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have to go elsewhere for water, as in some San Joaquin Valley towns. But at least so far, these 15 or 20 million Paulistas have water; the parks and rural fields are green and the São Paulo faucets put out clean, chlorinated water, with only occasionally a slight musty smell. Everyone who can, continues to choose bottled water in a determined effort to fill the ocean with plastic garbage, which is, of course, oil.

Monday Feb. 23, 2015

Above is a view of the Brazilian countryside.

the subway escalators, people politely, almost always, move to the right (like the sign says!) To allow those in a hurry to pass. Drivers are courteous, even in this city of perhaps 15 to 20 million. People are almost always ready to answer questions, even when they aren’t clear about the question or the answer! There is a rather ordinary Brazilian machismo; it’s reflected in the Futbol museum, a multi-million dollar homage to maleness. Yet, Brazilians are very attuned to the USA, and there are prominent informational items everywhere on the social, sexual, environmental and nutritional matters we dote on in the USA. There is a general tolerance of the other, with some exceptions: the homeless and the drug-addicted are ignored almost completely. I suppose people assume they don’t vote, or contribute much in any other way. In that sense, this is a harsh or practical reality. Is it tough love? I suspect it is. That of a country on the move. Street sleepers are usually gone by 10 am. In my upscale Paulista area, they are…where? The “millennials,” young, educated adults, are, it seems to me, like their peers all over the world.  The world is, says CNN, concerned about the closing down and evacuation of many millions in São Paulo due to lack of water. There is here, yes, a drought; much like ours in California. It may last several years. In some small towns, the water infrastructure is inadequate and people

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Sierra Sacramento Valley Medicine

I want to stay on in the same hotel, so I ask to extend. But I’m told the room rate now is 45 percent higher; the clerk explains that when the hotel is full, that happens. And even though I have been here now for a week, they cannot allow me a three-hour late checkout when I leave; not without another hefty charge. The people are very pleasant, and proper, but the rules are set somewhere in non-personal space; since I don’t want to devote my time to arguing or moving, I accept this abuse as inherent in a non-consumer sensitive society. I go to the Museu do Futebol – the soccer museum. Brazil is, at least nominally, Samba, song, and Futbol. The museum is much more than a huge monument to maleness, or the sport. It is a cultural resume of history and peoples. Brazil is a melting pot like the USA. They have won the World Football Cup five times, tied with Argentina. They failed in 2014, such a national disaster that it is not yet included in the displays devoted to each World Cup. I doubt it will be there before the next cup! São Paulo is a huge and labyrinthine metropolis. I travel by metro, bus and taxi when necessary. I am often lost. There is always the question of safety with respect to foreign travel. In the USA, our media is salted with reports of what sells: assault, theft, extortion, etc. Yet, at home, we know where and how those things are most likely to happen. On the other hand, in a foreign environment, that is not so clear. My trip from the airport bus station to downtown São Paulo is an example of what to do and not to do. I live in the mind of a child of the Great Depression of the thirties: waste not, want not.  So, after asking at the airport, instead

Profile for Sierra Sacramento Valley Medical Society

2015-Jul/Aug - SSV Medicine  

Sierra Sacramento Valley Medicine is the official journal of the Sierra Sacramento Valley Medical Society (SSVMS) and promotes the history,...

2015-Jul/Aug - SSV Medicine  

Sierra Sacramento Valley Medicine is the official journal of the Sierra Sacramento Valley Medical Society (SSVMS) and promotes the history,...