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SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL

VOLUME 27 . NUMBER 3 . SEPTEMBER 1973 230 PARK AVENUE· NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017

HALF OF CHINA: A REPORT ON A CONFERENCE· by Margery Wolf

THE INFLUENCE of the women's movement in the United States is being felt in many parts of academia, not all of which are political. China scholars, both men and women, are now more inclined to treat the status, activities, influence, and roles of the female half of Chinese society as legitimate subjects for research. Where ten years ago women in traditional China were dismissed as the pathetic but not particularly interesting victims of an androcentric patrilineal social system, many students of the society (though by no means all) are now beginning to take a closer look at such things as the political effect of Chinese peasant women's domestic power, or the uncomfortable compromise made by elite intellectual women early in this century between the principles of feminism and revolution. On June 11-15, 1973 an interdisciplinary conference with a very broad focus on Women in Chinese Society was held in San Francisco, under the auspices of the Joint Committee on Contemporary China of the Social Science Research Council and American Council of Learned Societies. The purpose of the conference was multiple: to provide • The conference was cochaired by the author, of Stanford, Cali· fornia, and Roxane Witke of Stanford University, who together de· veloped the plans for the conference with the assistanc!." of the Joint Committee on Contemporary China. The other participants were: Emily M. Ahern, Yale University; Charlotte L. Beahan, Columbia Uni· versity; Fu·mei Chen, Vestal, New York; Delia Davin, University of York, England; Norma Diamond, University of Michigan; Yi-tsi Feuenverker, University of Michigan (who prepared a paper but was unable to attend); Joanna F. Handlin, University of California, Berkeley; Elizabeth L. Johnson, Vancouver, British Columbia; Leo Ou-fan Lee, Princeton University; Victor Li, Stanford University; Mary B. Rankin, Washington, D.C.; G. William Skinner, Stanford Uni· versity; Marjorie Topley, University of Hong Kong; Sophie Sa Winckler, Harvard University; Arthur P. Wolf, Stanford University; Marilyn Young, University of Michigan; and John Creighton Campbell, staff, Joint Committee on Contemporary China.

a forum in which people working in a variety of academic disciplines but on the same general topic could ponder one another's conclusions, to stimulate new research on a very understudied aspect of China, and to encourage re-examination of the conclusions reached in earlier research on China. The papers prepared for the conference reflect not only the varied disciplines of the participants but also the great diversity of methods by and settings in which Chinese women can be studied. Five of the papers were about Chinese in the island province of Taiwan, one on Hong Kong, and one about residents of an overseas Chinese community. Ten of the papers analyzed data about mainland Chinese, three of them, from the post1949 period. For the obvious reason, all but one of the papers written about women resident on the mainland of China were based primarily on documentary evidence; the papers written about Chinese from other areas made fuller use of interview materials. Although this difference builds in certain biases in the nature of the data from different areas, it also encourages a dependence and a mutual respect between those who might be inclined to think they were studying the only "eal Chinese and those who might be incl ined to think only they were really studying Chinese. A gratuitous resolution of academic prejudice. With a conference topic so broad that it embraces half the members of a society, it is not surprising that the papers and the discussions of them swung widely from psychological variables to sexual mores to literary traditions. What may be somewhat more surprising is the intellectual enthusiasm that can unite such a group of participants when discussion ranges from the roots of feminism in the Ming to a study of the family cycle in

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Taiwan, and the discussion of that study in tum provides new insight into the lives of leading women comrades in the People's Republic. A legal scholar found the discussion of the dangerous power attributed to women's body effluvia had bearing on her own data, and her material added another dimension to a study commenting on the sometimes instrumental use of suicide by peasant women. And those interested in political change and revolution found much of value in a discussion of the influence of sisters on the political affiliations of their brothers. The blend of disciplines and perspectives made for unusually productive debates that more than justified the wide scope of the topic. Some very clear themes for future research emerged from the conference, the most salient of which is the relationship between women and various aspects of the economy. By assuming that peasant women conformed to the elite stricture enforcing seclusion on women, we accepted uncritically the pre-1949 observations that women had a limited role in productive labor, including agriculture. We do not know what the traditional division of labor between the sexes really was, nor do we know to what extent it varied with the agricultural base of a community. One of the themes of the women's movement in the United States and an important variable in studies of women in all social sciences is the relationship between the status of women in a society and the extent of their involvement in productive labor. Marjorie Topley provided evidence for this relationship: young women in Kwang-tung around the turn of the century used their unusual earning capacity in the silk industry to reject the conventional path of marriage and subjugation by the family. On the other side of the issue, men who labored certainly did not have higher status than those who did not, and the status of women in the family increased at the same time that they were withdrawing from whatever involvement in productive labor they may have had. On yet another level of societal analysis, Hakka women who on the whole (again our data are gross) are considerably more active in labor outside of the home seem to have considerably more status and power than other Chinese women. In the People's Republic this theoretical relationship between involvement in productive labor and status is accepted to the point of being the basis for policy on the bumpy path toward women's equality. Clearly, the economic variable is one of those having major priorities in research on women in China, be it from the perspective of history, political science, economics, or anthropology. It is not possible here to do more than mention some of the other topics that came up during the conference and were deemed to be in great need of research. Natu26

rally sexism was a frequent issue both as a practical problem and as one of theoretical interest. For example, on the practical level, why has the People's Republic not been more successful in its attempts to deal with sexism; and on the theoretical level, why does sexism seem to be one of the most difficult tasks in any revolution? The role of feminism in China, as a movement and as a set of principles, also was a central subject of discussion. The relationship between feminism and nationalism, between the feminist cause and political revolution, between feminism in the elite and family reform in peasant society were issues that arose again and again only to be put aside for lack of conclusive information. There was consensus also about the need for more historical research on the status of women in the various periods of China's long history. To date, the topic apparently has not been particularly appealing to serious students, or has been confined to studies of exceptional women or movements. A real need was seen by anthropologists and historians alike for a broader view, a drawing together of the tantalizing bits of evidence that show change in women's status, both up and down, of both elite and peasant. Here our interests were to increase not only understanding of the past, and hence of the context of modern society, but also what such studies can tell us about the process of change. There is a notion among some students of social change that women are the "cutting edge," that, historically speaking, changes in their status, role, etc. reflect changes less visible elsewhere but affecting the whole of society. It is an interesting thought and one that in the Chinese case can be examined as a theory with the valuable by-product of encouraging research on a seriously neglected topic. The third aim of the conference, to encourage reexamination of earlier research from the perspective of the female half of Chinese society, began to produce new insights even as the papers were being written. We have accepted for so long the view of Chinese society contained in the male ideology that we have casually labeled as "deviant" families that did not conform to the patrilineal structure. When Arthur Wolf examined the biographies of hundreds of Taiwanese women born early in this century or late in the last century (and anecdotal evidence from elsewhere in China), he found "deviant" families to be more typical than "conventional" families, and he hypothesizes that much of this variation from the presumed norm results from the decisions women make about the marriages of their children. This calls into question many of our assumptions about the nature of Chinese domestic life. Who does make decisions about major family events so crucial to male-descent principles? Have we been led astray only by male ideology or have we further muddled our unVOLUME

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derstanding of the society by inappropriately saddling peasants with elite values and elite behavior? In trying to sort out male ideology, peasant behavior, and elite values, we would do well to take a long look at studies of social mobility. A few men in China made huge social leaps but, since women were expected to marry into families slightly higher on the social scale than their own, nearly all women took a few steps upward every generation with their own marriages, the marriages of their daughters, and of their granddaughters. Many of the papers prepared for the conference are be-

ing revised for publication in a single volume. They may serve as happy samples of what is being done currently to make up for the neglect of this obviously fruitful approach to the study of Chinese society. However, they cannot begin to convey the intensity of discussion at the conference, the sense of shared discovery, the conviction that a beginning had been celebrated. By the time another conference on Chin~se women is called, we have high hopes that the background material will have been collected, that the focus can be smaller and the problems more specific.

SCHOLARL Y EXCHANGE WITH THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA A report prepared by Anne Keatley and Albert Feuerwerker PROSPECTS for increasing scholarly exchange with the People's Republic of China are now several shades brighter as a consequence of agreements reached between the Committee on Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China (which is jointly sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Academy of Sciences, and the Social Science Research Council) and the Scientific and Technical AssociatIOn of the P.R.C. during a visit to China by the committee from May 15 to june 15, 1973. In the early stages of these extended academic contacts, the emphasis will be on the natural and medical sciences, but exchanges in the social sciences and humanities will begin and they undoubtedly will increase as economic, political, and cultural relations between the United States and China develop. The visiting delegation was made up of committee members-excluding those who had recently visited the P.R.C. under other auspices, or who would be part of a medical science delegation scheduled to visit China under the committee's sponsorship in mid-june-and of several scientists who are not members of the committee: Emil L. Smith, chairman of the committee and chairman of the Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California Medical School, Los Angeles, and Mrs. Smith; Frederick Burkhardt, President, American Council of Learned Societies, and Mrs. Burkhardt; Eleanor Bernert Sheldon, President, Social Science Research Council; Harrison Brown, Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Sciences, and Director of the Population Program, Division of Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology, and Mrs. Brown: Albert Feuerwerker, Director of the Center for Chinese Studies, University of Michigan, and chairman of the SSRC-ACLS Toint Committee on Contemporary China, and Mrs. Feuerwerker; Max Loehr, ProSEPTEMBER

1973

fessor of Oriental Art, Harvard University; Ezra F. Vogel, Director of the East Asian Institute, Harvard University, and a member of the joint Committee on Contemporary China; Victor F. Weisskopf, Professor of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Anne Keatley, Staff Director of the committee. Visiting China with the committee were Bruce S. Old, Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Engineering, and Senior Vice President of Arthur D. Little Co., and Mrs. Old; Glenn T. Seaborg, Associate Director of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Professor of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, and Mrs. Seaborg; George Harrar, President Emeritus, Rockefeller Foundation; and Robert G. Sachs, Director, Argonne National Laboratory, and Professor of Physics, University of Chicago. During the month spent in China, the delegation visited universities, research institutes, museums, historical sites, schools, hospitals, factories, communes, and neighborhoods in or near nine cities: Canton, Peking, Sian, Loyang, Nanking, Wuhsi, Soochow, Shanghai, and Hangchow. The members of the delegation met with many scholars in their several fields, and held discussions with senior Chinese officials including Premier Chou En-laL Throughout its visit the delegation was accompanied by Mr. P'an Chun, Director of the Foreign Affairs Office of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the Scientific and Technical Association and by five other staff members of that office. The reception that the delegation received everywhere was invariably warm and friendly. Formed in 1966 to foster scholarly communication between the two countries, the committee recently has had increasing opportunities to carry out its mission. It provided administrative support for the visit of a Chinese physicians' delegation to the United States in

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October 1972 and hosted a Chinese scientific delegation during their U.S. visit in November and December 1972. This spring and summer the committee has sponsored three additional scholarly delegations from the P.R.C. in the fields of high-energy physics, insect hormone research, and hydro technology. Prior to the committee's journey to China, its role with respect to the American side of exchanges between the two countries had been largely one of assisting and advising American scholars on the status of Sino-American scholarly communications, on procedures for making contact with Chinese academic organizations, and on sources of information about the current status of science in China. In addition, the committee provided travel grants for a small number of scholarly groups that had obtained visas through their own efforts: 6 computer scientists in July 1972, 11 physicians from the National Medical Association in October 1972, and 7 physicists in July 1973. While Americans, scholars and others, have gone and will continue to go to China under many different auspices, the invitation to the committee from the Scientific and Technical Association of the P.R.C. and the discussions in Peking during the trip confirmed and solidified the informal working arrangements between the American committee and its Chinese counterpart 1 that developed in the course of the committee's sponsorship of the several visiting Chinese delegations just noted. The most important direct result of the committee's own visit is that for the first time a specific program of two-way exchanges has been agreed upon in principle between Chinese academic authorities and a group representing American academic institutions. Nine American groups, whose interests range from earthquakes to early childhood development, will visit China within the next one or two years under the committee's auspices. In return the Scientific and Technical Association will send seven scholarly groups (in addition to the three noted earlier) to the United States where their visits will be hosted by the committee. These agreements represent a minimum; it can be expected that a wide variety of additional academic exchanges (mainly American visits to China) will be arranged through other channels; and nonacademic cultural exchanges will proceed as they have begun, both with the assistance of the National Committee on United StatesChina Relations and under other auspices. The Committee on Scholarly Communication with the People's Republic of China and the Chinese authorities acknowledged that the interests of the scholarly communities of the two countries are in many respects dissimilar. Each side noted that the principle of equality 1 Roughly speaking, this is the role that the Scientific and Technical Association is assuming in the matter of scholarly exchanges.

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and mutual benefit in all exchanges will require that American delegations to China represent fields of scholarship that would benefit from collaboration with Chinese scholars or access to Chinese society. In practice, however, during the talks in Peking between the committee and the Scientific and Technical Association, the Chinese side was notably reluctant to accept "at this time" some of the committee's proposals in the social sciences and humanities, including Chinese studies (in which the SSRC and ACLS have interests through their Joint Committee on Contemporary China and the ACLS Committee on the Study of Chinese Civilization). Premier Chou En-lai, who talked with the committee's delegation for two hours on May 27, 1973, explained with reference to these programs, "I have found that we need a stage of preparation. I am still hopeful that they can be taken up in the future." The committee is confident that this will indeed be the case, and in the meantime it plans to organize multidisciplinary delegations in the fields for which exchanges have been agreed upon that will include China scholars and others in the social sciences and the humanities where appropriate. The details of the agreements for further scholarly communications are set forth in the following memorandum, which is the committee's record of the results of its discussions with the Scientific and Technical Association: EXCHANGE AGREEMENTS BETWEEN THE COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARLY COMMUNICATION WITH THE PEOPLE'S REpUBLIC OF CHINA AND THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE PEOPLE'S REpUBLIC OF CHINA MAY

27, 1973

I. Committee on Scholarly Communication with the People's

Republic of China Proposals for American Groups to Visit China A. Programs accepted for visits within one to two years I. Plant Studies-Visit to discuss plant studies in China and future exchanges of genepool materials for important food, feed and fiber plants. 2. Earthquake Prediction-Visit by seismologists, geophysicists, and other scientists engaged in research on prediction of earthquakes and earthquake hazards reduction to join with colleagues in China for exchange of information and ideas. 3. Pharmacology-Visit to discuss research on medicinal herbs for therapeutic use, identification of medically effective elements from herbs, and development of synthetic drugs with those elements. 4. Schistosomiasis-Visit by malacologists, parasitologists, aquatic ecologists, and biomedical scientists to discuss eradication and chemotherapy of schistosomiasis and other parasitic infections. 5. Acupuncture-Visit by specialists to observe acupuncture anesthesia and to discuss research on the physiology of acupuncture anesthesia. 6. Archaeology-Visit by scholars to meet with their Chinese colleagues in museums and at recent digs to VOLUME

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exchange information and to discuss methods of conservation and preservation. 7. Anthropology-Visit by anthropologists to discuss and review material in China relating to early man. including recent discoveries. with a view to a deeper understanding of the origin and evolution of man. which is of worldwide interest. 8. Early Childhood Development-Visit by educational specialists and child psychologists to discuss education in primary schools. day care centers and nursery schools. and to discuss research on childhood learning of Chinese and foreign languages. both written and spoken. 9. Linguistical Studies-Visit by linguists to discuss changes in the Chinese language. including character simplification. II. Scientific and Technical Association's Proposals 1. English Language Specialists-October. 1973 Visit by ten persons to meet with linguists. teachers. and foreign language specialists to discuss best and most modern methods of teaching English to native Chinese speakers.

2. Computer Specialists-October. 1973 Visit by fourteen persons for study of five to six weeki. IBM. SDC Be University computer centers requested. 3. Medical Group-October. 1973 Visit by six to ten doctors. for four weeks. to study pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases including bronchitis. influenza. heart and lung diseases, heart pains and use of computers in medical treatment. 4. Library Science Specialists-September, 1973 Visit by ten people to study organization. development and present situation at libraries of various institutions. Including division of labor and how coordinated; education of library personnel-training in library science. 5. Seismology-Within the Next Year Visit by ten persons to study earthquake prediction. 6. Laser Research-Within the Next Year Visit by ten persons to study laser generating equipment and devices; laser application. 7. Photosynthesis of Plants-Within the Next Year Visits by ten persons to study mechanism of primary reaction; flash photolysis; ultra structure of chloroplasts; isolation of reaction center; modulated polarographic determination of oxygen; and methods of rapid determination of oxygen,

PERSONNEL COUNCIL STAFF David L. Sills joined the Council as Executive Associate on September 1, 1973. He will be generally concerned with Council activities in behavioral science fields. in which he has had extensive research and administrative experience. Temporarily he has particular responsibility for administration and development of the programs of the Joint Committees on Contemporary China. on Japanese Studies. and on Korean Studies, and other efforts relating to research on Asia. Mr. Sills received the B.A. degree from Dartmouth College in 1942, spent the next four years in the Army of the United States, 1946-47 at Yale University, and 1947-50 in Japan, receiving the M.A. in sociology from Yale in 1948 and the Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University in 1956. His wide experience in sociological and demographic research in this country and in Asia began during his graduate training. He was a Research Analyst, Public Opinion and Sociological Research Division, Civil Information and Education Section. Occupation of Japan. 1947-50, and served successively as Research Associate. Acting Director, and Director of Research at the Bureau of Applied Social Research, Columbia University, 1952-61. He spent 1960-61 at the Demographic Training and Research Center, Bombay, as Expert, UN Technical Assistance Organization. From 1962 to 1967, as Editor of the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, he directed the preparation of the 17-volume work published in 1968. He spent the following year as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences; from 1968 to 1973 SEPTEMBER

1973

he was successively Associate Director and Director of the Demographic Division of the Population Council. In addition to the International Encyclopedia, his major publications include The Japanese Village in Tmnsition (coauthor). 1950; The Volunteers: Means and Ends in a National Organization, 1957; and The Government of Associations (edited with William A. Glaser), 1966. He has published numerous articles in social science journals. James Fennessey. Assistant Professor of Social Relations, and Associate Research Scientist, Center for Social Organization of Schools. Johns Hopkins University, joined the Council on a part-time basis on September 1, 1973. and will become a full-time member of the staff for the summer of 1974. His current assignment is to prepare working papers on the relation between the decision-making process and evaluation research in public policy. Mr. Fennessey received the B.A. degree from Holy Cross College in 1963, the M.A. in sociology from the University of Chicago in 1967, and Ph.D. in social relations from Johns Hopkins University in 1970. His professional career began as Research Assistant to James S. Coleman in 1965-66, with whom he analyzed and prepru:ed reports on the survey data collected for and presented in Equality of Educational Oppm路tunity. From 1966 to 1968 Mr. Fennessey served as Research Project Director at the Center for Social Organization of Schools; from 1968 to 1970, as Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago, returning to Johns Hopkins University in 1970. Mr. Fennessey is co-author (with Peter C. Briggs) of Incentives in Education Impact Evaluation Report, 1972. and has published several articles. 29


GRANTS FOR STUDY OF EAST EUROPEAN LANGUAGES The Joint Committee on Eastern Europe, sponsored with American Council of Learned Societies (which administers its program)-John Mersereau, Jr. (chairman), Morton Benson, Adam Bromke, Istvan Deak, Eugene A. Hammel, Paul L. Horecky, H. L. Kostanick, and Egon Neuberger-at its meeting on March 16-17, 1973 made 23 grants for study of the following languages:

th,t

Czech James D. Armsu'ong, Ph.D. in Slavic linguistics, Mouton Publishers Kristine Bushnell, graduate student, Slavic languages and literatures, Indiana University Wladyslaw Pleszczynski, graduate student, history, Indiana University Robert E. Rentschler, graduate student, German, University of Washington Hungarian Paul R. Magocsi, Research Fellow, Committee on Ukrainian Studies, Harvard University

FOREIGN AREA FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM In the final year of separate administration of the Foreign Area Fellowship Program by a joint committee of the Social Science Research Council and American Council of Learned Societies, fellowships have been awarded for doctoral dissertation research on five major world areas, and in Latin America and the Caribbean area for research training and internships as well. As of August 1, the appointments listed below had been accepted for 1973-74: Africa and the Near East The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee-Carl K. Eicher, Michigan State University; Thomas Naff, University of Pennsylvania; Karen Petersen, American University; William A. Shack, University of California, Berkeley; Richard L. Sklar, University of California, Los Angeles-which met on January 19 and February 11. It had been assisted by a Preliminary Screening CommitteeInez S. Reid, Barnard College, and Norman Stillman, New York University.

Modern G1'eek Martha D. Desch, graduate student, geography, University of California, Los Angeles F. Stephen Larrabee, Policy Assistant, East European Research, Radio Free Europe

Edna Bay, Ph.D. candidate in history, Boston University, for completion of research in Dahomey and preparation of a dissertation on the royal women of Abomey (renewal) James Bingen, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los Angeles, for research in Zaire on the role of U.S. aid in the Republic of Zaire Polish Steven Buccola, Ph.D. candidate in agricultural economics, Leon E. Ball, graduate student, history, University of University of California, Davis, for research in Ghana or California, Los Angeles Sierra Leone on the processing technology of an agriculAlexander Levitsky, graduate student, Slavic languages and tural product literatures, University of Michigan Susan Caughman, Ph.D. candidate in history, Boston UniGail D. Vroon, graduate student, Russian literature, University, for research in Ghana/Togo on an economic and versity of Michigan social history of Ewe women during the colonial period Bridget Connelly, Ph.D. candidate in comparative literature, Romanian University of California, Berkeley, for preparation of a Jolm Cole, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University dissertation on Arabic sira literature in oral, printed, and of Massachusetts manuscript versions (renewal) Mario D. Fenyo, Director, Department of History, Catholic Dennis Cordell, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of University of Puerto Rico Wisconsin, for research in Chad and Sudan on political David A. Kideckel, graduate student, anthropology, Uniand cultural relations on the Islamic frontier in Equaversity of Massachusetts torial Africa in the nineteenth century John R. Lampe, Assistant Professor of History, University Allan Darrah, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Northof Maryland western University, for research in Nigeria on Hausa Serbo-Croatian therapeutics: symbol and metaphor in episodes of affliction Norman Cigar, graduate student, Middle East Center, Uni- K. Burke Dillon, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Yale University, for completion of research in Kenya and preparaversity of Oxford William D. Cohen, graduate student, Slavic languages and tion of a dissertation on the diversification of the East African financial system (renewal) literatures, University of Michigan Marijean H. Eichel, graduate student, geography, Uni- W. Perkins Foss, Ph.D. candidate in history of art, Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation on the arts versity of California, Berkeley Rita P. Fishman, graduate student, Slavic languages and of the Urhobo and related peoples of the Niger River Delta (renewal) literatures, Indiana University Thomas A. Oleszczuk, graduate student, political science, David Groff, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for research in France, Senegal, and the Ivory University of Wisconsin Mary E. Reed, graduate student, history, University of CaliCoast on the emergence of a rural middle class in the Ivory Coast, ]880-]940 fornia, Berkeley Ernest A. Scatton, Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages Bruce Haight, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northwestern and Literatures, University of Virginia University, for preparation of a dissertatiotn on the poJames H. Seroka, graduate student, political science, Michilitical history of the Dyula Muslims of Bole, 1860-1920 gan State University (renewal) Ronald S. Thomas, graduate student, social anthropology, Grover Hudson, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles, for preparation of a dissertaHarvard University

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tion on descriptive, historical, and comparative phonology of the Sidamo languages of Eastern Cushitic (renewal) Janice Irvine, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Rochester, for preparation of a dissertation on Buu social order (renewal) John Johnson, Ph.D. ~andidate in folklor~, Indiana l!niversity, for research III England and Mall on the SunJata epic as an expression of Mandinka culture Bennetta Jules-Rosette, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Harvard University, for preparation of a dissertation on ritual practices and social organization in the African Apostolic Church (renewal) Barbara Kalkas, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Northwestern University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on the social origins and career patterns of the new men of Egypt (renewal) Deirdre La Pin, Ph.D. candidate in African literature, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on the structure and themes of Yoruba oral narratives (renewal) Gary Leiser, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pennsylvania, for research in England, Turkey, and Egypt on the establishment of the Fatimid caliphate in Egypt Dean Linsenmeyer, Ph.D. candidate in agricultural economics, Michigan State University, for a micro economic analysis in Zaire of maize production in the Kasaii Occidental Province Gordon Matzke, Ph.D. candidate in geography, Syracuse University, for research in Tanzania on the influence of human settlement on large mammal populations in an African woodland area Robert McChesney, Ph.D. candidate in Near Eastern studies, Princeton University, for preparation of a dissertation on the institution of the waqf and its effect on the economic, social, and political institutions of the Balkh (renewal) Christina Michelmore, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pennsylvania, for research in Egypt on the role of traditional leadership in Egypt, 1853-1924 Carrie Moore, Ph.D. candidate in African literature, Indiana University, for preparation of a dissertation on the social realism of the works of Sembene Ousmane (renewal) William Murphy, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Stanford University, for research in Liberia on symbolic classification in Kpelle culture Adell Patton, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in African history, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research in Nigeria on the Ningi Sultanate of the Jos Frontier, 1830-1936 (renewal) Hiromi Lorraine Sakata, Ph.D. candidate in ethnomusicology, University of Washington, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on music and musicians of 3 Persian-speaking areas of Afghanistan (renewal) Gary Schiff, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on tradition and politics: the religious parties of Israel (renewal) Joseph Sclafani, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Brown University, for research in Ghana on trade unionism in an African state: the national railway and port workers union Neal Sherman, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Wisconsin, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on Uganda government dairy policies (renewal) Terry Smith, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for research in Western Europe and Turkey on the formative era of the Bektashi Order of Mystics SEPTEl\IBER

1973

Allen Streicker, Ph.D. candidate in history, Northwestern University, for preparation of a dissertation on authority and resistance in Gwandu: Zaberma responses to aggression (renewal) Daniel Wagner, Ph.D. candidate in psychology, University of Michigan, for Arabic language training and research in Morocco on cross-cultural influences on cognitive development: studies in perception, memory, and selective attention Douglas Werner, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Los Angeles, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation on the Mamba-Lungo region of Zambia (renewal) Wayne Williams, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, Indiana University, for Krio language training and research in England and Sierra Leone on Krio syntax and its implications for literacy

East, South, and Southeast Asia The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee-Edward Anthony, University of Pittsburgh; George DeVos, University of California, Berkeley; Leonard H. D. Gordon, Purdue University; Gerald S. Maryanov, Northern Illinois University; John W. Mellor, Cornell University; and Susanne H. Rudolph, University of Chicagowhich met on February 2 and March 17. It had been assisted by a Preliminary Screening Committee-Robert F. Dernberger, University of Michigan; Edwin Eames, Baruch College, City University of New York; Delmos J. Jones, Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York; Marleigh Ryan, University of Iowa; Josef Silverstein, Rutgers University; and A. Russell Stevenson, Agricultural Development Council.

East Asia Studies Walter Ames, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Michigan, for research in Japan on the police and community William Atwell, Ph.D. candidate in East Asian studies, Princeton University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Japan and the United States on Late Ming Dynasty politics (renewal) Alison Black, Ph.D. candidate in Asian language and literature, University of Michigan, for research and language training in Taiwan and Hong Kong on Wang Fu-chih's concept of nature and artifice in human history Cathryn Cockerill, Ph.D. candidate in history, Princeton University, for research in Japan and Paris on Catholicism in village life in Meiji Japan Richard Gaulton, Ph.D. candidate in government, Cornell University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Hong Kong and the United States on political control and popular mobilization in Shanghai during the takeover by the Communist Party (renewal) Carol Gluck, Ph.D. candidate in modern Japanese history, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Japan and the United States on conservatism in late Meiji Japan (renewal) Alice Herman, Ph.D. candidate in history, Cornell University, for research in Taiwan, Japan, and England on the Chinese Constitutionalists and their press, 1907-12 Shih-pan-yu Hsieh, Ph.D. candidate in plant pathology, University of Hawaii, for preparation of a dissertation in the United States on bacterial leaf blight in rice (renewal)

31


Gommaar Meerbergen, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for language training and research in Japan on Korean minority status and social identity in Japan Ronald Morse, Ph.D. candidate in history. Princeton University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Japan and the United States on cultural creativity and Yanagida Kunio (renewal) Christian Murck, Ph.D. candidate in history, Princeton University, for research in Japan on sociopolitical concern in the sixteenth-century Chinese elite: a comparative study of two groups Daniel Okimoto, Ph.D. candidate in political science. University of Michigan. for preliminary training in the United States and research in Japan on the impact of language on politics James Polachek. Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Japan and the United States on landholding patterns and the gentry class in Kiangsu Province from the Ming Dynasty to the Communist period (renewal) Daniel Rosenberg. Ph.D. candidate in anthropology. University of Minnesota, for research in Mongolia on collectivIZed nomadic pastoralists Vivienne Shue. Ph.D. candidate in government. Harvard University. for research in Hong Kong on political organization in rural China Ralph Thaxton, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Wisconsin. for research in Taiwan on peasant revolution in China James Unger, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics. Yale University, for research in Japan on old and proto-Japanese morphophonemics Gail Weigl. Ph.D. candidate in art history, University of Michigan, for research in Japan on the Kano synthesis: creation of a style Harriet Zurndorfer. Ph.D. candidate in history. University of California. Berkeley, for language training and research in Japan and England on merchants and clansmen in a local setting in medieval China: a case study of the Fan Clan of Hsiu-ning Hsian-an, 800-1600

South Asia Studies Peter Calkins, Ph.D. candidate in agricultural economics. Cornell University. for research in Nepal on the effects of expanding fruit and vegetable production in the Trisuli Triangle on nutrition, marketing. employment. and income distribution Rakhahari Chatterji. Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for research in India on the political role of its labor unions Diana Eck, Ph.D. candidate in comparative religion, Harvard University, for research in India on the religious significance of pilgrimage Michael Freedland, Ph.D. candidate in comparative education, University of Illinois, for preparation of a dissertation in the United States on the social variables that structure and pattern access to education in a north Indian district (renewal) Paul Hanson, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for research in London and India on theories of sovereignty and political action in Mughal India Gillian Hart, Ph.D. candidate in agricultural economics, Cornell University, for language training in the United States and research in Bangladesh on labor supply John S. Hawley, Ph.D. candidate in religion, Harvard Uni-

32

versity, for language training and research in India on the Child Ksrna poems of Sur Das Michael Moffatt, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago, for preparation of a dissertation in the United States on an untouchable community in India (renewal) Lina Ostor-Fruzzetti, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Minnesota, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in India and the United States on ritual activities of caste Hindu and Muslim women in Orissa (renewal) F. Bruce Robinson, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Minnesota, for research in England and India on the nature of resistance in nineteenth-century Maharashtra Karine Schomer, Ph.D. candidate in South Asian language and literature, University of Chicago, for research in India on the Hindi poetess Mahadevi Varma (1907- ) Linda Stone, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Brown University, for language training and research in Nepal on religion and economic change Minto Thapa, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Claremont Graduate School, for research in Nepal on the effect of foreign advisory efforts on the administrative capability of His Majesty's Government of Nepal

Southeast Asia Studies Benjamin Batson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Cornell University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Thailand and the United States on modernization in early twentieth-century Thailand (renewal) Anthony Diller, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, Cornell University, for research in Thailand on areal and social variables in Southern Thai speech Brian Fegan, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Yale University, for completion of research in the Philippines on a Tagalog rice-growing village in Central Luzon (renewal) David Haas. Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Wisconsin, for research in Thailand on the interaction and role-making processes in two types of Thai civil service agencies Ronnie Lee Hatley, Ph.D. candidate in political science and psychology. Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation in the United States on psychological responses to the social and political changes in Indonesia, 1968-73 (renewal) Robert Lawless, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology. New School for Social Research. for research in the Philippines on the Igorot peoples of Northern Luzon Peter Metcalf, Ph.D. candidate in social anthropology, Harvard University, for preparation of a dissertation in the United States on the inequalities of land and wealth among the Kayan of Sarawak (renewal) William O'Malley. Ph.D. candidate in history. Cornell University. for research in the Netherlands and Indonesia on Indonesia during the Great Depression: Medan and Jogjakarta in the 1930's Norman Owen, Ph.D. candidate in history. University of Michigan. for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in the Philippines and the United States on the Bikol region in the nineteenth-century: socioeconomic change in the provincial Philippines (renewal) Elias Ramos. Ph.D. candidate in business administration. University of Wisconsin. for research in the Philippines on the sources of influence of the Philippines industrial relations system Margaret Roff. Ph.D. candidate in political science. Columbia University. for preparation of a dissertation in VOLUllIE

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the United States on the political mobilization of tribal people in Southeast Asia (renewal) Barton Sensenig, III, Ph.D. candidate in social psychology, Cornell University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Thailand and the United States on socialization for autonomy in Thailand (renewal) Esta Ungar, Ph.D. candidate in history, Cornell University, for research in Paris, Saigon, Hong Kong, and Tokyo on the Mac in sixteenth-century Vietnam: interregnum or dynasty Juree Vichit-Vadakan, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research in Bangkok on two mainstream communities Michael Vickery, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation in the United States on Thai and Cambodian chronicles for the fourteenth-sixteenth centuries (renewal) Richard Wallis, Ph.D. candidate in musicology, University of Illinois, for research in Indonesia on the musical contexts of traditional Balinese literature

Western European Program The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee-Joseph LaPalombara, Yale University (chairman); Jean Blondel, University of Essex; Terry Clark, University of Chicago; David Granick, University of Wisconsin; and Val Lorwin, University of Oregon-at a meeting on March 9-10. It had been assisted by a Preliminary Screening Committee-Paul M. Hohenberg, Cornell University; Eric A. Nordlinger, Brown University; Jane Schneider, York College, City University of New York; and Joan Scott, Northwestern University. Franklin H. Adler, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for research in Italy on the political development of the industrial bourgeoisie, 1906-26 Oscar L. Arnal, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pittsburgh, for preparation of a dissertation on the t:elationship between the Action Fran~aise and the Catholic Church, 1899-1939 (renewal) Renato A. Barahona, Ph.D. candidate in history, Princeton University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in Spain, France, and the United States on Basque traditionalism and the origins of modern Spain (renewal) Joep Bolweg, Ph.D. candidate in industrial relations, University of Wisconsin, for Norwegian language training and research in Norway on the impact of participatory organizational structures in industry on productivity and satisfaction Kenneth D. Boyer, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Michigan, for research in Germany on the relationship between regulation of freight transportation rates and choices of modes of freight shipment Alfred B. Bunnett, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Illinois, for research in Germany on Prussian Junkers and business, 1870-1913 Alfred P. Clark, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for research in England on British rearmament policy-making in the 1930's Mary E. Curran, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Columbia University, for research in Ireland on the nature and incidence of agrarian crime as a prepolitical expression of social dissatisfaction in nineteenth-century Ireland SEI'TEMBER

1973

Jesus M. de Miguel, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, f,?r a comparative analysis in Spain, Switzerland, Yugoslavla, Italy, and Portugal of health in the Mediterranean region Lynde.He D. ~airli.e, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Indlana Umverstty, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in England and the United States on the role of Conservative and Labor Party secretaryagents in English constituencies (renewal) Alessandro A. Falassi, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, for research in Italy on a morphology of the Tuscan folktale Jan E. Goldstein, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research in France on the diffusion of and resistance to Freudianism, 1882-1930 Anthony F. Greco, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Columbia University, for research in Italy on the political evolution of the Confederation of Italian Labor Unions Jan T. Gross, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for preparation of a dissertation on multiple authority structures in Poland during the German Occupation, 1939-45 (renewal) Robert A. Horowitz, Ph.D. candidate in educational psychology, Yale University, for research in England on longterm psychological effects of the "open classroom" approach in primary school education Judith J. Howard, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Connecticut, for research in Italy on the "woman question," 1870-1900 Gregory K. Iverson, Ph.D. candidate in linguistics, University of Minnesota, for research in Sweden on phonological rule-ordering relationships in Swedish David Y. Jacobson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Brown University, for preparation of a dissertation on the politics of criminal law reform in France, 1771-89 (renewal) Maura M. Kealey, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for completion of research in Germany on the response of political and economic elites to major strikes in the United States and Germany, 18731914 (renewal) Denis Lacorne, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University, for completion of research in France on Communist and Socialist elites (renewal) Paul G. Lauren, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for preparation of a dissertation on reorganization in the French and German Ministries for Foreign Affairs (renewal) Edgar Allan Lind, Ph.D. candidate in social psychology, University of North Carolina, for cross-cultural experimental research in France on factors influencing satisfaction with adjudicated conflict resolution Michael S. Lund, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for training in empirical comparative research and research in England on the influence of welfare policy elites on antipoverty legislation in the United Kingdom, 1964-72 Philip L. Martin, Ph.D. candidate in agricultural economics, University of Wisconsin, for German language training and a comparative analysis in Germany of the impact of mechanization on labor displacement in agriculture :Mary Lynn McDougall, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in France and the United States on the worker's movement in Lyon, 1832-52 (renewal) Michael L. Meiselman, Ph.D. candidate in history, Washington University, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in France and the United States 33


on a socioeconomic interpretation of the causes and character of the French Revolution (renewal) Alberto Niccoli, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Yale University, for research in Italy on the macro structure of the Italian economy Allan N. Sharlin, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Wisconsin, for German language training and research in Germany on the social history of Frankfurt am Main, 1848-1914 Thomas L. Steinmeier, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Yale University, for theoretical and empirical research in Italy on recent Italian development of a three-sector model of the Italian economy Timothy N. Tackett, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for preparation of a dissertation on priest and parish in the eighteenth-century dioce~e of Gap (renewal) Jerry L. Ulrich, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago, for completion of research and preparation of a dissertation in England and the United States on political culture and the expansion of political participation in England, 1850-1900 (renewal) Robert P. Van Spyk, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Oregon, for research in the Netherlands on a social geography of urban growth in Utrecht

Latin America and Caribbean P1路ogmm The awards were recommended by the National Screening Committee for Research Fellowships-Thomas E. Skidmore, University of Wisconsin (chairman); James M. Malloy, University of Pittsburgh; Robert A. Potash, University of Massachusetts; Daniel Schydlowsky, Boston University; and Rodol拢o Stavenhagen, College of Mexico, at a meeting on March 16-17. Preliminary screening was done by disciplinary committees consisting of Jane S. Jacquette, Occidental College, and John D. Wirth, Stanford University; Thomas C. Greaves, University of Pennsylvania, and Gilbert W. Merkx, University of New Mexico; Mary L. Daniel, University of Iowa, and Rene de Costa, University of Chicago; and, for professional internships, Harold Bierman, Cornell University; Calvin P. Blair, University of Texas at Austin; and Gloria N. Tait, Inter-American Development Bank.

Research Fellowships: United Slates Bruce Bagley, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los Angeles, for research on power and politics in Colombia: decision making under the Frente Nacional, 1958-74, in affiliation with the Department of Political Science, University of the Andes Paul A. Ballard, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Columbia University, for research on political leadership, informal groups, and the role of the Mexican federal government in industrial development, in affiliation with the College of Mexico Jean R. Barstow, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago, for research on the conceptions of property of the Mapuche Indians in Chile, in affiliation with the Institute of Training and Research in Agrarian Reform, Santiago William M. Berenson, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Vanderbilt University, for research on bureaucracy and bureaucratic elites in Uruguay, in affiliation with the National Office of Civil Service (renewal)

34

Robert D. Bond, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Vanderbilt University, for research on the bureaucracy and bureaucratic elites in the Venezuelan polity, in affiliation with Andres Bello Catholic University (renewal) Gary Brana-Shute, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Florida, for research on rural-urban migration of economically marginal New World black males, in affiliation with the Ministry of Public Works and Traffic and the Ministry of Education, Surinam (renewal) Elinor C. Burkett, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Pittsburgh, for research on the social history of Arequipa and the response to earthquake disasters, in affiliation with the National University of San Agustin (renewal) Ram6n D. Chac6n, Ph.D. candidate in history, Stanford University, for research on Yucatan and the Mexican Revolution, in affiliation with the National Institute of Anthropology and History, Mexico Joan R. Dassin, Ph.D. candidate in modern thought and literature, Stanford University, for research on the role of Mario de Andrade in the Brazilian modernist movement, in affiliation with the Institute of Brazilian Studies, Sao Paulo (renewal) Patricia N. Deustua, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Cornell University, for research on local level political and economic organization of the Late Chimu Kingdom in northern Peru, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru (renewal) Elizabeth W. Dore, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research on the dynamics of economic and social structures in Cajamarca, Peru, 1780-1920, in affiliation with the Institute of Peruvian Studies, Lima Peter C. Felsted, Ph.D. candidate, Vanderbilt University, for research on the economics of adult education in developing areas with a case study of Peru, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru Dennis L. Gilbert, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Cornell University, for reasearch on the structure and influence of the Peruvian political elite, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru Linn A. Hammergren, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Wisconsin, for research on national institutional integration in Peru, in affiliation with the National University of San Agustin (renewal) Judith C. Hoffnagel, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, In路 diana University, for research on Pentecostalism as an urban social movement in Recife, in affiliation with the University of Pernambuco l\.barten D. C. Immink, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Hawaii, for research on calorie supplementation and labor productivity, in affiliation with the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama. Guatemala Jeffrey C. Jacob, Ph.D. candidate in education, Syracuse University, for research on the behavior of children in low-income families in Guatemala City in terms of past and present poverty theory, in affiliation with Rafael Landivar University (renewal) Ram6n Jrade, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Brown University, for research on social change in peasant communities and Mexico's Cristero rebellion (affiliation to be determined) Janet Lever, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, Yale University, for research on the integrative power of soccer clubs in 3 urban centers of Brazil, in affiliation with the University Research Institute of Rio de Janeiro (renewal) Theodore Macdonald, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Illinois, for research on symbolism and cosVOLUME

27,

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3


mology of the lowland Quechua Indians of Eastern Ecuador, in affiliation with the National Institute of Anthropology and History, Quito Cynthia McClintock, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, for research on agrarian structures and peasant attitudes and behavior, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru William K. Meyers, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for research on working-class movements and revolutionary politics in Laguna, Mexico, in affiliation with the National Institute of Anthropology and History. Mexico Emilio F. Moran, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, for research on socioecological adaptation to the Trans-Amazonian Highway, in affiliation with the National Research Institute for Amazonia and the Federal University of Para, Belem Nancy P. Naro, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Chicago, for research on social dimensions and political conflict of the Praieira Revolt in Pernambuco. 1848-49. in affiliation with the Joaquim Nabuco Institute Thomas F. O'Brien. Jr .• Ph.D. candidate in history, University of Connecticut, for research on the decline of the Chilean nitrate entrepreneurs, 1881-90. in affiliation with the Center for Research on American History. Santiago (renewal) Benjamin S. Orlove. Ph.D. candidate in anthropology. University of California, Berkeley, for research on regional economic organization in the southern sierra of Peru, with emphasis on the wool trade, in affiliation with the University of Cuzco (renewal) O. F. Peterson, Ph.D. candidate in geography, University of Minnesota, for research on the development of squatter settlements, in affiliation with the University of the Andes, Bogota (renewal) A. Israel Rivera-Ortiz. Ph.D. candidate in political science, State University of New York at Buffalo, for research on the political environment of organizations dealing with development, in affiliation with the University of the Andes, Bogota (renewal) Kenneth D. Roberts, Ph.D. candidate in economics, University of Wisconsin, for research on the effects of adoption of high-yielding varieties of wheat on the agricultural labor force in the Bahio area of Mexico. in affiliation with the National Agricultural School. Chapingo (renewal) Michael J. Rodell, Ph.D. candidate in urban planning, University of California, Los Angeles, for research on urbanization and economic development in Bahia since 1950, in affiliation with the Federal University of Bahia (renewal) Humberto L. Rodriguez-Camilloni, Ph.D. candidate in architectural history, Yale University, for research on seventeenth-century architecture in Peru, in affiliation with the National University of Engineering Jane B. Ross, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University, for research on ecological aspects of conflict among the Jivaroan Achual Indians of northern Peru, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru (renewal) Mitchell A. Seligson, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Pittsburgh, for research on peasant attitudes and behavior in relation to land tenure patterns, in affiliation with the University of Costa Rica (renewal) Brooke Larson Shute, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University, for research on crisis and change in a regional economy: the Cochabamba Valley, 1750-1850, in affiliation with the Torcuato Di Tella Institute, Buenos Aires, and the National Archives of Bolivia, Sucre SEPTEMBER

1973

Brian. H. ~mith, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale Umverslty, for research on working class politics and the transition to socialism in Chile (affiliation to be determined) William C. Smith, Jr., Ph.D. candidate in political science, Stanford University, for research on political concomitants of industrialization in Argentina. in affiliation with the Torcuato Di Tella Institute, Buenos Aires Barbara B. Stallings, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Stanford University, for research on leadership and strategies of development in Chile, in affiliation with the Center for National Planning Studies and the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences, Santiago (renewal) Eric J. Van Young, Ph.D. candidate in history, University of California, Berkeley, for research on the agrarian history of the Guadalajara region, 1650-1810. in affiliation with the College of Mexico and University of Guadalajara (renewal) Robert W. Werge, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, for research on agricultural innovation in livestock management and intensive horticulture in El Rio, Dominican Republic. in affiliation with the Madre y Maestra Catholic University Raymond William, Ph.D. candidate in agriculture, Purdue University, for research on purple nutsedge (cyperus rotundus L.) and basic studies related to its control, in affiliation with the Graduate School of Agriculture, Federal University of Vi~osa (renewal) Patricia A. Wilson, Ph.D. candidate in policy planning and regional analysis, Cornell University, for research on the relationshi p between interregional and interclass inequalities in income in Peru and implications for decentralization policies, in affiliation with the Catholic University of Peru

Research Fellowships: United Kingdom Nicholas Bowen, D. Phil. candidate in history, University of Cambridge. for research on the triangular relationship between Argentina, Great Britain, and the United States during World "Var II, in affiliation with the Torcuato Di Tella Institute, Buenos Aires Victor G. Bulmer-Thomas, D. Phil. candidate in economics, University of Oxford, for research on the structure of the Costa Rican economy and projections of it consistent with the anticipated supplies of scarce factors, in affiliation with the National University, San Jose Valerie Hewett, D. Phil. candidate in sociology, University of Strathclyde. for research on migrant female labor employed in urban areas of Colombia as domestic servants, in affiliation with the Regional Center of Population, Bogota John R. Wells. D. Phil. candidate in economics, University of Cambridge, for research on a cyclical model of the Brazilian economy in the 1960's (affiliation to be determined) Glyn vVilliams. Lecturer. University College of North Wales, Bangor. for postdoctoral research on the process of adaptation of Welsh immigrants to two separate locations in Patagonia. Argentina, and its involvement of change in the antecedents of socialization and the adult personality, in affiliation with the Institute of Higher Studies, Chubut

35


Canadian Tmining and Research Fellowships Peter F. Bird, M.A. candidate in political science, University of Toronto, for Spanish language training at the Francisco Marroquin Linguistic Project, Antigua, Guatemala, and graduate study at the University of Toronto, including Latin American studies Kenneth H. Hundert, M.A. candidate in political science, University of Western Ontario, for Spanish language training at the Francisco Marroquin Linguistic Project, Antigua, Guatemala, and graduate study at the University of Western Ontario, including Latin American studies Patrick R. Klyne, M.A. candidate in history, University of Western Ontario, for Spanish language training at the Francisco Marroquin Linguistic Project, Antigua, Guatemala, and graduate study at the University of Western Ontario, including Latin American studies S. Francis Miller, M.A. candidate in geography, University of Windsor, for preliminary thesis research in Quito and graduate study at the University of Windsor, including Latin American studies Donald Nolet, M.A. candidate in sociology, University of Ottawa, for Spanish language training at the Francisco Marroquin Linguistic Project, Antigua, Guatemala, and graduate study at the University of Ottawa, including Latin American studies Brian C.J. Singer, M.A. candidate in sociology, University of Toronto, for Portuguese language training at the Catholic University of Salvador, Brazil, preliminary thesis research in Brazil, and graduate study at the University of Toronto, including Latin American studies James M. White, M.A. candidate in anthropology, Simon Fraser University, for Spanish language training at the Institute of Latin American Studies, Cuernavaca, and graduate study at Simon Fraser University, including Latin American studies

Professional Internships Marcia L. Green, M.S.W. California State University, Assistant Planner, Sacramento Regional Area Planning Commission, for an internship in social administration, Colombian Institute for Family Welfare, Bogota Neil E. Hart, M.A. in architecture and city planning, University of Pennsylvania, for an internship in urban planning, District Administrative Center, Bogota SaUy Lee Higman, M.A. in urban planning, University of Southern California, for an internship in urban planning, National Planning Group, Quito David A. Hines, M.A. in urban affairs, University of Wiscomin - Milwaukee, for an internship in urban planning, Rational Design, Mexico, D.F. ",rayne A. Label, Ph.D. in accounting and economics, University of California, Los Angeles, Assistant Professor of Accounting, University of Texas at Arlington, for an internship in business administration, Center of Social Science, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro Diane Y. Lewis, M.S. in urban plannin~, Columbia University, Project Director, National Urban League, New York, for an internship in urban planning, Urban Development Corporation, Kingston James D. Locke, M.A. in regional planning, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, for an internship in regional planning, National Institute of Planning, Arequipa Richard S. Paegelow, M.B.A. Columhia University, for an internship in business administration, Institute of Engineering, Mexico, D.F. 36

Michael J. Spreitzer, M.S. in nuclear engineering, University of Wisconsin, M.S. in technical writing, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, M.S. in technology, Washington University, for an internship in engineering, National Commission of Nuclear Engineering, Rio de Janeiro Girjesh Tiwari, M.P.W. and M.S. in civil engineering, University of Pittsburgh, for an internship in engineering, Foundation for Community Development and Municipal Promotion, Caracas

Collaborative Research Tmining Fellowships Project I: Migration and Return of Students and Professionals in Latin America; Codirectors: Simon Schwartzman, Getulio Vargas Foundation, Rio de Janeiro, William A. Glaser, Columbia University; research site: Getulio Vargas Foundation: Latin American participants Marfisa Cysneiros de Barros, licentiate in law and sociology. Department of Human Resources of the Superintendency of the Development of the Northeast Maria Cristina B. Freitas, licentiate in public administration, Brazilian School of Public Administration, Getulio Vargas Foundation Sara Adela PaUma, researcher, Bariloche Foundation, San Carlos of Bariloche, Argentina North American pal路ticipants William J. Mathis, Ph.D. candidate in psychology and education, University of Texas at Austin Luiz Rocha Neto, Ph.D. candidate in urban planning, Rutgers University Robert L. Stone, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Chicago Nelson Traquina, graduate student in international relations, University of Denver Project II: Historical Demography of Venezuela, 1750-1850, and Projections to the Present; Codirectors: John V. Lombardi, Indiana University, German Carrera Damas, Central University of Venezuela; research sites: Caracas and selected towns in Venezuela:

Latin American participants (These will be selected by the co directors. ) North American participants George R. Andrews, graduate student in history, University of Wisconsin Anthony A. Ginsberg, M.A. in Latin American studies, New York University Kathy Waldron, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University Project III: Origin, Composition, and Role in Politics of the Paraguayan Political Elites since 1930; Codirectors: Domingo Rivarola, Center of Sociological Studies, Asuncion, Riordan Roett, Vanderbilt University; research sites: Asuncion and small cities throughout Paraguay:

Latin American participants Amparo S. de Paciello, teaching assistant, Faculty of Law and Social Sciences, National University of Asuncion Miguel Angel Gauto, teaching assistant, Faculty of Communication Sciences, National University of Asuncion VOLu~m

27,

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8


Miguel Angel Manzoni Vierci, Professor of Law, National University of Asunci6n

North American participants Peter C. DeShazo, graduate student in history, University of Wisconsin Bernard Rosenberg, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, Los Angeles Robin E. Shoemaker, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, University of Chicago Project IV: Ecological and Political Control of Land and Resources by Aymara Kingdoms in the Lake Titicaca Area; Codirectors: Luis G. Lumbreras, University of San Marcos, John V. Murra, Cornell University; research sites: the Lake Titicaca and outlying regions:

Latin American participants Agostin Llagostera, subdirector of the Regional Museum and Professor of Anthropology, University of the North, Antofagasta, Chile Elias Mujica, graduate student in anthropology, Catholic University of Peru Gloria Paredes, Research Assistant, Archaeological Research Center, Tiwanaku Max Portugal, Research Associate, Archaeological Research Center, Tiwanaku Javier Reyes, Research Associate, Center for Aymanin Studies Felix Palacios Rios, graduate student in anthropology, University of Cuzco Patricia Soto, Lecturer in Anthropology, University of the North, Arica, Chile Bertha G. Vargas Vargas, technical adviser, Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, University of San Marcos NOTth American pm路ticipants John Hyslop, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Columbia University Carlos R. Saavedra, M.A. in anthropology, University of Florida Freda Y. Wolf, Ph.D. candidate in anthropology, Cornell University Project V: Role of the Salvador Industrial Elite in the Social and Economic Development of Bahia; Codirectors: Paulo R. Brandlio, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, Harry M. Makler, University of Toronto; research sites: metropolitan Salvador and satellite industrial centers:

Latin American participants (These will be selected by the codirectors.) NOTth American participants Colette Bernier, graduate student in sociology, University of Montreal Karen M. Giffin, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of Toronto Thomas W. Heffron, Ph.D. candidate in economics, Tufts University Howard C. Hendricks, Ph.D. candidate in history, State University of New York at Stony Brook Tiomthy L. McDaniel, graduate student in sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill David A. Silberstein, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Yale University SEPTEMBER

1973

Inter-American Resea1'ch Training Seminars Seminar on Methodologies for Analysis of Inequality Systems, June 11 - August 3, 1973, at the Latin Amencan School of Po~itical Science and Public Administration, of the Latin Amencan Faculty of Social Sciences, Santiago; Faculty Directors: Hayward Alker, Professor of Political Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Angel Flisfisch Lati~ American School of Political Science and Public Administration: Lilian Barros, graduate student in economics University of California, Los Angeles ' Clair Brooks, graduate student in political science University of Kansas ' Andrea Calabi, graduate student in economics, University of California, Berkeley Dennis Chavez, graduate student in sociology, Catholic University of Peru Octavio Chirinos, graduate student in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Gediminas Cibas, graduate student in economics, University of New Mexico Marshall Feldman, graduate student in urban planning, University of California, Los Angeles Luis J. Garay, graduate student in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Jose Garcia, graduate student in political science, Chico State University Robert Girling, graduate student in education, Stanford University Sherry Girling, graduate student in education, Stanford University Rodrico Perez, graduate student in engineering, National University of Colombia Gilda Perosa, graduate student in sociology, Cornell University Elisa Reis, graduate student in political science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Eustaquio Reis, graduate student in economics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Fernando Rojas, graduate student in economics, Harvard University Patricia Wilson, graduate student in regional planning, Cornell University Richard Ziebelman, graduate student in anthropology, Stanford University Seminar on Urbanization and Regional Development in Latin America, July I - August 30, 1973, at the Center of Development and Regional Planning, Federal University of Minas Gerais; Faculty Directors: Jose Armando de Souza, Coordinator, Research Department, Center of Development and Regional Planning, Paulo Roberto Haddad, Director, Center of Development and Regional Planning: Mauricio Abreu, graduate student in geography, Ohio State University Roger Anderson, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Bowling Green State University Gilberto Aristizabal, Office of Socioeconomic and Legal Studies, Bogota Anthony Beninati, graduate student in history, State University of New York at Stony Brook Richard Boyer, graduate student in history, Simon Fraser University John Corbett, graduate student in poiltical science, University of Colorado

37


Jose Da Silva, graduate student in economics, Center of Development and Regional Planning Robert D. Daughters, graduate student in urban planning, University of California, Berkeley Roberta Delson, Ph.D. candidate in history, Columbia University Luis Escobar, graduate student in ocean engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Shirley Harkess, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Kansas Francisco Jimenez, architect in regional planning, Administrative Department of District Planning, Bogota Robert A. Lewis, Assistant Professor of Economics, Ohio University Nancy D. Loy, Ph.D. candidate in sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Angel Medina, graduate student in urban planning, Columbia University Diana H. Mosovich, architect, Center of Urban and Regional Studies, Torcuato di Tella Institute, Buenos Aires Gabriel Murillo, graduate student in political science, University of the Andes, Bogota Susan C. Schneider, Assistant Professor of History, University of Massachusetts Jane Silva, staff member, urban planning, Coordination of Urban Politics, State Council of Development, Belo Horizonte Arthur L. Sticken, Ph.D. candidate in history, Indiana University Gabriela Toscano, graduate student in sociology, University of Brazilia

CO NTENTS OF ITEMS, VOLUMES 25-26 (1971-72) * ARTICLES Clubb, Jerome M. Historical Politics: American Elections, 1824-1970, 25:46 Deshler, Walter W. Urbaniz.ation in Africa: Some Spatial and Functional Aspects, 25:25 Dyke, Bennett, and Jean W. MacCluer. Uses of Compute-, Simulation in Human Population Studies: A Conference Report, 26:28 Experimentation as a Method for Planning and Evaluating Social Intervention, 25:31 Furth, Charlotte. Cultural and Political Conservatism in Modern China, 26:44 Goldberger, Arthur S. Structural Equation Models, 26:26 Hymes, Dell. The Scope of Sociolinguistics, 26: 14 Klein, Lawrence R. The Fourth Annual Conference on Project LINK, 26:47; The Third Annual Conference on Project LINK, 25:44 Landes, David S., and Charles Tilly. Historv as Social Science: Excerpts from the Report of the History Panel of the Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey, 25: 1 Li, Victor H. Legal Aspects of the Foreign Trade of the People's Republic of China: Report on a Conference, 25:42

MacCluer, Jean W. See Dyke, Bennett, 26:28 New SSRC Center for Coordination of Research on Social Indicators Opens in Washington, 26:25 Pye, Lucian W., and Kay K. Ryland. Activities of the Committee on Comparative Politics, 1954-70, 25:6 Ranney, Austin. Studying the Impacts of Public Policies, 26:1

Rifkin, Susan B. Science and Technology in China's Development: Report on a Workshop Held with the Aid of the Joint Committee on Contemporary China, 26:4 Ryland, Kay K. See Pye, Lucian W., 25:6 Eleanor Bernert Sheldon Elected President of the Council, 26:13

Sociolinguistic Aspects of Communication between Students and Teachers: Report on a Workshop, 25:30 • An index to Volumes 1-20 (1947~6) appears in Items, Vol. 22. No. 2, Part 2, June 1968; to Volumes 21-22 (1967-68). in Vol. 22, No.4, December 1968, pa[!e 51: and to Volumes 23-24 (1969-70), in Vol. 24. No.4, December 1970. page 50.

38

Taeuber. Irene B., and Conrad Taeuber. People in the United States in the Twentieth Century: Continuity, Diversity, and Change, 25: 13 Thompson, John M. Foreign Area Fellowship Program to Merge with Other Area Programs of the Ameriran Council of Learned Societies and Social Science Research Council, 26:41 Tilly, Charles. See Landes, David S., 25: 1 Webbink, Paul. Simon Kuznets, Recipient of 197] Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Scienre, nirerted the Program of the Council's Committee on Economic Growth, 1949-68,25:41

COMMITTEE BRIEFS AND OTHER REPORTS African Studies, 25:9,25; 26:21,52 Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey. 25: 1 Biological Bases of Social Behavior, 25: 12; 26: 12.19.28 Comparative Politics. 25:6 Conference Board of Associated Research Councils, 26:6 Contemporary China. 25: 10,42,52; 26:4,6,8,21,44 East Asian Studies. 25: 10 Eastern Europe, 26:21,22 Economic Growth. 25:41 Economic Stability, 25:44; 26:47 Exchanges with Asian Institutions, 26:19 Faculty Research Grants, 25:21 Foreign Area Fellowship Program, 25:32; 26:31,49 Governmental and Legal Processes. 26: 1 International Exchange of Persons, 26:24,52 Italy, Social Srience in, 25:19 Japanese Studies. 26:7,8 Korean Studies, 26:9 Latin American Studies, 25:21.50; 26:9 Near and Middle East. 25:22,52; 26: 10.30 Political Behavior, 25:46 Population Census Monographs. 25:13 Slavic and East European Studies, 25:23,37 Social Indicators. 26:25 Social Science Personnel, 25:20; 26:20 Sociolinguistics. 25:30.51; 26:14,19 Soviet Studies. 26:22 Transnational Social Psychology, 25:20.51 VOLUME

27.

NUMBER

5


PERSONNEL APPOINTMENTS Directors of the Council, 26 :7 Faculty Research Grants, 25:21 Foreign Area Fellowship Program, 25:32; 26:31,49 Grants for African Studies, 25:9; 26:21 Grants for Collaborative Research on the Near dnd Middle East, 26:30 Grants for East Asian Studies, 25: 10 Grants for East European Studies, 26:21 Grants for Japanese Studies, 26:8 Grants for Korean Studies, 26:9 Grants for Latin American Studies, 25:21; 26:9 Grants for Research on Contemporary and Republican China, 25:10; 26:8 Grants for Research on the Economy of China, 26:21 Grants for Research in Method and Theory, 26:20 Grants for Research on the Near and Middle East, 25:22; 26:10 Grants for Slavic and East European Studies, 25:23 Grants for Soviet Studies, 26:22 Grants for Study of East European Languages, 25:37; 26:22 President of the Council, 25:32, 51; 26:13

Research Training Fellowships, 25:20; 26:20 Staff of the Council, 25:32; 26:7, 8, 30 ANNOUNCEMENTS Fellowships and Grants, 25:40; 26:40 Fulbright-Hays Program, 26:24,52 Grants for Collaborative Research on the Near and Middle East, 25:52 Grants to Minority Scholars for Research on Racism and Other Social Factors in Mental Health, 26:24 Grants for Research on the Economy of China, 25:52 Grants for Travel to the People's Republic of China, 25:52 Regional Research Seminars on African Studies, 26:52 Summer Training Institute on Psychophysiology, 1972, 25:12 Summer Training Institutes to Be Held in 1971, by the Committee on Biological Bases of Social Behavior, 25: 12 PUBLICATIONS Books, 25: 11,24,38; 26: 11,23,39,51

NEW PUBLICATIONS The Development of China's Steel Industry and Soviet Technical Aid, by M. Gardner Clark. Report on a study made with the aid of the former Committee on the Economy of China. June 1973. 167 pages. $7.00. Orders should be addressed to New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. 14850. Di"ectoTY of Foreign A,"ea Fellows 1952-1972. October 1973. c. 400 pages. $3.00. Orders should be addressed to Social Science Research Council, Foreign Area Fellowship Program, P.O. Box No. 5113, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10017. Ideology and Politics in Contemporary China, edited by Chalmers Johnson. Product of a conference sponsored by the former Subcommittee on Chinese Government and Politics, Joint Committee on Contemporary China, August 2-6, 1971. Seattle: University of Washington Press, April 1973. 403 pages. Cloth, $15.00; paper, $4.95. The International Linlwge of National Economic Models, edited by R. J. Ball. Sponsored by the Committee on Economic Stability. Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Company, August 1973. 479 pages. $25.00. Japanese Economic Growth: Trend Acceleration in the Twentieth Century, by Kazushi Ohkawa and Henry Rosovsky. Report on a study initiated under the auspices of the former Committee on Economic Growth. Stanford: Stanford University Press, August 1973. 346 pages. $15.00. Language and Area Studies Review, by Richard D. Lambert. American Academy of Political and Social Science Monograph 17. Final report on the review sponsored by the Social Science Research Council. September 1973. c. 350

SEPTEMBER

1975

pages. $4.00 to individuals; $5.00 to institutions. Orders should be addressed to American Academy of Political and Social Science, 3937 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19104. Language Attitudes: Current Trends and Prospects, edited by Roger W. Shuy and Ralph W. Fasold. Product of workshops at the Conference on Sociolinguistics: Current Trends and Propects, jointly sponsored by the Committee on Sociolinguistics and Georgetown University, March 16-18, 1972. Washington, D. C.: Georgetown University Press, March 1973. 206 pages. $3.50. Language Planning: Current Issues and Research, edited by Joan Rubin and Roger W. Shuy. Product of workshops at the Conference on Sociolinguistics (see preceding title). Washington, D. C.: Georgetown University Press, March 1973. 121 pages. $2.95. Sociolinguistics: Current Trends and Prospects, Report of the Twenty.Third Annual Round Table Meeting on Linguistics and Language Studies, edited by Roger W. Shuy. Georgetown University Monograph Series on Languages and Linguistics, No. 25. Papers of the conference jointly sponsored by the Committee on Sociolinguistics and Georgetown University, March 16-18, 1972. Washington, D. C.: Georgetown University Press, March 1973. 360 pages. $4.50. Structural Equation Models in the Social Sciences, edited by Arthur S. Goldberger and Otis Dudley Duncan. Product of a conference cosponsored by the Social Science Research Council and the Social Systems Research Institute, University of Wisconsin, November 12-16, 1970. New York: Seminar Press, July 1973. 374 pages. $15.95.

39


COUNCIL FELLOWSHIPS AND GRANTS OFFERED IN 1973-74: DATES FOR FILING APPLICATIONS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS OF AWARDS Applications for fellowships and grants offered by the Council during the coming year will be due, and awards will be announced, on or before the respective dates listed below. Because applications received after the closing dates specified cannot be considered, and because preliminary correspondence is frequently necessary to determine under which program a given proposal should be submitted, prospective applicants should communicate with the Council if possible at least three weeks in advance of the pertinent closing date. Inquires should indicate the nature of the proposed training or research; the approximate amount and duration of support needed; age, occupation or current activity and vocational aim, country of citizenship and country of permanent residence; academic degrees held (specifying the fields of study); and if currently working for a degree, the present stage of advancement toward it. A brochure describing the several programs is available on request addressed to Social Science Research Council, Fellowships and Grants, 230 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017. Research Training Fellowships, applications, January 3, 1974; awards, April 1, 1974 Grants to Minority Scholars for Research on Racism and Other Social Factors in Mental Health, applications, October 1973; awards, December 1973

Postdoctoral Research Grants offered under joint programs of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council. Unless otherwise indicated, inquiries should be addressed to Social Science Research Council, Fellowships and Grants, 230 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10017. Grants for African Studies, applications, December 1, 1973; awards, March 1974 Grants for Research on Contemporary and Republican China, and for Research on the Economy of China, applications, December 1, 1973; awards, March 1974 NOTE: Grants for research on Chinese Civilization (pre-1911 China) are offered by the American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y., 10017, to which inquiries should be addressed. Grants for Japanese Studies, applications, December 1, 1973; awards, March 1974

Grants for Korean Studies. applications, December 1, 1973; awards, March 1974 Grants for Research on the Near and Middle East, applications, December 1, 1973; awards, March 1974 Grants for Collaborative Research on the Near and Middle East, applications, January 4, 1974; awards, March 1974 Postdoctoral Grants for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, including Collaborative Research Grants, applications to be submitted to Social Science Research Council, Fellowships and Grants, llO East 59 Street, New York, N.Y. 10022, December 15, 1973; awards, March 1974 Grants for East European Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies. 345 East 46 Street. New York, N.Y. 10017, December 31. 1973; awards, within 3 months Grants for Study of East European Languages, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, February 1, 1974; awards, within 2 months Travel grants for international conferences abroad on East European studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, February 15, 1974 Grants for Research on South Asia, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies, 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, December 3, 1973; awards. within 3 months Grants for Soviet Studies, applications to be submitted to American Council of Learned Societies. 345 East 46 Street, New York, N.Y. 10017, December 31, 1973; awards, within 3 months

Predoctoral Research Fellowships under p"ograms of joint committees of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council (formerly administered by the Foreign Area Fellowship Program): Address Social Science Research Council, Fellowships and Grants, ] 10 East 59 Street, New York, N.Y. 10022. Africa and the Middle East, November 12, 1973 East, South. and Southeast Asia, November 12, 1973 Latin America and the Caribbean Research Fellowships, November 30, 1973 Collaborative Research Training Fellowships, February 15, 1974 Inter-American Research Training Seminars, January ]5, 1974 ''''estern Europe, November 30, 1973

SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL 230

PARK

AVENUE,

NEW

YORK,

N.Y.

10017

Incorporated in the State of Illinois, December 27. 1924, for the purpose of advancing research in the social sciences Directors, 1973: WILLIAM J. BAUMOL, ALLAN G. BOGUE, DANIEL X. FREEDMAN, LEO A . GOODMAN, EDWARD E. JONES,

DORWIN CARTWRIGHT, SUSAN M. ERVIN-TRIPP, RICHARD F. FENNO, JR., RENEE C. Fox, LAWRENCE R. KLEIN, GARDNER LINDZEY, LEON LIPSON, HERBERT MCCLOSKY, JAMES N.

MORGAN, MURRAY G. MURPHEY, ALFONSO ORTIZ, JOHN W. PUTT, HENRY W. RIECKEN, ALICE S. ROSSI, DAVID M. SCHNEIDER, WILLIAM H . SEWELL, ELEANOR BERNERT SHELDON, ELLIOTT P. SKINNER, NEIL J . SMELSER, M. BREWSTER SMITH, EDWARD J. TAAFFE, KAIV. E. TAEUBER, JOHN M. THOMPSON, ROBERT E. WARD, CHARLES V. 'VILLIE

OfficeTs and Staff: ELEANOR BERNERT SHELDON, President; DAVID L. SILLS, BRYCE WOOD, Executive Associates; GORDON ADAMS, JAMES FENNESSEY, K. HOFSTADTER, ELEANOR C. ISBELL, DAVID JENNESS, ROWLAND L. MITCHELL, JR., ROBERT PARKE, MICHAEL POTASHNIK, DOROTHY SODERLUND, DAVID A. STATT, NICHOLAS ZILL; NORMAN MANN, Business Manager; CATHERINE V. RON NAN, Financial SeCTetary BEATRICE

40

VOLUME

27,

NUMBER

3

Items Vol. 27 No. 3 (1973)  
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