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Read about the three 2015 recipients of scholarships from SSPI!

Bert Sadtler looks at the number 1 element for business success!

Important satellite industry events that you don’t want to miss!

FEBRUARY 2016


CONTENTS

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Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner Preview

Thank you to our Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner Sponsors:

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2015 Scholarship Recipients

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What is the #1 Element for Business Success?

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Coming March 3 from SSPI: The Workforce Study Report!

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Better Satellite World: Schools Go Online in the Unconnected World

Upcoming Events SGx: Connecting Young Professionals, March 7 - Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, MD 20745, USA The 2016 SSPI Chairman’s Reception, March 8, Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, Oxon Hill, MD 20745, USA The 2016 Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner, March 8 - Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, MD 20745, USA Space Innovation Congress, April 7 & 8 - St Paul’s – 200 Aldersgate Street, London EC1A, United Kingdom Learn more about upcoming events at www.SSPI.org

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What can you experience at the

You can honor t

John Celli

PRESIDENT, SPACE SYSTEMS LORAL

Philip A. Rubin

PRESIDENT & CEO, RKF ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS LLC

Phillip Spector OF COUNSEL, MILBANK

The Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner is SSPI’s biggest fundraiser. The money we raise supports our programs like Better Satellite World and New Century Workforce, our Next-Generation talent attraction projects, and our services for individual and corporate members. It is also the number-one place in our industry to see and be seen, and there are many ways to take advantage of that opportunity. We hope to see you at the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner on March 8 during the SATELLITE conference in National Harbor, Maryland. Click here to learn more.

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SSPI is proud to be inducting six new members into the Satell For more information on these inductees, you can read l


the inductees... You can see the future... Richard Hadsall

CHIEF INNOVATION OFFICER, EMC

Penelope Longbottom PRESIDENT, LONGBOTTOM COMMUNICATIONS, A DIVISION OF SAGE COMMUNICATIONS

Andrew Sukawaty NON-EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN, INMARSAT

lite Hall of Fame at this year’s SSPI Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner. last month’s issue of The Orbiter or go to www.sspi.org.

Leading up to the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner, we asked many important members of our industry about what the satellite industry is going to look like in 2030. Here’s what some of them had to say:

“New generations of satellite will provide gigabit-speed connectivity in the most remote places on Earth, while super-fast, satellite-based Wi-Fi will be among the most affordable ways to connect in emerging market nations.”

Mark Dankberg

Chairman & CEO, ViaSat

“Robots will assemble large communications platforms in space from plug-and-play modules and will make in-orbit repair, refueling and maintenance routine.”

Edward Horowitz

Co-Founder, U.S. Space LLC

“By 2030, 80% of the total space economy will be services, and less than 5% of development and manufacturing will be funded by government. Transportation to and through LEO will be measured in launch events per day instead of satellites per year. Finally, we’ll all attend the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner and watch the Secretary of Space be inducted into the Satellite Hall of Fame.”

Chuck Beames

CEO, Vulcan Aerospace Find out what other industry members for Fashion Magazine April2012predicted 5 2030 at the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner!


You can witness magic... Almost everything you do has a little bit of satellite inside. But you can’t see it. This technology is invisible – like magic. It is also indispensable, and our way of life would vanish without it. This year’s Benefit Dinner will feature the premiere of a new Better Satellite World video. The new video, sponsored by the Intelligent Communities Group, L-3 Electron Technologies and Microspace, will focus on the future of the industry and the magic that satellites bring to everyday life! Click here for more Better Satellite World videos.

And you can network with industry professionals from around the globe.

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You can win the wine... Our Better Satellite World campaign continues to engage and delight the wider public as we articulate the tremendous value and net good that satellites bring to the world. As we continue this groundbreaking campaign, we are grateful for the contribution of SatNews CEO Silvano Payne, who has once again contributed a specially-branded magnum of Cabernet Sauvignon 2008 straight from his own vineyard, Siesta Estate Wines. In the days leading up to the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner, SSPI held a raffle for this unique bottle. All dinner guests registered by the 1st of March were automatically entered to win, and the lucky guest will be announced and invited to take pictures with Silvano Payne and SSPI Executive Director, Robert Bell.

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The Next Generation: Meeting the 2015 Scholarship Recipients The SSPI Scholarship Program assists deserving students with meeting the high costs of undergraduate and post-graduate study in satellite-related disciplines. Through the generosity of Scholarship Sponsors, SSPI provides scholarships ranging from $2,500 to $3,500 to high school seniors, undergraduate and graduate students from locations around the world. The 2016 Scholarship program is now underway! The submissions criteria and deadlines are now posted. Students interested in applying for the 2016 should log in to the SSPI site and visit http://www.sspi.org/cpages/scholarships_apply. (Note: Only SSPI members may apply for SSPI scholarships - and membership is free for students!)

Noah Corey Fleishman

Senior, El Segundo High School Noah Corey Fleishman won the 2015 Southern California Scholarship in his senior year at El Segundo High School in Los Angeles. He now attends the Aerospace Engineering program at California Polytechnic University, Pomona. His dream is to work as an engineer on the creation of satellites and other space craft. Noah is also interested in developing a program to allow middle and high school students across the country to design and launch functional cube-sats, in the hope that other students will fall in love with the space industry as he has. During his high school career, Noah has interned at Boeing’s Space and Intelligent Systems facility, and more recently, at Northrop Grumman’s Space Park. As part of this second internship, he worked with a team on the hi-bay floor of the James Webb Space Telescope. Noah’s engineering team competed in the Real World Design Challenge during his junior year of high school. His team won the tri state competition and made it all the way to the nationals. Noah’s scholarship will help fund his Aerospace Engineering degree at Cal Poly Pomona. Noah received a Scholarship from SSPI’s Southern California Chapter in 2015.

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Joseph Wade Ogburn

Senior, Peters Township High School Joseph Wade Ogburn was a senior at Peters Township High School when he won the 2015 Northeast Chapter Scholarship, and now attends the Honors College in Engineering at Virginia Tech University in the fall, where he plans to major in Electrical Engineering with a minor in Mechatronics. His dream is to work with the military to develop smart drones that can explore dangerous areas to save the lives of service men and women. He is also interested in the development of satellite technology for military strategy and defense. In August 2012, Joseph helped start a US FIRST Robotics Team named the Titanium Titans #4467. He spent three years on the team, working on every technical sub-team available, and is currently an Electrical and Mechanical Sub-tem Leader. Joseph has a passion for helping younger students and has recruited fellow Titans to design and run a variety of robotics workshops for them. He is also an Eagle Scout, having accumulated over 400 hours of community service in high school between the Boy Scouts and FIRST Robotics. His service included working for Scouting for Food, Eagle Scout project assistance, mentoring FIRST LEGO League and FIRST Tech Challenge robotics teams, and helping design and run STEM exploration workshops for younger students. Joseph has been an active member of the Order of the Arrow Leadership and Service Organization since 2011. His scholarship will help fund his Bachelor of Science degree at Virginia Tech. Joseph received SSPI’s International Scholarship in 2015.

Karlton Wirsing

Ph.D. Candidate, Virginia Tech Karlton Wirsing is a senior software engineer at Intelsat and has held the position for three years. During this time, he received Masters degrees in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic and State University as well as an NSA certified graduate certificate in Information Assurance. He is currently working on a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at Virginia Tech, extending his graduate research on the use of Wavelet Transform for signal filtering and the identification of self-similar and fractal signals to real world data on space weather and on Pulsars. While studying at Virginia Tech, Karlton calculated the link budget for the Cassini Space probe and showed that a cell phone in geosynchronous orbit could produce a stronger signal than Cassini. His work at Intelsat includes maintaining the ground control system software that supports $400 million worth of satellites, and while there, he has added satellites to the software and participated in the launching of entirely new satellites. Karlton’s scholarship will help fund the research credits he needs to complete his Ph.D. program, from which he hopes to graduate next year. Karlton received SSPI’s International Scholarship in 2015.

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What is the

#1 Element

for Business Success? By Bert Sadtler

Not only is running a business difficult; but, many smart people have been unsuccessful. According to an October 2014 Gallup survey, about half of businesses fail in their first five years in spite of good products, good people and good markets. Assuming you are delivering a relevant product or service, what is the most critical element that a business must have in order to generate growth and success? There are varying opinions. Some experts think leadership is the top element for business success while other feel the proper ingredients include a sense of urgency, proper financial backing, market timing, product sales and marketing strategies and even some luck. Clearly, in addition every viable business must have the right talent to be successful. However, the best talent in the world cannot overcome the sins of poor leadership or a poorly run business. There must be a more critical element than simply having the right talent. Consider the following questions: • When building a business beyond it being an employee of one, shouldn’t the total output of the business exceed the total sum of each individual employee? • Isn’t the business’s output a key element? If businesses face a competitive marketplace, what kind of favorable competitive advantage awaits the business that can find a way to deliver a higher value to their customer? We are really talking about “Performance Optimization.” The business must be able to go beyond the talent aspect and define ways to measure success in terms of performance optimization. The success metric becomes a function of the talent’s total output as the business delivers value to its customers and clients. Now, back to the question: “What is the #1 Element for Business Success?” If we agree we have the right ingredients for the business as listed above, and we want to maximize value for our customers then one could argue that:

The key to business success = performance optimization To maximize performance optimization; then “Organizational Goal Alignment” is the #1 element for business success. Let’s look at alignment through the example of a Roman warship. For the Roman Warship to achieve success, leadership needed to chart the right course, maximize the effectiveness of the crew (talent), synchronize all of its various weapons (performance optimization) and align the various components to focus on the same goal (organizational alignment).

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With the Roman warship, there are many moving parts. For example, the oarsman’s leader needed to understand where the boat was headed and then focus the oarsman on getting to that spot. The army’s leader needed to know when the ship carrying them would reach its destination and where the army with its horsemen would be departing into battle. The leader of the sailors needed to know the plan so the sailors could have the boat trimmed for maximum speed and maximum effectiveness. The Roman warship could be powered using its sails or it could be powered using the strength of oarsman or both could power it. Weapons on the boat included cannons, an army with horses and the ability for the warship itself to be a ramming weapon so it could broadside enemy boats. None of these moving parts worked effectively or efficiently without alignment. With alignment they would be able to deliver a greater total output than the sum of each individual part. The goals of each group on the boat needed to be aligned with the overall goal of winning the battle. Leadership needed to coordinate the aligned actions on the boat in order to optimize total performance. The element of just leadership alone is not enough. The alignment element is the enabler for the greatest output. Returning to business, the leader must have an understanding of the correct path forward and then be able to effectively communicate that path in order for the talent to be capable of flawless execution. Leaders need to make the right decisions for their organization to succeed. A leader who changes course every other minute will exhaust and frustrate the talent to the point where the execution will fail. Without effective alignment, and the ability to communicate the goals quickly through the organization, the value of critical leadership decision-making is lost. Alignment requires the leader to assign responsibility and functions to each department, so that all are focusing their responsibilities in the same direction. A business that is properly aligned, has good leadership, delivers performance optimization and gains competitive advantage will have the singular focus to successfully complete the overall goal of business growth.[CWP2] How do you decide if your business is properly aligned to deliver performance optimization from a talent perspective? Initially determining if a business is aligned can be completed through some simple questions. Here are two examples: Example 1) If the leadership were to hire a high caliber sales producer who earned $1M in sales commission, would the leadership be thrilled because the business had a significant revenue increase that also earned a bonus for the leadership? …or would the leadership be soured because they thought it was crazy to pay that sales producer so much commission bonus? An aligned organization (with an aligned compensation program) would answer with the first option. With an aligned organization, when the sales producer over-delivers, the leadership directly benefits in addition to the sales producer. Instead of viewing the commission bonus as an expense, it is viewed by leadership as a business investment. Example 2) If we were to speak with a selection of senior, mid level and low level members of your business and ask them to tell us the mission or purpose of your business or ask them to explain what your business delivered to its customers, would their answers be very similar or extremely different? An aligned business would answer with very similar responses. Unfortunately, we don’t see this happening at enough businesses.

You can read the rest of this article at www.SSPI.org.

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Coming March 3 from SSPI:

LAUNCH FAILURE? Attracting and retaining the talent that powers innovation

Today’s industry relies heavily on a cadre of experienced workers in the 45-54 age range, who make up 42% of employees. These are people who know the business and the technologies, and are deeply versed in the processes and the unique demands of customers. At the same time, a shocking 67% of employees with between 1 and 5 years on the job voluntarily leave their companies. Is it high attrition among younger employees that leads companies to rely on veterans, or does the reliance on veterans close off career paths for the next generation? Whatever the answer, one thing is clear: a successful tech industry should be sending fewer of its newest employees out the door, and rely less on those who will be heading off to retirement within the next 20 years. This report will be free to download for SSPI members, and will cost US$1,600 for non-members.

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Better Satellite World:

Schools Go Online in the Unconnected World A child born in America or Europe can expect to live in a household making the equivalent of at least US$31,000. For a child born in Mexico or Peru, the figure is less than US$6,000. In Africa south of the Sahara, the average income per person equals only about US$760. The problems of inequality are complex. Of all the things that could change the fate of children in poorer nations, however, one stands out: education. In America and Europe, nearly 90% of children at least finish secondary school. In Mexico, only 37% do, and in most of Latin America and Africa, nations do not even bother to track this number, focusing instead on boosting the number of children finishing elementary or primary school. In rich and poor nations, the better educated you are, the more you earn and the higher will be the standard of living you can give to your own children. A technical school graduate in Singapore, for example, earns 3.7 times more than a graduate of secondary school, and someone with a university diploma out-earns that high school graduate by 5.5 times. Improving education is a matter of money, culture and commitment. But increasingly, it is also about technology. America and Europe are part of the Connected World, where schools are making the Internet a core part of classroom education and homework. Mexico, Peru and much of sub-Saharan Africa are in the Unconnected World. It is where the majority of the world’s citizens still live, and getting Internet into most schools there is a distant dream. That dream, however, is coming true in more and more places thanks to the hard work of governments, not-for-profits and companies – and to satellite technology. Bits and Bytes from the Sky The world’s biggest satellite networking companies, Hughes Network Systems and Gilat, have connected thousands of schools as part of government-funded programs over the past few years. But much smaller companies are delivering the goods as well. One of them is NewCom International, based in Miami, which has a track record of working with nonprofit organizations to bring the Internet to remote and rural schools in Latin America. The village of Qocha Moqo is one such place. It is located in the Andes Mountains of Peru

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16,000 feet above sea level. Newcom donated a year’s worth of satellite Internet access to a village school, and partnered with two nonprofits to install the equipment and train people to use it. Willka Yachay is a Peru-based nonprofit that is dedicated to helping indigenous communities thrive in the modern world without sacrificing their cultural traditions. The other nonprofit, Kidnected World, provides online creative tools to connect young people around the planet. According to Hanna Rae Porst, Willka Yachay’s director, “Internet connectivity, powered by solar energy, has been life-changing for everyone involved. Thanks to the Internet and Kidnected’s creative tools, students have been able to connect with other students and indigenous tribes around the world, and share their cultural knowledge and ways of life. After school, the computers are open to all of the forty families that make up the village.” The impact on teachers has been equally profound. “Our teachers come from as far away as 22 hours of travel,” says Porst, “and they live and teach in the remote villages for three weeks straight. There is no telephone signal in Qocha Moqo, but now for the first time, our teachers can communicate with their families while they are here.” Entrepreneurs for Education The city of Puebla in southern Mexico is world’s away from the village of Qocha Moqo. Home to 1.4 million people, it is the capital of a rural state with an economy that mixes the manufacturing of machinery and equipment, automobiles and furniture with agricultural production of eggs, coffee, beer and beans. But two-thirds of public schools in Mexico still lack Internet access, and many of Puebla’s rural schools are among them. Fortunately, a Mexican nonprofit, Entrepreneurs for Technology in Education (UNETE), is doing something about it. For a Puebla school, UNETE provided computers and a Wi-Fi network, and Newcom contributed the satellite connectivity and systems that put 90 students and teachers online for the first time. Over the past 16 years, UNETE has made it possible for 2.3 million students to access modern technology in Mexican schools, and the two organizations hope to duplicate the Puebla model at hundreds of schools throughout rural Mexico. There are an estimated 3 billion Internet users in the Connected World. Another 6 billion additional devices now connect to the Web, forming the leading edge of the fast-growing Internet of Things that Ericsson predicts will total 26 billion by 2020. More than 4 billion people, however, still live in the Unconnected World. Thanks to satellite, the next generation living there will have greater opportunities than any generation that came before them. Click here for more about this story and to watch the video.

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The SSPI Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner offers a unique opportunity to network and visit with clients, customers, suppliers, colleagues and industry friends. From the champagne reception to a gourmet meal to the induction of the honorees into the Satellite Hall of Fame, SSPI始s annual Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner is always the talk of the indu industry. On that night, SSPI will hold its annual Chairman始s Reception. This invitation-only reception welcomes the C-Suite of the most important companies in our industry, including established players, their customers and innovative new entrants. It offers a relaxed and intimate atmosphe atmosphere for conversation and networking at the end of a long day in meeting rooms, and before the excitement of the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner.

March 8, 2016 Gaylord National Convention Center National Harbour, MD

Tickets are now available for the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner. For more information or to purchase an individual ticket or a full table, visit www.SSPI.org.

The Orbiter: February 2016  

In this issue of The Orbiter, we look ahead to the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner, we see the profiles of the Scholarship winners, and more!

The Orbiter: February 2016  

In this issue of The Orbiter, we look ahead to the Hall of Fame Benefit Dinner, we see the profiles of the Scholarship winners, and more!