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BE PART OF IT

THE FUTURE OF CAREERS IN PLYMOUTH A guide for parents and carers


CONTENTS 14%

12%

14%

12%

16%

16% 10%

Welcome 1

Qualifications Explained 10

18%

18%

8%

Plymouth Now

2-3

20%

Pathways to Employment 11 20%

GREAT BRITAIN

PLYMOUTH Property Financial & insurance Construction Professional scientific & technical Arts, entertainment, recreation & other Transport & storage Business administration & support Public administration & defence Accommodation & food

6%

Plymouth in the Future

4%

Manufacturing Education Wholesale Health

2%

4-5

Property Financial & insurance Construction Professional scientific & technical Arts, entertainment, recreation & other Transport & storage Business administration & support Public administration & defence Accommodation & food

Regional Centre of Excellence for STEM 12 Manufacturing Education Wholesale Health

2%

0

0

The View from Plymouth Employers

Careers Advice and Guidance

6-7

Home-grown Talent 13

8-9

facebook.com/cityplym twitter.com/cityplym

If you would find it easier to read this guide in larger print or a different format, please call 01752 305300 or e-mail info@cityplym.ac.uk. 2 I www.cityplym.ac.uk

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WELCOME

There has rarely been a better time to choose a career in Plymouth. Employment levels are amongst the highest they have ever been and companies are coming to the City or expanding here. Great news for you and your family! However, we know that the jobs and education scene has changed dramatically from the days when you (and I!) set out on your journey into work. That is why, for the first time, we have compiled a guide dedicated to parents and carers to help them understand where the opportunities are for their children. As you’d expect, we’ve done our homework. The research in this guide takes a detailed look at Plymouth today and how it might look in the future to inform both short and long-term career prospects. It is aimed at starting a conversation about career choices. If you’d like to continue the conversation, please get in touch with our Careers Crew who are featured on page 9 - they are happy to take any questions you might have, give you the information you need, and signpost you in the right direction. Finally, we’d really welcome your feedback on the guide so if there is anything you’d like us to cover in the future, please get in touch.

Phil Davies Principal and Chief Executive

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Plymouth has been performing consistently well for nearly ten years. TODAY’S CAREERS PICTURE

PLYMOUTH NOW

Right now, companies are investing in the City; development is happening and plans are being put into place. Plymouth is expanding and career opportunities are growing with it. Every year since the recession Plymouth has seen an increased and sustained output growth exceeding the national growth rate. •

Economic output for the City now exceeds £5billion a year.

There are over 130,000 jobs in the City.

The City has seen a rebalancing of the economy towards private sector growth (8.8% since 2010) and a decline in public sector dependency (from 26.3% in 2010 to 23% in 2013).

Compared to the rest of Great Britain, Plymouth has a higher cluster of enterprises in the advanced engineering, marine and defence, digital and construction sectors.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOUR CHILD? Plymouth is a great place to start a career and there are plenty of choices when it comes to career opportunities. Skills are in demand and jobs are there. However, we also know that 62% of 15-18 year olds in Plymouth are not decided on their future career. This isn’t particularly high or unusual but it highlights the need to take some time out, take a look at where the opportunities are and start finding out about sectors and careers that are of interest to your child. If your child is fully decided, please take a look at what that career might be like in the future and consider carefully what steps and finances will be needed to get there. Choices in qualifications and pathways have never been higher too!

SOURCES City College Plymouth Stakeholder Research (Fuel, 2016), Plymouth Skills Analysis (PCC, 2015), Plymouth and South West Devon Joint Local Plan (2017), BRES, Nomis Oxford Economics Forecasting Model (2014), CSW Statistical Reports (2014), Business Register for Employment Survey (ONS, 2013), The Defence Analytical, Services and Advice (MoD, 2013).

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Top sectors sustaining the economy - percentage of employment 2013

14%

12%

12%

16% 10%

10%

18%

8%

8%

20%

PLYMOUTH 6%

Property Financial & insurance Construction Professional scientific & technical Arts, entertainment, recreation & other Transport & storage Business administration & support Public administration & defence Accommodation & food

4%

6%

4%

Manufacturing Education Wholesale Health

2%

2%

0

14%

12%

16%

16% 10%

18%

18%

8%

20%

Property Financial & insurance Construction Professional scientific & technical Arts, entertainment, recreation & other Transport & storage Business administration & support Public administration & defence Accommodation & food Manufacturing Education Wholesale Health

20%

GREAT BRITAIN

6%

4%

Property Financial & insurance Construction Professional scientific & technical Arts, entertainment, recreation & other Transport & storage Business administration & support Public administration & defence Accommodation & food Manufacturing Education Wholesale Health

2% 0

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TOMORROW’S CAREERS PICTURE

PLYMOUTH IN THE FUTURE

Plymouth & South West Devon has a Joint Local Plan that is unanimously backed and adopted by all political parties. For Plymouth, the vision of being one of Europe’s most vibrant waterfront cities with a population of 300,000 is a very positive one. More growth will mean more jobs. But with Brexit on the horizon and machines predicted to be doing some of the work, where will those jobs be? •

Future skills requirements are likely to be seen mainly in high and low-skilled occupations if current trends continue*.

Demand for high skills is expected to increase along with a growth in high-level employment, mainly for occupations such as managers and senior officials, associate professional and technical occupations, and professional occupations ...

... as well as for low skills, required in elementary occupations and sales and customer service occupations. A decline to 2030 is expected to be seen in some low and intermediate-skills occupations, particularly in process, plant and machinery operatives and administrative and secretarial occupations.

* HotSW - Heart of the South West Local Area Partnership (Devon & Somerset)

Employment growth and occupational structure 2012-2030

Elementary occupations Process, plant & machine operatives Sales & customer service occupations Personal services occupations Skilled trades occupations Administrative & secretarial occupations Associate professional & technical occupations Professional occupations Managers & senior officials -10%

-5%

0

% total 2030

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5%

10%

% total 2012

15%

20%

% growth 2012-30

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Key sectors of overall employment growth

PLYMOUTH IN THE FUTURE WHERE WILL THE JOBS BE?

2013-2020

The health sector will continue growing, by 8.3%. Employment in the education and public administration and defence sectors, however, is expected to decline, therefore public sector dependency will further reduce.

At the same time, private sector employment, mainly experienced in real estate, professional, scientific and technical services, construction and information and communication, will see a large expansion of around 32%, 27%, 23% and 21%, respectively.

The creative industries (16%) and accommodation and food (11%) will also see significant growth.

The manufacturing sector, however, is expected to contract.

Food, drink, tobacco & other Manufacturing (exc aerospace & marine) Manufacturing Marine Aerospace Primary industries Public administration & defence Education Financial & insurance Retail & wholesale

WATCH OUT FOR THE MACHINES!

Transport & storage

The Bank of England has warned that 15 million jobs in the UK are under threat to the age of the robot with increasingly sophisticated machines doing work previously the preserve of humans. In the US the estimate is 80 million jobs.

Health & social work Accommodation & food Arts, entertainment, recreation & other

Jobs in the UK with a salary over £40,000 are at greatest risk. From 30 categories of jobs with a risk from artificial intelligence there is an 80% risk for accountants, auditors, technical writers, train and tram operators and power plant operators. At medium risk are judges, magistrates, economists, computer programmers, commercial pilots and financial advisors. Lowest risk (less than 1%) is in the healthcare sector.

Administration & support service Information & communication Construction Professional, scientific & technical Real estate -40%

-20%

0 UK

20% HotSW

40%

60%

Plymouth

SOURCES City College Plymouth Stakeholder Research (Fuel, 2016), Plymouth Skills Analysis (PCC, 2015), Plymouth and South West Devon Joint Local Plan (2017), BRES, Nomis Oxford Economics Forecasting Model (2014), CSW Statistical Reports (2014), Business Register for Employment Survey (ONS, 2013), The Defence Analytical, Services and Advice (MoD, 2013).

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THE VIEW FROM PLYMOUTH’S EMPLOYERS At City College we pride ourselves on being an educational establishment that understands what employers want from their future employees. So when we told them about our plans to publish a guide for parents and carers and wanted their input, over 50 organisations including Kier, Plymouth City Council, Bright Solicitors, Plymouth Citybus and the Federation of Small Businesses attended our ‘City Skills Forecast’ event to offer their views.

The big message from the employers was that the traditional education route to a job is no longer as relevant as it once was. The days of straight graduate recruitment are slightly dated, with employers wanting more hands-on experience, better communication skills and candidates with pliability that can be moulded to fit their own specific need.

WHAT DO EMPLOYERS WANT? They want education providers to start producing young candidates with the skills that employers ‘actually’ want and not what they ‘think’ employers want. Many were critical of schools ‘hanging on’ to students and not educating them about the other options that are available at further and higher education in addition to A Levels and university degrees.

The idea was to start a sensible discussion about what skills Plymouth and the surrounding area were going to need in the near future which in turn would start to influence how courses were created at City College.

TRADITIONAL EDUCATION VS NEW ROUTES

We asked some of Plymouth’s leading employers to offer careers advice tips for parents and young people ...

DONT’S •

“Don’t give guidance direct - my advice to my own children fell on deaf ears (because I am their Dad). I asked a colleague to give them 30 minutes of general careers advice and they listened and willingly adopted the ideas given (which were of course the same as mine!). If all parents did this to someone else’s child, everyone would be better off.”

“Don’t be afraid to question the careers advice. There are plenty of opportunities out there, take some time, get some advice and then go for it!”

“Don’t think that a standard CV ‘will do’! In an age when children are able to create things easily, I am still amazed by the lack of creativity put into CVs - they all look the same!”

“Don’t turn up to an interview without researching the company first. Remember, competition for places could be high and the majority of the applicants will have good grades. A well-prepared candidate will stand out, impress and stand a good chance of getting the job.”

DO’S •

“Remember that life skills such as timekeeping and communicating are very important. School leavers need to understand that there is a need to work consistently which takes effort and conviction.”

“Consider that leaving school at 16 to start an Apprenticeship CAN lead to higher qualifications as your career progresses.”

“Use all of your contacts and friendships to see if you can get your child to experience as many work environments as possible. This need not be a week’s work experience, but could be as little as a tour of the workplace, a ten minute chat with individual employees, or a mock interview.”

“Show enthusiasm! Employers are happy to take work ready young employees with ‘fire in their belly’ we’ll then give them the technical skills to succeed.” “Help children to see it as a career not as a job. If they start with the view of ‘how do I get to be the boss?’, they may realise that the key skills they need to demonstrate are not the skills of doing the job, but of ambition, hard work, timekeeping, a willingness to do some menial tasks and effective communication. Showing these attributes will help get them the job as well as help them progress.”

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“Watch your online footprint! Consider how employers check Facebook and Instagram, and how many potential applicants are ruled out by their social media (inappropriate images or comments, including such comments as ‘bunked off school today’!).”

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PRE BREXIT

Increase

28.57%

19.05%

Whilst most employers are confident of increasing staff numbers before we exit the EU there were real concerns over the potential loss of foreign workers who 45.00% Increase play important roles in the health and service sectors.

Stay the same

Decrease

38.1%

14.29%

Increase

Don’t know

15.00%

45.00%

25.00%

Decrease

Increase

Don’t know

POST BREXIT (TO 2021) 45.00%

Post Brexit, many businesses felt that investment Increase will need to be made. Again, concerns were raised about exiting foreign workers and the impact that will have. Whilst that should increase the number of jobs available, local employers feared that positions could be left empty.

35.00%

40.00% Don’t know

28.57%

Stay the same

Increase

19.05%

Decrease

15.00%

EMPLOYERS FEEDBACK

e

38.1%

14.29% Don’t know

%

How employers anticipate staff numbers changing in their organisation

Decrease

15.00%

Stay the same

15.00%

Decrease

Decrease ›

2021-2031

20.00%

05.00%

Stay the same

35.00%

40.00%

Increase

Don’t know

Clearly this is more difficult to predict but, over the long-term Plymouth businesses are confident due to the strategic direction of the City, Mayflower 2020 celebrations providing a boost and predicted long term economic growth post Brexit.

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20.00% Decrease

05.00%

Stay the same

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According to the World Economic Forum, 65% of children entering primary school today will ultimately end up working in completely new job types that don’t yet exist. With technological advances and an ageing workforce, the labour market’s future is one of constant change. It’s no wonder that, according to a recent Plymouth City Council survey, 59% of local parents said they need help understanding qualifications, training and employment routes.

CAREERS ADVICE AND GUIDANCE

Mike Jones, Employability & Enterprise Manager at City College Plymouth, offers the following tips for parents:

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 reate a conversation about careers - A job that exists 1. C today might not in five years’ time so it is a good idea to take some time out to discuss future options. An easy way to do this is to ask what your child likes to do and is good at. You’ll know what skills they have too so once you’ve had a chat you’ll start to build a picture of what careers utilise those skills sets and equally, which ones don’t! You don’t need to zoom straight to an actual job role. Also, speak to other parents and find out what they are doing or did in the past.  ook outside school options - Schools should have good 2. L careers resources but your child’s options have changed in recent years. Yes, the traditional route of staying in school and taking GCSEs until 16 is still there but your child can opt to attend a Studio School from the age of 14 to study subjects, for example, engineering, in more detail and then specialise in a technical or vocational area at college from 16. With more options available, it makes sense to look more widely, particularly if you’ve had a conversation about pursuing a more technical career.

3. How much will it cost to get the career? - All of us want our children to be the best they can be and pursue the career of their choice. A choice between a university route and an Apprenticeship route could lead to a £50,000 difference for your child once university fees and ‘earn as you learn’ wages for an Apprenticeship are factored in. It is a figure that should be considered very carefully. Either could be the right route (or there are more on page 11). Our advice is to take a look at the numbers involved and make sure your child understands the financial implications of the decision. University graduates do (on average) earn more than apprentices but will the higher wages pay off the student loan and by when? For apprentices, over the duration of their working life, would they earn more in the long term by doing a university degree?

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4. Adaptability will be key in a changing market - ‘Jobs for life’ are very rare! Before 2012, anybody entering the labour market was predicted to have four jobs in their lifetime. With technology, flexible working and an ageing workforce, that figure is now 20 jobs! Think about it for a moment: will your child really want to do the same thing from 18 to 67 (and possibly older)? So it is highly likely that we are talking about more than one career. Think about the first career and putting in place sought-after skills and qualifications. STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) are widely predicted to be the skills needed in the future. Your child should look to have real competency in one or two of these areas.

Mike Jones Employability & Enterprise Manager • HND in Business and Management • Level 4 Diploma in Advice and Guidance • Seven years’ experience of working in further education and five years’ previous experience working in recruitment

Sarah Sinclair Senior Careers Officer • Level 7 Postgraduate Certificate in Careers Education, Information, Advice and Guidance

5. Do your homework - We know that helping your child to choose a career can be tricky, particularly when the jobs scene is very different from when you and I made our choices! Thankfully, there are plenty of good online resources to help you and your child:

• 22 years’ experience working in education, including five years as a Careers Advisor

Lynette Soanes Careers Advisor

• www.nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk

• Level 4 Diploma in Advice and Guidance; currently studying level 6

• www.cswgroup.co.uk • www.getingofar.gov.uk

• 12 years’ experience delivering information advice and guidance in the further education sector

6. Have a chat with the ‘Unseen Careers Adviser’ - Careers Advisers can offer insight into options and point you in the right direction but we always recommend having a chat with somebody who works in the area your child is considering. You can ask a friend to do you a favour or even call up a business to ask if it is okay to pop in for a chat or schedule a phone call - you’ll be pleasantly surprised by how many businesses will help you. Another great way to find out more is to book in for one of our Open Days, course taster sessions or employer talks - feel free to get in touch and ask us for more details.

Contact the Careers Crew on: 01752 305803 I info@cityplym.ac.uk facebook.com/cityplym twitter.com/cityplym

• Level 6 Diploma in Careers Guidance and Development, and Support Services • 25 years’ experience in delivering education advice and guidance

CAREERS CREW

7. Seek impartial advice - With so many options on the table, seeking clear and impartial advice is a good way to ask any questions and get assistance. We know that most parents want face-to-face, individual appointments to discuss careers. As a Matrix-approved college, we have been inspected and accredited for our impartial advice so you are very welcome to book a free appointment or have a chat with one of our Careers Crew.

Helen Pryor Careers Advisor

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TRAINEESHIPS (PRE-APPRENTICESHIPS) A Traineeship is an education and training programme with work experience, designed to help young people who don’t yet have the appropriate skills or experience to secure an Apprenticeship or employment.

APPRENTICESHIPS

QUALIFICATIONS EXPLAINED

For those who would prefer to follow a work-based route, there is a choice between an Apprenticeship (level 2), an Advanced Apprenticeship (level 3), a Higher Apprenticeship (level 4), or a Degree Apprenticeship (level 5/6). Apprentices are employed and receive a wage whilst training with an employer.

NATIONAL VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS (NVQS) NVQs are work-related qualifications, which apply the practical skills and knowledge learnt at College directly to the workplace. They are studied alongside an Apprenticeship.

GCSEs We offer part-time GCSEs in English, maths, biology, chemistry and physics for those who have not achieved a grade C/4* at school. These are studied alongside the student’s chosen study programme.

FUNCTIONAL SKILLS Functional Skills are qualifications in maths, English and information communication technology (ICT) and are very popular with employers. Studied alongside a student’s chosen course, they form an essential part of their study programme.

LEVEL 1 AND 2 CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS These are one-year courses, which allow students to progress either into employment or on to higher-level study. All our level 1 and 2 qualifications have progression routes on to the next level of study (subject to satisfactory performance). For many students, these courses offer an ideal opportunity to develop their skills, learning in a more hands-on way and improving their future career prospects.

LEVEL 3 DIPLOMAS These are two-year vocational qualifications which prepare students for direct entry into employment or to higher education (such as a university-level course). Some diplomas consist of more than one qualification and many offer additional related qualifications to support applications to work or university.

BTEC SUBSIDIARY AND EXTENDED DIPLOMAS These are two-year vocational qualifications, which blend practical, career-focused skills and academic study to prepare young people for direct entry into employment or on to university-level courses (higher education). Students will study for a subsidiary diploma in year one and then continue on to the extended diploma in their second year. Level 3 BTECs are the equivalent to three A Levels and will earn students UCAS points for entry to higher education. For example, a BTEC National Diploma with overall three merit grades earns 96 UCAS points (one A Level with an A grade earns 48 UCAS points).

HIGHER NATIONAL CERTIFICATES These are higher-level qualifications, which relate to a particular employment sector and tend to be equivalent to the first and/ or second stage of a degree. They are for students who are aged 18+ and have successfully completed an A Level, extended diploma or other advanced-level course (level 3).

FOUNDATION DEGREES These are industry-related higher education qualifications equivalent to the first and second stage of a degree, developed by the College with employers. They are designed to include workplace experience, learning and assessment, whilst also providing a route for progression into employment or to the final year of an honours degree at specified universities. *Grade 4 applies to GCSE results from August 2017 onwards.

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At City College our students get more than just a course - they’re taking their first steps on the path towards their future career.

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Employment

Traineeship

Intermediate Apprenticeship

Advanced Apprenticeship

Higher Apprenticeship

Key Stage 3

GCSE grades D-F/3-1

Level 1 Diploma/NVQ

Level 2 Diploma/NVQ

Level 3 Diploma/NVQ

Higher National Certificate Level 4 Diploma NVQ

Foundation Degree and Higher National Diploma

Honours Degree

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GCSE grades A-C/9-4

A Levels Access to HE

Higher National Certificate

ENTRY LEVEL

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

LEVEL 4

LEVEL 5

LEVEL 6

PATHWAYS TO EMPLOYMENT

Entry Level Programmes

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REGIONAL CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE FOR STEM 12 www.cityplym.ac.uk 2 I Iwww.cityplym.ac.uk

This autumn we will be opening our Regional Centre of Excellence for Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM). The Centre will have a huge impact on the training and education of STEMrelated subjects for the City and wider region, but why is this important?

“Study STEM subjects, develop STEM skills and you’ll find no difficulty finding work that is well-paid and has good career prospects in the area.”

Currently just 25% of pupils in Plymouth study STEM academic and vocational subjects post-16 - not enough to meet the demands of employers for well-paid jobs with excellent long-term prospects across a variety of areas including digital, engineering and medical.

So what are the STEM job opportunities and what do they pay on average per year?

Looking at the national picture, demand for STEM skills and qualifications is high: •

830,000 jobs in STEM need to be filled by 2020

1,200,000 digital workers needed by 2022

182,000 engineers needed annually to 2022

230,000 construction professionals needed by 2022.

It is therefore not surprising that the STEM Plymouth Strategic Plan says:

Architects - £43,160

Chemists - £24,956

Civil Engineers - £30,369

Electricians - £32,500

Games Developers - £35,000

Manufacturing Engineers £29,000

Nuclear Engineers - £35,425

Sports Therapists - £28,000

City College, together with the Heart of the South West Local Enterprise Partnership, Plymouth City Council and the Regional Growth Fund, are making a £13m investment in a bright future for your children. We invite you to be part of it!

TAKE A TOUR! The new STEM Centre will open in September 2017 and you are invited to take a look around. Simply call us on 01752 305300 or e-mail info@ cityplym.ac.uk to register your interest.

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Students are at the heart of everything we do here at City College, so we’re always proud when they go on to great things in the City of Plymouth and beyond. Not only are they great ambassadors for the College, but they help inspire a new generation of learners.

Renowned polar explorer, Antony Jinman, studied public services at the College and is now a qualified International Mountain Leader who leads various remote expeditions, including a number of trips to the Arctic. Antony said: “I continue to work closely with City College and am always delighted to come into the College and talk to students about my future plans.”

ANTON PIOTROWSKI Ivybridge lad, Anton Piotrowski, may have won an in-house cookery competition at the College when he was a catering student, but it’s probably his Masterchef: The Professionals win that he’s best known for! Anton said: “The whole College experience really matures young people. It certainly gave me self-esteem and built my confidence.”

CHARLEINE WAIN Star of BBC1’s The Apprentice, Charleine Wain is now a multiaward winning hairdresser and owner of Charleine Wain Hair and Beauty Salon in Plymouth. She credits the College for helping her retrain and start a new career after she left the Royal Navy. Charleine said: “There’s no way I could have done it without the College. It gave me a new focus on life, giving me confidence and helping me set goals to succeed.”

PATRICK O'CONNELL Patrick O’Connell studied mechanical engineering at the College. He’s now the Managing Director of local, family-run tyre company, Bandvulc. After two days at sixth form, Patrick realised that school wasn’t for him and joined City College, which he credits for helping him get where he is today. Patrick said: “The lecturers were excellent because they all had real experience. I have very many happy memories of my time at the College.”

HOME-GROWN TALENT

ANTONY JINMAN

JON MORCOM Whilst studying at City College, Jon Morcom became Trainee Manager at the Duke of Cornwall Hotel - a hotel that he now jointly owns! Jon said: “For me, I’m proud that I was a student at the College. I’m proud that I can talk about that and I’m proud of where I’ve arrived. To give something back to the College is essential for me and I’m happy to continue to do this with opportunities for current students.”

DAVID ROWE David Rowe is the Managing Director of award-winning manufacturing company, Applied Automation, based in Plymouth. He attributes his success to his engineering training with City College as an apprentice, where he developed the base core skills that he still needs today. David said: "I can honestly say that during my 45 year career in engineering, I have used everything I learnt, and looking back I'm very grateful to the College for my training." ›

01752 305300

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City College Plymouth, Kings Road Devonport, Plymouth, Devon, PL1 5QG 01752 305300 I info@cityplym.ac.uk I www.cityplym.ac.uk

The College enquiry desk is open from 8.00am to 6.00pm Monday to Thursday and 8.00am to 5.00pm on a Friday during term time. During holidays the desk is open from 8.30am to 5.00pm Monday to Thursday and 8.30am to 4.30pm on a Friday.

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Š City College Plymouth 2017

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