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FAITH IN YOU

LOVE IN LEARNING

HOPE IN BETTER

this week in our school . . .

Volume 3 Issue 09 November 10th, 2017

getting it right ready respectful safe

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ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. week.

Chris Lubbe’s story extraordinary. told with It is about thisistime of year thatItI is meet with such calm and wisdom that at times each Head of Department to reviewitthe defiessummer’s belief andexam seemsresults. to pushThis the involves bounds of credibility. go into details as retelling plentyI won’t of useful and the thought-provoking it removes the power confronted by this discussion, but itofisbeing usually talking about numbers Behind this data are huge man who and with letters. great gentleness and stories:relates how pupils did,ofhow they felt, what compassion the tale a life they liked and what they achieved. We overshadowed and defined by tragedy, racism, always focus on how things can be violence and despair. What I can do here is talk wellheashad celebrating what for went about improved the impactasthat on our school well. As a Catholic school, exam results are the day he was there. just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is Given important that muchtooflook the beyond story Chris in the tells dataissoset I am South delighted Africa, under the apartheid regime of the that much more of my job involves 1970s,being 80s and early 90s, I must admit the I was in classes, walking around school concerned that many pupilsstudents might not have an and talking to pupils, and staff. awareness of those despicable race laws or If ever you are feeling at all despondent or even of the country’s first black President and its fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school redeemer, Nelson Mandela. If this was the case, wouldwere quickly raise your spirits. Let me my worries exposed as irrelevant in no show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, time. September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was Our pupils were quickly absorbed by Chris’s delighted to listen to performances of story, his warm delivery found hisHold Back Beethoven’s Ninthand Symphony, presentation easy to follow as he slowly up the River and When the Saints Gobuilt Marching a picture of South Africa before delving into the In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester detailsas ofthey his own experience. The young DJing demonstrated their prodigious peopletalents. who heard Chris, like the staff who Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen a point of watching listened to him and latermade that day as part of our the take place daily. Pupils and CPDLinteractions programme,that were rapt. staff holding doors open for one another, offering took thanks, little moments of personal The narrative us from Chris’s time as a civil appreciation and gratitude. Of rights activist, to his period in jail and course, his brutal things don’t always go well in a school, but it treatment by white prison guards to this eight is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from year stint working for Nelson Mandela a Year 9 to one of the lunch timealongside staff, or the very men who had come close to killing him see one pupil help another who is unsure in custody. The breathtaking punctuation mark where to go for class. being the revelation that he is now best friends with one of these men and godfather to the In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with man’sAidan child. who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In thick English studying The questions came andthey fast,were at the end of the play Blood Brothers and talking with the talk pupils stayed behind just to shake his excitement hand, humour perhapsand in an attempt toabout comesuperstitions; closer to in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new something like greatness, perhaps because they mission statement and exploring the had just witnessed someone whose voice had personal meanings within it. School is a been suppressed for humming years articulate busy, bustling, place. pain,

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. frustration and“Sir, rage, butyou speak also the power Outside it’s: have seen myoftie? ofCan forgiveness. is my abiding impression of you open That my bottle? What did you what the overwhelming power thinkI heard: of last night’s game? What timeofis it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my forgiveness. days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

people like Mandela, like Chris, are a beacon of hope in a world that brings the point of if I Perhapsso themany single to highlight of my week, had to pick, would be the conversation I had despair with Mrs. Fay who is leading the

development of our new library. I am a It library is in keeping with and our have school’s ethos, of enthusiast been everbut since I was little. furthest reach of my course when The we talk of forgiveness day-to-day memory is back moments spent inofour we are dealing in atodifferent currency local library entranced by its colour and behaviour: misdemeanours that are upsetting, bright possibilities. On Twitter irritating or disruptive, not the systematic abuse hold and of#RememberingMyLibrary an entire race resulting inreveals murder,the torture that such an institution has: ‘A library card abuse. That is why people like Mandela, like was a free pass to wonderment, words and Chris, are ato beacon of hope a world that the ability roam the world’inobserves one brings so many to the point of despair. user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Chris ended his talk with a number of talk of Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others quotations, his represented former boss,or one the escapesome that afrom library of of the refuge it offered an unkind world. which was,”May your from choices reflect your hopes, not your fears.” It comes from a speech Mrs. Faygave spent peacefully Mandela in last 2006Saturday and I find it deeply stacking the shelves and we are inching resonant as a school leader, a father and a closer to opening. What thrilled me was her citizen. comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by Forgiveness hope, out presence ofrequires a libraryaincommitment their school:to‘You fears often prevent us from finding the courage mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, toMiss?’ forgive, to move on. Chrisutterance Lubbe came to our was the breathless of one school this week and shone the light of hope pupil. Our library is at the heart of the and forgiveness, is being our duty to turn this school: a spaceitfor open to and sharing ideas and experiences. is openinspiration into action. Thank you,ItChris. plan and its shelves serve as a reminder thatBless. there should be no barrier to anyone God using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace,@BenDavis1972 entertainment or information. I can’t Twitter: wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

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calendar what’s on 


Year 7 Parents’ & Carers’ Evening, 5pm

Parent Council, 6pm

WED 15

TUE 14

THU 16

FRI 17 SAT 18

Year 11 & 13 mocks start Headteachers’ Surgery, 5 pm

MON 13

COMING UP THIS WEEK week beginning 13.11.17 week B

attendance We aim for 100% attendance for all of our students and have set 96% as satisfactory attendance for this year. Attendance is monitored period-by-period and statistics are published each week. Excellent attendance guarantees excellent learning. Attendance by year (October 16th):

Year 7 Year 8 year 9 year 10 year 11 School

97.5% 96.4% 96.4% 94.7% 95.4% 96.1%

Attendance and its impact on learning 10 days absence means 95% attendance 19 days absence means 90% attendance 29 days absence means 85% attendance 38 days absence means 80% attendance 47 days absence means 75% attendance Please note: If your child is off school you need to contact student services the same day on

Top: at the Siemens Rollercoaster Challenge; Below: 6th formers at the Teenage Cancer3 Trust fundraiser


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Head’s . WEEKLYstart REFLECTION

Gavin Landers, Assistant Priest attoSt.Charles Borromeo writes each week for us. r. Davis,Father Headteacher, reflects on the I get Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled eek. in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. et amor, Caritas ibi est (where charity andtie? love there is God) s about Ubi this Caritas time of year that I ubi meet with deusOutside it’s: “Sir,there have is you seen my ch Head of Department to review the Can you open my bottle? What did you mmer’s Have exam you results. thinkHave of last night’s game? time it, enough? If this is your ever This beeninvolves told you are useless? you ever been toldWhat you're notisgood enty of useful and thought-provoking Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my experience it is a scandal! scussion, but it is usually talking about days!” It can be noisy at times and in a mbers and letters. Behind this data are this size we iscan’t expect to the human race. Why? It is Every person is important, every personcommunity counts, every person invaluable ories: how pupils did, how they felt, what everyone to get on with each other allborn the in this time. So often how because from all eternity God intended, He chose, to create you to be here, ey liked and what they achieved. We time. But it is our community, and a lively, we think of ourselves doesn't reflect this truism. Our self worth is lacking and this becomes devastating. ways focus on how things can be lovely, positive one at that. proved as well as celebrating what went our selfschool, worth isexam based on what then we always goingoftomy beweek, poor, ifbecause there is always ell. As a IfCatholic results arewe have Perhaps the are single highlight I going to be someone richer than us. st one way of expressing the unique, Godhad to pick, would be the conversation I had ven talents and skills of each pupil. It is with Mrs. Fay who is leading the If our worththe is based how we look, then in time even with the delay portant to lookself beyond data soonI am development of-our new library. I amofa anti-ageing products - our outward grey hair, balding, and the listever goessince on. lighted that muchappearance more of mywill job change: involveswrinkles, library enthusiast and have been ing in classes, walking around the school I was little. The furthest reach of my d talkingIfto pupils, students and staff. is back to moments our our self worth is solely based on howmemory intellectual we are, then this spent totallyin disregards every sporting and local library entranced by its colour and physically enduring achievement to date. ever you are feeling at all despondent or bright possibilities. On Twitter igued I reckon a quick tour of the school #RememberingMyLibrary the hold However if our self worth is based on the fact that we are loved byreveals God, even with our imperfections and ould quickly raise your spirits. Let me that such an institution has: ‘A library card oddities, then this gives a whole new understanding of how our self worth should be understood: loved by ow you what I mean. Today (Thursday, was a free pass to wonderment, words and Himself what more affirmation arethe worthy of observes the love of God, which is what Jesus' eptemberGod 29th) for instance, I dropped into do we theneed? ability If towe roam world’ one sacrifice reveals we are worth dying for then we can walk with confidence knowing ar 10 GCSE Music. There, I was user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron that I AM LOVED! The challenge we receive is how do we respond to this love:library, do I love GodMark, in return? Do I love others as I lighted to listen to performances of gates of Stalybridge ‘Read, should? eethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of e River and When the Saints Go Marching the escape that a library represented or of I also got to sit Daniel theand refuge it offeredthen fromGod an unkind world. When wewith allow love and to beChester our motivation our method, is present: Ubi Caritas et amor, ubi they demonstrated prodigious DJingis charity and love there is God)! Caritas deustheir ibi est (where there ents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully nteen and made a point of watching the stacking thelet shelves we are Let us allow God in to our lives. God first loved us, us be and confident ininching that love and show God's love to eractions that take place daily. Pupils and closer to opening. What thrilled me was her others. aff holding doors open for one another, comment that several boys, some of whom ering thanks, little moments of personal affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by preciation and gratitude. Of course, presence of a library in their school: ‘You ngs don’t always go well in a school, but it mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, lovely to witness a voluntary apology from Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or pupil. Our library isHeadteacher, at the heart Mr. Davis, reflectsof onthe the I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled week. in a task that is so challenging and exciting e one pupil help another who is unsure school: a space for being open to and that I want to stay and have a go myself. aboutexperiences. this time of year that I meet here to go for class. sharing ideasIt isand It iswith open-Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? each Head of Department to review the Can you open my bottle? What did you plan and its shelves serve reminder think of last night’s game? What time is it, summer’s exam results.as Thisainvolves plenty ofbe useful andbarrier thought-provoking and, at least once a day, “Oh my Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with that there should no to anyone Sir?” discussion, but it is usually talking about days!” It can be noisy at times and in a numbers or and seeking letters. Behind this data are community this size we can’t expect dan who explained both the theory of using its volumes knowledge, stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what everyone to get on with each other all the ferentiation and its potential commercial solace, entertainment or they information. they liked and what achieved. We I can’t time. But it is our community, and a lively, focus onlife how things canweeks be lovely, positive one at that. plication. In English they were studying wait to see italways come to in the improved as well as celebrating what went a Catholic school, results are ofPerhaps the single highlight of my week, if I e play Blood Brothers and talking with ahead thankswell.toAsMrs. Fay andexam her band just one way of expressing the unique, Godhad to pick, would be the conversation I had mour and excitement about superstitions; helpers. given talents and skills of each pupil. It is with Mrs. Fay who is leading the important to look beyond the data so I am development of our new library. I am a Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new delighted that much more of my job involves library enthusiast and have been ever since ssion statement and exploring the being in classes, walking around the school I was little. The furthest reach of my Ben Davis, and Headteacher talking to pupils, students and staff. memory is back to moments spent in our rsonal meanings within it. School is a local library entranced by its colour and Twitter: @BenDavis1972 If ever you are feeling at all despondent or bright possibilities. On Twitter sy, bustling, humming place. fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold

Head’s start .

Every person is important, every person counts, every person is invaluable to the human race

would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the

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that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others4talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching


Head’s start . visit chris lubbe’s

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

We welcomed Chris Lubbe to the school on Wednesday to speak with staff and pupils. He told us about his experiences in South Africa, his personal involvement in the struggle ti end apartheid and spoke inspiring words of wisdom about forgiveness and reconciliation.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

5


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Head’s YEAR 11start MOCK. INTERVIEWS

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

This is always a big day in the life of our school. Suits and workwear are donned by Year 11 as they are interviewed by people from business and industry. Although many were nervous before the interviews they gave accomplished and mature performances and many spoke of the confidence they had gained from the experience. Don’t they look fantastic!

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

6


Head’s SCIENCEstart CLUB .GARDEN

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

Our school garden is going from strength to strength and is tended weekly by a team of volunteers led by Mrs. Robb. Here they are planning further developments with Francine from the Royal Horticultural Society to divide the garden into three to reflect the sections of our mission statement. Amazing idea!

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Head’s start . ENTERPRISE

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

Enterprise has been a real area of development over the last two years. The Year 7 Dragons’ Den experience is now underpinning our Christmas Fair, the subject is well embedded into Sixth Form and the Young Enterprise group has been formed and is preparing for this exciting time.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

7





Above: Year 13 team teaching; Below: Year 7 victorious again

8


Head’s start .

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff. If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that. Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world. Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

Head’s start . gcse art exhibition

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week. It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves being in classes, walking around the school and talking to pupils, students and staff.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

The GCSE results are long past but that doesn’t me we miss a chance to celebrate our pupils. Thursday evening saw the Hall and Drama Studio filled with art works, installations, sketch books and more as we exhibited last year’s Year 11 work. Thanks to all the parents, carers and staff who supported this.

If ever you are feeling at all despondent or fatigued I reckon a quick tour of the school would quickly raise your spirits. Let me show you what I mean. Today (Thursday, September 29th) for instance, I dropped into Year 10 GCSE Music. There, I was delighted to listen to performances of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, Hold Back the River and When the Saints Go Marching In. I also got to sit with Daniel and Chester as they demonstrated their prodigious DJing talents. Next, during lunch, I supervised the canteen and made a point of watching the interactions that take place daily. Pupils and staff holding doors open for one another, offering thanks, little moments of personal appreciation and gratitude. Of course, things don’t always go well in a school, but it is lovely to witness a voluntary apology from a Year 9 to one of the lunch time staff, or see one pupil help another who is unsure where to go for class. In Sixth Form, I enjoyed a lengthy chat with Aidan who explained both the theory of differentiation and its potential commercial application. In English they were studying the play Blood Brothers and talking with humour and excitement about superstitions; in Year 7 RE they were dissecting our new mission statement and exploring the personal meanings within it. School is a busy, bustling, humming place.

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since I was little. The furthest reach of my memory is back to moments spent in our local library entranced by its colour and bright possibilities. On Twitter #RememberingMyLibrary reveals the hold that such an institution has: ‘A library card was a free pass to wonderment, words and the ability to roam the world’ observes one user, whilst another quotes the wrought iron gates of Stalybridge library, ‘Read, Mark, Learn and Inwardly Digest.’ Others talk of the escape that a library represented or of the refuge it offered from an unkind world.

Mrs. Fay spent last Saturday peacefully stacking the shelves and we are inching closer to opening. What thrilled me was her comment that several boys, some of whom affect a dislike of reading, were electrified by presence of a library in their school: ‘You mean I can borrow this and, like, read it, Miss?’ was the breathless utterance of one pupil. Our library is at the heart of the school: a space for being open to and sharing ideas and experiences. It is openplan and its shelves serve as a reminder that there should be no barrier to anyone using its volumes or seeking knowledge, solace, entertainment or information. I can’t wait to see it come to life in the weeks ahead thanks to Mrs. Fay and her band of helpers.

Ben Davis, Headteacher Twitter: @BenDavis1972 2

9


Head’s . Christmas fair Parentstart Council:

Mr. Davis, Headteacher, reflects on the week.

I get to Maths to find all of Year 9 embroiled in a task that is so challenging and exciting that I want to stay and have a go myself. Outside it’s: “Sir, have you seen my tie? Can you open my bottle? What did you think of last night’s game? What time is it, Sir?” and, at least once a day, “Oh my days!” It can be noisy at times and in a community this size we can’t expect everyone to get on with each other all the time. But it is our community, and a lively, lovely, positive one at that.

Our Christmas Fair & Fun Run will soon be upon us. Mrs. Cheshire is co-ordinating stalls and Year 7 will be selling their wares. Anyone interested in having a stall is should 10 contact Mrs. Cheshire via the school.

It is about this time of year that I meet with each Head of Department to review the summer’s exam results. This involves plenty of useful and thought-provoking discussion, but it is usually talking about numbers and letters. Behind this data are stories: how pupils did, how they felt, what they liked and what they achieved. We always focus on how things can be improved as well as celebrating what went well. As a Catholic school, exam results are just one way of expressing the unique, Godgiven talents and skills of each pupil. It is important to look beyond the data so I am delighted that much more of my job involves

Perhaps the single highlight of my week, if I had to pick, would be the conversation I had with Mrs. Fay who is leading the development of our new library. I am a library enthusiast and have been ever since


TWEET OF THE WEEK Beth Renshaw   ✨   @BethRenshaw_

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drive past @SABSalford everyday for college and a year on and I still wish I was 11 back

1:07 am - 12 Sep 2017#inspiresummit2017


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ST AMBROSE BARLOW RC HIGH SCHOOL & SIXTH FORM www.stambrosebarlowswinton.org 37 Ash Drive Swinton Salford M27 9QP 0161 921 1570 @SABSalford Headteacher: Ben Davis 12

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St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 9 November 10th 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School and Sixth Form, Swinton, Salford. UK

St Ambrose Barlow Weekly Newsletter Vol. 3 Issue 9 November 10th 2017  

All the news from St. Ambrose Barlow RC High School and Sixth Form, Swinton, Salford. UK

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