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FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

this week in our school . . .

Volume 3 Issue 13 & 14 December 15th, 2017

getting it right ready respectful safe

1

ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. week.

So much celebrate this of week. It isto about this time year that I meet with

each Head of Department to review the We started our work onresults. becoming Rights summer’s exam Thisa involves Respecting with special work in form plentyschool of useful and thought-provoking time. discussion, This is a keybut part ofusually the development of it is talking about numbers letters. our culture as aand school. As IBehind said inthis the data letterare how pupils did, how they felt,onwhat issuedstories: at the time, the United Convention the they liked and what they achieved. Rights of the Child has only existed for 26 We years, focus how things can be but itsalways 54 articles setonout inalienable rights improved as well as celebrating what applicable to children everywhere as well aswent well. As a Catholic school, exam results are stating the responsibilities of adults across the just one way of expressing the unique, Godglobe.given talents and skills of each pupil. It is

important to look beyond the data so I am I see this as onethat of the most important things we delighted much more of my job involves have done school, walking it puts young people and beingas in aclasses, around the school their needs right at heartstudents of our work and talking tothe pupils, and and staff. asks some necessarily tough questions about If ever youtoare feelingrange at all of despondent our approaches a whole things. or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school your spirits. Also inwould form quickly time thisraise week pupils wereLet me show you what I mean. Today frantically beavering away on our new(Thursday, school September instance, I dropped into magazine. Rather29th) thanfor issuing a newsletter this Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was Christmas we have instead challenged each delighted to listen to performances of form toBeethoven’s produce a range contributions Ninth of Symphony, Holdand Back articles over the last three weeks. This the the River and When the Saints Goway Marching final publication will be less a summary of the In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester past weeks in demonstrated school (which their you can find on DJing as they prodigious Twitter, the website in these talents. Next,and during lunch,weekly I supervised the canteen and made pointanofexhibition watching and the newsletters anyway) and amore interactions thatwork takeand place daily.We Pupils celebration of pupils’ skills. are and staff holding doors open one are another, still finalising it, so parents and for carers more offering thanks, little moments of personal than welcome to offer their own contributions. appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it Last, but not least, the magazine needs a name; is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from something interesting, andtime inspiring. a Year 9 to one ofmodern the lunch staff, or Ideas see are gratefully received, but we’re to one pupil help another who istrying unsure steer itwhere away to from being called something like go for class. ‘The Ambrose Bugle’! In addition, we have contributions our very owna Bishop In Sixthfrom Form, I enjoyed lengthyJohn chat with who explained theCouncil theory of ArnoldAidan and members of the both Parent and differentiation and itsset potential Governing Body. It looks to be a commercial good read application. In English theydevelop were studying and hopefully something we can with the play Blood Brothers and talking with pride in the coming months. humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new Both of these things (the magazine and Rights mission statement and exploring the Respecting schools) are about personal meanings withindeveloping it. School is a leadership skill in place. pupils, a theme I busy,capacity bustling,and humming have often returned to in these columns. Their ability to do this, to serve others, to enact a sense of duty, to live out values and ethics,

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. rather thanit’s: simply comply orseen meetmy expectations, Outside “Sir, have you tie? isCan the real ourbottle? journeyWhat of improvement as you aim openofmy did you a think school. of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” Ititcan be noisy at you’re times and Arguably is easy to say part in ofaa school community this size we can’t expect by just turning up and doing what is expected of everyone tomuch get onrather with each all the you. I would than other our pupils time. But it is our community, and a lively, surprised us with what they can do, that they lovely, positive one at that. respond with vigour and enthusiasm to the trust and hope invested them. And they do! if I Perhaps the singleinhighlight of my week,

had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam world’ observes Friday morning saw the hundreds of us pitchone up to user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron school in our Christmas jumpers. We were a gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, colourful gang and weDigest.’ did to raise money for Learn and Inwardly Others talk of charity. At the last minute I sent out an email the escape that a library represented or of suggesting each person came into the refugethat it offered from anwho unkind world. school in the seasonal attire brought with them donations dry goods for the needy. Mrs. Fay of spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer toaopening. meofwas And what surprise What I got. thrilled The floor the her comment that several boys, some of whom chapel was covered with donations by 9 am. affect a dislike reading, electrified by That is living outof our values;were that is about more presence of a library in their school: ‘You than simply turning up. mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one My favourite moment was pupil. Our library is at thebeing heartstopped of the in the corridor by a Year 10 girl, who wasn’t wearing a school: a space for being open to and jumper, by quietly gave me the can of sharing ideas and experiences. It is beans open- she had brought in as a small but significant plan and its shelves serve as a reminder donation. that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, or information. I can’t As I said,entertainment so much to celebrate. wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of God Bless. helpers. Ben Davis, Headteacher

DEVELOPING OUR PUPILS’ ABILITIES TO to serve others, to enact a sense of duty, to live out values and ethics is the real aim of our journey of improvement as a school

Ben Davis, Headteacher

Twitter: Twitter:@BenDavis1972 @BenDavis1972

2

2


calendar what’s on

Achievement Points Over 17000 have been issued since September 29th. The House totals for last week were:

St. Benedict St. Francis St. Margaret Clitherow St Teresa of Calcutta

WED 20

Advent Liturgy and MADD evening, 7 pm

TUE 19

Dragons’ Den Year 7 Fair, 3:30 pm Year 13 Achievement Afternoon Headteacher’s Surgery, 5pm

THU 21

FRI 22

398 404 381 397

School closes for the Christmas Holidays at noon. Buses provided as normal.

SAT 23

MON 18

COMING UP THIS WEEK week beginning 04.12.17 week A

attendance We aim for 100% attendance for all of our students and have set 96% as satisfactory attendance for this year. Attendance is monitored period-by-period and statistics are published each week. Excellent attendance guarantees excellent learning. Attendance by year (December 7th)

Year 7 Year 8 year 9 year 10 year 11 School

96.6% 95.1% 95.6% 93.9% 94.3% 95.1%

Attendance and its impact on learning 10 days absence means 95% attendance 19 days absence means 90% attendance 29 days absence means 85% attendance 38 days absence means 80% attendance 47 days absence means 75% attendance Please note: If your child is off school you need to contact student services the same day on

Top: at the Siemens Rollercoaster Challenge; Below: 6th formers at the Teenage Cancer3 Trust fundraiser


Head’s . uplifting afternoon with beautiful readings, drama, It wasstart a truly

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

music, singing and a lovely buffet lunch served with smiles by the students who seemed to be enjoying themselves almost as much as their older guests. It was a joy to have Father Gavin present, he got the balance just right in impressing on everyone the true meaning of Christmas and then getting the party started by getting those who wanted, up to dance. It was fantastic to see the different generations enjoying themselves as one, just as the students dramatisation of "One Child” (email from a guest at the lunch)

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

SENIORstart CITIZENS’ CHRISTMAS Head’s . LUNCH

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

Our annual get together for local senior citizens was one of the most successful ever. Run by soxth formers and staff and well supported by pupils from across Years 7 to 11 the event was one of joy and Christmas cheer. Thanks to everyone involved. We even saw Mr. Davis having a dance!

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

4


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Head’s . aroundstart the school this week

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

Above: the book bench created and painted by Year 7 pupils. The bench will be on display in the Lowry Theatre before returning to our school as a permanent fixture.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Below: success in the Royal Horticultural Society awards. Our team won the Pupils’ Choice Award in the Plan It Green competition. Well done to Mrs. Robb too.

In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

5


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Head’s start . mood 6th form in festive

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

The Sixth Formers had an excellent afternoon in the Manchester markets celebrating Christmas. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Head’s start . girls’ network

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

The Year 12 Young Enterprise group also traded on the festive spirt with their stall in St. Ann’s Square where they were working with HSBC.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

The recently established Girls’ Network spent the afternoon and evening with their mentors recently at the Morson Group.

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

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THIS WEEK IN SCHOOL Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold

Above: Year 11 in the festive spirit in their Christmas Jumpers after their assembly on Friday. Below: We are the Champions! Celebrating victory in the Salford Indoor Rowing Championships. Lewis Barker was Key Stage 4 champion too.

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TWEET OF THE WEek

Amanda Swindells @buttonmoon1215 Dec 15

Replying to @SABSalford

My 2 had amazing time at the panto thank you x

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8


FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM www.stambrosebarlowswinton.org 37 Ash Drive Swinton Salford M27 9QP 0161 921 1570 @SABSalford Headteacher: Ben Davis 9

Profile for St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 13 & 14 December 15th 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School & Sixth Form College, Swinton, Salford, UK.

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 13 & 14 December 15th 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School & Sixth Form College, Swinton, Salford, UK.

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