students with the opportunity for in depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations In the areas of chemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.

PREREQUISITE:

BIOLOGY, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY PREPARATION

CHEMISTRY Grade 12,

Grade 12, University Preparation

College Preparation SCH4U1

SCH4C1

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop problem solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

This course enables students to develop an understanding of chemistry through the study of matter and qualitative analysis, organic, chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical calculations, and chemistry as it relates to the quality of the environment. Students will use a variety of laboratory techniques, develop skills in data collection and scientific analysis, and communicate scientific information using appropriate terminology. Emphasis will be placed on the role of chemistry in daily life and the effects of technological applications and processes on society and the environment.

PREREQUISITE: CHEMISTRY, GRADE 11,

PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

UNIVERSITY PREPARATION

61


Course Descriptions for Science: Grade 12 PHYSICS Grade 12,

Grade 12, University Preparation

College Preparation SPH4U1

SPH4C1

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data relating to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

This course develops students' understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore these concepts with respect to motion; mechanical, electrical, electromagnetic, energy transformation, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems; and the operation of commonly used tools and machines. They will develop their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics and solve both assigned problems and those emerging from their investigations. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

PREREQUISITE: PHYSICS, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY

PREREQUISITE: SCIENCE, GRADE 10, ACADEMIC OR APPLIED

PREPARATION

Course Descriptions for Social Sciences & Humanities: Grade 12 FAMILY STUDIES Nutrition and Health, Grade 12, University Preparation HFA4U1 This course examines the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; the nutritional needs of individuals at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Students will evaluate nutritionrelated trends and will determine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE, PREPARATION COURSE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES, ENGLISH, OR CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES

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Course Descriptions for Social Sciences & Humanities: Grade 12 FAMILY STUDIES Nutrition and Health,

Families in Canada,

Grade 12,

Grade 12 College Preparation

University Preparation HFA4C1

HHS4U1

This course focuses on the relationship between nutrition and health at different stages of life and on global issues related to food production. Students will investigate the role of nutrition in health and disease and assess strategies for promoting food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and refine their ability to use social science research and inquiry methods to investigate topics related to nutrition and health.

This course enables students to draw on sociological, psychological, and anthropological theories and research to analyse the development of individuals, intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will focus on issues and challenges facing individuals and families in Canada’s diverse society. They will develop analytical tools that enable them to assess various factors affecting families and to consider policies and practices intended to support families in Canada. They will develop the investigative skills required to conduct and communicate the results of research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent-child relationships.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE, OR UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES, ENGLISH, OR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES.

PREREQUISITE: ANY  UNIVERSITY  OR  UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE  PREPARATION  COURSE  IN  SOCIAL  SCIENCES  AND  HUMANITIES,  ENGLISH  OR CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 

Families in Canada,

Philosophy: Questions and Theories,

Grade 12

Grade 12,

College Preparation

University Preparation

HHS4C1

HZT4U1

This course enables students to develop an understanding of social science theories as they apply to individual development, the development of intimate relationships, and family and parent-child relationships. Students will explore a range of issues relating to the development of individuals and families in contemporary Canadian society as well as in other cultures and historical periods. They will develop the investigative skills required to conduct research on individuals, intimate relationships, and parent -child roles and relationships in Canada.

This course enables students to acquire an understanding of the nature of philosophy and philosophical reasoning skills and to develop and apply their knowledge and skills while exploring specialized branches of philosophy (the course will cover at least three of the following branches: metaphysics, ethics, epistemology, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, aesthetics). Students will develop critical thinking and philosophical reasoning skills as they formulate and evaluate arguments related to a variety of philosophical questions and theories. They will also develop research and inquiry skills related to the study and practice of philosophy.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE, OR UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES, ENGLISH, OR CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES.

PREREQUISITE: ANY  UNIVERSITY  OR  UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE  PREPARATION  COURSE  IN  SOCIAL  SCIENCES  AND  HUMANITIES,  ENGLISH  OR CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES 

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Course Descriptions for Social Science: Grade 12 Equity and Social Justice: From theory to Practice, Grade 12, University/ College Preparation HSE4M This course enables students to develop an understanding of the theoretical, social, and historical underpinnings of various equity and social justice issues and to analyse strategies for bringing about positive social change. Students will learn about historical and contemporary equity and social justice issues in Canada and globally. They will explore power relations and the impact of a variety of factors on equity and social justice. Students will develop and apply research skills and will design and implement a social action initiative relating to an equity or social justice issue. PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE, PREPARATION COURSE IN SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES, ENGLISH, OR CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES

Course Descriptions for Religious Education: Grade 12 Church and Culture,

Church and Culture,

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

Open HRE4M1

HRE4O1

This course is directed toward the clear identification of Catholic moral principles and the concrete application of these principles in the lives of students. The course proceeds from foundational beliefs rooted in Sacred Scripture concerning justice and peace to an exploration of the principles that shape Christian life. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood, interpersonal relationships and sexuality.

This course is directed toward the clear identification of Catholic moral principles and the concrete application of these principles in the lives of students. The course proceeds from foundational beliefs rooted in Sacred Scripture concerning justice and peace to an exploration of the principles that shape Christian life. In the Family Life Education strand, students explore a variety of topics related to the themes of personhood, interpersonal relationships and sexuality.

Special attention is given to the interaction between the Church and culture. The modern world is characterized by a multiplicity of values, philosophies, and ideologies. In a democratic, pluralistic society, these concepts may creatively reinforce one another or they may compete with and contradict one another. The Christian moral life is a call to follow Jesus Christ, to believe in the redemptive love of God for humankind and to proclaim and incarnate the reign of God as inaugurated by Jesus Christ. This course is intended to prepare the senior student for this lifelong task.

Special attention is given to the interaction between the Church and culture. The modern world is characterized by a multiplicity of values, philosophies, and ideologies. In a democratic, pluralistic society, these concepts may creatively reinforce one another or they may compete with and contradict one another. The Christian moral life is a call to follow Jesus Christ, to believe in the redemptive love of God for humankind and to proclaim and incarnate the reign of God as inaugurated by Jesus Christ. This course is intended to prepare the senior student for this lifelong task.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/ COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES, ENGLISH, OR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES.

PREREQUISITE: ANY UNIVERSITY OR UNIVERSITY/ COLLEGE PREPARATION COURSE IN CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES, ENGLISH, OR SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES.

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Course Descriptions for Technological Education, Part A: Board-based Technology: Grade 12 COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY Photography and Digital Imaging,

Computer Engineering Technology,

Grade 12,

Grade 12, University/College Preparation

College/University Preparation TGP4M1

TEJ4M1

This course enables students to further develop media knowledge and skills while designing and producing projects in the areas of live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students may work in the areas of TV, video, and movie production; radio and audio production; print and graphic communications; photography: digital imaging: broadcast journalism: and interactive new media. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to communications technology and will investigate career opportunities and challenges in a rapidly changing technological environment.

This course extends students’ understanding of computer systems and computer interfacing with external devices. Students will assemble computer systems by installing and configuring appropriate hardware and software, and will learn more about fundamental concepts of electronics, robotics, programming, and networks. Students will examine related environmental and societal issues, and will explore postsecondary pathways leading to careers in computer technology. PREREQUISITE: COMPUTER ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION

PREREQUISITE: COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY, GRADE 11, UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE PREPARATION

HOSPITALITY & TOURISM Hospitality and Tourism,

Hospitality and Tourism, Grade 12,

Grade 12,

Workplace Preparation

College Preparation TFJ4C1

TFJ4E1

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills related to the various sectors of the tourism industry. Students will demonstrate advanced food preparation and presentation skills; increase health and wellness knowledge; develop tourism administration and management skills; design and implement a variety of events or activities; and investigate principles and procedures that contribute to high-quality customer service Students will expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to transportation and their knowledge of apprenticeship and college programs leading to careers in the transportation industry.

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills related to the food and beverage services sector of the tourism industry. Students will demonstrate proficiency in using food preparation and presentation tools and equipment; plan nutritious menus, create recipes, and prepare and present finished food products; develop customer service skills; and explore event and activity planning. Students will expand their awareness of health and safety practices, environmental and societal issues, and career opportunities in the food and beverage services sector. PREREQUISITE: HOSPITALITY and TOURISM, GRADE 11, WORKPLACE PREPARATION

PREREQUISITE: HOSPITALITY and TOURISM, GRADE 11, COL-

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Â

Course Descriptions for Technological Education, Part A: Board-based Technology THE FOLLOWING TWO CREDIT PROGRAMS ARE OFFERED IN THE AM/PM OFFSITE AT SIR JAMES WHITNEY. THEY ARE AVAILABLE TO GRADES 10-12 STUDENTS. TRANSPORTATION IS PROVIDED BY THE ALGONQUIN & LAKESHORE CATHOLIC DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD.

PACKAGE ONE

PACKAGE TWO

Engineering and Construction Technology,

Transportation Technology,

Grade 11,

College Preparation

TCJ3C2/3E2

Grade 11,

This course focuses on the development of knowledge and skills related to residential construction. Students will gain hands on experience using a variety of construction materials, processes, tools, and equipment; learn about building design and planning construction projects; create and interpret working drawings and sections; and learn how the Ontario Building Code and other regulations and standards apply to construction projects. Students will also develop an awareness of environmental and societal issues related to construction technology, and explore career opportunities in the field.

College Preparation

TTJ3C2

This course enables students to develop technical knowledge and skills as they study, test, service, and repair engine, electrical, suspension, brake, and steering systems on vehicles, aircraft, and/or watercraft. Students will develop communication and teamwork skills through practical tasks, using a variety of tools and equipment. Students will develop an awareness of environmental and societal issues related to transportation and will learn about apprenticeship and college programs leading to careers in the transportation industry. PREREQUISITE: NONE

PREREQUISITE: NONE

PACKAGE THREE

PACKAGE FOUR

Transportation Technology,

Hairstyling and Aesthetics,

Grade 12,

College Preparation

Grade 11,

TTJ4C2

TXJ3E2

This course enables students to develop knowledge and skills in cosmetology and offers a variety of applications that will equip students to provide services for a diverse clientele. Students identify trends in the hairstyling and aesthetics industry, learn about related health and safety laws, and expand their communication and interpersonal skills through interactions with peers and clients. Students consider environmental and societal issues related to the industry and acquire a more detailed knowledge of apprenticeships and direct-entry work positions.

This course enables students to further develop technical knowledge and skills as they study, test, service, and repair engine management systems; power trains; steering/control, suspension, brake, and body systems on vehicles, aircraft, and/or watercraft; and/or small engine products. Students will refine communication and teamwork skills through practical tasks, using a variety of tools and equipment. Students will expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to transportation and their knowledge of apprenticeship and college programs leading to careers in the transportation industry. PREREQUISITE:

Workplace Preparation

PREREQUISITE: NONE

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY, GRADE 11 COLLEGE PREPARATION

66Â


Course Descriptions for Technological Education, Part A: Board-based Technology PACKAGE FIVE

PACKAGE SIX

Construction Engineering Technology,

Hairstyling & Aesthetics,

Grade 12,

College Preparation

TCJ4C2

Grade 12,

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills related to residential construction and to explore light commercial construction. Students will gain hands on experience using a variety of materials, processes, tools, and equipment and will learn more about building design and project planning. They will continue to create and interpret construction drawings and will extend their knowledge of construction terminology and of relevant building codes and regulations, as well as health and safety standards and practices. Students will also focus on environmental and societal issues related to construction engineering technology, and explore career opportunities in the field. PREREQUISITE:

Workplace Preparation

This course enables students to develop increased proficiency in a wide range of hairstyling and aesthetics services. Working in a salon/spa team environment, students strengthen their fundamental cosmetology skills and develop an understanding of common business practices and strategies in the salon/spa industry. Students expand their understanding of environmental and societal issues and their knowledge of postsecondary destinations in the hairstyling and aesthetics industry.

PREREQUISITE:

PACKAGE SEVEN

Construction Technology, Workplace Preparation

Hospitality and Tourism TCJ4E2

Grade 11/12

This course enables students to further develop technical knowledge and skills related to residential construction and to explore light commercial construction. Students will continue to gain hands on experience using a variety of materials, processes, tools, and equipment; create and interpret construction drawings; and learn more about building design and project planning. They will expand their knowledge of terminology, codes and regulations, and health and safety standards related to residential and light commercial construction. Students will also expand their awareness of environmental and societal issues related to construction technology and explore entrepreneurship and career opportunities in the industry that may be pursued directly after graduation.

PREREQUISITE:

HAIRSTYLING & AESTHECTICS, GRADE 11 WORKPLACE PREPARATION

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY, GRADE 11 COLLEGE PREPARATION

-ORGrade 12,

TXJ4E2

College Preparation

TFJ3C2/4C2

This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills related to the various sectors of the tourism industry. Students will demonstrate advanced food preparation and presentation skills; increase health and wellness knowledge; develop tourism administration and management skills; design and implement a variety of events or activities; and investigate principles and procedures that contribute to high-quality customer service. Students will expand their awareness of health and safety issues, environmental and societal issues, and career opportunities in the tourism industry.

PREREQUISITE:

HOSPITALITY and TOURISM, GRADE 11, COLLEGE PREPARATION

NOTE: Grade 11 Description found on page 48.

CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY, GRADE 11 WORKPLACE PREPARATION

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Extracurricular

70


GET INVOLVED WITH EXTRA CURRICULAR LIFE AT ST. THERESA The St. Theresa community encourages students to become actively engaged in their secondary school life. The commitment and level of involvement dictates the type of secondary school experience each student will have. Students can make a difference when they are actively engaged in all aspects of secondary school life. There are numerous activities for your involvement. The four main areas that activities fall into are Leadership, Recreation, The Arts and Athletics. Active involvement is recognized yearly at Awards Ceremonies and through the School Letter Recognition Program.

School Letter Recognition Program: Involvement in any school or community activity will enable students to earn points towards one of two school letters. The School Letter Recognition Program encourages students’ involvement and participation in various activities. It has become a very popular award at our Annual Awards Ceremony and one that many students strive to achieve. To earn their School Letter the student will have to accumulate a required number of points.

Junior Letter - 100 points

Senior Letter - 200 points ACADEMIC AVERAGE

POINTS Major Sports Minor Sports School Councils Major School Clubs Minor School Clubs Special Events Intramurals Special Recognition

up to 10 points up to 5 points up to 10 points up to 10 points up to 5 points up to 5 points up to 5 points per team/activity up to 5 points

points are awarded per semester

-

< 50% 51 to 59% 60 to 69% 70 to 79% 80 - 89% 90% or >

0 points 2 points 4 points 6 points 8 points 10 points

1st semester points based on 1st semester marks 2nd semester points based on 2nd semester marks

ACADEMIC AWARDS Honour Roll Designation Students who achieve an 80% or better average in a minimum of 8 courses/credits throughout the academic school year. Certificate of Distinction Students who achieve a 90% or better average in a minimum of 8 courses/credits throughout the academic school year. Ontario Scholar Students who graduate with more than an 80% average in a minimum of six grade 12 courses. Academic Awards Night – “A Celebration of Excellence” Each Fall students are awarded certificates for highest and silver standing in each subject. Students, who qualify, will also be awarded Honour Roll or Distinction Certificates.

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GET INVOLVED WITH EXTRA CURRICULAR LIFE AT ST. THERESA STUDENT LEADERSHIP GROUPS Student Council The purpose of this group is to organize, coordinate and carry out activities for staff and students in order to increase school spirit and promote a positive school climate. The group meets on a regular basis to organize dances, spirit activities (i.e. formal) and other events. These activities help to make St. Theresa the best high school in the Quinte area. Social Justice Group (J.E.D.I.) This group meets regularly to plan projects relating to poverty, pro-life, visiting seniors, Amnesty International, missions, etc. On-going activities include Thanksgiving Food Drive, 24 Hour Fast, support for the Dominican Republic group, assistance for Gleaners Food Bank and Good Baby Box, Christmas Sharing baskets, Random Acts of Kindness Week and other special events. Green Team Through education and awareness campaigns, the Green Team actively works towards waste and energy reduction in our school and community. Earth week events, composting, promoting re-usable water bottles and lunch containers, and working with the recycling program are some of the groups' activities. Intramural Council Executive (ICE) The St. Theresa Intramural Council Executive offers a variety of lunch hour athletic activities such as dodgeball, volleyball, basketball, soccer, floor hockey etc. In addition to lunch hour activities, after school hockey is also available. All students are welcome.

STUDENT GROUPS Peer Mentoring St. Theresa has a peer mentorship program. This offers students the opportunity to build their leadership skills through mentoring younger students and participating in a mediation component. Mediation is a process where a neutral third party facilitates a resolution between disputants. Students may build community service hours through participation in this program. All grade nine students will be partnered with a senior student in the peer mentorship program to assist with their transition to secondary school. Broadcast Club Students use the Communications Technology facilities to broadcast news interests and promotional items over the closed circuit daily announcements. Meeting several times per week, the group films, edits, directs and produces news broadcasts for the St. Theresa Community. Recycling Program In an effort to promote Agreen@ thinking here at St. Theresa, a team of dedicated students, under the supervision of grade 9 religion teachers, have incorporated a daily recycling program. The response to this program has been well received and the St. Theresa school community is looking forward to continuing the recycling routine. Yearbook Each year, students create and publish a yearbook to chronicle the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life and successes at St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School through activities, sports, special events and people. We are always looking for students to help memorialize these special moments. We need photographers, writers, layout personnel, editors, fundraising people and sales people to create a successful yearbook that will preserve in our memories long after students have graduated. This is a terrific opportunity to get involved and to learn new skills. Help create the future yearbook to build your precious memories from the past on. Shakespeare Guild The Shakespeare Guild is a group of devotees to all things Shakespearean. Passionate students who want to learn more about William Shakespeare, his works and his times and how they can be applied today, will make fine members of the Shakespeare Guild. Readings, movies, theatrical performances and food are all a part of our investigation into Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s world and character. A sense of humour is a must!

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GET INVOLVED WITH EXTRA CURRICULAR LIFE AT ST. THERESA ARTISTIC PURSUITS Choir The choir provides choral music at various events throughout the year, including assemblies, competitions and school liturgies. Drama Association Students wishing to have fun, be creative and develop new friendships should consider joining this club. St. Theresa has excellent facilities for full performances either for school assemblies or a large production. Each year St. Theresa produces either a unique play or a full scale musical to be presented to the public. The drama club is a great way to become a part of an imaginative, energetic and positive group within our school. School Band The St. Theresa School Band continues to grow musically. The band plays at school functions and at public events such as music festivals, concerts and benefit events like the MS walk for life. The band practices once a week after school. New members are always welcome. Senior Dance Club For those students that have already taken Dance as a credit course, or for those who have had outside dance training, we offer a venue for showcasing those dance talents via the Senior Dance Club. Our performances often take place in the surrounding community and/or at school Pep Rallies, assemblies, and in our ambitious STCSS Musical Theatre productions. Senior Dance Club is a great way to get involved with school spirit, build confidence levels and maintain physical fitness! Junior Dance Club For those students that have not yet taken Dance as a credit course and/or who just love to dance, we offer a venue for experimenting with various forms of dance and an opportunity to showcase their talents in one major public performance per school calendar year. Junior Dance Club is a great way to get involved with school spirit and build confidence levels! Young Authors Awards The annual OECTA Young Authors Awards/Prix Jeunes Ecrivians celebrates the writing talents of students and the teaching talents of their teachers. Each year, students submit short stories, poems, nonfiction articles and reports in both English and French. The first place winners at the school level advance to the unit level and then to the Provincial competition. Other Extracurricular Activities Other extracurricular Activities that provide a focus in the Arts area within the school are the Coffee Houses and Stage Crew. School Reach The School Reach team welcomes those students with a passion for trivia. Since its formation in the Fall of 2001, the St. Theresa School Reach team has grown quickly in popularity. Our intellectual gladiators meet weekly with coach Mr. Fahringer to ponder questions based on academic knowledge, popular culture and sports. Local high school teams compete in the spring to win a berth in the Ontario finals. Model UN Each year several senior students participate in a two-day Model United Nations Conference generously hosted by the Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board, usually held at Moira Secondary School. Representatives from all high schools in the area present position papers for their various respective countries and then draft resolutions that try to solve global problems. Over the years, the organizers are always impressed by the strong contingent of St. Theresa students. Canadian Math League Students participate in the Canadian Math contest six times per year. The aim of these 30 minute contests is to provide a stimulus for enrichment and problem solving. All students are welcome to write these contests.

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GET INVOLVED WITH EXTRA CURRICULAR LIFE AT ST. THERESA RECREATION / ACADEMIC ENDEAVOURS Ski and Snowboard Club Under the supervision of St. Theresa Staff, St. Theresa Catholic Secondary School has provided day trips to Calabogie Peaks, Mont Tremblant and a weekend stay at Mont Ste. Anne. This is a very active club at Batawa Ski Hill as well. Travel Club The St. Theresa Travel Club is open to anyone at our school, who is in good academic standing. The travel club departs on a major trip every year. In the past, we have travelled to Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Germany. The travel club welcomes new members and encourages students to explore the world with us. The teacher advisor for the travel club is Mrs. Bedore. Fitness Centre A weight training facility is available to all students. Trained senior students will provide orientation and supervision of the facility. A small lifetime membership fee will be charged. Intramurals A variety of lunch hour activities such as dodgeball, volleyball, soccer, basketball, floor hockey, etc. are offered to all students in an inclusive environment.

74


INTERSCHOOL ATHLETICS FALL SEASON

WINTER SEASON

SPRING SEASON

Boys:

Junior Soccer Senior Soccer Junior Volleyball Senior Volleyball Junior Football Senior Football Cross Country Golf

Boys:

Junior Basketball Senior Basketball Badminton Varsity Hockey Swimming Down Hill Skiing Curling Cheerleading Gymnastics

Boys:

Junior Rugby Senior Rugby Track & Field Tennis

Girls:

Junior Basketball Senior Basketball Junior Rugby Senior Rugby Cross Country Golf

Girls:

Junior Volleyball Senior Volleyball Curling Badminton Down Hill Skiing Varsity Hockey Swimming Cheerleading Gymnastics

Girls:

Junior Soccer Senior Soccer Track & Field Tennis

Other sports may be offered depending on the level of interest and availability of coaches

Eligibility: You must be taking 3 credit courses during the playing season and you must purchase a student ID Card. You have five years of eligibility to play interschool athletics.

Athletic Eligibility: Any time students change secondary schools, they are considered to be a transfer and must comply with the Ontario Federation of Schools Athletic Association (OFSAA) transfer policy before they are eligible to participate on a school team. Transfer forms are available from Community Service or Athletic Director and should be completed in early September to ensure participation.

75


PATHWAY TO YOUR FUTURE WORKPLACE PATHWAYS Students who will move from secondary school directly to the workplace have a wide variety of courses to choose from at the senior level. Cooperative education experiences are strongly encouraged so that students will have the opportunity to explore the workplace to determine the career direction they would like to pursue. Cooperative education will also give students the opportunity to develop the employability skills that are necessary in today’s workplace. Students who are considering this pathway should speak with their guidance counsellor in order to select the most appropriate courses.

APPRENTICESHIPS The majority of trades now require Grade 12 for entry into apprenticeship. Some of the construction trades may have lower entry requirements but students need to be aware that individual employers may require a Grade 12 diploma as a condition of employment. Students should also be aware that employers may require additional math or technology courses beyond diploma requirements. Students can access recommended “Apprenticeship Subject Pathways” at www.edu.gov.on.ca skill site. Students can also access local trade information at the school’s guidance and co-op offices. There is growing demand for trade certifications. Reference “The Skilled Trades Handbook” published by the East Central Ontario Training Board (ECOTB). A book is available in the School Library or in Student Services.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS (referred to as CAREER COLLEGES) These privately owned and operated schools offer training for a variety of occupations from secretarial work to radio announcing. The levels of education required to take these courses vary with the schools and the particular course. In general, the candidate should have completed Grade 12 and received an OSSD. These schools are very costly and should be investigated prior to making any commitment. School counsellors will gladly assist any student in this investigation. These programs usually allow students to accelerate the training period.

76


PATHWAYS cont’d. CANADIAN FORCES A candidate may enter the Canadian Armed Forces under one of three plans: a) entry for military trades training requires Canadian citizenship, a minimum of 17 years of age with at least grade 10 education (grade 12 is the norm), good physical health and the ability to pass certain selection tests; b) entry to subsidized plans require acceptance by a Canadian university; c) entry as an officer requires the candidate to already have a university degree or college diploma. Entry into the regular officer-training program at one of the military colleges (Royal Military College in Kingston) requires university preparation courses. A representative from the Canadian Armed Forces will present at St. Theresa to outline this particular pathway for students.

COMMUNITY COLLEGES There have been significant changes to legislation about the mandate of our Community Colleges. Some have now begun to offer Applied Degrees, some offer joint programs with universities where diplomas and degrees are granted. As a result, the admission requirements for some programs have changed dramatically. In the past, colleges have required the OSSD for admission. Students should consult calendars for specific admission requirements, as some university courses are required for some programs. The colleges do give consideration and sometimes considerable weight to other factors, such as interviews, portfolios, standardized tests, questionnaires and volunteer experience. Colleges vary in requirements for specific programs and students are advised to consult with a counsellor or college staff, and to check recent calendars. Good standing in English is important for all college programs. Presentations by local colleges are held at St. Theresa in the fall. The purpose of these sessions is to assist students in planning for a college pathway and to receive up to date information regarding college destinations. Students may also attend local colleges by registering for Student for a Day Programs – see a Guidance Counsellor for more information. Go to www.ontariocolleges.on.ca for more information.

UNIVERSITIES The Ontario Universities’ Council on Admission (OUCA) has developed guidelines based on the OSS program and curriculum. Final decisions about future admission requirements will be made at individual universities and they will issue further advice as necessary.         

The completion of the OSS Diploma, or equivalent, will be required for admission to an Ontario university. This will include the satisfactory completion of the Literacy Test and Community Involvement Hours. A minimum overall average of 60% in six Grade 12U or M courses will be necessary for consideration for admission to an Ontario university. Most universities and/or programs will have higher admission averages. Where there are prerequisite courses for admission to specific programs, it is probable that such courses will be required at the ‘U’ level, where offered. Consult individual university calendars. Universities may consider both Grade 11 and Grade 12 ‘U’ and ‘M’ courses for admission and/or prerequisite purposes. Presentations by many universities are held at St. Theresa in the fall. The purpose of these sessions is to assist students in planning for a university pathway and to receive up to date information regarding university destinations. Students must ensure that they meet all the course requirements and diploma requirements specified by the universities to which they have applied. The universities encourage students to maintain breadth in their secondary school course choices, and to keep their options open. Go to www.ouac.on.ca for more information. www.electronicinfo.ca is a great website to find out in-depth information on Ontario University programs.

77


Codes: C – College 

E – Workplace      L – Essential Skills      M – University/College 

Areas of  Study 

Arts

Business

Canadian &  World  Studies 

Computer &  Information  Science 

English

French  

Guidance

Cooperative Education &  OYAP 

Course Name 

Grade 9 

Grade 1O 

Grade 11 

       

Dance Drama  Drama – Production Technology  Music……………GUITAR  Music……………INSTRUMENTAL  Music……………STRINGS  Media Arts…….  Visual Arts 

ATC1O1 ADA1O1 ADD1O1 AMG1O1 AMI1O1 AMS1O1

ATC2O1 ADA2O1 ADD2O1 AMU2O1 AMS2O1

NAC1O1

AVI2O1

ATC3M1/3O1 ADA3M1/3O1 ADD 3M1    AMU3M1/3O1 AMS3O1/3M1 ASM3O1/3M1 AVI3O1/3M1

     

Information Technology  Introduction to Business  Entrepreneurship  Accounting  Introduction to Marketing  International Business Fundamentals 

BTT1O1

  

CGC1D1/1P1   

 

Civics Geography of Canada  Geography: Canadian and World Issues:  Global Challenges  History: Aboriginal Peoples in Canada  History: 2Oth Century Canadian  History: Identity and Culture – Canadian  History: The West & the World/American  History  (1/2 Credit each)  Economics  Law 

U ‐ University  Grade 12  ADA4M1/4E1 ADD4M1 AMU4M1 AMS4M1 AVI4M1/4E1

  BDP3O1  BAF3M1  BMI3C1   

BBB4M1

CHV2O5 (.5)     

   

  CGW4U1 

     

NAC2O1 CHC2D1/2P1     

  CHI4U1  CHY4U1/4C1 

 

 

    CHW3M5 &  CHA3U5   (.5)    CLU3M1 

Introduction to Computer Studies 

ICS201

Computer and Information  Science/Programming 

ICS3C1/3U1

ICS4C1/4U1

   

English Contemporary Aboriginal Voices  Writers Craft  Literacy Course 

ENG3C1/3U/3E NBE3C/3U     

ENG4C/4U/4E   EWC4U1/4C1  OLC4O1 

FSF3U1

FSF4U1

   

BBI2O1

ENG1D1/1P/1L ENG2D/2P/2L             

BAT4M1

CIA4U1 CLN4U1 

Core

ALCDSB Certificate of Accomplishment will be awarded at graduation to all who complete Core French programming  (four credits) in Grades 9 to 12 

    

Leadership and Peer Support  Career Studies  Learning Strategies for   (Exceptional students only)  Learning Strategies  Interdisciplinary Studies‐ Peer Mentor 

 

Co‐Op Two and Four Credit 

FSF1D1/1P1

78  

O – Open  

FSF2D1

  GLE1O1 

GLC2O5 (.5)  GLE201 

GPP3O1   GLE3O1 

  GLE4O1 

GLS1O1  

 

 

IDC4U1/4O1 

DCO3O COOP 2  COOP4 

COOP 2  COOP 4 


Areas of  Study 

Course Name 

Grade 1O 

Grade 11 

Grade 12 

           

Math……………………………………………..Principles Math………………………………….……..Foundations  Math……………………………………..Essential Skills  Math…………………………………………...Workplace  Functions and Applications  Functions  Foundations for Mathematics  Advanced Functions  Data Management  Calculus & Vectors  College and Apprenticeship  Math for Technology 

MPM1D1 MFM1P1  MAT1L1                   

MPM2D1 MFM2P1  MAT2L1                   

    MEL3E1  MCF3M1  MCR3U1  MBF3C1           

    MEL4E1        MHF4U1  MDM4U1  MCV4U1  MAP4C1  MCT4C1 

    

Healthy Active Living  Hockey Skills Course  Health for Life – Personal Fitness  Exercise Science  Recreation and Healthy Active Living  Leadership 

PPL1O1 PAL1O1Y       

PPL2O1 PAL2O1Y  PAF201     

PPL3O1 PAL3O1Y  PPZ3C1     

PPL4O1 PAL4O1Y    PSK4U1  PLF4M 

Religion

   

Religion…………….………………………..Be with me  Religion…………….……………..Christ and Culture  World Religions………………..Beliefs and Issues  Church and Culture 

HRE1O1      

HRE2O1     

  HRF3O1/HRT3M1   

    HRE4M1/4O 

Sciences

     

Science………………………………………….Principles Science……………………………………..Foundations  Science…………………………………..Essential Skills  Biology  Chemistry  Physics 

SNC1D1 SNC1P1  SNC1L1       

SNC2D1 SNC2P1  SNC2L1       

    SBI3U1/3C  SCH3U1  SPH3U1 

    SBI4U1  SCH4U/4C  SPH4U/4C 

  

Nutrition and Health  Families in Canada  Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology  and Sociology  Philosophy………………….Questions & Theories  Equity and Social Justice: From Theory to  Practice 

   

   

  HSP3C1/3U 

HFA4C/4U1 HHS4C/4U   

 

 

 

HZT4U1 HSE4M 

Communication Technology  Communication Technology…….Photography  and Digital Imaging  Hospitality and Tourism  Construction Technology…………………..Offsite  Hairstyling and Aesthetics……………….…Offsite  Transportation Technology………………..Offsite  Hospitality and Tourism…………………….Offsite  Computer Engineering Technology  Child Development & Gerontology 

 

TGJ2O1  

TGP3M1 

TGP4M1 

TFJ1O1            

TFJ2O1            

TFJ3C/3E1 TCJ3C2TCJ3E2  TXJ3E2  TTJ3C2  TFJ3C2/3E2  TEJ3M1/3E1   

TFJ4C/4E1 TCJ4C2/4E2  TXJ4E2  TTJ4C2  TFJ4C2/4E2  TEJ4M1/4E1  TOJ4C1 

Mathematics

Physical Education 

Social Sciences 

   

Technology

C – College 

      

E – Workplace      L – Essential Skills      M – University/College  79 

Grade 9 

O – Open  

U ‐ University 

10 12 2018 2019 course calendar  
10 12 2018 2019 course calendar  
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