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college facilities

2012 Prospectus

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Where aspiration meets opportunity “Outstanding Achievement� - ALPS 2011


college facilities

Contents 03

Welcome from the Principal

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The vision for the College

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Headteachers Statement

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Ten reasons to choose us

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The College facilities

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Communicating with staff

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Support for you

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Your personal development

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Enrichment opportunities

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How to apply

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Courses we offer

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Courses we offer

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Course Information

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How to find us

Find out more about the college!

Please call us on 0151 288 6300, visit www.sssfc.ac.uk or email us at enquiries@sssfc.ac.uk Follow us on Twitter @SSSFC


A Message from the Principal Mrs Laetitia Shemilt I am delighted that you are interested in joining our 6th Form College. I want to assure you from the outset that if you do choose to join us you will be valued as an individual with a unique set of talents and skills and we will support you in the pursuit of your ambitions. As a college we are committed to academic excellence and we will do our utmost to ensure you achieve your potential during your time with us. We expect you to be committed to learning, be organised and to work hard; but we also believe that you will only do this if you enjoy your time at College and are able to learn in a safe, caring and happy environment. College life should not just be about studying but should also provide opportunities to take part in activities such as sport, music, drama and dance as well as visits to places

in this country and abroad. Such experiences will help you develop into a well-educated young person and for this reason I strongly encourage you to make the most of the numerous enrichment activities on offer. I firmly believe that you deserve the very best and we are fortunate to have a state-of-the-art building with the most up-to-date technology. Our College motto is, “Where Aspiration Meets Opportunity�, so if you aspire to do well and you have high ambitions, then I really look forward to receiving your application and meeting you. With my best wishes for a successful Year 11.

college facilities Welcome from the Principal

Welcome to South Sefton Sixth Form College

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college the visionfor facilities the college

Our college is a centre of educational excellence, opportunity and support within an inclusive, caring environment.

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To achieve this... We have high quality teaching that enables you to fulfil your potential. This includes: • a world class learning environment • well-qualified staff who are supportive of you and treat you with respect and trust • excellent facilities that promote effective learning • classrooms where your fellow students are keen to learn • lessons that are dynamic, engaging and ensure you achieve to the best of your ability

will offer stimulat We offer stimulating and challenging learning opportunities that assist you to develop your potential to the full. This includes: • courses that are academically challenging • access to enrichment, sports’ activities and trips that develop personal and social skills • events and activities that are exciting and fun • opportunities to support charity work • guidance to help ensure your career choice is well-informed • tutorial sessions that lead to an accredited level 3 qualification

We provide a friendly, supportive and safe environment in which everyone is respected. This includes: • mutual respect between staff and students • equality of opportunity • showing understanding and respect for the beliefs of others • opportunities for people to practise their faith • a calm, orderly environment which is friendly and safe • pastoral support staff and systems that meet the needs of all individuals including those with disabilities • a student voice on the management of the College


South Sefton Sixth Form College has got off to a flying start... It has several outstanding features... The college has achieved a great deal in two years. In the words of the Vice Principal it ‘hit the ground running, and has results that some well-established colleges would envy’. The ambition to turn the college into an outstanding institution pervades everything it does... The college was set up to offer high-quality academic courses to young people from its community and to a very large extent it has succeeded in achieving this goal. It enables a high proportion of students to progress to university, many of whom are the first from their family to access higher education... There is an atmosphere of mutual respect and both staff and students are extremely committed to the college community. This is typified by the comments of students who told inspectors: ‘They really treat you as adults and listen to what you think’ and ‘Everyone here wants this place to succeed and works very hard’... Examination results represent good and sometimes outstanding progress given students’ starting points. This includes those students with special educational needs and/or disabilities, who make similarly good progress to that of their peers... When you consider the college is only two years old, some of this is quite remarkable... The principal and senior leaders demonstrate a strong determination to ensure all students, whatever their backgrounds, reach their full potential. Their ambitious approach is summed up by the college’s motto of ‘Where aspiration meets opportunity’.

Ofsted, 2011

For the full report visit www.ofsted.gov.uk or look it up on our website www.sssfc.ac.uk

college facilities Headteachers Statement

Curriculum & Achievement What Ofsted said

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college 10 reasons facilities to choose us...

10 reasons to choose us...

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to choose us

Students feel extremely safe and get on very well with each other and their teachers.

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Excellent advice and guidance help students take responsibility for their own learning and set and achieve ambitious targets.

Parents have great confidence in the college and are very happy with the standard of education it provides.

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Outstanding behaviour and mature attitudes contribute to students’ good overall achievement.

There is a purposeful atmosphere in lessons and students’ attitudes to learning make an excellent contribution to their progress.

“At college there is more independence and a chance to become more confident, with a wider variety of courses and experience of studying new newsubjects.” subjects.” Former student Hillside High School

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 tudents develop a good range of S skills, knowledge and understanding across many subjects.


New technology is used effectively to add interest to presentations.

Former student Savio Salesian College

college 10 reasons facilities to choose us...

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“I am looking forward tomeeting meeting new people and starting a new journey through education.� education. �

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Good independent study facilities are available and well-used.

Teachers have expert knowledge of their subjects and track the progress of students meticulously.

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A wide variety of information and guidance on health-related issues is provided, participation in physical activities is high and a healthy range of food is made available.

A safe college means happy students. Safeguarding is core to our provision at South Sefton 6th Form College. This means we are committed to ensuring your safety. This can take many forms; whether that be having a site that is safe and secure, providing a free and confidential counselling service or supporting you at times of personal challenge and difficulty.

Your safety is our priority. This means ensuring your safety on site and giving you the skills and support necessary to face the challenges of life in college, and beyond.


college facilities

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21st Century learning environment

Our College has the most up-to-date facilities of any Sixth Form College in the country and is technology-rich, enabling you to make the best use of ICT in your learning.


college facilities

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Light and airy

Special features of the building include:

The Atrium

Sports Hall

This light and airy central space is somewhere for students to meet and relax. In addition, the Atrium provides an ideal space for the arts’ students to perform.

You will have opportunities to take part in various sports activities during the week. As well as the College’s own sports hall and playing field we use Litherland Sports Park, just a short distance away which offers a wide range of sports.

The Learning Resource Centre As well as a full range of books, magazines and other resources, you will have access to high-speed internet links to enable you to research the information you need for your studies and in applying to university. Performing Arts Facilities Our facilities include a drama studio with stage sound and lighting, and a dance studio with a fully sprung floor. The college has quickly established a vibrant performing arts programme involving a large number of students.

Science Laboratories We have three laboratories, each with the most modern equipment, for studying Biology, Chemistry and Physics.


college facilities

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Technology-rich

ICT Suites and Facilities

Music Studio

Use of ICT will feature in much of your work and you will have access to ICT throughout the College. This will also help you to prepare for university, where you will be expected to use ICT as an integral part of your studies, or for employment.

Whether you are studying for A level or just playing for enjoyment, you will have access to a studio and specialist rooms for recording, editing and practising.

Art and Design Studio There is a fully-equipped studio/ workshop where you will be able to explore a range of two and three dimensional media, processes and techniques.

Thumbprint CafÊ The cafeteria is located just off the Atrium and offers a wide range of delicious food to suit all tastes. Internet access is also available on the cafe’s touch screen computers. You will be able to relax here with friends, grab a coffee or enjoy breakfast, brunch or lunch.

Welcoming social areas


college facilities with staff Communicating

Communicating with staff

“ The fantastic amount of technology at the college collegereally really appeals to me.� Former student St Ambrose Barlow High School

To help ensure you get the most out of your studies we believe that you will need access to your teachers at various times of the day. In many cases you will be able to speak to them but, if this is not possible our systems will enable you to email them at any time. In addition you will be able to access all your course materials through the College website, at home or elsewhere, as well as submitting your work to tutors on-line. You will have access to your Individual Learning Plan which will contain information about your progress in

the subjects you are studying. This will be via a secure link and will be confidential to you and the college. We believe your parents or carers will want to be kept informed of how well you are doing and so we will send them regular updates on your progress.

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college facilities Support for you

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Now As you start to consider the options you have for studying after taking your GCSEs, you need to gain as much information as possible about what is available. In school, your Connexions advisor will be able to point you in the direction of various sources of information. You will also have a session with a Connexions adviser to help you make your choice. We will work with your school to help ensure you have all the information you need about what we offer. A series of Open Events in the Autumn and Spring Terms will inform you

Support for you

“You have have more more independence independence “You and freedom freedom in in choosing choosing what what and you do. do. You You are are free free to to have have your your you say about what goes on and how say about what goes on and how the college college is is run run -- through through the the the student council.” council.” student Former student Lithreland High School

about the subjects available and will give you the opportunity to find out more about the College. Our first open evening for the college is on Tuesday 8th November 2011. Applying for a place We welcome applications from all students. If you decide to apply for a place we will have a meeting with you to discuss your application and your career intentions. We want to make sure you choose a programme of study that will be a success for you. (Please see the section on page 18 How to Apply)


college facilities Support for you

When you start with us We recognise the uniqueness of every student and will treat you as an individual. The support we offer will help you enjoy your time with us and gain the most from your studies. We will be there whenever you ask for help.

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Starting at the College will be a big change in your life. In your first few weeks you may need answers to questions as well as advice on various matters. There is a marked change from GCSE to A levels and many students find the first weeks of Year 12 a time of change and adjustment. You

“We are to be “You toldgoing us that thethstaff ones to giveabout you and really care an excel we agree.” Ofsted 2011

are not alone! You will have access to a team of trained specialists including your personal tutor, the college’s Connexions advisers, a counsellor and pastoral staff who are specialists in welfare and financial advice.

will help you with study skills and offer advice on career progression, finance, transport and general welfare matters. You will be a member of a tutor group of about 22 students who will meet on a regular basis throughout the week.

Your Personal Tutor When you come to our College you will have your own Personal Tutor. Your tutor will help you settle into life in the college and will support you in both your studies and any personal matters you may want help with. The support for your studies will include regular reviews of your progress tracked against your subject targets. This will help ensure you reach your full academic potential during your time with us. There will be two formal reviews of your progress each year and copies of the reviews will be sent home to your parents or carers. Consultation afternoons will also form part of this process when you and your parents/carers are invited into the college to review your progress.

Careers Guidance

In addition, your Personal Tutor will help ensure your time at the College is enjoyable and enriching. Your Tutor

Our Connexions Personal Adviser will help you make the right choices for your future. You will have access to various data-bases covering careers, universities and gap years. In Year 12 we have two events, Next Step 1 and 2, focused specifically on planning your future, be that employment, university or additional training. For those students who aspire to a place at Oxford or Cambridge, or to study Medicine, Veterinary Science or Dentistry, there will be additional guidance and support to help you towards securing a place.


college facilities Support for you

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Additional Learning Support We are very proud of the support that we offer to our students at South Sefton Sixth Form College. Our subject teachers, as well as our personal tutors, will make sure that you are supported throughout your time at college. As a student at SSSFC, you will also have the benefit of being able to access support from our Additional Learning Support (ALS) department, in order to help you to achieve your full potential.

Our ALS staff will work with you to ensure that you get the most from courses your course

Our ALS staff can offer you a range of help, advice and resources to enable you to develop your skills and succeed on your chosen courses. We can provide screening and professional assessments whenever necessary and if you have already been diagnosed as having a Specific Learning Difficulty or disability, then we will provide you with regular support to ensure that you can fully access the curriculum.

Our ALS teachers offer: 1:1 study skills support sessions for any concerns you have with your work including: • Organising your ideas/ structuring your work • Planning your time effectively • Communicating your ability through your written work • The development of research skills • Checking your progress • Mind mapping techniques • Developing revision resources • Reading and understanding examination questions • Organising your revision timetable • Developing strategies to help you to remember things • Helping you to improve your concentration ...and anything else that you may be having difficulty with!


college facilities Support for you

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“I have been grateful for all the support that I have had over two years years”” A female A2 student from Litherland High School

If you have a Specific Learning Difficulty we can also provide: • Regular individual support working with an ALS teacher to help you to manage your work. • Useful equipment to enable you to complete your work independently. • An assessment of your needs. • Access arrangements for external examinations (when necessary). • Use of a resource area with computers (ALS room) • Guidance on claiming DSA (university funding) If you require any help, or if you want to find out more, please come and talk to us on one of our Open Evenings or contact: Alison Craig (Assistant Principal, Curriculum) alison.craig@sssfc.ac.uk or Lauren Hayes (Learning Leader ALS) lauren.hayes@sssfc.ac.uk

Financial Support

DLS Fund

If you are in receipt of free school meals you will be automatically entitled to additional financial help towards the cost of

We recognise thst for some students the cost of college may be a challenge. We may be able to help towards the cost transport to and from college, provide lunch and assist in the cost of exam fees and resists.

• transport • exam resit fees • any additional educational costs you may incur In a time of financial need all students will be dealt with sensitively where each case judged on merit and were financial support can be provided, it will be.

You must not let worries about money get in the way of you making thye right choice about your future. Any enquiries regarding finance and support please contact ian.seddon@sssfc.ac.uk


college Your personal facilities development

Weekly Tutorial Session

Your personal development

16 We make no apology for saying that if you decide to come to our College you will need to work hard. A Levels are challenging and a real step up from GCSEs. Most of you will have your first A Level exam in January and so you need to be focused and committed from the start. Hard work is what will enable you to get the best out of yourself. At the same time, we want you to have a good time and enjoy yourself while you are with us. You will be coming to the college, not just to learn, but to develop as a person and we will offer you a number of things that will enrich your experience and help your personal development.

This is a weekly session where you will work with your tutor and fellow students in achieving your level 3 Asdan Cope Award. This is a significant qualification because it provides you with additional points when applying to university. Shorthand for the Certificate of Personal Effectiveness, COPE will allow you to plan, research and make presentations with your fellow students or research independently. You will explore a number of issues relevant to your experience and also gain accreditation for researching and planning your next step to university or employment after your A Levels. The Spiritual Dimension of the college

The college appeals to meto new college appeals because it’s state-of-the-art and we’ll be the first year to attend. It’s also local to where I live. Former student St.Wilfrid’s High School

We welcome students of all faiths and those with none. We have a prayer room for private prayer or contemplation – which is accessible to all. In tutorial, we have a thought for the week, an often philosophical piece of writing which allows you to reflect on the more spiritual dimensions of life. Student Council The Student Council provides a student voice in discussions with staff and governors on all aspects of College life. Students who participate in the council will gain valuable experience and skills in debating and decision making. We value our council and feel it has an important role in the running of our College. University Taster Sessions There will be various taster sessions and opportunities which will allow you to experience life at university to help you decide if it is for you. Volunteering Placements You will be able to request a placement where you can volunteer for a charity, organisation or business that you may be considering for a career. This might be with a hospital, veterinary practice, school, day centre, environmental agency, theatre – the list is endless!


college facilities Enrichment opportunities

Life in the College is an ideal time to take part in activities that you have not been involved in before.

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This might be going on a residential trip in this country or abroad; participating in drama, dance, music or sports events; getting involved with fund-raising activities to help others or learning a new skill such as sign language or first aid. Whatever you decide to do, it will be enjoyable and broaden your experience.

Enrichment opportunities Wednesday Afternoon Enrichment

Study Support

All students are involved in our Wednesday afternoon enrichment programme. This is the perfect opportunity to gain new skills, meet new people, learn something new and most importantly, have fun. From rugby to yoga, Zumba to sign language, there really is an enrichment activity for everyone!

Most students find the change from GCSE to A Level a big step. In particular, the amount of time you spend reading, researching and completing assignments outside normal lessons may seem daunting. Subject teachers will help you make the transition but in addition there will be staff to help you with your study skills.

Sport We have a range of team and individual sporting activities on offer. If football is your game, then join the training sessions and one of the teams is sure to want you to play for them! But it may be badminton or trampolining or table tennis or the gym that you enjoy most – check the full list of clubs and activities published in the first week in September and sign up! Performing Arts Dance, drama, music – all give you the chance to express yourself and have a good time. As well as joining a club, there will be opportunities for you to take part in performances for your fellow students and for members of the public.

The Learning Resource Centre will be available for your use throughout the day. As well as having access to reference books you will be able to use the internet to carry out research and access the wide range of study references designed to support you in your learning. Visits and Trips Experience the culture of another country; take part in fieldwork; visit a gallery or exhibition – all these broaden our understanding of the world in which we live and provide enjoyable social experiences. You will be encouraged to participate in visits and trips.


college How to facilities apply

How to apply

18 All Students We need to be confident that all students who apply for a place at our College have previously shown a commitment to learn. This is so that you can be certain that when you join us you will be with likeminded people who are serious about their own education. To do this we will ask your high school to confirm that you have worked hard whilst studying for your GCSEs. Your reference will help inform whether we are able to offer you a place at College. A level courses If you are to be successful at A level, you will need a minimum of five GCSEs at grade A* - C or equivalent. These should include a grade C or above in English.

Students taking physics or chemistry must achieve at least a grade B mathematics at GCSE. Students wishing to study biology must obtain at least a GCSE grade C in mathematics. In addition, students applying to study biology, chemistry, English, French, mathematics, music, physics or Spanish should have obtained at least a grade B in the subject at GCSE.

achieve the results you want.

Applied Courses

• the subjects you are best at

Some of you may wish to study Level 3 courses alongside your A Levels that have a broader more vocational focus and include coursework.

It is important to get these choices right as many universities and employers are looking for specific qualifications as part of their entry requirements. The more research you do now, the more likely you are to decide on the right course of study and importantly to succeed!

Decision Making Deciding what course to take after your GCSEs can be difficult. If you have a career in mind, or if you are just looking for courses that you find interesting, we will help you choose the subjects that best suit your needs and help you

At this stage, you might want to consider: • the career you are interested in and what qualifications you need for it • what degree or higher education course you are interested in • the subjects you enjoy


collegetofacilities What do next

19 “The advice guidance collegeand looks very moyou are is excellent and ensure andgiven spacious. The Principal is that you choose the right determined to get the bestcourses for and are well-prepared forther the the students who will go next stage in your career.” which is very encouraging. Ofsted 2011

What to do next... Autumn 2011

Autumn 2011 - Spring 2012

August 2012

• Attend our Information and Open Evenings. The first one is Tuesday 8th November.

We will consider your completed application form with the information we receive from your school about your attendance, punctuality, ability and your commitment to learning.

• GCSE results day – Thursday 23rd August 2012 – enrol on your course at the College.

• Read the prospectus and start thinking about the subjects you might want to study – speak to your subject teachers for their advice • Talk to your Connexions adviser. • Complete our application form and submit to: Admissions,The Principal, South Sefton 6th Form College, Sterrix Lane, Litherland, Liverpool L30 2DB or you can apply on-line at our website www.sssfc.ac.uk You should apply as soon as possible but no later than TUESDAY 31st JANUARY 2012. If you are a student in one of our partner schools you can take advantage of your guaranteed place. All other students are encouraged to apply before the end of FEBRUARY 2012. We will consider late applications but may not be able to guarantee you a place.

You will have an informal interview to discuss: • your choice of subjects and the entry requirements for these.

September 2011 • Induction activities to ensure you settle into life in the College quickly and easily!

• your progression routes and career options. If you are offered a place, you will be asked to confirm that you accept it.

“Good luck with your GCSEs!”


college facilities Courses we offer

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Courses we offer...

Advanced Level Courses We offer a wide variety of A Level courses. Some subjects you will be familiar with, such as English, mathematics, history, French, Spanish and art. Others like psychology, government and politics, and law are not normally available as GCSEs in schools and so, although you may have heard of them, you may not be clear about what topics they cover. The last section of this prospectus will give you a good idea of what you will study over the two years for each subject that you choose. It is important to realise that there are only a few subjects that you are required to have studied at GCSE level if you want to study them at A level. You can find out which these are by reading the subject information and by talking to your subject teachers, and Connexions advisers. You will study each A level subject for approximately 4.5 hours per week. In

addition, you will be expected to do private study or homework of about four hours per week, per subject. Students taking the A level route will normally be expected to take four subjects at AS level in Year 12. In Year 13 most students will continue with three subjects at A2 level. In addition you will study the Level 3 Certificate of Personal Effectiveness (COPE) Award. There will be the opportunity to undertake additional programmes such as the Extended Project or General Studies. We guarantee that AS courses starting in September 2012 will continue into an A2 course starting in September 2013.


college facilities Courses we offer

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“Studying at college is really something to get excited about - it’s full of people who enjoy the same subjects and have the same interests as you.”

Applied Courses GCSE Courses We offer one year GCSE courses in English and mathematics. These are for students who narrowly missed getting a grade C and will enable them to improve their grade. Each course is 3 hours per week plus homework. These are studied alongside your A Level Programme and you need to have met the College entry criteria before you take these GCSEs. Your individual Course The course that you choose has to match your ability and your aspirations. Once you have decided what you want to do, we will match what we offer to your needs and suggest a course that will enable you to succeed. What else will you study? In addition, all students will have the benefit of enrichment activities and Level 3 ASDAN Cope Award delivered through tutorial.


college information Course facilities

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Course information Page

AS/A2 Levels

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

Art & Design Biology Business Studies Chemistry Dance Drama & Theatre Studies English Language & Literature English Language English Literature Film Studies French Further Maths Geography Government & Politics History ICT Law Mathematics Media Studies Music Music Tech PE Performance Studies Philosophy & Ethics Physics Psychology Sociology Spanish

51 52 53 54 55

Applied Courses Business Applied Health and Social Care Law Applied Science Applied Sports Development & Coaching


Art & Design

college Art & Design facilities

Edexcel

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose Art and Design?

How will I learn?

Visual images are everywhere and they influence the way in which we see the world. AS/A2 Art and Design will provide you with both the practical and academic skills to understand how art shapes our experiences and thinking.

This is a largely practical course; you learn by doing. During the first year you will produce a portfolio of coursework and for the externallyset assignment you will create ideas in response to one of five different starting points. In the second year you will create a more in-depth coursework portfolio which will include a 1000-3000 word essay and you will complete another externallyset assignment.

What can I expect to learn? You will explore a range of two and three dimensional media, processes and techniques including: drawing, painting, sculpture, mixed-media, textiles and digital photography. You should expect to learn how to develop and create personal responses to ideas, observations, experiences, environments and cultures.

“ We learn to develop many new techniques and styles, using a wide variety of resources in Art. We have opportunities to visit universities to gain a greater insight.” James Hanlon Former Hillside High School Student

“ I love drawing and painting and enjoyed the subject at GCSE so wanted to pursue it. It develops my creativity.” Meghann Crawford Former Savio Salesian Student

How will I be assessed? In the first year your coursework accounts for 50% of the AS mark and the externally-set assignment accounts for the other 50% (together 50% of your A Level). The second year is exactly the same, with 25% of the A Level marks awarded for your coursework and the externally-set assignment accounts for the other 25%. What subjects combine well with Art and Design? Art and Design can be taken with virtually any subject. Many students combine it with humanities, the social sciences or with media but it can also be taken alongside science based subjects. Developing and encouraging your creative side can help you to have great ideas in the other subjects you choose

Where does this lead / What can I do next? Art and Design AS/A2 Level is an acknowledged academic qualification, it will provide a foundation for further study of Art and Design or related subjects in higher education. The study of art can lead to a range of careers in areas such as fine art, advertising, fashion design, product design, illustration, photography, theatre and the media to name just a few. What background, skills and achievements do I need A grade C or above at GCSE in Art and Design is expected together with a genuine interest in art. Students should also have good practical skills and the willingness to take advice and positive criticism.


college facilities Biology

Biology

OCR

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose Biology? Studying biology will give you the expertise and knowledge to understand today’s world and to make a difference to tomorrow’s. What can I expect to learn? At AS level you will cover two modules; the first is cells, exchange and transport where you will learn about the structure of cells and organs such as the heart. The second module is molecules, biodiversity, food and health. In this module you will consider how you keep your body healthy and you consider the vast range of living organisms on earth. The A2 topics that you will study are communication, homeostasis and energy. Then you will go on to study control, genomes and environment. As well as studying these topics you will also develop your investigative and analytical skills in both the AS and A2 courses.

“I chose to do Biology as I found the subject interesting; I want to study Medicine at university, so this A level will help me gain the skills I need for my career choice.”

AQA

Demi Doherty former Litherland High School student

“There have been many Biology revision days; these helped me a lot leading up to my January exams. In the future I look to go on to university to study Sports Science, and aspire to become a PE teacher.” Anthony Rigby former Savio Salesian College student

How will I learn? Learning will take place through a variety of different methods such as practical work, field work, ICT, discussion, group work and individual tasks. How will I be assessed? You will be assessed at AS/A2 level by written and practical examinations. At AS level your first module will be sat in January and the second module in June. The practical exam will be sat in May. At A2 level your assessment takes the same pattern. The first module is sat in January and the second in June. Just like the AS course there is a practical exam sat in May. What subjects combine well with Biology? Biology can be combined with any subject. Students who take biology often combine it with subjects such as chemistry, geography, mathematics, physics and psychology.

Where does this lead / What can I do next? Biology is a subject that can be studied in its own right at university. It is often taken by students intending to follow a medical career such as physiotherapy, radiotherapy, pharmacy, nursing, medicine, dentistry, podiatry and many more. In addition students have progressed to degrees in sport science, marine biology and conservation. What background, skills and achievements do I need? Grade B in GCSE Biology or BB in Core and Additional GCSE Science. You are also expected to have a minimum of grade C in GCSE Mathematics. See page 54 for Applied Science AS/A2


Business Studies

Business Studies college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose Business Studies? You will investigate real life businesses and have the opportunity to discuss your own experience of the business environment. It will help you develop a wide range of skills such as communication, analysis, presentation, problem solving and decision making, all helping you to succeed in the world of work. What can I expect to learn? In AS Business you will study two units. In unit 1 ‘planning and financing a business’ you will study the challenges of starting a business venture, exploring where business ideas come from, and how to research the market to assess the likely success of these ideas. You will also study how to raise the finance needed to start a business venture, how to calculate profit and other aspects of finance.

“ I took Business Studies along with Politics, Maths and Psychology. I love business because it helps me understand what is happening in the world around me. I hope to continue my studies at Manchester University.” Mark Penny former St Wilfrid’s HS student

In unit 2 ‘managing a business’ you will study how managers organise the day-to-day activities of the business, manage their workforces so they are motivated, and market the business and its products so that it attracts customers. In A2 you will study unit 3, strategies for success, and unit 4, the business environment and change. How will I learn? You will study real life case studies whenever possible encouraging discussion. Business Studies involves a lot of group work so enabling you to share your knowledge and experience with other class members. You will also have the opportunity to watch relevant and current DVDs, participate in role-plays and use ICT software to support your learning.

“ My school did not offer Business Studies at GCSE and I was very interested in exploring this subject. I enjoy learning new and exciting topics that I can apply to real life. Revision sessions are available every week and help and support is available when you need it.” Jess Ryan former Hillside High School student

How will I be assessed? AS – 2 written exams (unit 1 and unit 2) 100% examination. A2 – 2 written exams (unit 3 and unit 4) 100% examination. Exams are taken in January and June. There is an opportunity to re-sit any of the first 3 units. There is no coursework in Business Studies. What subjects combine well with Business Studies? Business Studies can be combined with any subject and there is no typical combination that is better than another. Therefore, you can successfully combine this subject with sciences, languages, social sciences, arts or humanities.

Where does this lead / What can I do next? Knowledge and skills gained in this subject will prepare you for a broad range of employment opportunities, whatever your initial choice of employment or progression to higher education. Some students enjoy the subject so much that they choose to take a degree in a business related subject or combine business studies with another subject e.g. with a foreign language. What background, skills and achievements do I need? No specific prior Level 2 qualification is required in Business Studies. Where Business Studies has been studied at GCSE, a minimum grade C will be required.


college facilities Chemistry

Chemistry

AQA

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose Chemistry? A level Chemistry answers many questions introduced during GCSE and develops further your curiosity and interest. It also allows you to enter a huge number of professions such as medicine and dentistry but also areas like banking and law. What can I expect to learn? In the first year there are three learning units. Unit 1: Foundation chemistry This includes topics such as periodicity, bonding, shapes of molecules, introduction to organic chemistry and amount of substance. Unit 2: Chemistry in action Where you will learn about kinetics, equlibria and redox. Organic chemistry is extended and you will learn about alcohols, haloalkanes, alkanes and alkenes. Unit 3: Investigative and practical skills assignment This is an assessment based on practical work.

“Chemistry interests me and I like doing practical work such as experiments. One-to-one revision sessions are available as well as revision days.” Beth Quinn former Litherland High School student

During A2 there are also 3 units. Unit 4 extends the ideas introduced in unit 2 on organic chemistry, kinetics and equilibria and you will study acids and bases, aldehydes, ketones and esters and amino acids as well as spectroscopic techniques. In unit 5 you will study thermodynamics, redox, transition metal chemistry and further periodicity. Unit 6 again comprises of practical and investigative assignments.

“On Wednesdays we have revision sessions after college and the teachers are very helpful.” Daniel McCouid former Hillside High School student

How will I learn? You will learn through a mixture of ICT, written and practical work. You will be required to solve problems and think analytically. How will I be assessed? Unit 1, 2, 4 and 5 are assessed by examination. Unit 3 and 6 comprise of an investigative skills assignment (ISA) and a practical skills assignment (PSA). The ISA requires you to undertake practical work, collect and process data and use it to answer questions in a written test. The PSA is assessed through practical work on the 3 main areas of chemistry -physical, organic and inorganic.

What subjects combine well with Chemistry? Maths, physics and biology combine well, but chemistry can be taken independently. However it would be a real advantage to study Maths at Advanced level if you are considering studying chemistry at university. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Chemistry is an excellent choice of subject for people who want a career in health and the clinical professions such as medicine, nursing, biochemistry, dentistry or forensic science. It can also lead to careers in industry and professions like banking or law. What background, skills and achievements do I need? Grade B in GCSE Chemistry or BB in GCSE Science Core and Additional. You will also need a grade B in Mathematics.

See page 54 for Applied Science AS/A2


Dance

Dance college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

27

Why choose Dance?

How will I be assessed?

The A Level Dance course is challenging and lively with a good balance between theoretical and practical work. You will explore a range of topics including dance appreciation, choreography, and performance. There will also be the opportunity to see and evaluate professional dance works.

AS Level Dance (first year) is assessed through solo choreography and performance and performance in a duo or trio (60% of AS marks) plus a written exam (40% of AS level marks)

What can I expect to learn During the course you will develop skills as both a choreographer and performer. You will utilise these skills when choreographing several dance pieces based on suggested themes. You will also develop your understanding of anatomy and the lifestyle of a dancer. How will I learn? The course will be delivered through a balance of practical and theory lessons. Practical lessons will focus on dance technique, performance skills and choreography. As part of the course, you will be expected to perform in front of your peers and members of the public. Theory lessons will focus on dance appreciation, anatomy and the lifestyle of a dancer.

A2 Level Dance (second year) • Practical Examination – 25% of total A-Level • Group choreography • Solo performance • Written Examination – 25%of total A-Level • Investigating one area of study from – ballet, modern or jazz dance. • Critical analysis and appreciation of one set work from a choice of three. What subjects combine well with Dance?

“ Dance is a hobby of mine and I wanted to continue it as part of my studies in order to improve my performance skills. I enjoy taking part in the practical lessons and creating my own choreography. In having studied Dance, it will help me during university applications as it shows I have applied myself to a wide range of subjects, not just academic ones.” Rebbeca Hodgson former Litherland High School student

Dance combines well with drama, theatre studies and P.E. as well as most subjects from the arts and humanities. Where does this lead / What can I do next? This course is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career or further education in dance or the wider performing arts industry.

“ I go to dance classes outside of college and I also did BTEC Dance so saw this course as an opportunity to build on my dance skills and technique. I see Dance as a subject where I can bring out my creative side. We have a great dance studio which we can use during free periods and after college. This is fantastic as it gives us the chance to work on our solo and group choreography outside of lessons.” Faye Cannon former Hillside High School student

What background, skills and achievements do I need? The study of dance at GCSE level is helpful, but not required. However, you should have some dance experience as well as energy, enthusiasm and commitment and be willing to work as part of a team. Where Dance has been studied at GCSE a minimum of a grade C will be required. You must be prepared to dance in front of others.


college & Drama facilities Theatre Studies

Drama & Theatre Studies

AQA

AS/A2 Level

28

Why choose Drama and Theatre Studies? Drama and Theatre Studies allows you to combine work towards practical performances with the study of various aspects of the theatre. The course will give you the opportunity to explore the translation of plays from ‘page to stage’, to discover the success of live theatre productions and to find out about the work of influential practitioners. What can I expect to learn? At AS you will gain knowledge and understanding of theatre practice both as a participant and as a member of the audience. The knowledge gained will be applied to the study of a prescribed play. You will also develop your performance and/or production skills producing a scripted performance. At A2 you will study

“The subject has always interested me; I enjoyed it at GCSE and wanted to continue with it at A Level. The interactive learning styles make the lessons very enjoyable.” Patrick Vogel Former St. Wilfrid’s Catholic High School student

a pre-twentieth and post-twentieth century play and a twentieth century play or contemporary drama. You will also devise and perform a drama in a theatrical style of your choice. How will I learn? Group work is an essential part of the learning process for theatre studies when exploring both practical and theory work. There will also be opportunities for independent research in order to develop your understanding and knowledge of the subject. How will I be assessed?

“ I have always been interested in drama and, visiting several open evenings at South Sefton College and finding out more about drama, pushed me even further towards wanting to find a career in that area. In Drama there are many opportunities to see live performances which help tremendously in us finding new and different techniques to acting.” Charlotte Jessop Former Litherland High School student

At AS you will complete a 1 hour and 30 minute examination based on live theatre productions you have seen and a prescribed play studied (60% AS, 30% of A Level). You will also produce a practical presentation of an extract from a play (40% of AS, 20% of A Level). At A2 you will complete a 2 hour written examination on two further prescribed plays including a pretwentieth century text (30% of a Level). You will also create a practical presentation of devised drama (20% of A Level). What subjects combine well with Drama and Theatre Studies?

Where does this lead / What can I do next?

English, media studies, dance, art, music, modern languages, PE, sociology and psychology all make a good combination with drama and theatre studies.

Students have used the subject to gain entry on to university courses in drama, english, media and journalism. Careers in drama, theatre or performance media are a logical progression. What background, skills and achievements do I need? Grade B in English Language is desirable. However, there are no specific entry requirements for the course but an interest in drama and theatre together with a willingness to participate in practical activities is essential. Where Drama has been studied at GCSE a minimum of a grade C will be required.


AS/A2 Level

Why choose English Language and Literature? In addition to developing your own writing skills for a range of audiences you will examine how writers and speakers use language in poetry, prose and drama, as well as travel writing, biography, conversation transcripts, media articles and other texts.

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“This subject helps because it gives me a wider vocabulary and better communication skills; the texts we look at help give a better insight into how other people see things. The plays, poems and novels that we read often bring about interesting debates within the class about each person’s view on the text.”

Molly Hodge former Maghull High School student

What can I expect to learn? Students follow a unified course that combines language and literature and includes the study of prose, poetry, drama and non-fiction texts. You will study the same texts for both language and literature and will look at contemporary written and spoken English. You will explore different literary genres, produce your own creative writing and undertake independent research. You will

“I thoroughly enjoy the class discussions we have in the subject because it is a chance to voice my opinion and gain some feedback. The discussions we have provide new ideas and views to consider and to incorporate into work.” David Bousfield Former Litherland High School student

English Language & Literature college facilities

English Language & Literature

AQA Syllabus B

develop the ability to create and sustain your own interpretations of texts and aspects of language and develop your literacy and communication skills. The AS course covers: The study of prose, poetry, drama and non-literary texts around a themed language production (writing for specific audiences/purposes); comparing set texts on a theme and producing a piece of creative writing based on the text. The A2 course covers: The study of spoken language including analysis of play scripts and transcripts of real life spoken situations; the transformation of two literary works into different genres. Which subjects combine well with English Language and Literature? There is a wide range of choice as to which courses you can take alongside this course but often students will combine this choice with other subjects in the humanities and social sciences or with a foreign language.

Where does this lead / What can I do next? English subjects are challenging, but are an excellent preparation both for university and your future career. Obvious careers include journalism, sales, teaching, management, administration, information management, publishing and careers in the public services. What background or achievements do I need? A minimum of a grade C in English and English Literature are required though a grade B is preferred and you must be a keen reader and read widely, fiction and non-fiction.


college facilities English Language

English Language

AQA Syllabus B

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose English Language? English language is a lively subject which will challenge your views, make you see things differently and may even change your life. If you enjoy argument and discussion it offers opportunities for engagement and debate. Studying English language will help you understand why we see the world the way we do. The skills you gain on this course will enhance your performance in other subjects. What can I expect to learn?

“I thoroughly enjoy the class discussions we have because it is a chance to voice my opinion and gain some feedback. I want to be a journalist, so the subject is a great help in pursuing my career; a good grade in English Language will allow me to take a journalism course in university.” Stephen Russell former Litherland High School student

At AS you will develop your understanding of the way in which language works. Amongst other things you will study language and power, gender and technology and learn about different ways of classifying and analysing written and spoken language. At A2 you will look at how and why language is so variable and changeable, learn about how children acquire language and carry out an investigation into an area of language that interests you. Which subjects combine well with English Language? There is a wide range of choice as to which courses you can take alongside English Language but often students will combine it with other subjects in the humanities and social sciences

“The lessons aren’t generic, or ‘sit down and copy out’; we learn a lot of different things different ways, going over everything as a class and having other students read our work, so we know what works and what doesn’t.” Natalie Newton former Maghull High School student

or with a foreign language. It cannot be taken with the combined English Language and Literature course. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Studying English Language will give you skills which you can use at university, in employment and in life generally. You will be able to apply for university courses in English language and linguistics as well as a whole range of other subjects. Obvious careers include journalism, sales, teaching, management, administration, information management, publishing and careers in the public services. What background or achievements do I need? A minimum of a grade B in English Language is required.


English Language college facilities

English Literature

AQA Syllabus B

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose English Literature? If you love reading then English Literature is the course for you. During the course you will have the opportunity to explore and share ideas about some great English writing and develop your own ability to express yourself in a cogent, relevant and wellorganised way. What can I expect to learn? The course involves the study of a wide range of literature including novels, plays and poetry from different periods of history. One of the texts will be a Shakespeare play. As well as developing your analytical skills you will be trained to write fluent, perceptive and well-structured

“I have always loved English so I have always wanted to continue it on after GCSE. I love to read and analyse the deeper meanings in books. You won’t struggle as Sally is a great teacher and will always help, and you will have the support of classmates during group work.” Amy Judge Former St. Wilfrid’s Catholic High School student

essays. You will be encouraged to argue and debate, developing your own personal response to a text. Group work is central to the study of English Literature and one of the most enjoyable aspects of the course. Which subjects combine well with English Literature? History, law, modern languages, media and art are often chosen by students who take English Literature. Some students choose to combine it with English Language. It cannot be taken with the combined English Language and Literature course. Where does this lead / What can I do next? English Literature students often takeup a humanities course at university. There is a wide range of careers that English Literature students follow; these include teaching, journalism, publishing, management, television, the law and marketing. What background or achievements do I need? A minimum of a grade C in English and English Literature GCSE is required though a grade B is preferred and you must have a keen interest in Literature and enjoy reading independently.

“I enjoyed English in my previous school and wanted to continue my passion through to college. I would recommend English to anyone who enjoys ‘reading between the lines’ of any poem or novel and having a good attitude towards the subject! Sally Porter is a fantastic teacher and she’ll always be there if ever you need any help.” Sean Kennedy Former St. Ambrose Barlow Catholic College student


college English facilities Language & Literature

Film Studies

WJEC

AS/A2 Level

32

Film Studies is a very exciting subject that is suitable for anyone with a broad interest in film. It involves the close analysis of films and the decisions made by film directors, and also the study of the film industry as a whole. The course deals with messages and values in British and American cinema, as well as offering an opportunity for students to write and direct their own work. What will students learn? How features such as editing, narrative, lighting, camerawork and colour are used by film directors to create meaning.

How will the student be assessed at AS Level? FM1: Exploring Film Form – 40% This is the coursework element and divides into two sections: • One analysis of how films convey meaning through the analysis of the micro elements of film form such as camera work, lighting, editing, sound. • One creative element, for example, students might create a short film or sequence from a film.

• This is a 2 ½ hour written exam paper. There are three questions one from each section.

• British film and genre.

• Section A: examines the cinema as an industry and the parts played by producers and audiences.

• A close study of film production companies such as Ealing and Working Title. • A comparative study of two American films.

Danielle Monaghan former Chesterfield High School student

FM2: British and American Film – 60%

• Producers and audiences, including the funding, production and marketing of films. • The role of stars in British film.

“I chose Film Studies as watching, and reading about all different genres of films is one of my favourite passions. I chose Film Club as my enrichment as it lets me view different types of films. I want to involve Film Studies in my career as I would like to go into a teaching job.”

• Section B: covers themes and messages in British cinema. • Section C: covers Hollywood and American Independent Cinema. Students are asked to compare and contrast two films.

“I’ve always found films to be particularly interesting, and so the opportunity to study them on an academic level was a fantastic opportunity! The best thing about taking Film Studies here at South Sefton is the fantastic technological support and equipment at our fingertips. In the long run, I think I would quite like to do something in the film industry.” Adam Tremarco former St Ambrose Barlow Catholic College student

What are the entry requirements? No prior Level 2 qualification is required in Film Studies though sound written and oral communication skills are essential. What opportunities exist after this course? Film Studies is widely acknowledged as a rigorous academic subject. It leads naturally to degree courses, which involve critical analysis such as English, media studies and journalism.


French

French college facilities

WJEC

AS/A2 Level

33

Why choose French?

How will I learn?

Studying French at AS/A2 offers you the chance to enhance your language skills, learn about the culture and society of the French speaking world and also enhance your career prospects. Employers greatly value staff who can speak a foreign language.

At South Sefton, we want to extend your studies beyond the immediate demands of the syllabus to allow you to develop independent skills to take forward to further study or the world of work. Studying beyond the classroom is essential at this level and it will be carefully structured and monitored. Assessments are carried out at regular intervals to support you in your learning and your subject tutor will discuss your progress with you. You will have the chance to participate in a variety of visits, such as participating in a trip to Paris.

What can I expect to learn? AS French is a language-based qualification testing all four language skills - listening, reading, speaking and writing; there is no literature. AS offers a natural transition from GCSE as most of the topics to be studied will already be familiar to you. A2 French further develops all four language skills through the study of more advanced topics such as aspects of French language, culture and society, including literature and cinema.

“There is a relaxed atmosphere in the class which makes the lesson more enjoyable; if I have a problem with work or homework I know I can always see the teacher.” Amanda Williams former Litherland High School student

How will I be assessed? AS At AS you will study two modules during the year covering a variety of topics including, travel and tourism, sport, hobbies, health and nutrition, youth culture, relationships, gender issues and education. There is an oral examination (40% of AS marks) and a listening, reading and writing examination (60% of AS marks) A2 At A2 you will develop the skills from AS and be tested in a similar way. In terms of topics, you will cover environmental, social and political issues including current affairs, immigration and media, amongst others.

“We are encouraged to see our tutor if anything is wrong or there is something we don’t understand. The lessons are very well planned, we’re encouraged to express our views and ideas and take part in many different, fun activities.” Jamie Croker former Litherland High School student

What subjects combine well with French? French can be combined with any other A Level subject. Although it is often combined with English, business studies, humanities or a social science subject. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Did you know that language graduates are the third most employable after doctors and lawyers? Universities and colleges offer single degrees and joint degrees in pure languages and European Studies. Many other courses such as business and computing, media studies, English and law have foreign language components. It can lead to a career in teaching, interpreting, translating, journalism and tourism, amongst others. The choice is endless. What background, skills and achievements do I need? A minimum of a grade B in GCSE French is required.


college Further facilities Mathematics

Further Mathematics

AQA

AS/A2 Level

34

Why choose Further Mathematics?

How will I learn?

If you enjoy Maths and want to study it in more depth or breadth than A-level Maths allows you should definitely consider Further Maths. Maths is a particularly wide and diverse subject and so it is not possible to do it full justice in just one A-level. In addition, if you are considering studying a mathematically related degree, Further Maths will be invaluable – certain Universities even require Further Maths at AS or A-level to study Maths at degree level.

As with your studies in Maths, Further Maths will involve a mixture of demonstration, exploration and tackling problems independently. Within Further Maths lessons students will be given greater opportunity to investigate the Maths themselves, using their imagination and taking even greater responsibility for their own learning. Proof is also an especially important aspect of learning Further Maths.

What can I expect to learn? The Further Maths course has a modular structure with three modules leading to an AS level and six modules leading to an A level. The Further Pure modules extend the work covered in the Core Maths modules. In addition to these modules, students will take a variety of applied modules from the areas of Decision Maths, Mechanics and Statistics. The greater depth of study means that more of the possibilities of the topics become apparent and that more meaningful problems can be considered.

“There are many opportunities for support here at SSSFC, for example we can use the technology provided in many ways, including using laptops at appropriate times to assist us in class.” Beth Bromilow Former St. Wilfrid’s Catholic High School student

How will I be assessed? Throughout the course your progress will be monitored with regular homework assignments and tests. Your final assessment in each module is by examination. In each year you will take one examination in January and the remaining two examinations in June. There is no coursework involved. What subjects combine well with Mathematics? Further Maths must be studied alongside Maths. This combination of Maths and Further Maths then counts as two of your subject choices. Students studying ‘double maths’

“I enjoy problem solving and the satisfaction of getting it right. I find Further Maths interesting as there are a variety of topics. There is a lot of support available from staff and the chance to participate in the maths’ challenge was enjoyable. I want to study Maths at university and know that taking Further Maths will help my application stand out.” Tom Christie former St Mary’s Catholic College student

often find this makes the subject easier as they get so much more practice than just studying one maths A-level. The problem solving and analytical skills gained will be of benefit to any student, whatever subjects they are studying alongside Maths and Further Maths. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Any student who is likely to want to study a degree in Mathematics, Physics or Engineering would be well advised to consider studying Further Maths. It is highly prized by Universities and employers in whatever area you study. What background, skills and achievements do I need? A grade A or A* in GCSE Maths is required.


Geography

Geography college facilities

WJEC

AS/A2 Level

35

Why choose Geography? Geography is a topical, hugely relevant subject which explores a number of global issues. Geographers are being asked to help governments and businesses come up with sustainable solutions to these challenges. As a result, a qualification in geography will become more relevant and valuable in the future, as you will develop a range of transferable skills. What can I expect to learn? On the AS course you will be introduced to some of the major physical and human geographical issues such as natural hazards, climate change, international migration and the big changes taking place in the global economy. You will investigate changing physical and human environments. There will be field trips to help you develop your research skills.

“There are many extra support classes and one-to-one tutorials. Employers look for Geography students as their skills can be applied to many jobs.” Ruth Lewis former St Wilfrid’s Catholic High School student

The emphasis in the A2 year is much more on independent student research of new areas of interest such as the geography of crime, environmental psychology and microclimates. You will also be studying glacial landforms and their management as well as ‘Emerging Asia – the geography of China’. How will I learn?

“We have been on a trip to the Lake District to find out more about the river defences. Geography is used by everyone whatever job you choose to do or course you choose to study at university.” Tom McIntyre former Hillside High School student

A whole range of learning and teaching styles will be employed in order to help you to understand the basic principles and develop new skills for dealing with a much more detailed geography demanding depth and breadth of thought. You will be challenged to realise your potential in a supportive learning environment, taking full advantage of the finest ‘state of the art’ technology at our disposal in the department. How will I be assessed? There are four units – two in the AS year and two in the A2 year which combine to make up the A Level qualification. You will sit modules in January and May/June for both years. However, you will be regularly assessed with constructive feedback in order to help you to achieve and exceed your target grade. What subjects combine well with Geography? Geography combines well with most A level subjects. It may be combined usefully with a science subject such as biology or with history, sociology, psychology or business studies.

Where does this lead / What can I do next? Geography is an appropriate qualification for a very wide range of higher education courses. Many students choose an HE course in a related area such as environmental studies. Studying geography can lead to a wide range of careers as well as to specialist areas such as environmental management, natural hazard management, tourism and recreation, nature conservation, and development work overseas as well as urban planning and design in the UK. What background, skills and achievements do I need? GCSE Geography at C or above is preferred though students with a keen interest and no Level 2 qualification in geography will be considered.


college facilities Government & Politics

Government & Politics

AQA

AS/A2 Level

36

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Why choose Government and Politics? Studying Government and Politics will boost your political awareness and general intellectual skills. Politics is everywhere and most of us have opinions about politics and politicians, even if we do not think that we are particularly ‘political’, because politicians often make important decisions that affect us all. What can I expect to learn? At AS students develop a broad knowledge and understanding of the political system of the UK. Key topics include: the British constitution; parliament; prime minister; cabinet & executive; political parties; electoral systems; British constitution; the judiciary and politics; the european union. The A2 course builds on AS knowledge but explores similar concepts and institutions in the United States looking at the electoral process

“I enjoy the way in which the lesson is taught and also the teacher himself; there are a great deal of revision days which have been most useful.” Joshua Cookson former St John Plessington student

and direct democracy, political parties, voting behaviour, pressure groups, constitutional framework, legislative branch, executive branch and the judicial branch. How will I learn? Learning will be through discussions, presentations, group work, video footage, statistical analysis and the use of ICT.

“I chose Government and Politics because I’m very interested in current affairs; I like the atmosphere and the teacher is always happy to answer emails or see students during free periods or break times.” Jeska Langdon Jeska Langdon former Archbishop Blanch Church of England High School student

How will I be assessed? At both AS and A2 assessment is by examination only. What subjects combine well with Government and Politics? Subjects such as history, english, law, sociology and business studies are often taken by students who study government and politics but any subject combination is fine. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Many students progress to degree programmes in subjects as diverse as business studies, economics, history and law as well as to careers in business and administration, journalism, the media, teaching, public relations and research.

What background, skills and achievements do I need? No prior political knowledge or understanding are assumed and you do not need to have studied any particular GCSEs but you should have a keen interest in current affairs and enjoy discussion and debate.


History

History college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

37

Why choose History? You will learn about events that have shaped the world you live in and the people and circumstances that shaped these events. You will also analyse why they happened. What can I expect to learn? The AS course covers periods of British and European modern history. The British history module will cover the period from the early 20th century to the end of World War 2, while the European section will cover the period 1917 up to World War ll focusing on Stalinist Russia. The A2 course concentrates on International Relations since World War 2 and the nature of authoritarianism and democracy in Germany from 1815-1945, providing an opportunity for more in-depth exploration of political, social and economic developments over the last 2 centuries. How will I learn? Learning will be done through source analysis, discussion, film (both contemporary and documentary), text analysis, group work and the use of ICT.

What subjects combine well with History? The content and skills of the course complement most subjects. History students often combine the subject with English, foreign languages, government and politics and religious studies. Where does this lead / What can I do next?

“We focus mainly on 19th and 20th Century history, which I find more interesting, as I can appreciate how it impacts on our lives today. There are always topics that weren’t covered in GCSE History, so it is interesting to learn new things.”

Most students go in to higher education and read a wide variety of subjects at degree level. Subsequently they enter careers as diverse as law, business management, the civil service, teaching, banking, retailing and accountancy. Former history students are now barristers, university lecturers, solicitors, accountants, surveyors, judges and writers. What background, skills and achievements do I need? It is helpful to have studied GCSE history but not essential. You will need an enquiring mind, an interest in how events and ideas in the past have helped to shape the present and good powers of communication. Where History has been studied at GCSE a minimum of a grade C will be required.

How will I be assessed? At AS, assessment is based on two examinations, one for the British History module and the other on the Stalinist Russia module. At A2 there is an examination on international relations, while the study of Germany will be assessed through coursework. You will be able to develop your own questions and focus for the study within the context of the period.

“I studied History in my final two years of high school and found it interesting; I decided to study it in more depth at sixth form and thoroughly enjoyed it. I highly recommend the subject; it involves a high degree of political issues and foreign policies, and is very enjoyable.” Sasha Thompson Former St George of England Specialist Engineering College student

Andrew Harvey Former Litherland High School student


college facilities Health and Social Care

Applied ICT

EDEXCEL

AS/A2 Level

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Why choose Information and Communication Technology? A Level Applied ICT is a wideranging course aimed at producing effective, discerning ICT users who want to extend their knowledge and skills in using and managing computers and information. It looks at the role of computers in everyday life and in the business environment.

“I loved ICT in high school and after the taster day at South Sefton I made my mind up to study this fun and interesting subject. ICT has a relaxed, friendly atmosphere and the teachers are helpful and understanding” Megan Mitchell former St Ambrose Catholic High School Barlow student

What can I expect to learn? You will use a range of the latest industry software and develop an awareness of the benefits and drawbacks of ICT and its impact on the way people live their lives. You will learn how to select and use appropriate tools and techniques to carry out investigations, capture and handle data, solve problems, make decisions and present and communicate information. In addition you will also learn how to plan and manage projects and in doing so work effectively with others.

“ICT is always a good qualification to have as it will help you in the future. I have enjoyed making my own e-book.”

Amy Johnston former Litherland High School student

How will I learn? Both the AS and A2 units focus on developing your communication and decision-making skills. Through investigation you will gain knowledge and understanding of ‘the information age’ and today’s ‘digital economy’. Through a series of practical activities you will develop and refine your skills in the use of a range of software such as, multimedia, database and spreadsheet systems. How will I be assessed? You will be assessed in units 3 and 7 by assignments set by the examination board that ask you to carry out practical, ‘hands-on’ tasks. You will collect evidence of your work for the other units in an e-portfolio. This is designed to be viewed on screen and will showcase your achievements. It will be assessed by your teacher and moderated by the examination board. What subjects combine well with ICT? ICT can be combined with practically any other subject from the sciences, business studies, social sciences or foreign languages.

Where does this lead / What can I do next? ICT offers a wide range of employment and higher education possibilities in areas such as computing, information technology or systems engineering but also provides a good grounding for much wider opportunities on degree courses such as multimedia, virtual reality, computer animation and interactive computer entertainment. What background, skills and achievements do I need? It is helpful to have studied ICT at GCSE level in order to have gained the basic skills and understanding of using computer systems. It is possible to start this subject fresh at AS level but you will need to be committed and have a keen interest and enthusiasm for the subject. Where ICT has been studied at GCSE level a minimum of a grade C will be required.


Law

Law college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

39

Why choose LAW?

“Law is a very good A level to possess. Employers will be impressed with it. The subject will also help if I get a job which requires legal knowledge, such as contract law.”

Law is an exciting subject which is alive, dynamic, and all around us. It is a challenging subject which will encourage you to improve problem solving and communication skills. It can help you decide if a legal career is for you. What can I expect to learn? It is unlikely that you will have studied Law before, but do not worry! The AS course is designed as an introduction to law and the legal system and will therefore help to remove any feelings of uncertainty and confusion that you might experience when taking on a totally new subject. In the first module you will learn about who works in the Law (Barristers, Solicitors, Judges) and the role of ordinary (lay people) in the law i.e. Juries and Magistrates. You will also develop knowledge of how Laws are made and interpreted in the UK. In the second module you will learn how to progress civil and criminal cases through the courts looking at offences such as a.b.h, g.b.h and wounding as well as the award of compensation and sentencing. During the A2 course we will focus predominantly on Criminal Law studying Offences against the Person (including Murder and Manslaughter), and Offences against Property (including Theft, Robbery, Burglary, Fraud, and Blackmail). You will also

Josh Bernard former St Wilfrids Catholic High School student

have the chance to consider some philosophical issues such as, ‘What is justice?’ and ‘Should morals influence law?’ How will I learn? Law is a subject which is dependant upon your involvement. Typical learning and teaching activities will include small group work, discussion, debate, mock trials, individual research, case law analysis, problem solving and obviously exam technique! Learning will also take place outside of the classroom with opportunities to visit local courts, to participate in a Law conference, and possibly a visit to New York City to compare the American Legal System to the English Legal System. How will I be assessed? External assessment of Law is entirely exam based, there is no coursework element at all. In AS you will have two exams, one in January, one in June. This is repeated at A2. You will have the opportunity to re-sit any modules and your best scores will go forward.

“I have always found law interesting and thought that studying law at sixth form would be a great stepping stone for me studying law in university and my career in law!” Samantha Rymer former St George of England High School student

What subjects combine well with Law? Law can be combined with any other subject. It could, therefore, be linked with subjects which develop similar skills, such as English, history, government and politics and sociology but could be matched equally well with subjects such as business studies, mathematics or one of the sciences. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Many students taking law proceed to study the subject in higher education but many also opt for business studies courses. Employers also value people with an understanding of law. What background, skills and achievements do I need? You will need a grade B in English Language as strong written and communication skills are essential.


college facilities Mathematics

Mathematics

AQA

AS/A2 Level

40

Why choose Mathematics?

How will I learn?

This is a highly regarded and enjoyable A level. Many students will find it a much more stimulating and rewarding course than at GCSE level, with greater focus on imaginative problem solving skills. The skills and knowledge which you develop will be useful in a wide range of other subjects and careers, particularly in the areas of science and business.

Maths is a ‘doing’ subject. Your teacher will explain new concepts using a mixture of demonstration and exploration, with regular use of ICT; most of all studying Maths is about students investigating and tackling problems themselves.

What can I expect to learn? The maths course has a modular structure, with three modules leading to an AS level in the first year and six modules to an A level. The core of the subject is the Pure Maths modules (Core 1, 2, 3 and 4). The first module extends certain topics you have studied at GCSE (equations, graphs, geometry) and introduces new ones (calculus) so that you have the basic tools needed to study maths at a more advanced level in Core 2, 3 and 4. In addition you will study some Applied Maths modules. These modules are concerned with how maths can solve real-life problems. In the first year everyone studies Decision 1. In the second year students have a choice of studying Statistics 1 or Mechanics 1.

How will I be assessed? Throughout the course your progress will be monitored with regular homework assignments and tests. Your final assessment in each module is by examination. In each year you will take one examination in January and the remaining two examinations in June. There is no coursework involved. What subjects combine well with Mathematics? The study of mathematics is particularly valuable for any students who wish to study physics or chemistry. Students studying biology, psychology or geography will also benefit from following a mathematics course and should consider the AS level if they do not wish to take the full A level.

“I enjoyed the trips that have been organised, for example a competition against other sixth forms or lectures on applying Maths to relevant subjects in the outside world. The teachers are always there for you if you need any help and place helpful Maths revision sessions in weeks before exams.” Tom Kelly Former Hillside High School student

Where does this lead / What can I do next? As well as being a subject which can be studied in its own right, mathematics will support most scientific or business related courses and areas of employment. What background, skills and achievements do I need? You need to get at least a B grade, at the Higher Level, at GCSE in order to have the confidence and algebraic skills to move on to AS/A2. Success in mathematics requires determination in solving problems and commitment. Above all, you must enjoy doing maths.

“I wanted to carry on studying Maths, as it is a very interesting subject and also I would like to study Maths at university. I enjoy learning about more advanced topics that were not covered at GCSE, such as Integration; these more difficult problems mean I can challenge myself in the subject.” Rachel Lavery Former Litherland High School student


Media collegeStudies facilities

Media Studies

WJEC

AS/A2 Level

41 41

Why choose Media Studies? The study of this subject will give you more of an idea of the power of the media in your life – the impact it has on you in social, political and economic terms. What can I expect to learn? The course investigates the ways in which different media such as newspapers, documentaries, advertising and film influence the way we see and think about the world we live in. You are bombarded by different media texts on a daily basis and, without knowing, you are highly skilled in interpreting and decoding the messages they include. It could be said that society and the way we live has, to a certain extent, been determined by the media which operates in our world. In response to this you will study the numerous debates and issues surrounding media production in our society today:

Do sex and violence in the mediums of film and television affect us? Does the news really tell us the truth? Who owns and controls our media and how much power do they really have on national and global levels?

“I enjoy learning about everyday things such as television and advertising. I will be able to keep improving my knowledge of the Media which will help me to specify which media course I shall choose to pursue in the future� Hannah Mason former St Ambrose Barlow Catholic High School student

Can we actually be manipulated into changing our behaviour through the medium of advertising? You will develop filming, video editing, storyboarding and research skills, along with the ability to evaluate your own work. You will also learn about the media industries and recent developments in technology. You will have the opportunity to work with professional standard equipment such as digital video cameras and editing software.

What subjects combine well with Media Studies? English and sociology are natural combinations with media studies but there are lots of other subjects that also link with it including business studies, psychology, and government and politics. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Media Studies is one of the fastest growing A levels in Britain at the moment and universities have responded with courses in journalism, photo-journalism, television studies, film studies and media studies through to history and media, sociology and media and other such combinations. What background, skills and achievements do I need? No prior Level 2 qualification is required in Media Studies though sound written and oral communication skills are essential. Where Media Studies has been studied at GCSE a minimum of a grade C is required.


college Music facilities

Music

AQA

AS/A2 Level

42 AQA Why choose Music? Studying music will give you the opportunity to develop your talents as a musician through performance, composition and analysis. The course looks at a range of styles, classical and popular, and allows you to understand music at a deeper level, as well as to improve your presentational skills.

“I have an interest in music and benefit from the option to use the music rooms during break. I would like to pursue it as a career in composition, or recording and production.” Tommy Burn former Duchess Community High School, Alnwick student

What can I expect to learn? The course has three elements: performance, composition and listening and understanding. You will have the opportunity to take part in group and solo performances, on an instrument or using your voice. You will develop the skill of notated composition and will use this to write your own compositions. You will learn how music of different types have been composed and put together, and develop your skills of listening and analysis.

“I enjoy learning about and listening to new music, and wish to further study Music, Performance Studies or perhaps Drama at university.”

Sophie Anderson former St Ambrose Barlow Catholic College student

How will I learn? You will learn through listening to and exploring classical and popular music from throughout history. You will learn how music is put together and try these ideas yourself. You will learn to write about music including learning to write essays about music. You will develop your performance skills, in class, through instrumental lessons, and outside of lessons, and will compose your own music. You will go to concerts and trips to meet other musicians. To help you learn you will have access to a brand new recording studio and specialist music computers, practice rooms with high quality instruments, and excellent library resources. How will I be assessed? At AS you will have a listening paper and a written examination as well as a composition and a performance. A2 is assessed using the same methods as AS.

What subjects combine well with Music? Music combines well with most subjects from the arts and humanities through to the sciences. Where does this lead / What can I do next? You can go on to study at music college or university. Potential career paths include the performance industry (orchestras, opera companies, theatres, bands), teaching (school, instrumental), the music and media industry (recording, broadcasting, journalism) as well as the arts world generally. Music students are highly regarded by employers and universities because of the many skills that musicians offer. Success at music A Level highlights your self-discipline, commitment, and creativity, alongside showing you can work well by yourself and as part of a team. What background, skills and achievements do I need? A minimum of a grade B at GCSE or a grade C with grade 5 music theory. All students should be able to play a musical instrument, working towards grade 5, as a minimum.


Music collegeTechnology facilities

Music Technology

EDEXCEL

AS/A2 Level

43

Why choose Music Technology?

A2 - Music Technology Portfolio 2

Technology has had a massive impact on the music industry. Using our ‘state of the art’ technology suite and recording studio you will gain skills used in the industry. You will arrange and produce your own pieces and will explore the development of music technology in popular music.

Analysing and Producing Exam

What can I expect to learn? During the course you will learn about how technology can help in composition and how a recording studio operates. You will have the opportunity to compose, sequence and arrange using recording equipment and software such as Sibelius for score writing and Protools for sequencing. You will also study the social, cultural and historical impact of music technology with particular reference to popular music, jazz, and music for the moving image. How will I learn? You will learn through listening to and exploring popular music and jazz. You will learn how technology has been used in music and will try these techniques for yourself. You will have lots of practical sessions and workshops to get to grips with the recording studio and computer facilities, and you will become confident at writing about music. You will receive instrumental lessons to improve your practical skills and will be able to go to concerts and trips to meet other musicians. How will I be assessed? AS - Music Technology Portfolio (a multitracked recording, a sequenced performance, and a sequenced arrangement) Listening and Analysing Exam

Two-thirds of the subject is coursework based. Listening skills are an essential part of music and students listen to a variety of popular music and answer questions on its development and the music technology that influenced it. This is assessed in late May in a formal written examination. What subjects combine well with Music Technology?

“Throughout the course I have developed different skills like computer work and listening to and reading music. An interesting area of Music Tech is the mixing desk, creating song and sounds, experimenting and often creating music very different from that perfor med at the start of the production process.” Anna Middleton Former Litherland High School student

Music technology combines well with maths and physics if you are considering studying it at university but it can be taken with most subjects.

“I wanted to do Music Tech because I’m passionate about music and because of the challenges involved in the course. I was curious to learn about the technical side of music, working on computers to reconstruct songs.” Ben Tisdall Former Litherland High School student

Where does this lead / What can I do next? As well as preparing you for a music technology course at university this is a good subject to study if you are interested in a career in music production or sound engineering. It can also lead to opportunities in education and the performing arts industry. Music students are highly regarded by employers and universities because of the many skills that musicians offer. What background, skills and achievements do I need? If studied, a grade C in music is required. If GCSE music has not been studied a strong technical ability must be demonstrated.


college facilities Physical Education

Physical Education

WJEC

AS/A2 Level

44

Why choose Physical Education? Anyone who has an en enthusiastic interest in sport and is a keen participant or performer will enjoy the challenges that an A level course in PE will present. It is an ideal subject to allow you to develop the skills in your specialist practical areas while at the same time making you aware of all the other factors that contribute to improving performance.

“I have always enjoyed sport and achieved an A in P.E at GCSE so decided to study it for A level. There is always a good atmosphere in the class and we all get along with the teachers and have a good time whilst still learning. I am aiming to get into university so achieving a good grade at A level will definitely help me.” Adam Jones former Hillside High School student

What can I expect to learn?

“I have always been a keen sports’ person from an early age and have always found P.E enjoyable. As part of the course we are all asked to coach and lead a lesson and for me this is one of the highlights of P.E as in later life I aspire to be a coach. Both P.E teachers are committed to giving extra support to whoever may need it and are wiling to give up their time to help others” Samantha Kilroy former Litherland High School student

AS: Anatomy & physiology; skill acquisition; contemporary studies; practical. A2: Exercise physiology; sport psychology; history of PE and sport; practical. On completing the course you will have specialised in two of your favoured sports and developed the skills required to improve your performance; this performance is part of your assessment. The theory component develops a range of skills involving the study of physiological aspects e.g. motivation, and also sociological aspects which include issues such as discrimination, sponsorship and the roles of the sporting bodies that contribute to sporting success in Britain.

Which subjects combine well with Physical Education? Students choose a wide variety of subjects to complement and contrast P.E., particularly biology, psychology, sociology and business studies. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Higher Education courses in physical education, sport, leisure and health are common destinations for students, as are pathways into the uniformed services and health and fitness careers. What background or achievements do you need? No prior Level 2 qualification is required in Physical Education though it is preferable to be participating in at least one sport on a regular basis. Where PE has been studied at GCSE a minimum of a grade B will be required.

See page 55 for Sports Development & Coaching BTEC AS/A2


college facilities Performing Arts

Performing Arts

EDEXCEL

BTEC AS/A2 Level

45

Why choose Performing Arts?

What can I expect to learn?

This is a vocational course which focuses on building technique and performance skills through practical classes. It is designed for dedicated performers who wish to work in a professional environment and gain further experience of the Performing Arts industry.

You will study two disciplines of Performing Arts; Acting and Dance.

“Performing Arts takes in a combination of acting and dance disciplines, and since I was interested in both I thought this was an ideal subject to study. I particularly enjoy the practical aspects of Performing Arts, although the teachers make the coursework interesting too.” Tom Atherton Former Hillside High School student

Each art form will be explored separately focusing on technique and performance skills. Units include, Performing to an audience, Contemporary theatre performance, Contemporary Dance, Urban Dance. How will I be assessed? All of your assessments are practical performances that take place every half term. You will be required to complete written assignments to accompany practical work. Course requirements It is preferable that you have a GCSE in one of the two disciplines you will be studying. However if you have performance experience or Dance/ Drama grades at C or above, your application will be considered.

“ From an early age I wanted to be an actress. I love being on stage, taking on another character and feeling their emotions. We have the opportunity to devise our own pieces, which gives me great satisfaction.” Kelsey Rickards former Deyes High School student


college facilities Philosophy and Ethics

Philosophy and Ethics

OCR

AS/A2 Level

46

Why choose Philosophy and Ethics? Philosophy and Ethics offers an exciting, engaging and diverse academic course that explores philosophical, spiritual and ethical ideas from a range of perspectives. Through studying Philosophy and Ethics, you will develop a capacity to think critically and creatively and express your ideas with clarity.

“I enjoy discussing why humans are here and I also really enjoy debating ethical issues such as abortion. I like the discussions we have within the class, because we can learn other points of view.” Matthew Judge former Savio Salesian College student

“My favourite thing about this subject is that it greatly gives you the opportunity to express your opinion, both independently and as a group; the lesson never fails to be enjoyable.”

Jessica Pye former Sacred Heart Catholic College student

What can I expect to learn? It will help you to develop skills in written and verbal communication, presenting information and formulating coherent arguments - all of which are skills to be utilised in any aspect of work or study. At AS Level you will study philosophical ideas concerning the existence of God from a range of world views including the ancient Greeks and the Judeo-Christian tradition, as well as studying challenges to religious belief. You will also study ethics by learning about ethical theories and exploring how they can be applied to the practical moral issues of war and peace, abortion, euthanasia, genetic engineering and human embryo research. At A2 Level you will develop your studies of philosophy of religion and ethics further; you will study the theories of Immanuel Kant, Natural Law, Situation Ethics, Utilitarianism and Buddhist Ethics. As you might expect, discussion plays a large part in how we approach this subject. You must come prepared to give voice to your ideas, but also be prepared to open your mind to ideas that may not even have occurred to you before.

Which subjects combine well with Philosophy and Ethics? Philosophy and Ethics combines well with most other subjects. The most common combinations tend to be with social science and humanities subjects such as English, psychology, sociology, government & politics, and history. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Those going into areas such as medicine, law, journalism or politics find the skills developed in religious studies particularly valuable. What background, skills and achievements do I need? You will need to be open-minded, independent and inquisitive. A good level of competency in written English is necessary for you to succeed in religious studies given that essaywriting is an important aspect of the course. Therefore, you should have obtained a GCSE in English at Grade C or above.


Physics

Biology college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

47

Why choose Physics?

“Physics is a fascinating, immersive exploration of what we know and how we know it, and while it is challenging, overcoming those hurdles is satisfying in a cathartic way.”

Physics is a fascinating subject to study at higher level and physics graduates are in demand because of their intelligence, analytical skills and proven ability to solve problems.

James Henry Former Savio Salesian College student

What can I expect to learn? Physics is a key part of science and technology and it appeals to those people who want to understand the world around them. The course delivers physics in a stimulating manner whilst ensuring that you gain a sound understanding of the main principles of physics. Particle physics, quantum physics and relativity are some of the areas that you will find particularly fascinating. How will I learn? Each area of physics will be discussed, applied and whenever possible, experimentally tested. You will therefore learn through a combination of written and practical work and will be required to solve problems and think analytically. This type of learning will increase your understanding of why things do the things they do.

How will I be assessed? Each year there will be three assessments. Two assessments will be through external examination (one in January and one in June). There will also be a practical assessment, which will test your ability to follow procedures and understand the results. What subjects combine well with physics? Physics is an excellent subject to take with mathematics and the other sciences.

“I found Physics really interesting in high school and was always watching documentaries on space and quantum mechanics, so decided I wanted to study the subject further. Physics opens up so many doors; it’s not as scary as people seem to think. Sometimes it’s really weird, but that only makes it more interesting.” Giorgia Line Former Hillside High School student

Where does this lead / What can I do next? Many students make direct use of their knowledge of physics in higher education and future employment e.g. engineering. Those who choose alternate career paths, like accounting, will find the analytical skills developed in the physics course invaluable. What background, skills and achievements do I need? You will need a grade B in GCSE Physics or BB Core and additional GCSE Science. You will also need a grade B in GCSE Higher Tier Maths.

See page 54 for Applied Science AS/A2


college facilities Psychology

Psychology

AQA Spec A

AS/A2 Level

48

Why choose Psychology? Psychology is a fascinating and extremely popular subject. It involves the study of the human mind and behaviour and so if you are interested in studying why people act and think differently, then psychology is for you. Psychology is a science, with cutting edge research, that has applications to issues in everyday life, ranging from sleep disorders to social change. Students who choose psychology need a combination of curiosity and scepticism and need to enjoy conducting and analysing research. What can I expect to learn? In your AS year, you will study topics such as memory and will investigate how memory works in everyday life. You will also study explanations of attachment behaviour, stress, abnormality and social influence along with research methods. In the second year, you will increase your psychological knowledge and understanding and develop your analysis and evaluation skills. At A2 you will be given the opportunity to acquire in-depth knowledge of highly topical areas in psychology,

“The most interesting thing about Psychology is how much you can relate it to experiences in real life with issues such as peer pressure. I plan to go to a university to study Medicine and know that Psychology will help me in this.” Oluwaseyi Odeyemi former De-La-Salle Humanities College student

including research into sleep states; factors relating to eating behaviour (including eating disorders); aggression; psychopathology (theories, classification and diagnosis of schizophrenia), as well as the psychology of addictive behaviour. You will also extend your knowledge of research methods used in psychological investigations.

“In my opinion Psychology is a very important A level to have as it provides a lot of opportunities. Psychology has always appealed to me as it is different to any subjects I have studied before.” Lucy Clark former Hillside High School student

How will I learn? Students will be taught by practitioners who adopt many different teaching styles. Students will be able to conduct their own research, use video cameras to reenact experiments and investigate areas of interest and take part in class presentations and discussions. There will be accompanying booklets to compliment the teaching in class and students will be provided with a number of study resources to aid learning. How will I be assessed? This course will be externally assessed by written examination only. What subjects combine well with Psychology? Psychology can be taken with any other subject but it is often taken with biology, P.E., sociology, health and social care, law or English.

Where does this lead / What can I do next? A level psychology combines well with biological sciences and social sciences and students may progress onto careers in medicine, teaching, social work and business management. Further study of psychology in higher education can lead to careers in clinical & educational psychology counselling, rehabilitation and sports therapy. What background, skills and achievements do I need? You do not need to have studied psychology at GCSE level to take this course. You need to have the College entry criteria along with at least a grade C in both Maths and English. You will be engaged in many active learning experiences so enthusiasm and the ability to think critically are definitely an advantage.


Sociology

Sociology college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

49

Why choose Sociology? Are you interested in contemporary, modern Britain? Do you want to acquire knowledge and a critical understanding of the social world in which you live? Then choose sociology. Learn to develop your skills in organising and presenting information, ideas, descriptions and arguments. What can I expect to learn? Sociology is the scientific study of society, of people and of their behaviour. It is an evidence-based subject, which means it is based on research conclusions, and a theoretical subject. Sociologists have developed theories to explain their research findings. At AS you will study both these aspects of the subject. You will be introduced to different theories and study the research methods developed by the sociologists. You will also study their findings in a number of key areas. Sociologists have studied how families are changing, becoming more varied and less predictable, how schools operate and the power of teachers to influence achievement.

“Sociology was a new subject for me which looked interesting. We have discussions which help us relate and apply our learning into real life.� Aidan Lever former Hillside High School student

On your A2 course you will study theories and research in more depth and look at other areas of social life. You will consider how people create their identities, you will look at who has the power to influence society and you will consider why some people conform and others commit crime. By the time you finish your course you should see the world differently, have deeper understanding of the way societies work and have learnt how to carry-out and interpret social science research.

What subjects combine well with Sociology? All the social sciences and humanities subjects such as English, geography, history, government and politics, law and business studies combine well with sociology. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Sociology provides an excellent background for anyone choosing a career that involves working with people. People with sociology A level can be found in all areas of work. It is particularly relevant for the caring professions, media work, personnel and human resources management. Students of sociology go on to a hugely diverse range of careers and higher education courses from jobs in the media, such as researchers and journalists, to teaching, police work, social work and health care. What background, skills and achievements do I need? No prior Level 2 qualification is required in Sociology though sound written and oral communication skills are essential, you should also meet the standard College entry criteria.


college facilities Spanish

Spanish

WJEC

AS/A2 Level

50

Why choose Spanish? Studying Spanish at AS/A2 offers you the chance to enhance your language skills, learn about the culture and society of the Spanish speaking world and improve your career prospects. It is a multicultural world and employers greatly value competence in a foreign language. What can I expect to learn? AS and A2 Spanish allow you to develop and reinforce the language skills you have acquired at GCSE. In fact, AS offers a natural transition as many of the topics to be studied will already be familiar to you. At A2 level, not only will your language skills be further developed through the study of more advanced topics but you will also have the opportunity to study many aspects of Spanish language, culture and society, including literature and cinema.

“Spanish is a subject I have really enjoyed throughout school life. I continued my studies at SSSFC and particulary enjoy the group discussions and learning more about Spain. At this point in my education I am keeping my career options open.” Megan Edwards former St. Wilfrid’s Catholic High School student

“Languages have always been my passion, and I’m keen to develop my linguistic skills. Due to my exam results I have based my career choices around Spanish. I hope to continue my Spanish Studies to the highest possible level and hope to become a teacher. I would get great satisfaction in spreading this knowledge to others” John Cawley former Litherland High School student

How will I learn? Spanish lessons will take place in a stimulating and exciting environment where you will be challenged to improve your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills to a most impressive level. Great emphasis is placed on the spoken language to ensure that you become a confident communicator and, therefore, group and pair work constitutes a large part of the course. Independent learning is vital if you are to succeed at A level and you will have access to a well developed VLE and well resourced LRC to help you achieve your potential. How will I be assessed? You will be assessed in all four skills at ‘A’ level. At AS, formal examinations test your competence in reading, writing and listening whilst a visiting examiner assesses your oral ability. The A2 course follows a similar format with the addition of translations into Spanish and a detailed study of a region in Spain, a film and a piece of literature.

What subjects combine well with Spanish? Spanish can, and increasingly is, studied in combination with any subject as AS and A2 level. It is most often combined with English, business studies or a humanities or social science subject. Students who are keen linguists can, of course, take both French and Spanish at AS/A2. Where does this lead / What can I do next? Universities and colleges offer single degrees and joint degrees in pure languages and European Studies. Many other courses such as business and computing, media studies, English and law have foreign language components. It can lead to a career in teaching, interpreting, translating, journalism and tourism. What background, skills and achievements do I need? AS Spanish - A minimum of a grade B in GCSE Spanish is required. A2 Spanish - Students have to have achieved a grade C in AS Spanish to progress to A2. A2 Spanish students who have taken AS Spanish in secondary school will need to have achieved a grade C in order to progress to grade 2.


Applied Business

Applied Business college facilities

AQA

AS/A2 Level

51

Why choose Applied Business? One day you will work in a business – it might even be your own business. As an advanced level person you are most likely to be a manager in the business you work for. Even if you have a career in the NHS you will need business skills. This course is different from AS Business Studies because it is partly assessed through coursework rather than examination. What can I expect to learn? Unit 1: Investigating Business – coursework assessed unit You will choose a high street business to investigate, such as McDonalds, Next or Tesco. You explore the aims and objectives of the business, the needs of their customers and how these are met through the use of marketing, such as advertising. You find out how they deal with competition from other businesses and how external factors, such as changing social values, can affect a business. You will explore the meaning of enterprise and enterprising behaviour and why individuals and teams are vital to the success of a business.

Unit 2: People in Business – coursework assessed unit You will investigate the training and development opportunities available to individuals in businesses and why motivation is vital in retaining staff. In this unit you work in a team to carry out the activities associated with the recruitment process.

“I love studying applied business, it goes really well with enrichment activities like the Young Enterprise project.   It is taught using practical examples and look forward to learning more as I progress through the course.”   Jack Watson former Hillside High School student

Unit 3: Financial Planning and Monitoring – unit assessed by examination You will be assessed on your ability to calculate business costs, revenues and then profits and be required to know how managers use this information in decision making. How will I be assessed? In the first two units you will be assessed through coursework. These will be divided into sections and you will have the opportunity to revise each section after comments by your teacher. This is a good option for Business if you like coursework and are good at it. The third unit is assessed by an examination taken in January.

What subjects combine well with Applied Business? Many subjects go well with Business, such as Sociology, Psychology, Geography and Maths but, even if you are a scientist, you will develop management skills that will be useful in your career. Where does this lead?

“I enjoy learning about the application of business principles within the workplace and this combines well with my other subjects.  The teacher is really nice and help us to understand using real life examples like McDonalds and other businesses.  At this point in my education I am keeping my career options open.” Rebecca Moore former Maghull High School student

The AS Applied Business combines with any other A-level to take you to university or on to a higher level training course. It develops your skills of research, report writing, teamworking and presentational skills. What background, skills and achievements do I need? No prior level 2 qualification is required in Business but you must be capable of doing coursework and in working with others.


college and Health facilities Social Care

Health and Social Care

OCR

Single & Dual Award AS/A2 Level

52

Why choose Health and Social Care? This is a course for people who want to develop their knowledge, skills and understanding relevant to this broad vocational area. The course is designed to lead to employment, further study at higher levels or training. About the course: Single Award – AS A three unit award in year 12 that leads to an AS GCE Single Award. This is for students who would like to consider the possibility to persue a career in health. There is an option to choose three more units in year 13 that would lead to a Single A Level at the end of year 13. Double Award – AS A six unit award in year 12 leads to AS GCE Double Award. In year 13 students will complete another 6 units leading to an A2 GCE Double Award in Health and Social Care. What can I expect to learn? Single Award and Double Award (AS): Unit 1: Promoting Quality Care (Exam) – an investigation into attitudes, prejudices, human rights and access to services. Unit 2: Communication in Care Settings (Portfolio) – the importance of effective communication skills in Health and Social Care. Unit 3: Promoting Good Health (Portfolio) – this unit looks at health and wellbeing and the part that health promotion plays.

Double Award (AS): Unit 6: Working in Early Years Care and Education (Portfolio) – this unit investigates the range of care and education provision for children from 0-8 years. Unit 7: Health as a Lifestyle Choice (Portfolio)

“I picked Health and Social Care because I am very interested in becoming a psychiatric nurse and this course will help me gain experience in this area and then go to university.” Christopher Robinson former St George of England student

– students will look at the nutritional values of food and the dietary requirements of individuals. This unit also includes looking at the positive effects of exercise. Candidates should be open to participating in a number of exercise classes in order to complete this unit. Unit 9 : Caring for Older People (Exam) – an investigation into the effects of ageing and the support services available to older people. How will I be assessed? Single Award (AS): Coursework/Portfolio – Units 2 and 3 External Exam – Unit1`

“I came to an Open Evening, I thought this subject looked and sounded interesting. In the future I am thinking of being a nurse or working with children.” Ashley Keel former Hillside High School student

Double Award (AS): Coursework/Portfolio – Units 6 and 7 External Exam: - Unit 9 What subjects combine well with this subject? Health and Social Care combines well with Biology, Psychology, Sociology and Law. Where does this lead / What can I do next? The AS course lasts for one year leaving students with the option to progress onto a second year of Health and Social Care which upon completion will give them an A2 level in Health and Social Care. What background, skills and achievements do I need? Students are not required to have studied Health and Social Care previously (e.g. at GCSE level). Students will be required to meet the college entry requirements (and hold a grade C in GCSE English Language).


Applied Law

Applied Law college facilities

EDEXCEL

BTEC AS/A2 Level

53

Why choose Applied Law? Applied Law is an exciting course which allows you to explore Law and the Legal System in a practical setting. The BTEC Applied Law course allows you to demonstrate knowledge and understanding through the completion of assignments which will be continuously assessed. There is no final written examination so if you enjoy coursework, and perhaps are considering a career in the Law as a Legal Secretary, Legal Executive or Para Legal, this could be the course for you! What can I expect to learn? During the course you will be introduced to the key aspects of the English Legal System and the main areas of substantive Law within it. The modules that you will study can include: Unit 1: Dispute Solving in the Legal System Unit 2: Understanding Law Making Unit 3: Aspects of Legal Liability Unit 4: Unlawful Homicide and Police Powers Unit 5: Aspects of Property Offences and Police Powers Unit 8: Aspects of the Law of Tort

“The whole class is involved in Law and you always feel free to express your point of view. Once a week we have a ‘Law Clinic’, allowing you to catch up on any work you’re having trouble with and there are trips to court available to experience the law in practice.” Robert Hughes Former Bluecoat School student

How will I learn? Law is a subject which is dependent upon your involvement. Typical learning and teaching activities will include small group work, discussion, debate, mock trials, individual research, case law analysis, problem solving and obviously assignment based work! Learning will also take place outside of the classroom with opportunities to visit local courts, to participate in a Law conference, and possibly a visit to New York City to compare the American Legal System to the English Legal System. How will I be assessed? During the course you will be assessed both formally and informally. Formal internal assessments will include problem questions, presentations, and extended research projects. External assessment of Law is entirely coursework based, there is no written examination at all. What subjects combine well with Applied Law? Law can be combined with any other subject. It could, therefore, be linked with subjects which develop similar skills, such as English, history, government and politics and sociology but could be matched equally well with subjects such as business studies, mathematics or one of the sciences.

What background, skills and achievements do I need? It is unlikely that you will have studied Law before, but do not worry! The BTEC Applied Law course is designed as an introduction to Law and the Legal System and will therefore help to remove any feelings of uncertainty and confusion that you might experience when taking on a totally new subject.

“I thought that since there were no exams in Applied Law and everything is assessed on coursework, it would be more like a real-life situation and give me a qualification employers would be really impressed by.” Wiktoria Wegryzn Former St. George of England Specialist Engineering College student


college Applied facilities Science

Applied Science

AQA

AS/A2 Level

54

Why choose Applied Science? Studying applied Science will give you an insight into how science is applied to many professions and industries and will give you a practical based learning programme covering the three Science areas of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. What can I expect to learn? In the first year you will study 6 units. Unit 1: Investigating science at work. This explores the types of organisations that use science, how science is used in organisations and how health and safety regulations are used in the workplace. Unit 2: Energy transfer systems. A Biology module that looks at the circulatory system and the process of respiration. Unit 3: Finding out about substances. A Chemistry module that investigates qualitative chemical analysis and the energy changes that take place when chemical reactions happen.

“Although I enjoyed Science at school, I didn’t want to devote three subjects of my college timetable to it, so decided to take Applied Science as it incorporates bits of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. I’m glad I made this choice now, and would recommend others to do the same.” Mark Thomson Former St. Ambrose Barlow Catholic College student

Unit 4: Food Science and technology. A Biology module that investigates food hygiene and the causes of food spoilage. Unit 5: Choosing Materials. A Chemistry and Physics module that investigates why particular materials are used for their purpose.

“I was always most interested in the practical aspects of Science at school so this seemed like an ideal choice for me at A Level; the teacher is very supportive and always listens to any AQA we have, or any topic problems we are struggling with.” Lauren Leyden Former Hillside High School student

Unit 6: Synthesising organic compounds. A Chemistry module that investigates the different classes of organic compounds. In the second year you will study another 6 units including how to carry out scientific investigations; medical physics; sport science; the physics of performance effects; controlling chemical processes as well as the actions and development of medicine. How will I learn? You will learn through a mixture of different activities such as using ICT for presenting your work, practical experiments, group work and independent research. You will also learn by visiting scientific workplaces.

How will I be assessed? You are assessed by written external examination which consists of short structured questions but the majority of your assessment will be through the production of portfolio evidence. What subjects combine well with Applied Science? Applied science can be combined with health and social care. Where does this lead / What can I do next? This course will prepare you for a career in the science industry or industries that use scientific knowledge and skills. It will also prepare you for further and higher education courses, such as paramedical degrees. What background, skills and achievements do I need? A minimum of a grade CC in Core and Additional science, grade C in separate sciences or Merit in BTec is required.


BTEC AS/A2 Level

Why choose Sports Development & Coaching? BTEC Level 3 Certificate in Sport is equivalent to an A Level. It is a great option for anybody who has studied BTEC Sport at GCSE. This qualification can lead onto sport and leisure courses at university and is a great asset to anybody interested in entering into employment in leisure and sport. What can I expect to learn? You will study various modules throughout the 2 years. Modules will include aspects of anatomy and physiology, fitness recording and testing, physiology of fitness and many others. How will I learn? Assessments will be made practically and through assignments. You will be assessed through posters, leaflets, powerpoint, presentations, fact sheets letters and short essays. A major advantage of this course is that the work is all coursework – there is no exam. However you have to like doing coursework and be good at it. You should know this from your experience of coursework at GCSE.

Sports & Coaching collegeDevelopment facilities

Sports Development & Coaching

EDEXCEL

55 55

“My career plans are to either go to University – or to do more courses to do with – Sport Coaching, to gain qualifications and achievements which will help me get a job doing Coaching as a career. This subject will help me achieve this.” Kelly McGarrigle Former St Wilfrid’s Catholic High School student

What subjects combine well with Sports Development & Coaching? Students choose a wide variety of subjects to complement and contrast, particularly biology, psychology, sociology, business studies and ICT. You should not do this subject along with PE. What background, skills and achievements do I need? GCSE Physical Education C or above or BTEC First in Sport at a Pass. You will need to be hardworking, focused and organised to meet weekly deadlines and you should be able to work independently in pairs and in groups.

“I prefer BTEC Sport’s assessment through coursework as there are no exams to get stressed over, and I can dedicate more revision time to other subjects.” Daniel Humphray Former Savio Salesian College student

See page 44 for Physical Education AS/A2


How to find us

How to find us

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From Southport, Formby & Crosby

From Kirkdale, Walton & Anfield

From Ormskirk & Maghull

Duration: From Southport = 54 mins; From Formby = 39 mins; From Crosby = 30 mins Trains leave every 15 minutes.

Duration: 23 mins Trains leave every 15 minutes

Duration: From Ormskirk = 29 mins Route: Ormskirk - Liverpool Central

59 leaves 16 mins and 46 mins past the hour. Be at Crosby Station for 7.45 am to get to college on time!

159 leaves at 28 and 58 minutes past the hour Be at Walton Station for 7.45 am to get to college on time!

Southport Train Station

8 Minutes Netherton, Interchange Huyton Travel Bus: 159 Get off at Netherton Way, Litherland

Route: Southport - Hunts Cross

10 Minutes

Old Roan Rail Station

30 Minutes

Trains leave every 15 minutes 159 leaves at 28 and 58 minutes past the hour Be at Maghull Station for 7.45 am to get to college on time!

Ormskirk Train Station Maghull

13 Minutes

Old Roan Train Station 1 Minute

7 Minutes Walk up Boundary Road towards Sterrix Lane (past Litherland Sports Park) Arrive at South Sefton Sixth Form College

Seaforth & Litherland Rail Station 5 Minutes

Seaforth, Bridge Road Kirkdale Train Station 6 Minutes Bridge Road onto Arriva Bus: 59 Route: To Bootle Bus Station (Litherland, Netherton Way) Bus stops outside

Train: Liverpool To Ormskirk

1 Minute 8 Minutes Netherton, Interchange Huyton Travel Bus: 159: Get off at Netherton Way, Litherland 7 Minutes Walk up Boundary Road towards Sterrix Lane (past Litherland Sports Park) Arrive at South Sefton Sixth Form College


How to find us

Bus and Train Routes to and from the college

57

From Aintree Duration: 23 mins

9 Minutes Walk up Netherton Way onto Boundary Road and arrive at South Sefton Sixth Form College, Sterrix Lane, Bootle, L302DB

58 leaves at 23 and 53 past the hour. Be at Raymond Avenue, Netherton for 8.20 AM to get to college on time!

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Alight at Bootle, Bridle Road

5 Minutes Take Bus Number 58 Route: Netherton Magdalene Square Liverpool 10 Minutes

To Raymond Avenue, Netherton

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Telephone 0151 288 6300 Email enquiries@sssfc.ac.uk www.sssfc.ac.uk


Notes

Notes 58


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college facilities


college facilities

60

Alternative formats are also available on request. The information in this prospectus is correct at the time of publication (October 2011) and is subject to change.

South Sefton 6th Form College Sterrix Lane, Litherland L30 2DB Telephone 0151 288 6300 Email enquiries@sssfc.ac.uk www.sssfc.ac.uk

Follow us on Twitter @SSSFC


South Sefton Sixth Form Prospectus 2012