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Ha l f A Million - 2 L e t t e r f ro m o u r E xe c u t i ve Director - 4 Key A c c o m p lishments - 5 A G row i n g G ra s s ro ots Force - 6 T h e N ex t G e n e ra t i o n o f Refor m - 7 O n l i n e A d vo c a c y I n itiative - 10 G l o b a l G row t h I nitiative - 11 W h e r e d o e s yo u r p ayc h ec k go? - 14 W h e r e d o yo u r d o n a t i ons go? - 15 2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0 S t ra t e gic Plan - 16 I n ve s t i n C h a n ge Today - 17 T h a nk You! - 18


THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

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LETTER FROM OUR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dear Friends, Forty years after Nixon launched the War on Drugs, our society continues to suffer the degenerative effects of prohibition. We suffer the communal burden of over incarceration, putting more people behind bars for drug related convictions than Europe locks up for all crimes combined. We suffer financially, spending billions on prisons and interdiction efforts to fight an unwinnable global war that will forever be fueled by the allure of profit. We suffer medically, failing to provide proper treatment to drug addicts and barring the infirm from access to medicine. And an unlucky few suffer violently, like SSDP member Rachel Hoffman who got caught in the crossfire between police and drug dealers. Students for Sensible Drug Policy is the largest grassroots organization educating the public about the dire consequences of the failed Drug War by harnessing the energy and determination of students. We have been building a movement and changing policies for more than a decade. And I’m thrilled to announce that never before have we enjoyed the political momentum that we have today. We are winning. Not only do we have federal, state and campus-wide victories under our belt, but we have reason to believe that substantive change is within reach. While we may see more progress in the next few years than we have in the last few decades, it’s important to remember that the War on Drugs won’t end tomorrow. It will take sustained effort, a multi-generational coalition, and financial resources to build mass public support for drug policies that are rooted in compassion, liberty and justice. Students for Sensible Drug Policy is important to this equation because we serve the movement in two vital ways. Our staff recruits and trains a global grassroots network of dedicated and savvy activists who are the foot soldiers of SSDP’s and other organizations’ PR and lobbying campaigns. And through this process, we cultivate the next generation of the movement — today’s SSDP members are tomorrow’s leaders. If you already donate to SSDP, thank you! We couldn’t have accomplished all we have without your support. If you are not currently supporting our work, I hope that this prospectus gives you a better idea of why SSDP’s continued existence is so essential. If you agree that sustaining momentum is just as important as creating it, I invite you to invest in the future of our movement by becoming an SSDP donor today. Sincerely,

Matthew Palevsky, Executive Director Students for Sensible Drug Policy


THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

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KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS AT A GLANCE • NATIONAL CAMPAIGN: SSDP forced Congress to significantly scale back the federal law that denies financial aid to students with drug convictions (more than 200,000 have lost their aid since the law was passed in 1998). Thanks to the lobbying efforts of SSDP and our broad coalition of allies, the penalty is no longer retroactive and barriers to regaining aid have been lowered. • LOCAL CAMPAIGNS: Recent campaigns spearheaded by SSDP members include: Rhode Island SSDP chapters formed the RI Patient Advocacy Coalition, and successfully passed a medical marijuana law with near-unanimous support from the state legislature; Chapters in Columbia, MO led a successful campaign to make marijuana the lowest law enforcement priority; Kalamazoo College SSDP led a campaign to implement a life-saving needle exchange program in their community; Brown University SSDP members ran a successful campaign to restore voting rights to felons in their state. • CAMPUS CAMPAIGNS: SSDP chapters have waged a total of 80+ campus change campaigns, 36 of which have successfully changed campus policy. The majority of those implemented are life-saving Good Samaritan Policies. Other campaigns include lowering penalties for marijuana possession on campus, removing police patrols from dorm buildings, establishing safe-ride programs, and setting up harm reduction education centers. • CAMPAIGN SUPPORT: SSDP chapters have played a key support role in many successful campaigns spearheaded by other organizations. Most recently, SSDP chapters were integral in the successful campaigns to decriminalize marijuana in MA and legalize medical marijuana in MI. • EVENTS: SSDP has brought together thousands of students at our annual international and regional conferences over the past 12 years. More than 500 students attended our 2008 international conference in Washington, DC. • MEDIA: SSDP has appeared in nearly every major news outlet in the country, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, CNN, Fox News, and a feature piece in Rolling Stone.


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A G RO W I N G G R A S S RO O T S F O RC E BU I L D I N G THE MOVEMENT TODAY 75% of Americans agree that the War on Drugs has failed. But far fewer support replacing the War on Drugs with anything new. Politicians won’t act until the public is on our side. And that’s why a vast, vibrant, well-trained network of activists is vital to our cause. From Boston to Houston to Seattle, SSDP chapters are constantly educating their communities about sensible alternatives to the status quo. And we don’t just talk about sensible policies. We work to enact them. U.S. CHAPTER NETWORK

DC Staff

SF Staff

CHAPTERS BY THE NUMBERS

SSDP.ORG/ CHAPTERS

5 50 200 50 10K 90 0

original SSDP chapters in 1998 chapters in 2006 chapters in 2009 average members per chapter approx. number of current chapter members avg. new chapter startup requests received monthly dues charged to members

Amanda and Irina show off their chapter’s hand-made banner


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T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N O F R E F O R M S U S TA I N I N G MOMENTUM TOMORROW Whether SSDP alumni stay directly involved in drug policy or move into other careers in business, medicine, law, and the arts, they are the leaders of tomorrow. And there are thousands of them. Here are just a few... Shaleen Aghi-Title U. of Illinois Alum

Alex Kreit Hampshire College Alum

Current: Speakers Bureau Director, LEAP

Current: Law Professor, San Diego

Highlights: Co-founded UIUC SSDP chapter; National Lawyers Guild Drug Policy Committee Co-Chair.

Highlights: Chair of San Diego Medical Marijuana Task Force; Wrote Supreme Court amicus breif for SSDP.

Troy Dayton American University Alum

Kris Lotlikar Rochester Inst. of Tech Alum

Current: Senior Development Officer, MPP

Current: VP of Marketing, Renewable Choice

Highlights: Raised approx $1 million for the cause; Profiled on CNN special on happiness; Founded one of the first SSDP chapters.

Highlights: First SSDP Executive Director; Co-founded one of the country’s largest wind energy companies.

Alison Grimmer Roosevelt University Alum

Sean Luse Ohio State University Alum

Current: Quality Assurance Monitor, Chicago Housing Authority

Current: Director, Berkeley Patients Group

Highlights: Contributed to groundbreaking report on racial disparities of drug policy in IL.

Highlights: Director of Ohio Hempfest 20002004; Secretary of Alliance of Berkeley Patients 2009-2010.

Kris Krane American University Alum

Leah Rorvig Columbia University Alum

Current: Harborside Management Associates

Current: UCSF Medical Student

Highlights: Associate Director of NORML 03-06; Executive Director of SSDP 06-09; Coach of softball team “The One-Hitters.”

Highlights: Director of Publications for Drug Policy Alliance 2003-2006; Published antidrug testing op-ed in USA Today.

“Before finding SSDP, I wasn’t sure where my career path was headed. By graduation day, I knew I had to commit my life to ending the War on Drugs. Now I have the best job in the world!”

-Stacia Cosner,

SSDP Outreach Director U. of Maryland Alum


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THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

“SSDP is an invaluable component of o provide our campaigns with active, sav also recruit and cultivate future leader generational struggle, and SSDP repre

-Ethan Nadelmann, Executiv


THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

our movement. Not only does SSDP vvy activists in nearly every state, they rs of the movement. This is a multiesents the next generation of reform.�

ve Director, Drug Policy Alliance

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THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

O N L I N E A DVO C AC Y I N I T I AT I V E CULT I VAT I N G C O N N E C T I O N S I N T H E D I G I TA L AGE ONLINE PRESENCE BY THE NUMBERS

417,000 415,000

Video views on YouTube Supporters on Facebook

390,000 42,000

Website page views in 2009 Supporters on E-mail Alert List

SSDP has a vibrant and growing online presence. Since the vast majority of SSDP members are young people, they are on the cutting edge of new technology and are connected with each other through websites like Facebook, Twitter, Digg, and YouTube. As SSDP’s real-world network grows, so does our online presence, which allows us to reach hundreds of thousands of people who can take action during our campaigns and the campaigns of our allies.

GIVING OPPORTUNITY: Creating a full-time Online Advocacy Director position will allow SSDP to reach untapped potential on the Internet. Despite having a strong online presence, SSDP has relied solely on unpaid volunteers for our IT needs. But those needs are rapidly growing. Will you help to ensure that SSDP remains on the cutting edge by contributing to this project?

SSDP board member Chris Chiles hard at work on Facebook


THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

G L O BA L G RO W T H I N I T I AT I V E

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CR E AT I N G A N I N T E R N AT I O N A L M OV E M E N T ACTIVE NATIONAL NETWORKS

United States

U n i t e d K i ngdom

Canada

Nigeria

In 2006, a group of Canadian students contacted SSDP for help with starting a sister organization modeled after ours. With the help of a generous donor, SSDP sent an organizer to Canada for 3 months, and CSSDP was born. Since then, new networks have been established in the U.K. and Nigeria as well. SSDP’s staff is currently working with students in other countries such as Australia, Colombia, Indonesia, and Mexico, assisting them with organizing and finding funding sources, with the goal of helping them to become self-sufficient.

GIVING OPPORTUNITY: Hiring a full-time International Liaison will enable the expansion of SSDP’s presence globally, as well as help our current networks to collaborate more effectively with one another. Will you invest in this groundbreaking project?

REPRESENTING YOUTH AT THE UNITED NATIONS SSDP has acheived global recognition for our work within the United Nations NGO community. Former SSDP E.D. Kris Krane participated in high-level U.N. meetings in Vienna, and received a standing ovation for his mediation of a conflict with opposition groups. More info at ssdp.org/unitednations


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THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

DID YOU KNOW? Out of every type o that focus on youth development are t of youth organizations repor t that th

Despite being broke and in debt, hundred in 2008 to lobby Congress as part of SS dents were able to afford the trip becau


THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

of organization in the U.S., nonprofits the most likely to be underfunded. 74% hey are unable to raise their budgets.

ds of students traveled to Washington, DC SDP’s conference. Nearly all of these stuuse of sponsorships from generous donors.

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W H E R E D O E S YO U R PAYC H E C K G O ? C O M PA R E TO T H E AV E R AG E A M E R I C A N

The average American makes $63,000 per year and donates $1,821 (nearly 3%) to charity or political causes. What slice of your pie is invested in changing the world?

$63,000 SALARY Transportation $8,758

Insurance $5,336 Groceries $3,465

Housing $16,920

Entertainment $3,404 Health $2,853 Clothes $1,881

$80,000 SALARY

Contributions

$2,481

Contributions

$1,821

Dining $2,668

$170,000 SALARY

Contributions

$4,537

Data collected from 2007 Consumer Expenditures Report by the U.S. Dept of Labor


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W H E R E D O YO U R D O N AT I O N S G O ? SS D P ’ S N AT I O N A L B U D G E T A N D S TA F F

2009 INCOME

$408,711

2009 EXPENSES

Foundations $226,491

$361,811 Outreach $178,287

Canada* $30,764

Events

$10,559

Small Gifts $16,533

Corporate $25,550

Major Gifts $129,578

Campaigns $94,571

Admin, Fundraising & Misc $58,190

*The majority of Canadian SSDP’s budget is administered by SSDP in the U.S. via a pass-through grant.

The most important expense that SSDP incurs is the employment of our regional outreach directors. Leaders of budding and established chapters rely on the expertise, friendship, and constant availability of our outreach staff, who ran successful SSDP chapters when they were in college.

NATIONAL OUTREACH STAFF

Amber Langston Midwest & South

Jonathan Perri West Coast & Mountain Plains

Stacia Cosner Northeast & Mid-Atlantic


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2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0 S T R AT E G I C P L A N • CHAPTER GROWTH: Increase our chapter network from 109 chapters to 285. • CAMPUS CHANGE: Successfully enact at least twelve sensible policies at campuses nationwide. • CAMPAIGN SUPPORT: Continue to assist the local, state, and federal lobbying campaigns of allied organizations such as the Drug Policy Alliance, the Marijuana Policy Project, Americans for Safe Access, and others. • DIVERSITY: Start chapters at four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). • EVENTS: Host our eleventh annual international conference in San Francisco, with more than 500 attendees. • GLOBAL GROWTH: Form two new international SSDP networks. • INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY: Organize a global drug policy campaign with the participation of at least three international SSDP networks. • ALUMNI OUTREACH: Increase the number of dues-paying Alumni Network members from 50 to 200. • MEDIA: Continue to represent the student movement to end the War on Drugs in the news media. • NATIONAL CAMPAIGNS: Continue to lobby Congress to reform drug policies that directly impact students, such as the Higher Education Act’s Aid Elimination Penalty. • ONLINE ORGANIZING: Continue to utilize innovative online tools, like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and our website, to enhance the ability of our thousands of members to communicate and collaborate.


THE FUTURE OF OUR MOVEMENT... IS IN YOUR HANDS

I N V E S T I N C H A N G E T O DAY What will the world look like in 5 years? In 10 years? In 20? For Students for Sensible Drug Policy, that answer depends on two variables: the amount of passionate, inspired young people who are interested in this issue today, and the extent to which we can help them become savvy, effective activists tomorrow. Your generosity ensures that we have the resources we need to make that transformation happen. A donation to SSDP is an investment in the future success of the drug policy reform movement. Will you help us pass the torch to the next generation by making a contribution to SSDP this year? Donate online: www.ssdp.org/donate Donate by mail: 1623 Connecticut Ave, NW Ste. 300 Washington, DC 20009

Philanthropy

Origin: from phil- “to love” & anthropos “humankind”

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THANK YOU! We would like to extend our deep appreciation to every individual and organization who donated to SSDP in 2009 and to those who plan to contribute in 2010. We are especially grateful to those who invested in our work with major gifts (below). Without your generosity, our movement would not be as strong as it is today. MAJOR GIFTS • • • • •

Bergstrom Foundation Berkeley Patients Group Capitol Wellness Collective Criminal Justice Policy Foundation Drug Policy Alliance

• • • • •

John Gilmore Robert Field Harborside Health Center Marijuana Policy Project Open Society Institute

SSDP’s National Board, Staff, and Select Chapter Leaders at our 2009 Strategy Summit (front row, L to R) Morgan Lesko, Micah Daigle, Brian Wallace, Caleb Chepesiuk, Mischa Steiner, Kris Krane, Marc Brandl, Jimi Devine, Michael Blunk, Chris Chiles, Matthew Potter, Julia Peterson, Tyler Smith, Stacia Cosner (rear row, L to R) Irina Alexander, Rachel Anderson, Alison Grimmer, Jonathan Perri, Doug McVay, Eric Sterling, Devon Stewart, Darrell Sour, Gabriel Loewinger, Constance Sisk, Amber Langston, Jason Matthys



2010 SSDP Organizational Prospectus