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FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

this week in our school . . .

Volume 3 Issue 10 & 11 November 24th, 2017

getting it right ready respectful safe

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ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. week.

I love It a celebration. This of week us the is about this time yearafforded that I meet with opportunity as a school to come together each Head of Department to reviewand the celebrate hundreds of pupils’ summer’s exam results.achievements. This involves We held our of annual Evening at plenty usefulPresentation and thought-provoking Maxwell Hall, University Salford, hosting discussion, but it isofusually talking about and letters. this data are formernumbers Year 11 pupils (manyBehind of whom are now in stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what our Sixth Form) and ex-Year 13s, most of whom they liked what they Wein have gone onto and university. Thisachieved. is a big night always focus on how things can be our calendar and one where we reiterate what improved well aswhere celebrating what went we stand for as as a school, we recognise well. As a Catholic school, exam results are all that is good and successful in our community just one way of expressing the unique, Godand where cheerand theskills vitality ourpupil. youngIt is givenwe talents of of each peopleimportant as they move onto to bigger things. to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves With the hallinfull of parents, carers, staffthe andschool being classes, walking around formerand pupils we opened with a prayer from talking to pupils, students and staff. Father Gavin Landers and a welcome from from If ever you feeling at all despondent our new Chair of are Governors, Karen Whitehead.or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school Then the hall was rocked with two extraordinary would quickly raise your spirits. meHart musical performances by current pupil Let Josh show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, (Year 10) and former pupil Brendan McCarthy. September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was Josh performed Van Halen’s Eruption and delighted to listen to performances of Yngwie Malmsteen’s Black Star on guitar a Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold in Back virtuoso blast of sheer energy. Brendan the River and When the Saints Go Marching showcased his depth talent, and full of In. I also got to of sitpiano with Daniel Chester integrity withtheir Lostprodigious Boy by Ruth as and theyconfidence, demonstrated DJing B. Wetalents. were truly blessed their Iskills and the Next, duringby lunch, supervised andsay made a point of watching the talent canteen and I must it took me back to the first interactions take place daily. Pupils time (in 1986) thatthat I ever heard Eruption and I and staff holding doors foras one another, still wish I could play half open as well Josh. offering thanks, little moments of personal gratitude. Ofyear course, Next itappreciation was my turnand to reflect on the gone things don’t always go well in a school, but it by and offer some thoughts to our pupils as they is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from collected their9 certificates and awards. Thereor a Year to one of the lunch time staff, was much I could have said, but no-one comes see one pupil help another who is unsure to these events to hear a headteacher. That where to go for class. said, I will reiterate here a point I made. The certificates thatForm, the Year 11 anda 13 pupilschat with In Sixth I enjoyed lengthy Aidan who explained thethan theory collected represent so muchboth more justof their potential commercial exam differentiation results. They and are aitsmanifestation of the application. In English they were capacity of young people to change the studying world, the play Blood Brothers and talking with even in out straitened and hardened times. I humour and excitement about superstitions; have absolute faith in them to confront with in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new hope the challenges of our age and show us a mission statement and exploring the way forward - without suchwithin confidence in next personal meanings it. School is a generation arehumming we? busy,where bustling, place. Head Girl Holly Meadows and Head Boy Ryan Roberts then introduced our guest speaker

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting Stephen O’Malley, of Civic that I want to stayfounding and havedirector a go myself. Engineers, who talked his education, Outside it’s: “Sir, haveabout you seen my tie? his application of maths in construction Can you open my bottle? What didand youabout the complexities of growing andtime facing the think of last night’s game? up What is it, Sir?” and, at least onceto a have day, “Oh my world. We are fortunate such committed days!” Itpartners can be noisy at times a business in people suchand as in Stephen; community this size we can’t expect the amiable involvement he gave us on the night everyone get on with each other all the was greatlyto appreciated. time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. After the awards had been issued, Karen Whitehead, offered closing remarks Perhaps the singlesome highlight of my week, and if I we headed into the Salford evening having had to pick, would be the conversation I had confirmed again strength with Mrs.once Fay who is the leading the of our school community. Myofthanks to everyone whoa made development our new library. I am the evening possible, library enthusiast andparticularly have beenMrs. everLingard since who co-ordinated the entire event no mean I was little. The furthest reach of -my memory is back to moments spent in our feat. local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from animportance unkind world. Such evenings reinforce the of finding the positives in our school and Mrs. Fay spent celebrating them.last As Saturday I am oftenpeacefully heard to say, stacking the shelves and wethey are shouldn’t inching schools are complex places, closer to opening. What thrilled me wasstaff, her work, but they do and the do so because comment that several boys, some of whom pupils and families share common vision and affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by are proud toofbe part of in the same community. presence a library their school: ‘You

i have absolute faith in our young people to confront the challenges of our age and show us a way forward

mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, As we gowas intothe Advent I pray utterance that this bond Miss?’ breathless of one between us, this ‘connection between pupil. Our library is at the heart of thepeople’, asschool: John Henry Newman said, is strengthened a space for being open to and sharing ideasofand is openfor the benefit us experiences. all. When we Itknow that this and its in shelves serve as reminder isplan happening a community asadiverse as our that there should be no barrier to anyone school it shows others that bridges can be built using its volumes orsociety seekingofknowledge, and offers a vision to ‘hope in better’ solace, entertainment oryoung information. led and embodied by our people.I can’t What wait to see it come to life in the an honour it is to witness and be weeks part of that. ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of My particular thanks to staff, parents, carers, the helpers. community and our pupils and students.

BenBless. Davis, Headteacher God Twitter: @BenDavis1972

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972

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calendar what’s on  

English Department trip to A Christmas Carol

WED 29

TUE 28

THU 30

FRI 01 SAT 02

MON 27

Christmas Fair and Fun Run, 11am - 1pm

COMING UP THIS WEEK week beginning 27.11.17 week B

attendance We aim for 100% attendance for all of our students and have set 96% as satisfactory attendance for this year. Attendance is monitored period-by-period and statistics are published each week. Excellent attendance guarantees excellent learning. Attendance by year (November 17th)

Year 7 Year 8 year 9 year 10 year 11 School

97.0% 95.3% 95.9% 94.2% 94.8% 95.4%

Attendance and its impact on learning 10 days absence means 95% attendance 19 days absence means 90% attendance 29 days absence means 85% attendance 38 days absence means 80% attendance 47 days absence means 75% attendance Please note: If your child is off school you need to contact student services the same day on

Top: at the Siemens Rollercoaster Challenge; Below: 6th formers at the Teenage Cancer3 Trust fundraiser


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Head’s . WEEKLYstart REFLECTION

Gavin Landers, Assistant Priest attoSt.Charles Borromeo writes each week for us. r. Davis,Father Headteacher, reflects on the I get Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled eek. in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. preserve us from mournful saints!" s about "God, this time of year that I meet with Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? ch Head of Department to review the Can you open my bottle? What did you mmer’s This examquote results. of lastfornight’s WhatSaint timeisisan it, oxymoron and is also fromThis St. involves Teresa of Avila is a think challenge us all.game? A mournful enty of useful and thought-provoking and, at least the once a day, my the antithesis of what we are promotingSir?” in School during month of“Oh November. We have introduced the scussion,whole but it school is usually talking about days!” It can be noisy at times and in a to the 'Happy Saints'. mbers and letters. Behind this data are community this size we can’t expect ories: how pupils did, how they felt, what everyone to their get on with each other all class the Patron Saint, or Perhaps you have seen the young people donning badges of their form ey liked and what they achieved. We time. But it is our community, and a lively, perhaps you have been in school and seen how each Form classroom has the patron of their class on a ways focus on how things can be lovely, positive one at that. poster the classroom door and in the classroom. Maybe you have seen the teachers walking around proved as well on as celebrating what went the image ofexam their Patron Jean Baptist De La Salle - of onmy a keyring just so happens to ell. As a with Catholic school, results Saint are - St.Perhaps the single highlight week, if(which I be a bottle opener also). All these things have been put into place to remind each one of us that our st one way of expressing the unique, Godhad to pick, would be the conversation I had vocation in life is to be a Saint! And more than that, our vocation is to be a Happy Saint. ven talents and skills of each pupil. It is with Mrs. Fay who is leading the portant to look beyond the data so I am development of our new library. I am a No one likes their be a miserable man, people want seebeen the joy of since the Gospel reflected in those lighted that much more of priest my jobtoinvolves library enthusiast and to have ever ing in classes, walking the school was wants little. The furthest reach ofChristian. my who preach thearound Good News. So too, noI one to meet a mournful d talking to pupils, students and staff. memory is back to moments spent in our local byCompassion; its colour andHis mercy, etc. Perhaps this All the Saints reflect some aspect or facet oflibrary Jesus;entranced His joy; His ever youmonth are feeling at all despondent or bright possibilities. On Twitter we can be the advocates to bring the joy of the Gospel into our families, school community, and igued I reckon quick tour of the school reveals theIIhold parish. aLet us be advocates for change,#RememberingMyLibrary let us be, as Pope Saint John Paul asked us to be, the "Saints of ould quickly raise your spirits. Let me that such an institution has: ‘A library card the New Millennium". ow you what I mean. Today (Thursday, was a free pass to wonderment, words and eptember 29th) for instance, I dropped into the ability to roam the world’ observes one Let us ask God for the grace to be Happy Saints! ar 10 GCSE Music. There, I was user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron lighted to listen to performances of gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, eethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of e River and When the Saints Go Marching the escape that a library represented or of I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester the refuge it offered from an unkind world. they demonstrated their prodigious DJing ents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully nteen and made a point of watching the stacking the shelves and we are inching eractions that take place daily. Pupils and closer to opening. What thrilled me was her aff holding doors open for one another, comment that several boys, some of whom ering thanks, little moments of personal affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by preciation and gratitude. Of course, presence of a library in their school: ‘You ngs don’t always go well in a school, but it mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, lovely to witness a voluntary apology from Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or pupil. Our library isHeadteacher, at the heart Mr. Davis, reflectsof onthe the I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled week. in a task that is so challenging and exciting e one pupil help another who is unsure school: a space for being open to and that I want to stay and have a go myself. aboutexperiences. this time of year that I meet here to go for class. sharing ideasIt isand It iswith open-Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? each Head of Department to review the Can you open my bottle? What did you plan and its shelves serve reminder think of last night’s game? What time is it, summer’s exam results.as Thisainvolves plenty ofbe useful andbarrier thought-provoking and, at least once a day, “Oh my Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with that there should no to anyone Sir?” discussion, but it is usually talking about days!” It can be noisy at times and in a numbers or and seeking letters. Behind this data are community this size we can’t expect dan who explained both the theory of using its volumes knowledge, stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what everyone to get on with each other all the ferentiation and its potential commercial solace, entertainment or they information. they liked and what achieved. We I can’t time. But it is our community, and a lively, focus onlife how things canweeks be lovely, positive one at that. plication. In English they were studying wait to see italways come to in the improved as well as celebrating what went a Catholic school, results are ofPerhaps the single highlight of my week, if I e play Blood Brothers and talking with ahead thankswell.toAsMrs. Fay andexam her band just one way of expressing the unique, Godhad to pick, would be the conversation I had mour and excitement about superstitions; helpers. given talents and skills of each pupil. It is with Mrs. Fay who is leading the important to look beyond the data so I am development of our new library. I am a Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new delighted that much more of my job involves library enthusiast and have been ever since ssion statement and exploring the being in classes, walking around the school I was little. The furthest reach of my Ben Davis, and Headteacher talking to pupils, students and staff. memory is back to moments spent in our rsonal meanings within it. School is a local library entranced by its colour and Twitter: @BenDavis1972 If ever you are feeling at all despondent or bright possibilities. On Twitter sy, bustling, humming place. fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold

Head’s start .

Let us be advocates for change… let us be ‘saints of the new millenium

would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the

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that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others4talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching


Head’s . bakingstart and learning

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

A team of talented chefs attended an event in Manchester recently and were lucky enough to meet Bake Off winner Candace Brown, inviting her into school to take on our most talented. Let’s wait and see.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Over 77% of parents and carers attended the recent Year 7 Parents’ Evening and made the most of looking at the work of pupils in the Sports Hall.

In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

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Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

getting out and about

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class.

This amazing photo is of Year 9 on their Geography field trip in Wales where they explored and worked their hiking socks off learning about the local area. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Left you can see our Science club continuing to work on the development plan for our school garden.

In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972

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6


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972

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Head’s start . yorkshire sculpture park

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

The Art department led a fantastic trip to the Yorkshire Sculpture Park. As part of the visit they co-ordinated a photography competition and you can see the entries on our Twitter page - results soon.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

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Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972


 

Photos from our recent Presentation Evening. 8


this week Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

This week saw so many exciting and inspiring experiences for our young people. There was the challenge of mock exams for Year 11, the BBC School Report team took over Salford People’s Museum and we were delighted to be awarded the Five Star School Award by the Royal Horticultural Society.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

9


Head’s . Christmas fair Parentstart Council:

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

Our Christmas Fair & Fun Run will soon be upon us. Mrs. Cheshire is co-ordinating stalls and Year 7 will be selling their wares. Anyone interested in having a stall is should 10 contact Mrs. Cheshire via the school. Donations for the Tombola should be handed into school .

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since


TWEET OF THE WEEK Civic EngineersÂ

@civicengineers

Nov 20

An inspirational evening @SABSalford annual presentation! Fantastic achievements, proud @civicengineers is involved, thanks for inviting Stephen O’Malley to speak

More

11


FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM www.stambrosebarlowswinton.org 37 Ash Drive Swinton Salford M27 9QP 0161 921 1570 @SABSalford Headteacher: Ben Davis 12

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 10&11 November 24th 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School & Sixth Form, Swinton, Salford, UK.

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 10&11 November 24th 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School & Sixth Form, Swinton, Salford, UK.

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