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2016-2017 St. John Bosco High School Program of Studies


Table of Contents Program of Studies Framework.................................................................................................................................................... 2 Mission and Vision ................................................................................................................................................................... 2 The Preventive System ............................................................................................................................................................ 2 The Bosco Man........................................................................................................................................................................ 3 Academic Program Personnel...................................................................................................................................................... 4 Curricular Pathways ..................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Project Lead the Way .............................................................................................................................................................. 5 Bio-Medical Sciences .............................................................................................................................................................. 6 Social Entrepreneurship........................................................................................................................................................... 6 Sports Medicine ....................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Academic Program Services ........................................................................................................................................................ 7 Writing Across the Curriculum ................................................................................................................................................. 7 St. John Bosco Online Academy ............................................................................................................................................. 7 Approved Traditional & Online Coursework ................................................................................................................................. 8 University of California, California State University A-G .......................................................................................................... 8 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

Approved Core Coursework ....... 12

NCAA Initial – Eligibility Requirements....................................................................................................................................... 13 Division I ................................................................................................................................................................................ 13 Division II ............................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Department Coursework ............................................................................................................................................................ 15 English ................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Kinesiology ............................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Mathematics .......................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Religious Studies ................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Science .................................................................................................................................................................................. 24 PROJECT LEAD THE WAY COURSEWORK ............................................................................................................................. 25 BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE COURSEWORK ................................................................................................................................... 26 Social Science ....................................................................................................................................................................... 28 SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSEWORK ........................................................................................................................ 30 Visual and Performing Arts .................................................................................................................................................... 32 World Languages................................................................................................................................................................... 34 St. John Bosco Online Academy Coursework ............................................................................................................................ 37

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Program of Studies Framework Mission and Vision In keeping with the Salesian Mission and Vision: St. John Bosco High School is a distinctive Catholic college preparatory community in the Salesian tradition educating young men with reason, religion and loving kindness to become men of purpose. We are committed to the formation of good Christians and honest citizens characterized by faith, intellect, leadership, and citizenship in the image of Jesus Christ. We strive for excellence in Catholic male formation through intellectual, artistic, spiritual, and physical advancement, becoming the school of choice for young men in Southern California.

The Preventive System (Excerpts translated from Petitclerc, J. M. (2009) Congresso Internazionale “ Sistema Preventivo e Diritti Umani” The most significant parts of the preventative system. Roma, 2 – 6 Gennaio)

Some remain quite doubtful at the thought that a 19th century educator and priest could have developed a pertinent pedagogical response for our youth. The socio-economic realities of our countries at the beginning of the 21st century are so different from the ones prevailing in Turin in the 19th century. However, they have a common characteristic: that of a society in crisis. In Don Bosco’s days, people were experiencing several transitions: from a farm to an industrial society, from a rural society to an urban one, from monarchy to a republic. Even today, we live a crisis, marked by important mutations on the economic, technological and cultural levels. We are entering in a society that economists and sociologists call post-industrial or post-modern, and, as in all era of social crisis, the transmission of values becomes a crucial question, and the problems of youth are acute, particularly those related to the immigration phenomenon. The three important guidelines of the preventive system which still remain very pertinent in a time of crisis are: to restore authority by developing an educative relationship based on trust, to allow the young male to project himself in the future as a witness of hope, and to learn to live together among young people and with adults by building an alliance with them. Let us reflect a few moments on these three values of the Salesian pedagogy: trust, hope, and alliance. A Pedagogy of Trust Without trust, there is no education. This is the basic principle of education as understood by Don Bosco. The authority of the educator can only be rooted in this relationship of trust between him and the young person. Research conducted on the topic of resistance confirms that the capacity for change in a young person involved in repeated offensive behaviors rests on the relationship with an adult that knew how to trust the young person, without locking the young person in his or her past. An education based on trust, is an education based on reason. The educator who acts in a reasonable manner, convinced that the young person is gifted with the capacity to reason, is able to understand the interests of the young. An education based on trust is rooted in an unshakable faith in the capacity of a young person to grow, regardless of his present difficulties. The preventive system rests on this conviction. A Pedagogy of Hope The motto given by John Bosco to his disciples deserves to be heard: ``The Salesian never complains about time``. Time is not a reality to complain about, but on the contrary it is an asset in helping young people to maximize all the avenues of progress in order to build a just, fraternal and peaceful world. Nowadays, it is very important to teach the child, the adolescent, to be in awe when encountering beauty and progress! Of course, we must warn them against the possible abuses of new discoveries. But, let us make sure that this warning does not stop them from being capable to marvel at what emerges. “A falling tree makes more noise than a growing forest tree” says an African proverb. It is time, for the sake of the happiness of our youth, that we stop bombarding them with the noise of the falling trees (largely diffused by the medias), and that we 2


expose them to the beauty of growth. It is this attention to the process of growth that characterizes the way John Bosco looks at the young. The story of the seed, called to become a great tree, is certainly, the best parable on education. There are three categories of men and women in the narrative of the seed. First of all, there are those who only see a seed (let us admit that the vision is quite limited!). Then, there are those who, in looking at the seed, only dream about the tree (these idealists risk, in only dreaming, crushing the seed). Finally, there are those who see both the seed and the tree. These are conscious of the grounds. To educate, according to John Bosco, is to offer the best ground in order to allow the child to take root in their family, social, and cultural heritage and to bloom as a unique person. The Pedagogy of Alliance This pedagogy is not about doing for, but with the young; the young person is not only a recipient but rather a partner of the educative interaction. John Bosco used to repeat to his educators: ``What matters is not that young people be loved, but that they know that they are loved``. In other words, the essential is in the perception of the child. This great educator, called ``Father and Teacher of Youth`` in the ecclesial tradition, is often presented with the popular imagery of a tightrope walker. It refers to the fact that, as an adolescent, John Bosco loved to play as a street entertainer to gather his friends. But there is also a more symbolic meaning: isn’t the art of education somehow like the art of a tightrope walker? To know how to say yes, but also to know how to say no; to be sufficiently close, but also sufficiently distant. To offer security, but also to make responsible. It is always a question of balance. We are talking not only about a covenant with a young person but also with the group. To experience the group, not like a burden, but like an opportunity for the process of socialization. With a group, the educator sometimes has a tendency to only perceive a sum of individual relationships, while it is a question of interactivity between the members of the group. John Bosco, thanks to his undeniable talents as a comedian, knew how to transform the group as an ally. He was able to see the dynamic of the group, not as a difficulty, but rather as an opportunity to promote the growth of the responsibility of each one toward the others. Finally, it is also about building an alliance between all the adults which relate with the same young person. In the last letter which he addressed to the directors, John Bosco stressed the quality of the relationships between the members of the educative community. The first right of the child is certainly the right to the coherence between all the adults that accompanies his growth.

The Bosco Man Don Bosco’s vision established that the virtues of faith, knowledge, leadership and citizen create the conditions for success among the young. St. John Bosco High School is committed to forming young men of purpose – good Christians and honest citizens. To form the The Bosco Man, we seek to empower him with the skills, strength, values and faith to meet the challenges presented by a new era. He must be prepared for the academic rigors of college and the opportunities of a professional career. In addition, he must be formed into a faith-driven leader of service for his family and his community. Only then will The Bosco Man be truly whole and ready for life. Upon graduation, The Bosco Man will be an outstanding product of the Salesian educative model, advancing the legacy of the Bosco Brotherhood and Catholic Salesianity for generations to come. The core values of the fully formed Bosco Man are characterized by the following:    

Faith-driven: A man of integrity, character and compassion, formed in the Catholic faith. Thinker: A collaborative problem-solver; professional, informed, mature and prepared for life. Leader: A decisive leader who takes initiative and practices good judgment in service to others. Citizen: A kind, selfless contributor to his community and an advocate for social justice.

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Academic Program Personnel Executive Administration Fr. Nick Reina SDB, Director Mr. Dennis Mulhaupt, President

Administration Mr. Casey Yeazel, Principal Mr. Guillermo Gutierrez, Vice Principal of Student Services Dr. Christian De Larkin, Vice Principal of Academic Affairs Mr. Adan Jaramillo, Coordinator of Youth Ministry & Activities Coordinator Mr. Monty McDermott, Athletic Director Mr. Derrick Fernando, Dean of Students Mrs. Elizabeth Hunt, Associate Dean Mr. George Quezada, Director of Guidance and College Counseling

Curricular Leads Mr. Joseph Griffin, Religious Studies Department Lead Mr. Curtis Hartman, Social Science Department Lead Ms. Judith Day, English Department Lead Mr. Ernie Antonelli, Mathematics Department Lead Mr. Walt Wippler, Science Department Lead Ms. Norma Aguilera, World Languages Lead Mr. Martin Lang, Visual and Performing Arts Department Lead Mr. Sidney Davidson, Kinesiology Department Lead Mr. Derrick Fernando, Writing Across the Curriculum Lead

Curricular Pathway Coordinators Mr. Casey Yeazel, Honors Program Coordinator Mr. Walt Wippler, Project Lead the Way Coordinator Mr. Robert Linares, Bio-Medical and Research Science Coordinator Mr. Sidney Davidson, Sports Medicine Coordinator Mr. Bryce Weiglin, Social Entrepreneurship Coordinator

College and Career Counseling Mr. Omar Delgado, Grade 9,10 Ms. Monica Jara, Grade 10,11 Mr. George Quezada, Grade 10,12 Ms. Rubi Araque, Registrar Mrs. Annie Rojes, Counseling Secretary

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Curricular Pathways Honors Program Bosco Honors is a four-year program designed to meet each of the characteristics of a Salesian Education. Students in the Honors Program will take honors level courses in the disciplines of History, English, Advanced Mathematics, Science, World Language, and Advanced Visual and Performing Arts granting the student extra credit in his grade point average. This program is designed for students seeking an academically challenging and comprehensive education that provides them with the skill-set necessary to meet their educational and career aspirations in college and beyond. Students admitted into the program begin each academic year with the Honors Summer Seminar (HSS). Utilizing a cohort-model, students will be supported in their research, writing, and communication as they progress towards their upper-class leadership and internship components and final senior portfolio. The Honors Program invites a small cohort of students to develop problem formulation and problem solving skills by applying their research skills to a real-world setting throughout the summer / winter sessions and across all Honors Courses. Here, research plays an integral part in the overall academic preparation of the student. Studies on college readiness stress the importance for the student to develop research skills in order to engage in active inquiry and dialogue about subject matter and research questions. In addition to developing a strong research base and the academic knowledge and skills found in the core subjects mentioned above, years III (summer service immersion) and IV (summer internship immersion) will provide the contextual skills and awareness to work in a professional collaborative environment to demonstrate leadership skills in different settings. Acceptance is based on a holistic review of:  STANINE result from High School Placement Test  Geometry Readiness Exam Result  Writing Sample  Teacher/Principal Recommendation  Interview

Project Lead the Way (www.pltw.org) Project Lead the Way (PLTW) is the leading provider of rigorous and innovative Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education curricular programs used in middle and high schools across the United States. STEM education is at the heart of today’s high-tech, high-skill global economy. For America to remain economically competitive next generation of leaders – the students of today – must develop the critical-reasoning and problem-solving skills that will help make them the most productive in the world. STEM education programs, like the one offered by PLTW engage students in activities, projects, and problem-based (APPB) learning, which provides hands-on classroom experiences. Students create, design, build, discover, collaborate and solve problems while applying what they learn in math and science. They’re also exposed to STEM fields through professionals from local industries who supplement the real-world aspect of the curriculum through mentorships and workplace experiences. Acceptance is based on a holistic review of:  Results from High School Placement Test and Geometry Readiness Exam  Writing Sample  Teacher/Principal Recommendation  Interview 5


Bio-Medical Sciences This pathway is designed for students who are interested in the fields of biology or medicine. Students must possess well developed academics skills, have a desire to engage in challenging course work, and aspire to pursue higher education leading to a career in medicine or other related fields. In addition to rigorous classroom instruction in advanced mathematics, Cellular and Molecular Biology, Biochemical Genetics, and Anatomy and Physiology, students will gain considerable clinical knowledge through experiential learning with professionals in a hospital setting. Students will conduct independent research, participate in medical simulations, and attend lectures provided by physicians, research scientists, and other medical personnel. Acceptance is based on a holistic review of:  Results from High School Placement Test and Geometry Readiness Exam  Writing Sample  Teacher/Principal Recommendation  Interview

Social Entrepreneurship This Ivy League inspired pathway is designed in collaboration with the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania for students interested in creating and leading business ventures. Social entrepreneurs are people or organizations that use economic and technological innovation to achieve social goals. They use entrepreneurial skills to create organizations that, instead of seeking profit, pursue a more just and humane society. Students will be introduced to social entrepreneurship through case studies, key readings, and primary information resources. Students will become familiar with organizations and social entrepreneurs through service-learning projects, site visits, and will begin to develop skills demonstrated by successful social entrepreneurs, including team building and leadership, negotiation, and working in complex social and cultural environments. Acceptance is based on a holistic review of:  STANINE result from High School Placement Test  Writing Sample  Teacher/Principal Recommendation  Interview

Sports Medicine The sports medicine pathway specializes in the knowledge, skills, practices, and theories encompassed in the health and safety of athletic individuals. Students will understand the various careers of healthcare professionals, including the team physician, athletic trainer, physical therapist, biomedical engineer, nutritionist and psychologist. This pathway is designed for students interested in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, medicine, fitness, physiology of exercise, kinesiology, nutrition, and other sports medicine-related fields. Coursework content will include anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, hygiene, nutrition, taping, bracing, emergency procedure, conditioning, injury prevention, injury evaluation, rehabilitation, therapy, and field work observations. Acceptance is based on a holistic review of:  STANINE result from High School Placement Test  Writing Sample  Teacher/Principal Recommendation  Interview 6


Academic Program Services Writing Across the Curriculum Mission In an effort to align writing expectations for all students, the Writing Across the Curriculum team will come together to discuss best practices in writing instruction, learning objectives, and assessment in an effort to develop a feasible action plan for a school-wide roll-out of the SJB Writing Across the Curriculum Initiative. The curriculum will be developed with the support of data-driven research that coincides with Common Core and College Board standards for writing in all areas of study along with classroom experiences. By the end, the team will produce a writing curriculum that makes teacher expectations accessible to all students by aligning instruction and evaluation vertically and horizontally.

St. John Bosco Online Academy (SJBOA) Mission Today’s young people are immersed in a world full of technology and the classrooms of tomorrow are no exception. The constantly evolving nature of the teaching and learning dynamic coupled with the continuously advancing forms of technology make online classes and distance learning a challenging yet essential part of educating our students. Furthermore, national and state departments of education have reported a marked increase in online enrollments amongst elementary and secondary school students with nearly three-quarters of enrollments accounted for by high schools. Research also shows that there has been an increase in online enrollment throughout degree-granting postsecondary institutions from 2002 through 2012. For our students, this necessitates a need for early exposure to online classes in order to promote better familiarity and preparation of what many colleges and universities have to offer. SJBOA addresses this need by providing students the opportunity to take UC approved classes throughout the course of the year. The St. John Bosco Online Academy (SJBOA) is a progressive step towards addressing these challenges while providing a comprehensive, college preparatory curriculum that meets our students’ various learning and academic needs. The Online Academy allows students to improve their academic standing through grade remediation, completion of prerequisite classes, and additional enrichment courses. Furthermore, with St. John Bosco faculty as teachers, the SJBOA affords students more access to assistance and support in a self-paced, flexible learning environment.

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Approved Traditional & Online Coursework

University of California, California State University A-G History/Social Studies - (a)  AP Government and Politics Comparative  AP Government and Politics United States  AP Human Geography  AP U.S. History  AP World History  Civics  Modern World History  U.S. History  World History since the Renaissance (Apex Learning)

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Precalculus Honors Trigonometry

Lab Science – (d)  Anatomy & Physiology  AP Biology  AP Chemistry  AP Environmental Science (Online)  AP Physics 1  AP Physics 2  Biology  Biology Core (APEX Learning)  Biology Honors  Chemistry and Lab  Chemistry Core (APEX Learning)  Chemistry Honors  Environmental Science  Physics and Lab

English – (b)  American Literature/Composition  AP English Language and Composition  AP English Literature and Composition  British Literature/Composition  Composition/World Literature I  Composition/World Literature I Honors  Composition/World Literature II  Composition/World Literature II Honors  English 10 Common Core (Apex Learning)  English 11 Common Core (Apex Learning)  English 12 Common Core (Apex Learning)  English 9 Common Core (Apex Learning)  English I (Apex Learning)  English III (Apex Learning)  English IV (Apex Learning)

Languages Other Than English – (e)  AP Chinese Language & Culture  AP Spanish Language and Culture  AP Spanish Literature and Culture  French I  French I (Apex Learning)  French II  French II (Apex Learning)  French III  Latin I  Latin II  Mandarin I  Mandarin II  Mandarin III  Spanish I  Spanish I (Apex Learning)  Spanish I for Heritage Speakers  Spanish II  Spanish II (Apex Learning)  Spanish II for Heritage Speakers  Spanish III  Spanish III (Apex Learning)  Spanish III Honors

Mathematics – (c)  Algebra I  Algebra I Common Core (Apex Learning)  Algebra II  Algebra II Common Core (Apex Learning)  Algebra II/Trigonometry Honors  AP Calculus AB  AP Calculus BC  AP Statistics (Apex Learning)  Elementary Statistics  Geometry  Geometry Common Core (Apex Learning)  Geometry Honors  Mathematics I Common Core (Apex Learning)  Mathematics II Common Core (Apex Learning)  Mathematics III Common Core (Apex Learning)  Precalculus  Precalculus (Apex Learning)

Visual and Performing Arts – (f)  Advanced Band  Advanced Drawing  Animation 8


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Ceramics Concert Band Drawing & Painting Exploring Art Media Production Photography/Yearbook Theatre Arts

Elective – (g)  AP Computer Science A (Online)  AP Computer Science Principles (Online)  AP Macroeconomics (Apex Learning)  AP Microeconomics (Apex Learning)  Applied Engineering  Cell and Molecular Biology  Economics  Engineering Capstone  Entrepreneur In the Classroom  Financial Literacy  Intro to Engineering Design  Intro to Health Science and Technology  Intro to Sports Medicine  Journalism  Medical Ethics  Multicultural Studies (Apex Learning)  Principles of Engineering  Psychology  Psychology (Apex Learning)  Social Entrepreneurship  Speech & Debate  U.S. and Global Economics Core (Apex Learning)  World History to the Renaissance (Apex Learning)  World Religion

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University of California Admissions Information General Criteria for Admission Strength of program; GPA in “a-g” courses (grades 10-12), SAT Reasoning or ACT & Writing); declared major; personal statement; community involvement. Scholarship Requirements Students must earn at least a “C” in each of the courses for admission and must earn an overall minimum 3.0 GPA in those on the UC approved list, which are taken after the 9th grade. Admission by Examination Only If scholarship and subject requirements for admission are not met, it is still possible to qualify for admission as a freshmen by examination alone. http://admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/freshman/requirements/examination/ Honors Coursework The University assigns extra points for up to eight semesters of certified honors level and advanced placement courses taken in the last three years of high school: A=5 points, B=4 points, and C=3 points. No more than four semesters of certified honors level courses taken in the 10th grade may be given extra points. A grade of “D” in an honors or advanced placement course does not earn extra points. The courses must be in the following “a-g” subjects: history, English, advanced mathematics, laboratory science, and language other than English, and they must be certified at your high school as offered at the honors level. In these fields, as well as in the fields of computer science, social science, and the visual and performing arts, courses that are designed to prepare students for an Advanced Placement Examination of the College Board or a Higher Level Examination of the International Baccalaureate and college courses that are transferable to the University are acceptable honors level courses. “D” and “F” Grades “D” and “F” grades in the “a-g” courses must be repeated or validated. Consult with a counselor to determine how grades can be improved and how the University will use them in evaluating your scholarship record. Grades for repeated courses in which you initially earned a grade of “C” or better will not be used. Subject Requirements Complete high school A-G approved coursework in the following subjects with a grade “C” or higher. 11 of the 15 requirements must be completed by the end of the 11th grade. a. History - 2 years b. English - 4 years c. Mathematics - 3 years (4 years recommended) d. Laboratory Science - 2 years (3 years recommended) – One year life science and one year physical science with lab. e. Language other than English - 2 years of the same language (3 years recommended) f. Visual/Performing Arts - 1 year of a single yearlong course. g. College Preparatory Electives - 1 year:  advanced “a-f” course or “g” category elective  an additional year in the same language used for “e” above or two years of a second language other than English.  one additional year sequence of any lab science.  visual & performing arts. Application Filing Period - November 1st to November 30th

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All campuses observe the dates listed below for the beginning of application filing. Each campus will accept for consideration all applications submitted during the filing period.

University of California Website for information and applications. www.ucop.edu/admissions/

SJBHS CEEB School Code: 050260

California State University Admissions Guidelines General Criteria for Admission  Scores of either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) are required.  To be eligible, students with a given grade point average must present the corresponding ACT composite or SAT composite score. Conversely students with a given ACT composite or SAT total score must present the corresponding GPA to be eligible. In other words, the lower the GPA - the higher the test score required.  Grade point averages are based on work completed in the last three years of high school, exclusive of physical education and military science. Students with a 3.0 or higher GPA are eligible with any score on the entrance examination. Students earning a GPA below 2.0 are not eligible for admission.  CSU subject requirements are the same as UC Requirements.

California State University Website for current information and application. www.csumentor.edu

SJBHS CEEB School Code: 050260

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National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Approved Core Coursework History/Social Studies - (a)  Modern World History  AP World History  AP Human Geography  U.S. History  AP U.S. History  Civics  Economics  Psychology  AP American Government and Politics  AP Comparative Government and Politics

 

AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC

Lab Science – (d)  Biology  Biology Honors  Environmental Science  Chemistry and Lab  Chemistry Honors  Anatomy & Physiology  AP Biology  AP Chemistry  Physics and Lab  AP Physics 1  AP Physics 2

English – (b)  Composition/World Literature I  Composition/World Literature I Honors  Composition/World Literature II  Composition/World Literature II Honors  American Literature/Composition  AP English Language  British Literature/Composition  AP English Literature  Journalism  Public Speaking

Additional Core  Mandarin I  Mandarin II  Mandarin III  AP Chinese Language & Culture  French I  French II  French III  AP Japanese Language & Culture  Spanish I  Spanish I for Heritage Speakers  Spanish II  Spanish II for Heritage Speakers  Spanish III  Spanish III Honors  AP Spanish Language  AP Spanish Literature

Mathematics – (c)  Algebra I  Geometry  Geometry Honors  Algebra II  Algebra II/Trigonometry Honors  Trigonometry  Elementary Statistics  Pre-Calculus  Pre-Calculus Honors

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NCAA Initial – Eligibility Requirements Division I Core Course Requirement: (16)  Initial full-time collegiate enrollment before August 1, 2016. o 4 years of English o 3 years of Math (Algebra I or higher) o 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered) o 1 year of additional English, math or natural/physical science o 2 years of social science o 4 years of additional courses (any area above, foreign language) Test Scores: (ACT/SAT)  Students must present a corresponding test score and core-course GPA on the sliding scale: o http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/eligibility_center/Quick_Reference_Sheet.pdf  SAT: critical reading and math sections o Best sub score from each section is used to determine the SAT combined score for initial eligibility.  ACT: English, math, reading, and science sections. o Best sub score from each section is used to determine the ACT sum score for initial eligibility.  All ACT and SAT attempts before initial full-time collegiate enrollment may be used for initial eligibility.  Enter 9999 during ACT or SAT registration to ensure the testing agency reports your score directly to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Test scores on transcripts will not be used. Core Grade-Point Average  Only core courses that appear on the high school’s List of NCAAA courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center’s website: www.eligibilitycenter.org will be used to calculate core-course GPA.  Initial full-time collegiate enrollment before August 1, 2016 o Students must present a corresponding test score (ACT sum score or SAT combined score) and corecourse GPA (minimum 2.0) on Sliding Scale A: http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/eligibility_center/Quick_Reference_Sheet.pdf  Core-course GPA is calculated using the best 16 core courses that meet subject-area requirements

Division II Core Course Requirement: (16)  Initial full-time collegiate enrollment before August 1, 2016. o 3 years of English o 2 years of Math (Algebra I or higher) o 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered) o 3 year of additional English, math or natural/physical science o 2 years of social science o 4 years of additional courses (any area above, foreign language) Test Scores: (ACT/SAT)  Students must earn a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68.  SAT: critical reading and math sections o Best sub score from each section is used to determine the SAT combined score for initial eligibility.  ACT: English, math, reading, and science sections. o Best sub score from each section is used to determine the ACT sum score for initial eligibility.  Enter 9999 during ACT or SAT registration to ensure the testing agency reports your score directly to the NCAA 13


Eligibility Center. Test scores on transcripts will not be used. Core Grade-Point Average  Only core courses that appear on the high school’s List of NCAAA courses on the NCAA Eligibility Center’s website: www.eligibilitycenter.org will be used to calculate core-course GPA.  Minimum 2.000 grade point average.  Core-course GPA is calculated using the best 16 core courses that meet subject-area requirements

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Department Coursework The St. John Bosco coursework described below is comprehensive, rigorous, and college preparatory. Every course offered in the program of studies has been designed, reviewed, and aligned with national and state learning standards and/or frameworks. Course grade level appropriateness and A-G categories are denoted within the parenthesis following the course title.

English EN100 Composition and World Literature I

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CSU, UC (b)

This course is designed to introduce students to literature from various cultures, and to enhance and improve their writing abilities through various types of written assignments. Through these written assignments, projects, and various activities, students also develop research, listening, and speaking skills. The literature portion of the course reviews primary elements of literature and poetry, and examines the function of these elements within various literary works, while a l s o incorporating relevant art, music, and philosophical ideas. In terms of writing, students will improve and develop their skills in writing narratives, multi-draft compositions, expository compositions, journals, letters, and autobiographical compositions. This course provides a foundation for the English curriculum that students will encounter in their remaining years at St. John Bosco High School. EN105 Composition and World Literature I (Honors)

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CSU, UC (b)

This course is designed to introduce students to literature from various cultures, and to enhance and improve their writing abilities through various types of written assignments. Through these written assignments, projects, and various activities, students also develop research, listening, and speaking skills. The literature portion of the course reviews primary elements of literature and poetry, and examines the function of these elements within various literary works, while a l s o incorporating relevant art, music, and philosophical ideas. In terms of writing, students w i l l improve and develop their skills in writing narratives, multi-draft compositions, expository compositions, journals, letters, and autobiographical compositions. This course provides a foundation for the English curriculum that students will encounter in their remaining years at SJBHS. (Prerequisite: Standardized Test Scores above the 60 percentile) EN150 University Prep

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University Prep is an elective course that offers ninth graders some important keys to high school success. This course will offer students instruction in organizational strategies, goal setting and time management techniques. It will introduce freshmen to the high school experience focusing traditions, activities, and services available. Students will work on high school planning, and explore post-secondary career options. Students will have one-on-one conference time with the teacher throughout the semester and opportunities to engage in scholarship. EN200 Composition and World Literature II

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CSU, UC (b)

This course continues to focus on multiculturalism as begun in the freshman year as well as on the multiplicity of social and historical issues addressed in the literature. Encompassed within the teaching of the various core novels, plays, short stories, and poetry is a concentration on writing and the writing process. Within the teaching of the writing process is the development of vocabulary including literary terms, grammar usage, and words from the literature itself. Also present is a continued focus on the development of speaking and listening skills with an emphasis on the use of visual aids and technological tools.(Prerequisite: Successful completion of Composition and World Literature I)

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EN205 Composition and World Literature II (Honors)

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CSU, UC (b)

Composition and World Literature II Honors continues to focus on multiculturalism through World Literature begun in the World Literature and Composition I, freshmen year. The course also seeks to address the multiplicity of social issues addressed in literature. Encompassed within the teaching of the various core novels, short stories, and poetry is a concentration on intensive writing and the writing process. Within the teaching of the writing process is the intense development of vocabulary including literary terms, grammar usage, and words from the literature itself. A quality, contemporary and educational vocabulary is established. In this course, language skills are reinforced in terms of grammar, mechanics, and syntax. The course continues to focus on the development of oral communication with an emphasis on the use of visual aids and electronic media. Self-assessment continues to be an important focus of the course. (Prerequisite: Minimum B in Comp/World Lit I Honors or Minimum A in Comp/World Lit I). EN300 American Literature/Composition

11

CSU, UC (b)

Refines and continues building on the basic skills presented in the ninth and tenth grades. Its primary focus is a thematic survey of American literature. Through a variety of assessments, the student analyzes and synthesizes the evolution of the American character and the American Dream. Student communication skills are further enhanced through the development of personal, analytical and creative writing. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Comp/World Lit I and II). EN3000 AP English Language and Composition

11

CSU, UC (b)

An alternative for the 11th grade student, it trains the student to be a skilled reader of prose and poetry written during various historical and literary epochs—though its primary focus is the American character and the American Dream. By taking the course, the student may then challenge himself in the AP exam in May for the College Board. (Prerequisite: Minimum A in Comp/World Lit II, Minimum B in Comp/World II Honors.) EN400 British Literature and Composition

12

CSU, UC (b)

This course continues to refine and develop those skills reintroduced and emphasized during the previous years. It surveys a core of British literature to serve as a summation and emphasis of a l l literary concepts from the ninth, tenth, and eleventh grades. The various activities develop students’ research and writing skills, as well as their listening and speaking skills. The literature portion of the class introduces the students to canonical and contemporary British literature, incorporating relevant art, music, and philosophical ideas. This course does give a sense of finality to the scope and sequence of the English curriculum, yet it also fosters a life-long love of literature and learning. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Comp/World Lit I and II and either American Literature or AP English Language and Composition). EN4000 AP English Literature and Composition

12

CSU, UC (b)

An alternative for those seniors who meet the minimum requirements set by the department and who wish to challenge themselves with the taking of the AP exam in May of the senior year. The course emphasizes all aspects of the English language. All literature serves as a source as the students read through the genre of the literary world. (Prerequisite: Minimum A American Literature or Minimum B in AP English Language.) EN360 Journalism

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (g)

This is a semester course that presents the fundamentals of journalism and journalistic writing. It introduces the differing styles of communication that characterize the newspaper, magazine, television, and advertising worlds. This course also serves as a prerequisite for joining the school’s newspaper staff. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Comp/World Lit II or Comp/World Lit II Honors.) 16


EN350 Speech & Debate

10, 11, 12

S

This course is for students interested in improving expository writing skills, communicative skills and public speaking skills. The course is designed to present the students with a set of systematic strategies to increase the ability to react critically, form arguments and influence others to see arguments from a different point of view. This course will also teach students how to obtain, compile and present useful (both in written and spoken formats) and offer critical opinions based on those evaluations. (Prerequisite: Successful completion of Comp/World Lit I).

17


Kinesiology KN100 Health

9, 10, 11, 12

S

This is a semester long course designed to bring comprehensive health awareness to the student. The course will cover seven major content areas of health education. Students will work individually and cooperatively to explore, analyze, and solve health related problems and issues. Positive lifelong health habits will be encouraged by development of conceptual knowledge and practical skills. KN110 Strength and Conditioning

10, 11, 12

S

This course provides a framework of knowledge in athletic conditioning. It demonstrates an examination of exercise technique, program design, periodization, and the development of bio-motor abilities. Instruction methods for speed, agility, flexibility, plyometrics, and Olympic lifting are also included. (Prerequisite: None.) SPORTS MEDICINE COURSEWORK SM150 Introduction to Kinesiology

9

S

Kinesiology is the study of human movement and the associated responses and adaptations. In this context, a kinesiologist must understand the scientific basis underlying exercise-induced biomechanical and physiological responses. Although kinesiology professionals often work in sports medicine facilities, the field of kinesiology is quite broad. Depending upon one’s area of interest, a kinesiology major might study: (1) how to develop and lead exercise programs for diverse populations; (2) how organ systems work at the cellular level; or (3) how to improve biomechanical efficiency in tasks of everyday living. SM160 Sports Nutrition and Performance

9

S

The basic principles of human nutrition are investigated, emphasizing the nutrients, food sources, and their utilization in the body for growth and health throughout life. This course also assesses contemporary nutrition issues. 
Students will also study functions, digestion/absorption, interrelationships, cellular metabolism of the macronutrients; determination of nutrient requirements, assessment of nutritional status, fluid balance and acid base balance during health exercise. SM250 Introduction to Sports Medicine

10

CSU, UC (g) S

Sports Medicine is a program designed for students interested in fields such as athletic training, physical therapy, medicine, fitness, physiology of exercise, kinesiology, nutrition, and other sports medicine related fields. The program includes class work and practical hands-on application. This class will introduce basic skills to include: anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, hygiene, nutrition, taping, bracing, emergency procedure, conditioning, injury prevention, injury evaluation, rehabilitative procedures and incorporate practice and game observations. SM 260 Sports Anatomy and Movement (Muscular and Skeletal Functions) 10

S

This course is designed to understand the movement in the muscular and skeletal systems. Information involving the structure and function of the human body is discussed in lecture and the laboratory. Anatomy and Physiology is designed to help meet the needs of students preparing for their field work practicum. This course builds upon the previous Sports Medicine coursework and outlines the major muscular and skeletal functions used in the fourteen sport offerings in the school as well as the major injuries associated.

18


SPORTS MEDICINE COURSEWORK IN PROGRESS Sports Enhancement and Behavior A guide for those who are interested in exploring opportunities in sport and exercise psychology. A survey of the foundational psychological theories, principles, and studies related to athletics, athletics, and the sporting industry. Skills and techniques addressed include imagery training, intensity regulation, and goal setting, along with population-specific advice. (One semester Course) American Athletics (History of Sports) This course examines the place sports hold in American life since the mid nineteenth century. Focuses on sports as a reflection of our social, political, and economic make up and its ability to effect and shape our institutions. Particular attention will be given to social class, race and ethnicity, gender, community, technology, and commercialization and the media. (One Semester) Advanced Sports Medicine (Field Work) Advanced Sports Medicine is designed for students to assist in the fields of Athletic Training, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Sports Performance Clinic, Chiropractors, and Rehabilitation on and off campus under the supervision of a professional. Must have approval from department chair and principal before taking course. (One or Two semesters)

19


Mathematics MA100 Algebra 1

9

CSU, UC (c)

This is a course in elementary algebra for the average and above average student. The subject covers an in depth study of the topics of number, linear equations and inequalities of one and two variables, polynomials and polynomial equations, and problem solving. (Prerequisite: None) MA200 Geometry

9, 10

CSU, UC (c)

A course in Euclidean Geometry for the average to above average student. It provides a careful in depth study of the principles of geometry covering the topics of: parallel lines, congruency, similarity, polygons, circles, constructions, area, volume, and coordinate geometry. (Prereq: Minimum of a "C" in Algebra 1. For incoming 9th Graders, a HSPT Score between 6 and 8 and a Geometry Readiness Score of 70% or better.) MA205 Geometry (Honors)

9, 10

CSU, UC (c)

The Honors Geometry course is a comprehensive look at the study of geometric concepts including the basic elements of geometry, proofs, parallel and perpendicular lines, the coordinate plane, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles, trigonometry, congruence and similarity, surface area, volume and transformations. This class will also include a look into some Algebra concepts as well as a study of conics. (Prerequisite: For incoming 9th graders: Stanine score of 7-9 on the Placement Test and MDTP Geometry Readiness score of 90% or better; For 10th graders: Averaged Algebra 1 grade on an A for the entire year and SJBHS Algebra 1 teacher recommendation.) MA300 Algebra 2

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (c)

A continuation of the study of algebra for the average and above average student with a detailed focus on its structure. The topics covered will include: number, linear systems, polynomial equations, relations, functions conic sections, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences, series and the counting principle. (Prereq: Minimum of a “C� in Geometry or Honors Geometry. For incoming 9th Graders, a HSPT Score between 4 and 9 and a Second Year Algebra Readiness Score of 70% or better.) MA305 Algebra 2 with Trigonometry (Honors)

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (c)

This course is designed for the above average student in mathematics. It is a preparation for the study of Precalculus Honors. It covers all of the major topics of Algebra 2 along with a full course of Trigonometry. (Prerequisite: A grade in Geometry or B or better in Geometry Honors) MA450 Elementary Statistics

11, 12

CSU, UC (c)

An overview of the science of statistical estimation with a focus on a basic understanding of fundamental statistical measures, methods of quantifying and classifying data, current applications, and interpretation of the validity of statistical inference. (Prerequisite: C or better in Algebra 2)

20


MA460 Pre-Calculus

11, 12

CSU, UC (c)

This is a course for the above average student in mathematics. The course provides a study of advanced algebra, trigonometry and an introduction to differential and integral calculus. It is a preparation for a comprehensive study of calculus. (Prerequisite: Restricted to a “B” or better in Algebra 2, or department recommendation) MA465 Pre-Calculus (Honors)

11, 12

CSU, UC (c)

A course designed for the superior student in mathematics. It is a preparation for the study of AP Calculus (BC). The course will review and enhance the study of: elementary functions, graphing, modeling, exponential and logarithmic functions and trigonometry, limits, continuity and will then cover the major concepts and applications of differential calculus and an introduction to integral calculus. (Prerequisite: A minimum of “B” in Algebra 2 with Trigonometry (Honors) or A minimum “B” in Algebra 2 with a minimum “B” in a semester of Trigonometry) MA4500 AP Calculus (AB)

11, 12

CSU, UC (c)

This is a course for the superior mathematics student. It is a full-year college course in the theory, application and problem solving of the differential and integral calculus restricted to one variable. Students in this course take the AP Exam in May with the possibility of receiving college credit and/or placement. (Prerequisite: “A” in Pre-Calculus and or “B” in Honors PreCalculus, and Department Chair recommendation) MA4600 AP Calculus (BC)

12

CSU, UC (c)

This course is a continuation of the Calculus series. It is a very rigorous course with differential and integral calculus extended to vectors, parametric equations, sequence, series and differential equations. (Prerequisite: Restricted to a “B” in AP Calculus AB, and Department Chair recommendation)

21


Religious Studies RS100 The Revelation of Jesus Christ in Scripture

9

S

The purpose of this course is to give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible they will come to encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. In the course they will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. If they have not been taught this earlier, they will learn how to read the Bible, and will become familiar with the major sections of the Bible and the books included in each section. The students will pay particular attention to the Gospels where they may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally. [One Semester: Fall] (Prerequisite: None.) RS110 Who is Jesus Christ? (Christology I)

9

S

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the Mystery of Jesus Christ, the Living Word of God, and the second Person of the Blessed Trinity. In this course students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate revelation to us from God. In learning about who he is, the students will also learn who he calls them to be. [One Semester: Spring] (Prerequisite: None.) RS200 The Mission of Jesus Christ (The Paschal Mystery) (Christology II)

10

S

The purpose of this course is to help students understand all the God has done for us through his Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study, students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with him, which is accomplished through the Redemption Christ won for us. Students will learn that they share in this Redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. They will also be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Christ and what life as a disciple entails. [One Semester: Fall] (Prerequisite: None.) RS210 Ecclesiology, Sacraments, and Liturgy

10

S

The purpose of this course is to help students understand that in and through the Church they encounter the Living Jesus Christ. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by him through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today. This Body has both Divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn not so much about events in the life of the Church, but about the sacred nature of the Church. Students will also understand that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the Sacraments, and especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the Sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life. [One Semester: Spring] (Prerequisite: None.) RS300 Life in Jesus Christ (Morality and Ethics)

11

S

The purpose of this course is to help students understand the Catholic believe that it is through Christ that they can fully live out God’s plans for their lives. Students are to learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples. RS310 World Religions

11, 12

S CSU, UC (g)

This course exposes students to the philosophical, ideological, and cultural frameworks in the world’s religions. Students will identify the commonalities and differences in the world’s religions, especially within the context of the Catholic faith. RS400 Christian Vocations

12

22

S


This course offers student’s opportunities to begin to apply what they have come to believe as their vocation as a Christian. The course is designed to be a “practical discipleship” for young men living in the United States in the 21st century. Through the reflection on real life choices, students are able to begin to prayerfully reflect on their personal gifts and unique call by God. Special attention will be given to surveying the various life vocations within the Church: single life, married life, religious life and priestly life. The goal of the course is to help students understand and have some methods of coping with the opportunities, challenges, and developmental tasks facing young adults today. [One Semester] (Prerequisite: None.) RS410 Church History

12

S

(ELECTIVE): This course is an overview of the history of Western Christianity. Special attention will be paid to the 1st century church, the key events of the 300’s, the Great Schism, the high Middle Ages and Reformation, through modern times, including both Vatican Councils and the Church today. [One Semester] (Prerequisite: None.) RS430 Sacred Scripture

12

S

(ELECTIVE): Social teaching is essential to the Catholic Faith. Rooted in the covenant between God and his Chosen People and in the teaching of Hebrew prophets who announced God’s special love for the poor, Catholic social teaching is built on the life and words of Jesus Christ. The Lord came to preach glad tidings to the poor and to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind (Lk.4:18-19). He identified with the poor and marginalized and taught his followers to respond to “these least ones” (Mt. 25:45). This course seeks to form young people who not only know how the Scriptures and Catholic social teaching call them to justice, but who possess the ability and desire to respond to that call in their daily lives. In order to achieve that goal, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching organizes the Church’s social teaching around seven themes: [One Semester] (Prerequisite: None.)

23


Science SC100 Biology

9

CSU, UC (d)

This college preparatory course utilizes lecture, film, laboratory activity, field excursions, and individualized study. It is an in depth analysis of cellular structure and function, human anatomy, plant physiology and anatomy, ecological interactions, evolution, and the multiple kingdoms. (Prerequisite: None.) SC105 Biology (Honors)

9

CSU, UC (d)

This course presents an in-depth, detailed, fast-paced and comprehensive sequence of the fundamental concepts in Biology including (but not limited to): molecular and cellular biology; genetics; evolution; animal and plant diversity; animal and plant anatomy/physiology; and behavioral biology. Additionally, the lab component of this course introduces proper techniques and procedures in conjunction with various labs such as: dissections, microscopes, fieldwork, and real-world applications of biology. Both the lecture and lab components emphasize critical thinking, and self-motivated, independent research and learning. (Prerequisite: English Stanine of 6) SC200 Environmental Science

10

CSU, UC (d)

Environmental Science introduces students to the biological and physical systems of Earth. The course is a lab based class designed to inquire and investigate the the workings of Earth's many natural systems as well as how these systems are impacted and affected by human activity. Students will develop a understanding about the environment and how each Earth system is interconnected. The students will examine the dependence and influence humanity has with the environment. Students will explore and design solutions to develop sustainable systems of Earth's many resources. An emphasis will be placed on making informed and ethical decisions concerning environmental issues in today's world. (Prerequisite: Completion of Biology.) SC210 Chemistry and Lab

10

CSU, UC (d)

This college preparatory course covers eleven major conceptual sections. These include: classification and properties of matter, atomic theory, structure, and electron arrangements, quantitative composition of compounds, types of chemical reactions and stoichiometric analysis, types of chemical bonds and molecular shapes, the Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases, solution concentrations and pH, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and an introduction to organic chemistry. (Prerequisite: Completion of Biology with a minimum grade of "C") SC215 Chemistry (Honors)

10

CSU, UC (d)

Chemistry Honors is a year-long college preparatory course designed for the motivated student. The major conceptual sections covered in this course are: classification and properties of matter, atomic theory, structure, and electron arrangements, qualitative composition of compounds, types of chemical reactions and stoichiometric analysis, types of chemical bonds and molecular shapes, the Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases, solution concentrations and pH, acids and bases, oxidation and reduction, and an introduction to both organic chemistry and biochemistry. Students will gain knowledge that will be supplemented with hands-on labs and completion of lab reports. The laboratory component comprises approximately 20% of this course. (Prerequisite: Minimum Grade of “B” in Honors Biology, or minimum grade of “A” in Biology)

24


SC360 Physics and Lab

11, 12

CSU, UC (d)

This college preparatory course utilizes lecture, laboratory and project activities to provide a conceptual and mathematical approach to understanding Physics. Major topics include motion, forces, vectors; static equilibrium; work, energy and momentum; kinetic theory, heat, thermodynamics; vibrations, simple harmonic motion, waves, sound; electricity and magnetism; and light and optics. Problem solving / critical thinking skills are fundamental to the course. (Prerequisite: minimum of “C” in Chemistry) SC3500 AP Biology

11, 12

CSU, UC (d)

This college level course utilizes lecture and laboratory activity to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Examination following the College Board design. (Prerequisite: Minimum grades of “B” in Biology, “B” in Chemistry.) SC3600 AP Chemistry

11, 12

CSU, UC (d)

This yearlong Advanced Placement course is an extensive, in-depth analysis of the following areas of Chemistry; fundamental particles or matter, the mole concept and its relationships in chemical reactions, gases, thermochemistry, atomic structure, basic and advanced concepts in chemical bonding, chemical forces and states of matter, and chemical kinetics and equilibrium. These concepts are introduced and reinforced through lectures as well as lab activities. The emphasis throughout the year is to prepare the student for the Advanced Placement Examination following the College Board design. (Prerequisite: A minimum grade of “B” in Honors Chemistry or minimum grade of A in Chemistry with Teacher Recommendation) SC4500 AP Physics 1

11, 12

CSU, UC (d)

This yearlong Advanced Placement course provides a systematic introduction to the main principles of physics and emphasizes the development of problem solving ability. It is a science elective designed for the 12th grade student. Five major conceptual sections are covered in this course: mechanics, fluid mechanics and thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. (Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Mathematics class higher than Algebra 2; minimum of “B” in Chemistry; and Department Chair approval) SC4600 AP Physics 2

12

CSU, UC (d)

Advanced Placement (AP) Physics 2 is offered at our school as the second year of a two year sequence following AP Physics 1. AP Physics 2 is a college-level course that uses advanced algebra skills and some calculus based on a college-level text. Five major conceptual sections are covered in this course: fluids, thermodynamics, electricity and magnesium, optics, and modern physics. (Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus; minimum of “B” in AP Physics)

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY COURSEWORK EG150 Introduction to Engineering Design

9

CSU, UC (g)

Designed for 9th or 10th grade students, the major focus of IED is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

25


EG250 Principles of Engineering

10

CSU, UC (g)

Designed for 10th or 11th grade students, this survey course exposes students to major concepts they’ll encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. They develop problem- solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions. EG350 Applied Engineering

11

CSU, UC (g)

This course builds on the major concepts and skills learned in Introduction to Engineering Design (9th grade) and Principles of Engineering (10th grade). Through the use of design problems students, working in design teams, will be challenged to a deeper level of understanding and application of engineering topics in the areas of energy and power, control systems, and structures and materials. In addition, students will continue using 3D modeling, programming language, and data collection software to assist them in developing a design solution. Lastly, following the engineering design process, design problem solutions will be presented to a panel comprised of peers, faculty, and members of the professional community. EG450 Engineering Capstone

12

CSU, UC (g)

In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. Finally, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel. This course is appropriate for 12th grade students. BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE COURSEWORK BS150 Introduction to Health and Science Technology

9

CSU, UC (g) S

The Introduction to Health Science Technology course curriculum is a rigorous, entry-level course designed to provide an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, environmental, and information systems of the health care industry. The course focuses on health careers, exploration, leadership development, ethical and legal responsibilities, the history of health care, and the economics of health care. BS160 Medical Ethics

9

CSU, UC (g) S

Medical Ethics is a course designed to study ethics as practices in the health care setting. This course develops philosophical knowledge centered on ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, and skills. Students will be introduced to several traditional moral theories, and use health care settings scenarios as examples for analysis. This course will progress through a variety of ethical challenges that health care professionals face throughout their careers. BS250 Cell and Molecular Biology

10

CSU, UC (g)

Cell and Molecular Biology focuses on the physiological, developmental, cellular, molecular, and environmental factors responsible for the initiation and progression of human disease. Approaches include; the regulation of gene expression, DNA repair, mitochondrial stability, cell cycle control, and signal transduction pathways in normal and diseased tissue with particular emphasis on cardiovascular control, and signal transduction pathways in normal and diseased tissue with particular emphasis on cardiovascular control, cardiovascular disease, cancer, angiogenesis, and the application of stem cells for regenerative 26


medicine. BS350A Anatomy and Physiology

11

CSU, UC (d)

This course provides students with the fundamental concepts in human anatomy and physiology. Information involving the structure and function of the human body is discussed in lecture and the laboratory. Anatomy and Physiology is designed to help meet the needs of students preparing for higher education and also for a more in-depth personal understanding of health and fitness. BIOMEDICAL SCIENCE COURSEWORK IN PROGRESS Biochemical Genetics Biochemical Genetics focuses on the metabolic pathways as well as on the chemical structure and the functions, replication, and mutations of the molecules involved in the transmission of genetic information, namely DNA and RNA. This course will extensively examine the arrangement of genes on DNA, the replication of DNA, the transcription of DNA into RNA, and the translation of RNA into proteins. Capstone Students will complete at least 25 hours of field work observations in a hospital or related medical facility. They will also design and facilitate a seminar based on research conducted during their final year in the program under the direction of a medical professional.

27


Social Science SS200 Modern World History

10

CSU, UC (a)

This is a study of the major ideas, events and turning points in the shaping of the modern world. Modern World History focuses on world developments since the late 18th century. Among the periods covered are the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, Political Revolutions, Imperialism, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and Contemporary Events. Critical thinking skills will be developed through analysis of events, cause and effect relationships, and prediction of consequences. Specific learning tools incorporate writing methods, public speaking, use of technology and literature. (Prerequisite: Required of all 10th graders.) SS2000 AP World History

10

CSU, UC (a)

The purpose of the Advanced Placement World History course is to use relevant factual knowledge taken from primary and secondary sources with high-order thinking skills to acquire a greater understanding of the development of global processes, from ancient times to the present day. The course emphasizes the character of change and continuity in world structures and their impacts. Furthermore, this study will evaluate the interchange of major societies in the global community and the results of that interplay. Throughout the duration of this course, the instruction lends itself to chronological periodization as well as thematic perspective. Students in this course take the AP Exam in May with the possibility of receiving college credit or placement. (Prerequisite: Minimum of “A” in Comp/World Lit I, or minimum “B” in Honors Comp/World Lit I) SS2500 AP Human Geography

10

CSU, UC (a)

The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. Students will develop skills that enable them to use and think about maps and spatial data, understand and interpret the implications of associations among phenomena in places, and recognize and interpret at different scales the relationships among patterns and processes. The following topics will be covered in the course: Geography’s nature and perspectives, population, cultural patterns and processes, political organization of space, agricultural and rural land use, industrialization and economic development, and cities and urban land use. (Prerequisite: Minimum of “A” in Comp/World Lit I, or minimum “B” in Honors Comp/World Lit I) SS300 United States History

11

CSU, UC (a)

This survey course consists primarily of readings in and lectures on the history of the United States. Course will trace the development of the United States from 1492 to the present day, using the traditional political-military approach as well as a social-cultural perspective. Particular emphasis will be on events of the twentieth century, although Exploration and Colonization, Nationalism and Sectionalism, and Industrialization and Expansion will be reviewed appropriately. Students will develop practical familiarity with the geography of the nation, vocabulary appropriate to the study of American history, and understanding of the major historical periods, individuals, movements, and ideas that have contributed to the creation of the American society. Note taking, essay writing, and critical synthesis will be emphasized. (Prerequisite: Required of all 11th graders not enrolled in AP U.S. History.) SS3000 AP United States History

11

CSU, UC (a)

An accelerated lecture course intended to introduce students to college-level work and expectations. Familiarizes students with the significant events and issues of American history and develops the process of critical analysis necessary to interpret these facts. The course covers the major historical periods in United States history from 1492 to the present, and students 28


will be expected to grasp basic factual knowledge and related themes. In addition, students will be exposed to historical debate on selected issues, focusing on areas of disagreement among historians. Critical thinking and essay writing skills will be strengthened throughout this challenging course. Participants may take the Advanced Placement Exam in May for college credit. (Prerequisite: Minimum “B” in AP World History, or minimum “A” in World History) SS400 Civics

12

CSU, UC (a) S

This course establishes the connection between the basic concepts of American constitutional government and the practical and philosophical applications of democratic participatory citizenship. Students are expected to master various theories of government, the foundations of the United States Constitution, the three-branch system of government, and citizen responsibilities. Both historical and current issues and controversies play a major role in the course and are integrated into the subject matter. Participation and critical thinking are emphasized. Students are encouraged to become informed citizens and to take an active role in the political process. [One Semester] (Prerequisite: Required of all 12th graders not enrolled in AP American Government.) SS4000 AP U.S. Government and Politics

12

CSU, UC (a)

The overall goal of this college-level course is to develop an understanding of the American political system through an exploration of its philosophy, traditions, values, and Constitutional framework. Students will examine the organization, powers, and processes of the Congress, the Presidency, and Judiciary as they function in the political system. The problems of bureaucracy, faction, interest-group politics, and minority rights will also be explored. Students will write frequently and critically on a variety of topics related to the course and will have the opportunity to take the nationally administered Advanced Placement Exam in American Government for college placement or credit in May. (Prerequisite: Minimum “B” in AP US History, or minimum “A” in US History) SS4500 AP Comparative Politics and Government

12

CSU, UC (a)

Advanced Placement Comparative Government is the study of governmental systems throughout the world with specific emphasis on classification and identification of similar trends in different political systems. The course is an overview of the field of comparative government combined with six different government specific case studies: United Kingdom, Russia, China, Mexico, Iran, and Nigeria. The material is deigned and organized with ultimate goal of success of Advanced Placement examination in May. Reading assignments and required projects are listed in the syllabus. In addition to the reading assignments, students will be required to respond in class to free response type questions similar in format to those on the AP Exam. Students will have five unit tests that will be multiple choice and essay format. (Prerequisite: Minimum “B” in AP US History, or minimum “A” in US History) SS410 Economics

12

CSU, UC (g)

S

This course is an introduction to the study of economics and economic systems prevalent in our world today. Special focus is on the economy of the United States - its structure, problems, and prospects. Course will cover economic foundations, alternative systems, microeconomics and macroeconomics, and aspects of the international economy. Students are expected to assimilate basic economic concepts, and to apply them in realistic situations. Various hands-on experiences may be provided to facilitate student understanding and participation, including the reading of case studies, playing the Stock Market, creating a budget, guest speakers, and current events applicable to the subject matter. Students must utilize mature thinking and writing processes in this course. [One Semester] (Prerequisite: Required of all 12th graders not enrolled in AP American Government.)

29


SS350 Psychology

11,12

CSU, UC (g)

S

Students are introduced to psychology, with a focus on the scientific study of human development, learning, motivation, and personality. Areas of specific study, including methods, growth and development, mental health, behavioral disorders, and social psychology, build on the knowledge and experience students have acquired in their own lives. Major contributors to the field of psychology are studied, including Freud, Maslow, Pavlov, Erikson, and Skinner. Students will have the opportunity to apply psychological perspective to personal experiences and, thus, to “know thyself.� Activities may include meditation, temperament sorters, mnemonics, hemisphere dominance inventory, and creativity quotient puzzles. Upper-division reading, writing, and thinking processes must be utilized in this course. [One Semester] (Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing) SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSEWORK SE150 Entrepreneurship in the Classroom

9

CSU, UC (g)

Designed and implemented by the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania faculty, with guidance from a set of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education advisors, the curriculum provides students with hands-on, inquirybased methods to critically analyze core business concepts. The entrepreneurship curriculum utilizes mathematics to teach students learn to think critically as owners, developers, and entrepreneurs, by learning how to plan and make long-term business decisions. The curriculum includes developing business ideas, learning the competitive environment, sales and marketing, pricing strategies, operations and human resource management, cost analysis, budgeting and accounting, and presentation skills. The course emphasizes project-based learning and culminates in a formal business pitch that students make to school faculty, their peers, and other professional and business leaders. SE450 Financial Literacy

10

CSU, UC (c)

Designed and implemented by the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business faculty, with guidance from a set of UPenn Graduate School of Education advisors, the curriculum is designed to provide students with access to greater future wealth. Financial Literacy is a college preparatory, applied mathematics course integrated with key math content standards. The innovative finance curriculum utilizes mathematics to teach key life skills; students learn to think critically and plan for the long-term. The use of graphic analysis demonstrates to students the compounding effect of investing over forty years. The curriculum covers the importance of saving, strategies for generating and protecting greater wealth, as well as fundamental career skills including negotiations and professionalism. The course effectively fuses experiential and project based learning with core mathematics content and instruction. SE250 Social Entrepreneurship

11, 12

CSU, UC (g)

Social entrepreneurship is recognized as encompassing a wide range of activities: enterprising individuals devoted to making a difference; social purpose business ventures dedicated to adding for-profit motivations to the nonprofit sector; new types of philanthropists supporting venture capital-like 'investment' portfolios; and nonprofit organizations that are reinventing themselves by drawing on lessons learned from the business world. This course explores entrepreneurship as a mechanism for social change, economic development, and community wealth creation. Specifically, we examine the concepts and practice of social entrepreneurship, through reading and project assignments, class discussions, cases, and guest speakers.

30


SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP COURSEWORK IN PROGRESS Economic Policy in Society This course is an introduction to the principles of social economics and policy. The course will expose students to concepts such as supply and demand, markets, national income, international trade, economic development, the economics of social issues, and the relationship between power and markets. Financial Management This course is designed to introduce students to concepts integral to understanding the financial operations of not-for-profit, non-governmental organizations - NGOs. Students examine corporate governance structures and explore, from a financial perspective, how these organizations achieve socially responsible agenda. Students will gain an understanding of the broader financial realm of socially responsible organizations and utilizing and managing money for social causes. Organizational Leadership & Management This introduction course will examine the theory and practice of leadership and decision-making in the nonprofit sector. Students will be exposed to core classic and contemporary theories on leadership, management, governance and organizational effectiveness of nonprofit organizations. This course will also focus on the effective management of human resources during the process of change. It emphasizes change management as a tool for survival, growth, increased productivity and conflict management in the complex and volatile business environment of today and the future. Change in an international environment also is discussed.

31


Visual and Performing Arts VP100 Exploring Art

9

CSU, UC (f)

This yearlong course is intended to be an introduction to communication by drawing, working with black, white, and color using the Elements and Principles of Design. Searching and planning for ideas, styles, different drawing media (oil pastels, pastels, charcoal, graphite pencil, chalk and paints) and different techniques. The students will explore the options of composition, the light and shadows, and analyzing and critiquing completed work. A paper is required on artist styles. (Prerequisite: None) VP110 Theater Arts

9

CSU, UC (f)

A yearlong course designed to train students in the fundamental skills of acting and theatrical production. Students will study and learn the tools of an actor (mind, body and voice) and apply these tools to a range of in-class performances. In addition, students will gain an understanding of how writers, performers, and designers collaborate to produce a theatrical production. Theater history, how the human experience has been represented on stage throughout the centuries, will also be explored. (Prerequisite: None) VP120 Concert Band

9

CSU, UC (f)

Students will discover the world of music through hands-on work with concert band instruments. Musical terminology, rhythmic figures and reading skills will be learned to further enhance this experience. Concert Band is considered a performance group. Instruments being offered are Flute, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, Horn, Trombone, Baritone, Tuba, Electric Bass, Mallet Percussion and combined percussion. (Prerequisite: None) VP130 Animation

9

CSU, UC (f)

This course will cover the history, theories, and creation process of 2D animation. All phases of production will be covered and will explore the art of storytelling and communicating artistic ideas through the use of traditional and computer animation techniques. (Prerequisite: None) VP270 Advanced Band

9, 10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (f)

Advanced Band is yearlong course open to students with previous instrumental music experience and who already know how to read music. Students will participate in pep band, marching band and concert band performances. Students are required to attend private or semi-private sectionals/lessons on a regular basis. In addition, students will have individual opportunities to participate in optional events like Solo and Ensemble Contest, IMEA and the Conference Music Festival. Attending all full band performances is a course requirement. Members will also practice marching techniques and music to be used in performances at football games and parades. Members will be expected to attend rehearsals outside of regular class time. (Prerequisite: Open to students who: have successfully completed 9th Grade Concert Band with a “B�, and/or display equivalent competence on a band instrument through audition, and/or have successfully completed Instruments 2 the previous school year, and/or Band Director approval.) VP250 Drawing & Painting

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (f)

The intent of this course is to adhere to the National Core Arts Standards: Artistic Processes and Anchor Standards. Students will be creating artistic ideas and works, performing, presenting and producing their artistic ideas, responding through critical analysis, and connecting their artistic ideas to external contexts - societal, cultural and historical. Students develop not only their ability to draw and paint assigned subject matter, but more importantly, their powers of observation and interpretation. 32


They develop their skills in creative problem-solving, learning to turn "mistakes" into important opportunities for self-discovery and produce fine art that expresses their own unique visions. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in Exploring Art) VP350 Advanced Drawing

11, 12

CSU, UC (g) S

This course offers opportunities for the student-artist to further investigate observation and representation of form in space, figure drawing, and technical interpretation. This course further explores the medium of drawing and challenges the student to expand his creativity in form, idea, concept, materials and techniques. Mediums to be used: charcoal, pastel, colored pencils, and conte crayon. [One Semester] (Prerequisite: Minimum “B” in Drawing) VP360 Media Production

11, 12

CSU, UC (g) S

Media Production is designed for students interested in the digital arts. Students will focus on the three components of film making (pre- production, production, post-production). Students will be introduced to the creative elements and technical skills necessary to produce high quality media (script writing, story boards, camera work, lighting, sound, editing, etc.) that enables students to convey their own unique point of view. Students will alternate between roles as director, producer, editor and other various roles which will enhance the student’s understanding of how to create high quality media. (Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation) VP380 Ceramics

11, 12

CSU, UC (f)

Ceramics provides all students with an opportunity for creative expression and cognitive development in a nonverbal way. Students will learn about the history of ceramics and will create sculptural and functional pieces. Students will critique their work and plan out elaborate projects. Students will fully participate in every class and do their part in keeping a clean learning environment. Assessment is based on effort and improvement regardless of entry-level skills or personal aptitude. (Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in Exploring Art) VP370 Photography/Yearbook

11, 12

CSU, UC (f)

Students in Photography/Yearbook will develop and expand their knowledge and skills in producing both artistic and commercial photographs using digital DSLR cameras and equipment. Students will learn how to set the camera controls to create specific effects with the cameras, for example lighting control and emphasis. Students will learn digital imaging using Photoshop Elements to enable them to edit and manipulate digital images. Students will create page layouts, and write copy, captions and stories which will be combined with their photographs for special assignments and publishing materials including the high school yearbook. (Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation)

33


World Languages WL100 Spanish I

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

Provides practice in listening for comprehension and speaking. The student learns vocabulary related to home, school and community. The student will practice pronunciation, intonation and use of basic language structures in both oral and written exercises. The course develops appreciation for the customs and traditions of Spanish-speaking people both within the United States and abroad. (Prerequisite: None) WL110 Spanish I for Heritage Speakers

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

A year course designed to fulfill the needs of home speakers of Spanish. The course builds upon the knowledge; skills and experiences students bring to the Spanish classroom. Attention is given to the skills of reading, writing, grammar, listening and speaking. Students are given ample opportunities to express themselves in speech and writing. (Prerequisite: Students pass the Heritage speaker placement assessment.) WL200 Spanish II

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

Reviews the subject matter presented in Spanish I and provides further practice in comprehension, speaking, oral reading and writing. Language structures appropriate to this level are covered and correct pronunciation and intonation are further developed. The course further develops appreciation of the culture, customs, geography, history and traditions of Spanish speaking people throughout the world. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Spanish I) WL210 Spanish II for Heritage Speakers

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

This course provides further practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing for the speakers of Spanish. The meaningful and personalized activities motivate students to improve the quality of language they produce. The course focuses on reading development, formal grammar, general facility in composition and conversation. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Spanish I for Heritage Speakers or Department Chair approval.) WL350 Spanish III

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

Further develops aural-oral facility through more varied listening and speaking activities. Grammatical concepts are reviewed and analyzed, while vocabulary development and proficiency skills are fostered in conversational settings. In addition, there is appreciation of Hispanic culture. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Spanish II or “C” or better in Spanish II for Heritage Speakers and Department Chair approval.) WL355 Honors Spanish III

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Spanish Language and Culture class. The course includes expansion upon previously learned grammar as well as new advanced concepts, vocabulary study, and extensive use of all modalities in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational contexts. The continued study of culture from Spanish-speaking regions will occur through the use of literature and other authentic sources (music, audio sources, video, articles, etc). The class will be taught almost exclusively in the target language and students will be expected to use the target language as well. (Prerequisite: Grade of “A” or better in Spanish II or “B” or better in Spanish II for Heritage Speakers and Department Chair approval.) WL4500 AP Spanish Language

10, 11, 12 34

CSU, UC (e)


A college level course in advanced Spanish composition and conversation. It emphasizes aural/oral skills, reading comprehension, grammar and composition. Students in this course take the AP Spanish Language Exam in May with the possibility of receiving college credit and/or placement. (Prerequisite: Grade of “A” or better in Spanish III or Grade of “B” or better in Spanish II for Heritage Speakers or Grade of “B” or better in Spanish III Honors) WL4600 AP Spanish Literature

11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

A college level course that covers selected authors from the literature of Spain and Spanish America and centers on the understanding and analysis of literary texts. The class enhances students’ proficiency while developing their ability to analyze texts and communicate ideas through discussion and writing. (Prerequisite: Earned a 3, 4, or 5 on the AP Spanish Language Exam) WL140 French I

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

Provides practice in listening for comprehension and speaking. The student learns vocabulary related to home, school and community. The student will practice pronunciation, intonation and use of basic language structures in both oral and written exercises. The course develops appreciation for the customs and traditions of French-speaking people both within the United States and abroad. (Prerequisite: None) WL240 French II

10, 11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

Reviews subject matter introduced in French I, and provides further practice in comprehension, speaking, oral reading and writing. More advanced language structures are practiced and correct pronunciation and intonation are further developed. The course introduces reading for direct comprehension without translation, writing adapted dialogues, narratives and dictation. The course continues to develop appreciation for the French culture and customs. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in French I.) WL380 French III

11, 12

CSU, UC (e)

Further develops aural-oral facility through more varied listening and speaking activities. Grammatical concepts are reviewed and analyzed, while vocabulary development and proficiency skills are fostered in conversational settings. In addition, appreciation of French culture continues to be fostered. (Prerequisite: Grade of “B” or better in French II and Department Chair approval.) WL130 Latin I

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

This course is an introduction to Latin, in this course students will read, write, listen and speak Latin. The focus of this course is reading comprehension and the aim of the first two years of Latin is to prepare students to read authentic Latin literature, both prose and poetry. Using the Cambridge Latin Course and other dynamic stories, students will recognize syntax in a natural way, as opposed to the grammar/translation method that is so often used in a Latin class. Students will also compose Latin plays, and computer generated slideshows, and recite Latin through dramatic reading. In short, students will read, write and summarize written Latin at a basic level. (Prerequisite: None) WL230 Latin II

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

The stories in this course will begin in Roman Britain with the Salvius family, but eventually, the characters will end up in Alexandria, Egypt. This will give scholars exposure to Roman imperialism and allow them to experience life in the Roman Empire outside of the city of Rome. At the end of the year, the scholars will follow Julius Caesar to Gaul (the area now known 35


as France) as he attempts to conquer and colonize that region. Leading up to their experience reading Caesar in his original Latin, scholars will learn all the grammar necessary to do so, including the Subjunctive Mood, Participle Phrases, Indirect Speech, and the many uses of the Ablative Case. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Latin I.) WL120 Mandarin Chinese I

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

This course provides a well-balanced foundation to the Chinese language, with practice in listening for comprehension and in speaking. The course will cover introductory grammatical structures and the appropriate vocabulary for conversing at home, school and in society. The student will learn to write in Chinese characters. Oral and written exercises will assist in the acquisition of basic language structures. Furthermore, this course will introduce Chinese culture and society, giving emphasis to its role in Asia and in relation to the United States. (Prerequisite: None) WL220 Mandarin Chinese II

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

Reviews subject matter introduced in Mandarin Chinese I, and provides further practice in comprehension, speaking, oral reading and writing. More advanced language structures are practiced and correct pronunciation and intonation are further developed. The course introduces reading for direct comprehension without translation, writing adapted dialogues, narratives and dictation. The course continues to develop appreciation for the Chinese culture and customs. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Mandarin Chinese I.) WL360 Mandarin Chinese III

9, 10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

Mandarin III takes students to a higher level of aptitude in the target language. Building on skills obtained in the previous two years, students continue to expand on their ability to conduct a variety of real-life conversations using more authentic vocabulary and oral expression. They also focus on becoming more fluent and improving their pronunciation and tones. Through more advanced writing and speaking assignments, students learn and practice more complex syntax and grammar structures and express thoughts in an authentic and polite manner. Students hone their ability to speak spontaneously, summarize readings, and express their opinions by conducting more advanced discussions on topics such as Chinese cuisine, tipping, living environments, shopping, travel, course choice, education, and job searches. (Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or better in Mandarin Chinese II.) WL4700 AP Chinese Language & Culture

10, 11

CSU, UC (e)

The main course objective for AP Chinese Language and Culture is to refine and further develop students’ abilities with spoken and written communication in Chinese. We use the textbook Beyond the Basics, articles from Chinese newspapers, and multimedia resources such as CDs, DVDs, online materials, etc. The AP Chinese course also expands what students know about Chinese culture and provides them with an introduction to ancient Chinese literature. Texts include Gateway to the Chinese Classics and Chinese Breakthrough: Learning Chinese Through TV and Newspapers, as well as articles from Chinese newspapers and teacher handouts.

36


St. John Bosco Online Academy Coursework St. John Bosco Online Academy (SJBOA) courses are equivalent to traditional, semester length high school classes in as few as four or as many as 20 weeks depending on the online course format and the student’s work pace. Presently, the following classes and their descriptions are available. All SJBOA coursework is CSU, UC A-G approved. A-G categories are denoted within the parenthesis following the course title. Students must obtain counselor approval for course transferability prior to enrollment to ensure all prerequisites and/or co-requisites have been met.

English English 9 Common Core

CSU, UC (b)

English 9 provides an introduction to informational and literary genres and lays a foundation of critical reading and analytical writing skills. Through texts that range from essays, speeches, articles and historical documents to a novel, a play, poetry and short stories, students analyze the use of elements of literature and nonfiction. As they develop their writing skills and respond to claims, students learn to formulate arguments and use textual evidence to support their position. To hone their listening and speaking skills, students engage with a variety of media types through which they analyze and synthesize information, discuss material, create presentations, and share their work. English 10 Common Core

CSU, UC (b)

English 10 builds upon students' foundation of critical reading and analytical writing skills. Through texts that range from investigative journalism, essays, articles and historical documents to a novel, drama, poetry and short stories, students analyze the use of elements of literature and nonfiction. As they develop their writing skills and respond to claims, students learn to refine arguments and organize evidence to support their position. To hone their listening and speaking skills, students engage with a variety of media types through which they analyze and synthesize information, discuss material, create presentations, and share their work. English I

CSU, UC (b)

Introduction to Literature and Composition is a course that covers literature study, reading, writing, and language. Students read literature from around the world, including the following genres: short story, poetry, memoir, autobiography, drama, and epic. They read examples of informational writing, such as a letter, Web site, magazine article, newspaper article, speech, editorial, and movie or book review. Along the way, they acquire and practice reading skills and strategies that are directly applicable to these literary and informational reading materials. English 11 Common Core

CSU, UC (b)

In English 11, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. Starting with the Declaration of Independence, students explore how the greatest American literature tells the stories of individuals who have struggled for independence and freedom: freedom of self, freedom of thought, freedom of home and country. Students reflect on the role of the individual in Romantic and Transcendentalist literature that considers the relationship between citizens and government, and they question whether the American Dream is still achievable while examining Modernist disillusionment with American idealism. As well, reading the words of Frederick Douglass and those of the Civil Rights Act, students look carefully at the experience of African Americans and their struggle to achieve equal rights. Finally, students reflect on how individuals cope with the influence of war, cultural tensions, and technology in the midst of trying to build and secure their own personal identity. English III

CSU, UC (b) 37


American Literature is a literature and composition course offering organized as a survey of American literature. It can stand alone as a complete year of general study in English without a specific prerequisite, but its modular design allows flexibility in how the program is used in the classroom; teachers may use a single unit, lesson, or activity to supplement regular class content. The course builds literary and communication skills, including reading, writing, language appreciation and aesthetics, listening and speaking, viewing and representing, and research. English 12 Common Core

CSU, UC (b)

English 12 asks students to delve into the mingled history of British and World literature. It asks students to imagine: Face to face with a human being unlike any you've seen before, do you feel fear, awe, or curiosity? Do you look for what you can give, what you can take, or what you can share? Do you find unfamiliar people and customs magical, mysterious, or monstrous? Students explore how humans interact with and influence each other — historically, socially, and otherwise — and examine the complexities of cultural identity in our global and fast-changing world. English IV

CSU, UC (b)

British and World Literature is a streamlined survey of British literature that illustrates the origins of English-language literature and reflects its reach beyond the British Isles. The course is standards-based. Each activity correlates to state standards in six core areas: reading, writing, language (appreciation and aesthetics), listening and speaking, viewing and representing (including media literacy), and research. The course gives students meaningful practice in fundamental literacy skills while introducing them to classics of British and world literature. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to think and respond independently, critically, and creatively to the subject matter, whether it's a work of literature, a piece of nonfiction writing, or a media work. The course emboldens students to approach these works — both on their own terms and within a larger context — while providing them with the tools and encouragement they need in order to do so. Creative Writing

CSU, UC (g)

Creative Writing is an English elective course that focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes one revised short story and three to five polished poems. Students draft, revise, and polish fiction and poetry through writing exercises, developing familiarity with literary terms and facility with the writing process as they study elements of creative writing. Elements of fiction writing explored in this course include attention to specific detail, observation, character development, setting, plot, and point of view. In the poetry units, students learn about the use of sensory details and imagery, figurative language, and sound devices including rhyme, rhythm and alliteration. They also explore poetic forms ranging from found poems and slam poetry to traditional sonnets and villanelles.

38


Mathematics Algebra I Common Core

CSU, UC (c)

Algebra I builds students' command of linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include problem-solving with basic equations and formulas; measurement; an introduction to functions and problem solving; linear equations and systems of linear equations; exponents and exponential functions; sequences and functions; descriptive statistics; polynomials and factoring; quadratic equations and functions; and function transformations and inverses. Geometry

CSU, UC (c)

Geometry builds upon students' command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include reasoning, proof, and the creation of sound mathematical arguments; points, lines, and angles; triangles and trigonometry; quadrilaterals and other polygons; circles; congruence, similarity, transformations, and constructions; coordinate geometry; three-dimensional solids; and applications of probability. Mathematics I Common Core

CSU, UC (c)

Mathematics I builds students' command of geometric knowledge and linear and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing skills to break down complex challenges and demonstrate knowledge in new situations. Course topics include relationships between quantities; linear and exponential relationships; reasoning with equations; descriptive statistics; congruence, proof, and constructions; and connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates. Algebra II Common Core

CSU, UC (c)

Algebra II introduces students to advanced functions, with a focus on developing a strong conceptual grasp of the expressions that define them. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include quadratic equations; polynomial functions; rational expressions and equations; radical expressions and equations; exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric identities and functions; modeling with functions; probability and inferential statistics; probability distributions; and sample distributions and confidence intervals. Mathematics II Common Core

CSU, UC (c)

Mathematics II extends students' geometric knowledge and introduces them to quadratic expressions, equations and functions, exploring the relationship between these and their linear and exponential counterparts. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include extending the number system; quadratic functions and modeling; expressions and equations; applications of probability; similarity, right triangle trigonometry, and proof; and circles with and without coordinates. Precalculus

CSU, UC (c)

Precalculus is a course that combines reviews of Algebra, Geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent advanced math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational 39


functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers. Mathematics III

CSU, UC (c)

Mathematics III incorporates advanced functions, trigonometry and probability and statistics as students synthesize their prior knowledge to solve increasingly challenging problems. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations. Course topics include inferences and conclusions from data; polynomial, rational, and radical relationships; trigonometry of general triangles and trigonometric functions; and mathematical modeling. AP Calculus AB

CSU, UC (c)

In AP Calculus AB, students learn to understand change geometrically and visually (by studying graphs of curves), analytically (by studying and working with mathematical formulas), numerically (by seeing patterns in sets of numbers), and verbally. Instead of simply getting the right answer, students learn to evaluate the soundness of proposed solutions and to apply mathematical reasoning to real-world models. Calculus helps scientists, engineers, and financial analysts understand the complex relationships behind real-world phenomena. The equivalent of an introductory college-level calculus course, AP Calculus AB prepares students for the AP exam and further studies in science, engineering, and mathematics. AP Statistics

CSU, UC (c)

AP Statistics gives students hands-on experience collecting, analyzing, graphing, and interpreting real-world data. They will learn to effectively design and analyze research studies by reviewing and evaluating real research examples taken from daily life. The next time they hear the results of a poll or study, they will know whether the results are valid. As the art of drawing conclusions from imperfect data and the science of real-world uncertainties, statistics plays an important role in many fields. The equivalent of an introductory college-level course, AP Statistics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in science, sociology, medicine, engineering, political science, geography, and business.

40


Social Science AP Macroeconomics

CSU, UC (g)

AP Macroeconomics students learn why and how the world economy can change from month to month, how to identify trends in our economy, and how to use those trends to develop performance measures and predictors of economic growth or decline. They'll also examine how individuals, institutions, and influences affect people, and how those factors can impact everyone's life through employment rates, government spending, inflation, taxes, and production. The equivalent of a 100-level collegelevel class, this course prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, political science and history. AP Microeconomics

CSU, UC (g)

AP Microeconomics studies the behavior of individuals and businesses as they exchange goods and services in the marketplace. Students will learn why the same product costs different amounts at different stores, in different cities, at different times. They'll also learn to spot patterns in economic behavior and how to use those patterns to explain buyer and seller behavior under various conditions. Microeconomics studies the economic way of thinking, understanding the nature and function of markets, the role of scarcity and competition, the influence of factors such as interest rates on business decisions, and the role of government in promoting a healthy economy. The equivalent of a 100-level college course, AP Microeconomics prepares students for the AP exam and for further study in business, history, and political science. AP Psychology

CSU, UC (g)

AP Psychology provides an overview of current psychological research methods and theories. Students will explore the therapies used by professional counselors and clinical psychologists and examine the reasons for normal human reactions: how people learn and think, the process of human development and human aggression, altruism, intimacy, and self-reflection. They will study core psychological concepts, such as the brain and sense functions, and learn to gauge human reactions, gather information, and form meaningful syntheses. Along the way, students will also investigate relevant concepts like study skills and information retention. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey course, AP Psychology prepares students for the AP exam and for further studies in psychology or life sciences. Psychology

CSU, UC (g)

Psychology is a college preparatory course that provides a solid overview of the major domains in the field of psychology— methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior. By focusing on significant scientific research and on the questions that are most important to psychologists, students see psychology as an evolving science. Each topic clusters around challenge questions, such as “What is happiness?” Students answer these questions before, during, and after they interact with direct instruction. In completing the course, students will develop the skills to be able to think critically, to evaluate ideas and information, and to analyze and synthesize qualitative and quantitative evidence. All the domains the American Psychological Association (APA) emphasizes are included in the course—methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior. Multicultural Studies

CSU, UC (g)

Multicultural Studies is an interdisciplinary, college preparatory elective course, drawing from history and sociology, which examines the United States as a multicultural nation. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences. Major topics in the course include identity, immigration, assimilation and distinctiveness, power and oppression, struggles for rights, regionalism, culture and the media, and the formation of new cultures.

41


U.S. History since the Civil War

CSU, UC (a)

This course traces the nation's history from the end of the Civil War to the present. Students evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while also exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the "information revolution" affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups. The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards. U.S. and Global Economics Core

CSU, UC (g)

U.S. and Global Economics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East. World History to the Renaissance

CSU, UC (g)

World History to the Renaissance traces the development of civilizations around the world from prehistory to the Renaissance. The course covers major themes in world history, including the development and influence of human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economic systems, major religions and belief systems, science and technology, and the arts. Topics covered in this course include the birth of civilizations; the classical civilizations of India, China, Greece, and Rome; the rise of new empires such as the Byzantine; and an examination of civilizations in Africa and North and South America. From there, students journey to the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance. World History since the Renaissance

CSU, UC (a)

World History since the Renaissance covers the development of civilizations around the world from the Renaissance to the present. The course covers major themes in world history, including the development and influence of human-geographic relationships, political and social structures, economic systems, major religions and belief systems, the effects of science and technology, the vital role of the arts, and the importance of trade and cultural exchange. Topics covered in this course include the Reformation and its legacy, the Scientific Revolution, European exploration, the Enlightenment, political revolutions, the rise of nation-states, the industrial era, the spread of imperialism, and the issues and conflicts of the 20th and 21st centuries. The content is based on standards from the National Council for History Education (1997), the National Center for History in the Schools (1996), and the National Council for Social Studies (1994) and is aligned to state standards.

42


World Languages French I

CSU, UC (e)

French I students learn to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as sports, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the verb system, adjective agreement, formal and informal address, reflexive verbs, and past tense. Students also gain an understanding of the cultures of French-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe, as well as insight into Francophone culture and people. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace. The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. French II

CSU, UC (e)

French II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives both in formal and informal address. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms in cooking, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes present- and past-tense verb forms and uses, negation, and direct and indirect objects. Students deepen their knowledge of French-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace. The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. Spanish I

CSU, UC (e)

Spanish I students learn to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace. The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards. Spanish II

CSU, UC (e)

Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal situations. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues. The material in this course is presented at a moderate pace. The content is based on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) standards.

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Program of Studies - 2016 2017  

St. John Bosco High School - Program of Studies - 2016 - 2017

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