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FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

this week in our school . . .

Volume 3 Issue 12 December 2nd, 2017

getting it right ready respectful safe

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ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. week.

This week, after this months the with It is about timeofofplanning year thatand I meet inevitable last minute rushing around, we each Head of Department to reviewheld the our first ever Christmas Fair. It This was involves about much summer’s exam results. more than celebrating Christmas or kickstarting plenty of useful and thought-provoking Adventdiscussion, - it was about that weabout are but itrecognising is usually talking numbers Behind this data are community and and that letters. we are still growing together stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what as one. they liked and what they achieved. We focus howsince things can be It is a always little over fouron years the school improved as well as celebrating what went opened on this site to serve a much larger and well. As a Catholic school, exam results are more diverse community. We are proud that we just one way of expressing the unique, Goddo andgiven above all else, is important me that talents anditskills of eachto pupil. It is everyone feels part of our community. We important to look beyond the data so all I am have adelighted need to be our thatconnected, much moretoofunderstand my job involves place being and our Thiswalking necessitates in role. classes, aroundan the school appreciation of our skills and talents and and talking togifts, pupils, students and staff. sense of what we might bring, what we can do. If ever you are of feeling at allofdespondent or This lies at the heart the idea service. fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school wouldserves quicklyaraise your spirits. Letserve me Our school community, our staff show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, the families and young people who are part of September 29th)our for pupils instance, I dropped into our school, we expect to serve others Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was and live out their faith. It is hard to serve unless delighted to listen to performances of we know how we can do Symphony, it, understanding what Beethoven’s Ninth Hold Back we can offer to others. the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester Eventsaslike thedemonstrated Christmas Fair bring these ideas they their prodigious DJing into sharp focus, even morelunch, so when we talents. Next, during I supervised the canteen andmajority made aofpoint ofwho watching consider that the those madethe thatunder take place daily. the fairinteractions happen were the age of 16Pupils and and staff holding doors open for one another, most were Year 7. This Wednesday we offering thanks, little moments of personal welcomed a great educational speaker to the appreciation and gratitude. Of course, school to present to staff. David Cameron (not things don’t always go well in a school, but it the former PM) has been a Director of Children’s is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from Services and9has worked at lunch all levels school a Year to one of the timeofstaff, or life across the UK. He gave a very powerful talk see one pupil help another who is unsure much where of which resonated with the staff. to go for class. Of theInmany said, one phrase kept Sixththings Form,he I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan explained boththe theFair theory coming backwho to me as I viewed on of differentiation and its potential commercial Saturday: ‘create opportunities for young people application. In English they were and adults to surprise you because theystudying will.’ In the play Brothers and talking with other words weBlood all have the capacity to exceed humour and excitement about superstitions; expectations, to meet the demands of a in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new challenge that seemed overwhelming. When mission statement and exploring the we dopersonal this, amazing thingswithin happen and weishave meanings it. School a a greater belief in ourselves and others. busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. InOutside putting it’s: on a“Sir, Christmas Fair we had no idea have you seen my tie? quite would We were Canhow you itopen mygo. bottle? Whatsurprised. did you The Parent Council co-ordinated verytime successful think of last night’s game? aWhat is it, Sir?” and, at least a day, “Ohset mythe event. The Year 7s once who had been days!” It can be noisy at times and in a using challenge of working teams to run a stall community this size we can’t expect £10 investment from the stall, came up trumps everyone to getwere on with other all the too. Then there the each Year 11 helpers, time. But it is our community, and a lively, Danny who did the music, Mr. Morrison who, lovely, positive one at that. dressed like a festive Dale Winton, was MC for the day and organised a fabulous fun run. ifAnd Perhaps the single highlight of my week, I yet more, the local businesses who came, the had to pick, would be the conversation I had families who supported in theirthe droves, the staff with Mrs. Fay who is leading who willingly came into work on a Saturday, the development of our new library. I am a caretaker who spent thehave day trouble-shooting library enthusiast and been ever since the glitches. I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

We all have a need to be connected, to understand our place and our role. This necessitates an appreciation of our gifts, skills and talents

No expected it to last fail. Saturday We all assumed it would Mrs. Fay spent peacefully bestacking great. The surprise is not that it happened, the shelves and we are inching but that to it generated such athrilled senseme of community, closer opening. What was her ofcomment belonging. need boys, to remember a thatWe several some ofas whom affect the a dislike of reading, were electrified by school importance of expecting more from presence librarymore in their school: each other, of nota doing (our time is‘You too mean I can thisRomero and, like, read it, as is precious) but,borrow as Oscar said and Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one alluded to in our mission statement, being more. pupil. Our library is at the heart of the Being more connected, being more part of a school: a space for being open to and team, of a community. There is huge power in sharing ideas and experiences. It is openthat asand we its work to develop And lots plan shelves serveour as aschool. reminder ofthat wonderful surprises. there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, My thanksentertainment to everyone who made such Iacan’t solace, or information. fantastic day itpossible, our Parent wait to see come to especially life in the weeks ahead and thanks Mrs.7 Fay and her band of and Council theto Year Dragons’ Den pupils helpers. staff. God BenBless. Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972

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calendar what’s on  

English Department trip to A Christmas Carol

WED 06

TUE 05

THU 07

FRI 08 SAT 09

MON 04

Christmas Fair and Fun Run, 11am - 1pm

COMING UP THIS WEEK week beginning 04.12.17 week A

attendance We aim for 100% attendance for all of our students and have set 96% as satisfactory attendance for this year. Attendance is monitored period-by-period and statistics are published each week. Excellent attendance guarantees excellent learning. Attendance by year (November 27th)

Year 7 Year 8 year 9 year 10 year 11 School

96.8% 95.2% 95.7% 94.0% 94.6% 95.3%

Attendance and its impact on learning 10 days absence means 95% attendance 19 days absence means 90% attendance 29 days absence means 85% attendance 38 days absence means 80% attendance 47 days absence means 75% attendance Please note: If your child is off school you need to contact student services the same day on

Top: at the Siemens Rollercoaster Challenge; Below: 6th formers at the Teenage Cancer3 Trust fundraiser


Head’s start . FAir & Fun Run: Our Christmas Community together

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

A small selection of the many snaps taken on the day. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Clockwise: Teagan and Mr. Morrison; The Year 11 helpers who stewarded the event; one of the many stalls; the produce on display.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class.

Overleaf: Mrs. Robinson and Mr. Davis raised £40 for one of the stalls by being sponged (see Twitter for action footage); The Fun Runners!

In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

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Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

5


Head’s start . THIS WEEK IN SCHOOL

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

We welcomed the charity Caritas to speak to assemblies about their work. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

We also launched our new form time initiative on kindness and gave Years 8 - 10 form reading time to promote a love of reading.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class.

The English department led a fantastic trip to see A Christmas Carol at the Bolton Octagon (pictured left) and the Girls’ Network, which involves 20 pupils in Year 10 and 12 working with business mentors visited The Morson Group for a networking session (pictured above)

In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Achievement Points Over 16000 have been issued since September 29th. The House totals for last week were: St. Benedict 464 St. Francis 503 St. Margaret Clitherow 470 St Teresa of Calcutta 473 Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972

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TWEET OF THE WEek

Caroline HodsonÂ

@CazHodson

8h Replying to @SAB_ParentC @SABSalford

Very impressed yesterday! Well done to all! X

8 hours ago

More

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FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM www.stambrosebarlowswinton.org 37 Ash Drive Swinton Salford M27 9QP 0161 921 1570 @SABSalford Headteacher: Ben Davis 8

Profile for St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 12 December 2nd 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School and 6th Form College, Swinton, Salford, UK.

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 12 December 2nd 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School and 6th Form College, Swinton, Salford, UK.

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