Page 1

MARCH 2019

BRAND STORY AUTEUR SARASOTA TM

LIVE LOCAL ON THE CREATIVE COAST SARASOTA | BRADENTON LIVE LOCAL | LOVE LOCAL

FRESH SPACES

ENGAGING INFLUENTIALS ON FLORIDA’S WEST COAST MARCH 2019 SRQMAG.COM

REMEMBERING ARCHITECTS TIM SEIBERT AND GENE LEEDY RUDOLPH’S MID-CENTURY MENU

HOME OF THE YEAR WINNERS MARCH 2019 | $4.00 US

03

0

SRQMAR19_Coverv2.indd 1

74470 93873

6

2/19/19 1:15 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 2

2/17/19 1:29 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 1

2/19/19 9:16 AM


Ads-MAR19.indd 2

2/17/19 1:18 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 3

2/17/19 1:18 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 4

2/17/19 1:19 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 5

2/17/19 1:19 PM


MARCH 2019 62 ANNUAL HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION WINNERS Showcasing immaculate spatial s ynergies and br eathtaking views while emplo ying smart renovation techniques and building str ategies, the ar chitects, builders, interior designers and landscape artists who won in this year’s SRQ Magazine Home of the Year competition collaborated to bring these incredibly stunning Gulf Coast residential spaces to life. From seaside to street-side, inside and out, these exemplars of the local built environment celebrate and contribute to an impressive legacy of award-winning architecture. This page: 2019 Home of the Year Best Landscape, Platinum Winner, Citrus Avenue Property—DWY Landscape Architects; Architecture by Leader Design Studio; Interior Design by SAWA Design Studio.

SRQMAR19_TOC.indd 6

2/19/19 3:55 PM


auteur / o’tur / author or originator; an artist whose style and practice is considered original and distinctive

PAN O R AM I C R E S I D E N C E S | 3 6 0º LIVI N G

Artist’s Rendering

I N N O VAT I V E B Y D E F I N I T I O N INSPIRING BY DESIGN From the creators of Beau Ciel, en Provence, Orchid Beach Club, Aria and Virage comes a luxury tower lifestyle unlike any Sarasota has seen before. Expansive tower residences feature panoramic bay views. Curated interiors, concierge-level services and innovative amenities create an ambiance of uncommon artistry and inspiration. An ideal Boulevard of the Arts location surrounds you with the endless attractions of the new Sarasota Bayfront.

A S P E C I A L B R A N D STO RY M A R K E T I N G F E AT U R E | S R Q M A G A Z I N E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

BrandStory_2019-03-ULA-KOLTER-AuteurV2.indd 7

2/17/19 1:37 PM


PANOR AM IC R E S I DE NC E S OVE R LO O K I N G SAR AS OTA BAY

Artist’s Rendering

THE ARTISTIC VISION FOR AUTEUR is framed by fresh, modern architecture with a distinctive coastal flair. Ingeniously designed by the acclaimed Chuck Jones of Curts Gaines Hall Jones of Tampa, the majestic 19-story tower features an intimate collection of just 56 expansive residences overlooking Sarasota Bay and the dazzling redevelopment of Sarasota’s Bayfront performing arts, culture and recreational district, The Bay. Auteur’s extraordinarily wide-open floorplans feature continuous walls of glass spanning multiple living areas to create panoramic city and bay views. Within this exclusive address, coded-access elevators rise to private foyers that open to spacious, sunlit interiors where soaring 10.5’ to 12’ ceilings add to the stately elegance of contemporary Tower, Estate, and Penthouse residences. Deep terraces provide year-round outdoor living space with spectacular views, from pastel sunrises over the city to vivid sunsets over Sarasota Bay and the Gulf Isles. Designed for maximum livability, smartly configured residences are pre-wired with the latest smart home technology. Designer-coordinated interiors boast the finest flooring, finishes and features. High-performance kitchens feature Sub-Zero®/Wolf® appliances, Neff® European-style cabinetry, quartz countertops and handcrafted Hansgrohe® faucets. Lavish Owners’ Suites feature spacious balconies, large walk-in closets, oversized showers, freestanding soaking tubs and premium Kohler® sinks. Each meticulously finished residence comes with a generous selection of premium interior and appliance packages. Ascentia Development Group’s exclusive Studio ADG, a personalized interior design program, assists owners and their interior decorators with the styling of each home’s finishes, flooring, cabinetry, fixtures and appliances. Jack Dusty Restaurant

A S P E C I A L B R A N D STO RY M A R K E T I N G F E AT U R E | S R Q M A G A Z I N E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

BrandStory_2019-03-ULA-KOLTER-AuteurV2.indd 8

2/17/19 1:38 PM


A V I S I O N A RY D E V E L O P M E NT TE A M The latest in a decades-long record of creating standards setting residential and resort environments along Florida’s west coast, Auteur is the result of a partnership between Sarasota’s Ascentia Development Group (ADG) and GDI. “We wanted a lifestyle that fosters vibrant connections to the “New Sarasota,” notes the development team. “The cutting-edge cultural, culinary, fashion, and outdoor recreational scenes that surround Auteur at The Bay, Quay Sarasota, and Downtown are all within walking distance. Auteur’s programming, services and amenities will feature it all.” ADG President & Partner, Jay Tallman says, “The vision for Auteur led us to look beyond the usual resources and recruit the amazing ForrestPerkins to help create interiors, amenities and programming unlike any Sarasota has seen before.”

Artist’s Rendering

C U R ATE D S E R V I C E S & A M E N ITI E S The celebrated interior design firm of orrestPerkins is at the forefront of the boutique luxury hospitality industry across the country, including flagship hotels for our Seasons, Marriott and Fairmont. For Auteur, Colletta onner of the firm’s Dallas office is curating interiors distinguished by a rich palette of services, amenities and concierge-supported programming that foster vibrant connections to city, sea and healthy living. A dramatic, two-story lobby introduces the theme with a staffed reception desk surrounded by fine art and innovative lighting, an approach that continues to express itself with effort-

less elegance and artisan detail in the amenity areas, both indoors and out. Residents can work out in a fully equipped fitness facility or yoga studio, relax in a poolside cabana or learn to cook in a private clubroom’s Wolf/Sub-Zero® demonstration kitchen and lounge. The foot of the building features adjacent restaurant and retail space. Owners will also enjoy access to select services, amenities and accommodations at the adjacent Hyatt Regency hotel and yacht basin featuring available yacht slips and optional membership in Barton & Gray Mariners Club, the nation’s leading purveyor of personal yachting excursions.

A S P E C I A L B R A N D STO RY M A R K E T I N G F E AT U R E | S R Q M A G A Z I N E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

BrandStory_2019-03-ULA-KOLTER-AuteurV2.indd 9

2/17/19 1:38 PM


S A R A S OTA’S N E W B AYF R O NT Auteur overlooks The Bay, the city’s reimagined performing arts district. Home to the iconic Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall, the first phase of The Bay includes a magnificent redevelopment of Boulevard of the Arts, from U.S. 41 to Sarasota Bay. Highlights include lush gardens, a park, public art, watercraft launches and bayfront piers, all of which will be completed as Auteur welcomes its first residents. New state-of-the-art performing arts facilities and outdoor amphitheater are also part of The Bay master plan. It all adds up to a Sarasota Bayfront lifestyle as original and distinctive as those with the vision to call it home. “With each new project we’ve committed ourselves to raising the bar and doing something different, says ADG’s ay Tallman. We’re confident that Auteur will exceed everyone’s expectations.”

Artist’s Rendering

PA N O R A M I C

R E S I D E N C E S

|

3 6 0°

L I V I N G

TOW E R R E S I D E N C E S O VE R LO O K I N G S A R AS O TA B AY FR O M TH E $ 2 M I LLI O N S TO LE A R N M O R E , R E G I S TE R O N LI N E O R C A LL FO R A N A P P O I N TM E N T 941- 26 0- 14 6 1 | A U TE U R S A R AS O TA . C O M

A S P E C I A L B R A N D STO RY M A R K E T I N G F E AT U R E | S R Q M A G A Z I N E | M A R C H 2 0 1 9

BrandStory_2019-03-ULA-KOLTER-AuteurV2.indd 10

2/19/19 9:20 AM


MARCH 2019 23 SRQIST Selby Gardens puts boots on the ground to save local cacti. Donald ‘Sno0py’ Wa s and D2AG set sail for greatness. Meet the slippery pinnipeds of the newly public Sea Lion Preserve. Weapons of war become tools for tness in the new hardcore training regimen, MaceFit. Boxing legend Evander Holy eld talks Boys and Girls Clubs of America. Architects Sam Holladay and Guy Peterson remember Edward ‘Tim’ Seibert. Architect Max Strang on the genius of Gene Leedy.

28 CULTURE CITY With the latest exhibition transforming the campus, Selby Gardens Curator-at-Large Dr. Carol Ock-

SRQMAR19_TOC.indd 11

man talks the mastery and mystery of Paul Gauguin. Sculptor Je Hostetler nds new purpose in plaster.

53 CARGO Meet friends old and new where co ee, donuts and furniture design intersect at The Farm House in Bradenton. Put the LBD aside for a li le while and make some room in the closet for coral wear. An unexpected home o c e design functions as a retreat for bookworms and historians alike in Lakewood Ranch.

88 FORAGE Nestled within The Sarasota Modern, Rudolph’s restaurant generates a foodie’s high with hanging alligators and sous-vide gastronomy. At Sage, Chef Covelli’s global

SPECIAL SECTIONS menu and a restored historic space promise a path to culinary bliss. Take a magical trip to forage the latest crop of mind-bending mushroom dishes. Decadent cheesecakes and a vors you didn’t know you needed await at Canopy Road Market.

102 RECONNOITER Will Robinson and Joe Gruters head to Tallahassee with plans to stop red tide. But will their legislation produce results?

104 WANDERLUST At Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa, experience a zen expanse of endless calm. Whatever worries and cares you had at home will fade into insigni cance. Welcome to a place of peace and restoration.

SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO, 46 If you’re seeking homespiration, turn to page 46 for a sneak peek at spring’s trendiest inspirations from the experts on closet r enovations, landscaping, downtown living and int eriors. Featuring Arcos, Big Earth Landscape Supply, California Closets, Molly K.Laub and PGT Innovations.

SRQ360 14 94

Inside the Brand Cocotele

MARKETING FEATURES 7

BRANDSTORY Auteur 57 Provisionist 94 Nosh 100 STORY PROJECT CareerEdge

Cover: 2019 Home of the Y ear Best Landsc ape, Platinum Winner, Citrus Avenue Property—DWY Landscape Architects; Architecture by Leader Design S tudio; Interior Design by SAWA Design Studio. This page: Charred Octopus from Rudolph’s at Sarasota Modern

2/19/19 12:27 PM


SRQ

M A G A Z I NE MARCH 2019

SRQ MEDIA

CEO / PRESIDENT / EDITOR IN CHIEF

ADVERTISING

LISL LIANG

GROWMYBUSINESS@SRQME.COM 941-365-7702 x211

SENIOR EDITOR

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Phil Lederer ART DIRECTOR | PHOTOGRAPHER

Wyatt Kostygan

SUBSCRIBE@SRQME.COM 941-365-7702 x215

ONLINE TICKETS

CONTRIBUTING SENIOR EDITOR

Jacob Ogles STAFF WRITER / SPECIAL PROJECTS

SRQSB2.COM SRQHEARMEROAR.COM SRQPROJECTHINK.COM 941-365-7702 x221

Brittany Mattie GET SRQ DAILY

CONTRIBUTING CREATIVES WOODY WOODMAN

EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER

WES ROBERTS SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS AND ENGAGEMENT

Ashley Grant ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Ashley Ryan Cannon SALES AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT EXECUTIVES

ORIGINS OF SRQ

Suzanne Munroe Julie Mayer Magnific CLIENT SERVICES AND, MARKETING MANAGER

Ashley Jimenez ASSOCIATE PRODUCER, MARKETING, EVENTS AND PROGRAMS

Kira Forgash

The magazine in your hands o ers enormous insight into our community, but the most informed in our community follow our constant coverage of Sarasota and the Bradenton Area in SRQ Daily. The electronic newsle er is a must-read in thousands of inboxes. Check our special editions: the Monday Business Edition, the Wednesday Philanthropy Edition, the Friday Weekend Edition and the much-discussed Saturday Perspectives Edition, featuring a diverse range of opinions from the region’s top pundits and newsmakers. SIGN UP ONLINE AT SRQMAG.COM

The “SRQ” in SRQ magazine originates from the designated call le ers for the local Sarasota Bradenton International Airport. “SR” was the original abbreviation for the airport before the growth in total number of airports required the use of a three-le er code. Le ers like “X” and “Q” were used as ller, thus the original “SR” was revised to “SRQ,” much as the Los Angeles airport became “LAX.” As a regional publication commi ed to the residents of and visitors to both Sarasota and Manatee counties, SRQ captures the place that we call home.

PUBLISHERS OF SRQ MAGAZINE. LUX LIFE MAGAZINE. ROCKET KIDS MAGAZINE. MODERN HOME MAGAZINE. SRQ ACCESS REGIONAL VISITORS GUIDE. SRQ DAILY 331 South Pineapple Ave., Sarasota, FL 34236 | Phone 941-365-7702 Fax 941-365-0853 S RQ MAG.CO M

SUBSCRIBE TO THE PRINT AND DIGITAL EDITION Join our readers in the pleasurable experience of receiving SRQ magazine in your mailbox every month. To reserve your subscription, provide your information and payment online. You can set up multiple addresses, renewals and special instructions directly through your online account. When you subscribe online, your rst print issue will arrive in your mailbox in 4–6 weeks. For immediate access to the digital edition, s ubscribe directly at our ipbook. Subscribe online at SRQMAG.COM/SUBSCRIBE. Contact us via email at subscribe@srqme.com Vol. 22, Issue 215 Copyright © 2019 SRQ MEDIA. SRQ: Live Local | Thrive Local. Sarasota and Bradenton is published 12 times a year. IMPORTAN T N OTICE: The entir e contents of SRQ are copyrighted by Trafalger Communications, Inc. C olumn and department names are property of Trafalger Communications, Inc. and may not be used or r eproduced without express wri en permission of the publisher. SUBSCRIPTION: Subscriptions to SRQ are $36 for 24 issues. Single copies are $4 at area newsstands.

UPFRONT_SRQMAR19_Masthead2.indd 12

2/19/19 12:42 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 13

2/17/19 1:20 PM


Inside the Brand COMING UP: Hear Me Roar Leadership and Awards Luncheon | 5/2/2019

ITB Geralyn Lucas, Keynote

SB2 State of the Economy and Localpreneur of the Year Awards Luncheon | JANUARY 24 SRQ MEDIA and over two hundred community members gathered at the Hyatt Regency Sarasota on Thursday 24, 2019 to explore the State of the Regional Economy. The first SB2 symposium of 2019 offered the audience an insightful program that analyzed the health of our local economy. Season Presenter, Steve Altier of Seaside Bank, began the symposium by welcoming the audience with warm remarks. Altier reflected on his career noting, “To see where this business community has gone in the last 30 years and to be a part of it has been a great honor.” Opening speaker and featured panelist Jeffrey Mayers, General Manager of The Resort at Longboat Key Club discussed the convergence of tourism and the economy, bringing up what was to become a topic that gathered much discussion during the SB2 program, the red tide algae bloom. Mayers acknowledged that, “We’re going to be dealing with a hangover effect for sometime,” and urged the importance of overcoming negative perceptions. Eric Collin, President of Firmo Construction, offered an informative market outlook about the construction industry.

Dorothy Butler Gillium, Trailblazer

Hear Me Roar Leadership and Awards Luncheon THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019, 10:30AM 1PM HYATT REGENCY SARASOTA SRQ MEDIA will host the h annual Women in Business Hear Me Roar Leadership and Awards Luncheon on Thursday, May 2, 2019 from 10:30am-3pm at the Hya Regency Sarasota featuring nationally-recognized keynote speaker, a not ed luminary who has made a signi cant impact in their eld and the announcement of the winners from this year’s 2019 Women in Business Competition. SRQ MEDIA is pleased to announce Geralyn Lucas as this year’s Hear Me Roar Keynote Speaker. Lucas is the best-selling author of Why I Wore Lipstick: To My Mastectomy and ac complished producer whose book w as made into an Emmy nominated movie and inspired collaborations with Betsey Johnson and Stila cosmetics. Legendary civil rights journalist and the rst black reporter for the Washington Post Dorothy Butler Gillam will be honor ed with the Women in Business Trailblazer Award. Tickets are $75 per person. Table sponsorships at $850 for a full table and $425 for a half table available online at SRQHEARMEROAR.COM

SPONSORS Seaside Bank Hya- Regency Sarasota Community Foundation of Sarasota County New Balance Sarasota Waterworks Members Club Diamond Vault Saks Fi h Avenue Sarasota VIctoria Blooms CALL 941 365 7702 X 221 FOR DETAILS.

UPFRONT_SRQMARCH19_ITB.indd 14

The program continued with an insightful panel discussion featuring Kevin Cooper, President and CEO of The Greater Sarasota Chamber of Commerce, Jacki Dezelski of the Manatee Chamber of Commerce, Sharon Hillstrom of the Bradenton Area Economic Development Corporation, Mark Huey of the Economic Development Corporation of Sarasota County, Je rey Mayers of The Resort at Longboat Key Club, Phillip Rich of Seaside Bank, and Drayton Saunders of Michael Saunders & Company. SRQ MEDIA received hundreds of nominations for this year’s Localpreneur of the Year Competition from the community. Out of the nominations, over thirty honorees were selected. These individuals have earned the respect of their peers in the following areas: corporate acumen, innovation, philanthropy, leadership and community impact. This year’s five 2019 Localpreneurs of the Year are: Kelly Ison, Einstein Pets; Paul Ma ison, Mattison’s Restaurant and Catering; Candice McElyea, One Eight Oh PR; Pete Petersen, Dealers United; and, Bre Wallin, Walt’s Fish Market and Restaurant. Congratulations! Visit SRQSB2.COM for tickets to the rest of the season.

2/18/19 2:24 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 15

2/17/19 1:20 PM


RSVP Magazine Sponsored March 2019 Events SILL 2019 SPEAKER SERIES MARCH 1-3 Described b y the O cala Star- Banner -as an “Equine Cirque du Soleil”, the renowned show has recently performed in Las Vegas, NV, Honolulu, HI and all o ver N orth Americ a. This the atrical European-style, equestrian-themed, Cir que show tells a beautiful seamless story with a contemporary blend of A crobatics, Aerial, Dance and E questrian Arts, woven together to the ac oustic beats of rich Spanish guitar. From daredevil Cossack riding to the beautiful Aerial chandelier, we invite you to take a step back in time and experienc e the enchanting world of Cirque Ma’Ceo! cirquemaceotickets.com MARDI GRAS GALA MARCH 5 The Mardi Gras Gala is Goodwill Manasota’s signature event and ALWAYS sells out! Let us take you to the Big Easy where the fabulous Phil Mancini will transform Michael’s On East once again into Bourbon Street a’ la Michael’s, serving authentic New Orleans food in a lively, street party atmosphere complete with re dancers, stilt w alkers and other street performers. Experiencegoodwill.org/events SWAC SPEAKER SERIES: RECONSTRUCTING U.S.- RUSSIA RELATIONS MARCH 5 Join the S arasota World A airs Council for the nal program in its 2 018-19 lecture series Reconstructing U.S.-Russia Relations, featuring Dr. William P omeranz, Deputy Dir ector of the Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies at the Woodrow Wilson C enter. Dr . Pomeranz is an expert on politic al and ec onomic developments in Russia, with expertise in is sues ranging from the development of R ussia’s Constitution to human rights law. sarasotawac.org MUSIC ON MAY LANE MARCH 8 Join us on Friday, March 8th from 4 pm to 9 pm for Music on May Lane, our rst neighborhood block party complete with food, drinks, and music, in the heart of the Rosemary District. Celebrate with us at The Bayside Club! Thebaysideclub.com

husband Peppe own an inn. P eppe, a s weet and timid man, is terri ed of his tyrannical wife. When Gaspar, Rita’s rst husband whom she belie ved drowned, comes back, he turns Rita and P eppe’s lives upside down. N ext is Susanna’s Secret by Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari. Continuing our Beyond Verdi series: Susanna has a secr et she isn ’t telling. Her husband Count Gil, smelling tobacco on his wif e’s clothes, is c onvinced that she is ha ving an a air. What could her secret be? Sarasotaopera.org PONIES FOR PUPS MARCH 9 The 10th Annual Ponies for Pups Charity Polo match bene ing the non-pro t, no-kill shelter, Nate’s Honor Animal Rescue, the event is speci cally intended to o se t costs related to the medical care, rehabilitation and w ell-being of the hundr eds of animals taken in annually. Honoranimalrescue.org AVANT-GARDE: A MAGICAL EVENING MARCH 23 Wizards and sorcerers. Magicians and illusionists. Fairies and elves. Genies and dragons. Singer Stevie Nicks or Titania, Queen of F airyland? Harry Po er or Harry Houdini? Mids ummer N ight’s Dream or Pu the Magic Dragon? The magical world beckons you to step through the sliding door s of illusion and onto the dazzling Ringling College campus, where we will honor the most w ondrous beings in our r ealm - Ringling C ollege students. Reserve your seats now for this spellbinding evening. Ringling.edu ASOLO REP- A DOLL’S HOUSE, PART 2 MARCH 22-23 In the nal scene of Ibsen’s 1879 groundbreaking masterwork, Nora Helmer famously slammed the door on her marriage and f amily life, leaving her husband and children behind. What happened to the iconic heroine next? This snapp y sequel imagines her 1 5 years later as a s uccessful writer and independent woman, but a skeleton from her past has her returning home to the one man who can help her. asolorep.org ASOLO REP- NOISES OFF

KALEIDOSCOPE OF CREATIVITY MARCH 9 Join the Book er High School Vis ual & Performing Arts pr ogram for Kaleidoscope of Creativity, its rst-ever fundraising event to support initiatives that provide meaningful opportunities for VPA rising star s. Proceeds from the e vent will be earmarked for providing master classes on campus, money to gain access to performances that enhance appreciation and exposure, as well as fees a endant to pursuing placement in the country’s top collegiate programs. Foundation.bookervpa.com

MARCH 20–APRIL 20 Precision timed, cunningly constructed, rip-roaringly hilarious – Noises O is a comedy of epic proportions – and the laugh-untilyou-cry guilty ple asure of audienc es for decades. With opening night just hour s away, a motle y company of act ors stumbles thr ough a fr antic, nal rehearsal of the British sex f arce N othing On, and things could not be going worse. Lines are forgo en, love triangles ar e unraveling, sardines are ying everywhere, and c omplete pandemonium ens ues. asolorep.org

SARASOTA OPERA RITA / SUSANNA’S SECRET

COLLABORATION CELEBRATION

MARCH 9 These two rare one-act comedies by Donize i and Wolf-Ferrari will make for a delightful evening at the oper a. Beginning with Rita Two Men and a W oman by Gaetano Doniz e i. Rita and her

MARCH 26 How does a place create a community? We know from research that a per son’s zip c ode is a mor e reliable determinant of he alth than their genetic code. Why then, do w e still struggle with

UPFRONT_SRQMAR19_RSVP.indd 16

poverty, addiction and homeles sness in this region of beauty and pr osperity? Join us f or our annual luncheon in Mar ch, where guest spe aker Elma J. Felix-Lamontagne, AICP, will deliver a presentation about how places help t o shape the identity of a community. gs-humanservices.org/event/ celebration2019 WINE WALK WORLD’S FAIR MARCH 29 You won’t want to miss this year’s Wine Walk, a wine pairing experience unlike any other! As you stroll to the Ca’d’Zan, you will taste and explore your way through The Ringling’ s World Fair. Each station will feature a unique theme from the World’s Fair with exciting food and wine pairings, along with activities and ent ertainment. Experience a v ariety of wines from Total Wine and more, while engaging with the wine mak ers, and enjo y culinary delights from Sarasota’s top caterers. Ringling.org WOMEN & MEDICINE EDUCATIONAL LUNCHEON MARCH 29 This year marks the 7th Anniv ersary of Women & Medicine and will s upport the Internal Medicine R esidency Program at SMH. This educational luncheon f eatures informative presentations and discus sions from Sarasota Memorial Physicians. smhf.org UNION TANGUERA + KATE WEARE: SIN SALIDA MARCH 29–30 U.S. Choreographer Kate Weare collaborates with French tango ensemble t o reveal the formal strengths and distinctions betw een Argentine tango and c ontemporary dance partnering. Performed by three tango danc ers and two contemporary dancers with live music performed by Argentinean composer Gustavo Beytlemann. Ringling.org SARASOTA OPERA RITA / SUSANNA’S SECRET MARCH 30 The Music C ompound’s 5th annual Beer, Bands & BBQ is back fr om 11 am t o 4 pm. It will be host ed at a ne w location, the c ourtyard of The Bazaar on Apric ot & Lime, 8 21 Apricot Ave. Sarasota. Look forward to 10 bands including K ara & Kaleidogroove, students from Music Compound will perform between sets. Food trucks and beer will be available throughout the da y. Admission is free and you are encouraged to bring y our own lawn chair. Musiccompound.com CIRCUS ANGEL SCAVENGER HUNT MARCH 30 Fun for all ages, The Cir cus Angel Scavenger Hunt is a bene t for the Sho wpeople’s Winter Quarters, established in 2 015 by The Circus and Traveling Shows Retirement Project. The scavenger hunt includes six cir cus theme st ops, live entertainment, giveaways and gi bags. You will have enough time t o enjoy each stop and to solve riddles with clues. Call 941-302-0054

2/19/19 3:58 PM


Cool Today Park, Locker Room Left to right: Steve Padgett of Fawley Bryant Architecture, Brian Leaver of Tandem Construction and Michael Dunn of the Atlanta Braves.

A NEW HOME FOR THE BRAVES

MEET THE LOCAL TALENT BEHIND THE CONSTRUCTION OF COOL TODAY PARK Thanks to Tandem Construction and Fawley Bryant Architecture, America’s favorite pastime has arrived to North Port. On March 24, 2019 the Atlanta Braves will take on the Tampa Bay Rays in their brand new spring training facility. Described as “A state of the art baseball production facility with an instrumental role in daily community activity,” by Michael Dunn, Vice President of Florida Operations/Atlanta Braves, Cool Today Park has over 6,000 seats for fans. Sarasota-based Tandem Construction was a construction management project lead and Fawley Bryant Architecture was responsible for the facility’s design. Cool Today Park is one of Tandem Construction’s newest community-oriented projects. With forty years of experience in the region, Tandem managed the construction of the complex’s 55,000-square-foot clubhouse, ancillary buildings, and the ballpark’s fieldwork in thirteen fast-moving months. Fawley Bryant Architecture develops innovative and practical space solutions that are thoughtfully designed. “The Atlanta Braves is a “Blue Chip” organization from top to bottom,” says Steve Padgett, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, Principal and Managing Partner of Fawley Bryant. “It was our intent to help create a new facility that matched that same character of the organization. The facility needs to be engaging to the community, fan friendly, first class, efficient, and a sports performance facility that develops, trains and rehabilitates world class athletes.” Cool Today Park will bring both baseball and economic growth to North Port and the greater Sarasota community. “Having the Braves here for their 30 year contract brings huge dividends for South County in terms of financial gain,” comments Brian Leaver, Senior Vice President and Project Executive at Tandem Construction. “This truly has been a job creation project for the people of South County. Tandem has been a small part of it, but we’re proud of that. We have helped the construction economy but the financial impact of this project will continue forward in our community.” Steve Padgett, Fawley Bryant Architecture adds, “Now there will be the opportunity for new generations of people to grow up in this region not only as fans of the [Braves] organization, but also of fans of the people that operate it.”

www.mlb.com/braves/braves-spring-training Fawley Bryant Architecture facilitates the creation of smart, beautiful spaces. A commercial architecture firm with locations in Sarasota and Manatee counties, we’ve served Southwest Florida for more than two decades. We design real-time, in front of our clients, making decisions collaboratively to help initiate the visioning process. We do our best work when you tell us about yours. Servicing multiple industries, our portfolio spans from multimillion-dollar sports stadiums to small window renovations and façade updates.

Tandem Construction is a Sarasota-based Construction Management Firm serving Southwest Florida since 1980. We provide Construction Management services to the Commercial Office, Education, Healthcare, Sports & Recreation, Multi-family, Government, Non-Profit and Hospitality sectors. Our openbook project delivery, partner-based approach, and proven success with sustainable/green building practices has resulted in long-term relationships and consistent results for each and every client.

FAWLEY BRYANT ARCHITECTURE

TANDEM CONSTRUCTION

FAWLEY- B RYA N T. C O M

SRQMAR2019-TandemConstruction.indd 17

|

9 41 -3 4 3 -4 0 7 0

TA NDEM C ONS T RUC T I ON.C OM

|

941-954-1599

2/19/19 11:53 AM


2 0

Y E A R S

A U T H E N T I C A B O U T

L I V E

O F

S T O R Y T E L L I N G

O U R

L O C A L

H O M E T O W N

|

L O V E

L O C A L

ENGAGING THE POWER OF LOCAL O N T H E C R E AT I V E COA S T C A L L U S A B O U T O U R M O V I N G S TO R I E S D I V I S I O N F O R D O C U M E N TA R Y A N D V I D E O P R O D U C T I O N SRQME.COM

20THANNIVERSARYAD.indd 18

|

941-365-7702 X211

2/19/19 2:19 PM


20THANNIVERSARYAD.indd 19

2/19/19 2:20 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 20

2/17/19 1:21 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 21

2/17/19 1:21 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 22

2/17/19 1:21 PM


Local Heart & Soul Stories About the People, Places and Experiences that Define Our Hometown

SRQIST IT MAY NOT BE FUZZY AND CUTE AND BEGGING TO BE PETTED —it may in fact be prickly, spiny and waiting to stab you should you stray too close—but that doesn’t mean the Harrisia aboriginum, or aboriginal prickly-apple, doesn’t deserve to be saved. Formerly found in the dry coastal regions of Sarasota, Lee and Charlotte counties, the species of cactus has taken a series of mighty hits to its population and diversity, thanks to loss of habitat amidst burgeoning development. It used to grow all over Manatee County too, though now dwindled to a small population on Longboat Key. In response, Marie Selby Botanical Gardens, with help from a yearlong conservation grant from the Cactus and Succulent Society of America, will send its botanical team on a rescue mission, evaluating the species’ population and biodiversity, while looking to boost wild populations. In the field, teams seek out existing populations and collect spine samples for genetic testing, while botanists back at Selby Gardens raise a whole new crop of cacti from harvested seed, eventually to be transplanted out in the wild, where it provides shelter to Hawk Moths and food for similarly endangered Gopher Tortoises. “It’s such an important component of these ecosystems,” says Bruce Holst, vice president of botany at Selby Gardens. “It’s important to bring it back from possible extinction.” In the meantime, the Selby Gardens botanical team will continue introducing new populations on higher ground, away from predicted sea level rise onset by ongoing climate change. SRQ

CACTUS RESCUE CORPS The Selby Gardens botanical team enters the field to save Florida’s cacti. WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

SRQIST_SRQMAR19.indd 23

2/18/19 2:30 PM


SRQIST

THE REAL LION KING Wild animal whisperer Marco Peters opens the gates and local curiosos fall in love with the lions of the sea. WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

This page: Marco

Peters poses with a couple of i ppered friends, Stella and Ki y, at the Sarasota Sea Lion Preserve.

VISITORS GAIN ACCESS TO THE SARASOTA SEA LION PRESERVE in Myakka City for the first time since its founding by Marco Peters in the late 1990s, as the center evolves to meet the flamboyant pinnipeds’ needs. A former Ringling Bros big cat trainer, Peters gave up handling the fearsome incisors of lions’ roaring jaws to care for these mane-less, agile swimmers—24 California and Patagonian sea lions that call the Preserve home, to be exact—now open to the public after being sequestered for 20 years, aiming to raise awareness and promote the conservation of marine mammals by allowing personal interactions with its flippered residents. With a playful gruff, or deep, loud bark, you’ll meet slippery stars such as Grommet, Hans, Bruce, Stella, Poonki, Lilly and Avocado—whom may wriggle, splash, hug and even plant kisses on cheeks, but none of which can ever be released in the wild, due to either old age, injury or being born in captivity. And through a hands-on program designed to show people how to care for them, handle them and understand them, Peters hopes visitors leave with both memories and inspiration to be part of conservation efforts. “This is not a petting zoo,” Peters says. “My hope is that this becomes part of Sarasota, like how Mote Marine Laboratory became a part of Sarasota.” SRQ Reservations are limited and a paid entrance fee exists to raise funds. Tours include land and water options with photos, as well as opportunities to learn what it takes to be a trainer (water quality, s h preparation, habitat maintenance and behavioral education). sarasotasealionpreserve.com, 941-219-3583.

SRQIST_SRQMAR19.indd 24

2/18/19 2:35 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 25

2/17/19 1:21 PM


SRQIST

ACHIEVING DESTINY Donald “Sno0py” Watts sows the seeds of his success. 30 |

CULTURE CITY SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

CALL IT FATE. Call it fortune. Call it inevitable. But Donald “Sno0py” Watts, the Sarasota-based musician and entrepreneur, always

knew he was meant for something bigger. And this month, after being “discovered” only half a year ago, Watts sets out on yet another world tour with the B.B. King’s Blues Club All-Star Band, drumming his way to ports as far-flung as Fiji, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea. “It’s a great opportunity to experience different cultures and embrace different ways of life,” he says, “and I’m excited to be carving out my own path.” But as Watts traverses the globe, sending back social media shout-outs from each stop, he remembers that “Destined 2 Achieve Greatness” (D2AG) isn’t just the name of his company, it’s a personal motto and a philosophical foundation to be lived every day. So he’ll leave the tourist traps behind and venture into each of the communities he visits, meeting with the locals and encouraging musicality wherever he finds it. D2AG is about building up, he says, whether a kid in New Caledonia playing with his first pair of drumsticks or a struggling entrepreneur finding inspiration in the D2AG social media streams back in Sarasota. “I want to help them to pull out the greatness within themselves,” says Watts. “No matter what that dream is.” SRQ WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

SRQIST_SRQMAR19.indd 26

2/18/19 2:35 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 27

2/17/19 1:23 PM


SRQIST

GOING CLUBBING Fitness gets medieval on that mass with MaceFit.

This page: In The

Cave, Frank DiMeo trains only those willing to learn.

UNLEASH YOUR INNER KNIGHT IN SWEATY GYM SOCKS and

bring a little bit of the Dark Ages to your workout (in a good way) with MaceFit, the latest training regimen from trainer Frank DiMeo, owner of The Cave, off Ashton Road. Harnessing what DiMeo calls “centrifugal strength training,” MaceFit novitiates wield adjustable ADEX maces and clubs in swinging arcs and circular patterns, activating multiple muscle groups and mining extreme range of motion for best results. “You’re not gonna do that with a barbell,” says DiMeo. And with weighted maces ranging from five pounds to 50 it’s a regimen for beginners and veterans alike. “The only thing we ask is that you come in with a coachable attitude and be willing to learn.” But class sizes stay small, for more personal attention and safety/swinging room. SRQ WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

SRQIST_SRQMAR19.indd 28

2/19/19 9:22 AM


Ads-MAR19.indd 29

2/17/19 1:23 PM


SRQIST

30

IN THEIR CORNER

|

SRQIST SRQ MAGAZINE

Boxing legend Evander Holyfield swaps gloves for golf clubs to support the Boys and Girls Clubs of Sarasota. FOR THE NINTH YEAR RUNNING, Heisman Trophy Winner Archie Griffin and The Concession Charities join forces for the Archie

Griffin Celebrity Golf Classic, a star-studded tournament raising funds to benefit the Boys and Girls Clubs of Sarasota County. And this year, the annual celebration punches up its guest card with keynote speaker and special celebrity golfer Evander Holyfield, boxing legend and the sport’s only four-time heavyweight champion. With the charity tournament teeing off on March 4, Holyfield weighed in on his reasons for loving the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. SRQ WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER

WHY DID YOU WANT TO DEVOTE SOME OF YOUR TIME TO THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS?

HOLYFIELD: The biggest reason to point out is myself. I didn’t have anything and I really didn’t have a future. But when I joined the Boys Club at the age of six, they put me in the proper place at the proper time. I was the youngest of nine in my family. But when I got to the Boys Club, I didn’t get knocked over, I wasn’t a crybaby— I wasn’t all these things that my brothers and sisters made me out to be because they were so much older. And, all of a sudden, my con dence grew. It gave me a good balance. WHEN YOU’RE VISITING BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS ACROSS THE COUNTRY, CAN YOU SEE THE IMPACT THEY’RE MAKING? It looks great.

The fact of the ma er is, it’s the Boys Clubs who are giving goals and safe haven for kids, so that these kids can at least go somewhere, have a place. I never would have been the person I am today if it wasn’t for the Boys Club. So giving back is appreciation. ARE YOU AN AVID GOLFER? No, I’m not. But

most of the people that helped me into boxing, they weren’t in boxing but they were happy for me. They were so happy for me to be the very best. That’s what life’s about. WHAT MESSAGE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN OF THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUBS? I would just give them the three

simple things that my mother gave me. She said, “listen, follow directions, don’t quit, and you’ll reach your goal.” SRQ This page:

Evander Holy eld

SRQIST_SRQMAR19.indd 30

2/18/19 2:40 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 31

2/17/19 1:23 PM


This spread: Sam Holladay and Guy Peterson share fond memories of Tim Seibert. Seibert’s Cooney House in the background.

THE LION IN WINTER This past December, Sarasota lost a legend in the passing of famed architect Edward ‘Tim’ Seibert, known as the “Lion” of local architecture. A formative gure in what became known as the Sarasota School of Architecture, Seibert cut his teeth apprenticing under Paul Rudolph, dealt in design under Philip Hiss, worked alongside the likes of Victor Lundy and Gene Leedy and, in his 40+ years active in the region, le an enduring imprint on the built environment and a legacy in his rm, Seibert Architects. On a cold January morning, Sarasota architects Sam Holladay, president of Seibert Architects, and Guy Peterson of Guy Peterson O ce for Architecture swap memories made and lessons learned.

WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

FEATURE_MAR19_INTERVIEW.indd 32

2/19/19 4:07 PM


INTERVIEW WITH

ARCHITECTS GUY PETERSON AND SAM HOLLADAY ON THE LEGACY OF TIM SEIBERT

FEATURE_MAR19_INTERVIEW.indd 33

2/19/19 4:07 PM


INTERVIEW WITH I was scared to death, intimidated by Tim Seibert. But he took his time to talk to me about what being an architect is like and of course I was naïve enough to say, “Do you have any summer jobs?” I didn’t know anything about architecture. WHAT DREW YOU IN? WHAT TURNED A TWO-WEEK NOTICE INTO 20 YEARS?

WHAT WERE THE FIRST IMPRESSIONS, FIRST MEETINGS WITH SEIBERT LIKE?

SAM HOLLADAY: Kind of blunt, only as he can be. I was hired on a two-week notice and I stayed there for 20-some odd years, but he actually said, “You can go back with the boys, and if you learn anything you can stay.” That kind of approach, but it was always with a li le grin. That was kind of his humor. GUY PETERSON: I met Tim Seibert when I was a young boy. My parents and the Seiberts were early members of The Field Club. I grew up next to it and my parents were friends of the Seiberts. Pandora, their daughter, was just a li le younger than I, but I knew her growing up at The Field Club, sailing and things like that. All I knew from my parents at that time— because Tim was a generation ahead of me— was that he was a well-known architect. I was there when he designed his additions to The Field Club, the glass pavilion, addition to the dining room, a bath-house, and then a really interesting li le snack bar out over the water. So when I was growing up, I got to see some of his architecture plus obviously we all went to the Siesta Beach Pavilion. WERE THOSE FORMATIVE IMPRESSIONS?

PETERSON: I think, ultimately. Because I was going to be a doctor. I started the change to architecture at the end of my rst year of college. What year did you start, Sam? HOLLADAY: With Tim? 1972. PETERSON: Okay, well I started college in ‘72, and I changed in early ‘73. That summer, thinking I’m changing to architecture, I talked to my father and told him the news— I wasn’t going to be a doctor. HOLLADAY: He was a doctor right? PETERSON: He was a doctor. He said, “Well, before you make your mind up, I want you to go talk to two people. I want you to talk to Frank Fine and I want you to talk to Tim Seibert.” Frank was an amazing and intellectual man. He was very supportive and enlightening. And then I met with Tim. This is the summer of ’73. You [Holladay] had just started, and he brought you into this meeting.

FEATURE_MAR19_INTERVIEW.indd 34

HOLLADAY: I didn’t know a whole lot about Seibert. I had go en here, and I was working with somebody else for about six to nine months. About the time I graduated, I was down here trying to interview and this secretary says, “We’re not hiring, but let me do you a favor.” And she wrote down two lists—the A list and the B list—and said interview these guys and then these guys and if you don’t get any hits, don’t see anybody else in this town. About a month or two later she called me and said, “Well, if you haven’t go en a job try this one other fellow.” A designer here in town had been with Tim for a while and was leaving. In the few months that I was here, I had seen a lot of his work and felt like it was something I wanted to do. DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITES OF SEIBERT’S WORK? PETERSON: One of

my favorites is the house he rst did for himself. I got to go there a number of times when I was young. HOLLADAY: That was very impressive. PETERSON: It was at that time a pre y forward-thinking house and very simple concept. The Cooney House was a li le di erent, more opaque kind of a house but still a very narrow lot, inward-focusing, and a very well-resolved project. The other one is obviously the Hiss Studio, that goes way back, but there’s a certain clarity to that, that I enjoy. It’s a beautiful house. HOLLADAY: His house has just been . . . it’s like the bog took it over. It’s unrecognizable. It was great, just from the idea and approach. It was two pavilions connected with a screened cage. The houses that he and Frank built were a whole series of those. There are several of those around here and they’re all the same module, but every one of them is unique. Siesta Beach Pavilion. Lido Key Beach Pavilion. Bay Plaza. PETERSON: John D MacDonald’s house. That was kind of a departure for him when he did that. HOLLADAY: That’s well put. It seems to me, a er looking at a lot of this work, that somewhere around the late middle 60s there was a shi in a lot of the design

Le : The John D. MacDonald House on Siesta Key.

and the MacDonald house was one. The Cooney House was kind of a di erent thing, and there’s another house right on Whit eld Avenue up north of the airport that was built in the late 60s and there was this shi . IS THERE A UNITING OR GUIDING PRINCIPLE OR SENSIBILITY THAT YOU COULD CALL A SEIBERT TOUCH?

HOLLADAY: In the early work for sure, and it was not only Tim who was doing it at that time, but the whole indoor-outdoor relationship, use of materials, the special structure. PETERSON: Clarity of idea. HOLLADAY: Exactly. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN EXACTLY, CLARITY OF IDEA? PETERSON: There’s

an underlying honesty to the architecture. You’re not concealing structure by hiding it in walls. You’re expressing the structure, so you understand how the building’s held together. That becomes part of the structure of the space. All those things are all part of the language of the architecture. And it’s really based out of that international style of modernism that Rudolph was doing at the time. He brought that to Sarasota, this kind of so ened Bauhaus kind of a look. HOLLADAY: Something we all take for granted now is air conditioning. I’ve lived in a couple of Seibert houses, a Rupp house, an apartment Rudolph did—they all had a lot of natural ventilation. You can open up some of those and I swear to God you would think everything’s going to be blowing through and out of the house. There’s so much movement in the houses. PETERSON: What’s interesting is that the natural light, the ventilation, the shading, and all those things are sort of passive design theories. Today, you’re a hero if you do those things, you’re like a green architect. In reality, those are really just amazing regional design concepts for the environment that we lived in. That’s part of that honesty in architecture. MR. SEIBERT WORKED WITH MR. RUDOLPH RIGHT? HOLLADAY: Yes. Worked with and

when [Rudolph] was working with Phil Hiss, which was a major in uence on architecture in Sarasota County. [Seibert] was designing a lot of houses with Phil Hiss before he was a licensed architect. That’s when he did his studio. And according to Tim’s shake on it, Rudolph was always looking for a free meal and he was heading over at night and he would review all [Seibert’s] work with

2/18/19 5:12 PM


Above: Interior of the house Seibert built for himself in 1952 on Siesta Key, photo by John Molitor. Images courtesy of Seibert Architects.

him and talk about architecture. Then the next morning there’d be notes all over his work, saying “do this,” “do that,” “okay,” “not okay.” He, in a sense, got an education directly through critiques. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE TIM SEIBERT’S LEGACY IN THIS TOWN?

PETERSON: He’s part of a larger voice, but a very important voice in that larger period of time that launched a lot of progressive ideas in architecture. He was a signi cant player in that. Would it have withstood without him? It’s hard to say. But he is, of the local architects, arguably the most well known and in uential. Gene Leedy was great, but he moved to Winter Haven. HOLLADAY: It’s kind of like the last man standing kind of a thing. Frank is still around and Jack was up until a few years ago. A er he retired he was very vocal about, and criticized some of the things that he saw going on in Sarasota. And it had changed. And anything that changes is always going to be di erent. There are some issues going on in downtown Sarasota right now that still need to be corrected but, generally it’s headed in the right direction.

FEATURE_MAR19_INTERVIEW.indd 35

PETERSON: Part of his legacy is the rm that Sam took over. But Tim was not trying to get them to stop in time and do what he did; he was le ing them move forward with their own voice and supportive of that, and encouraging them to do that. Even though he was retired, he was certainly a proponent of his rm continuing to grow and look at new directions in architecture. HOLLADAY: That’s true. He was very interested in what we were up to, and we really can’t do what was being done in the 50s and 60s, and 70s even. PETERSON: Nor should you probably. FAVORITE MEMORIES?

PETERSON: Sam can speak to this a lot more than I can—but Tim wasn’t really known for being very complimentary. I remember I did a project in Lido Shores a number of years ago, where we did some renovations and an addition to the DeVriesCraig house that Tim had designed, which is a really nice project. It was in the paper, and Tim was interviewed about it. And he said, at the end of the article, “Guy did a good job.” It wasn’t a high ve but it was like, I’ll take it. That’s about as good as you could get, I thought.

HOLLADAY: Early on, when I was a lot younger, he had a client in talking to him, and the client started ge ing very picky about some of the design aspects. One of the other guys in the o ce was presenting, Tim was si ing there and a er about 15, 20 minutes of this guy just, as Tim would say, ge ing pecked to death by a duck, he grabbed the drawing, ripped it o the desk, wadded up the paper and threw it in the trash can and said “Get out.” I was thinking, “Holy cow! What is this guy?” PETERSON: It was a Howard Roark moment. HOLLADAY: I told him that once and, I said, “You did a few things that just blew me away when I saw it, but a er a while I think you were right.” He and I talked a er he retired in the late ‘90s, about how the o ce was running, and I said, “I’m not Tim Seibert, no way could ever be or pretend to be. Everybody does it their own way.” And he said, “You’re absolutely right. Keep at it, kid.” PETERSON: That was your high ve? HOLLADAY: Yeah. PETERSON: As close to it as you can get from him. SRQ

2/20/19 9:17 AM


36 |

SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

CAST IN CONCRETE BRILLIANT, BOLD AND ENOUGH TO BREAK THE MOLD, ARCHITECT MAX STRANG REMEMBERS GENE LEEDY. Though primarily known today for his work transforming the Florida city of Winter Haven, where he designed City Hall, the Chamber of Commerce building and more than a dozen other notable commercial and residential projects, Gene L eedy’s architectural contributions to Sarasota’s singular built en vironment remain difc ult to overstate. A f ounder of the S arasota School of Architecture, Leedy worked alongside the lik es of Paul Rudolph and Victor Lundy, trailblazing an architectural philosophy in-line with and a s distinct as the Floridian landsc ape surrounding. In light of his No vember passing, just a w eek before the passing of Sarasota colleague Edward ‘Tim’ Seibert, SRQ sat do wn with Max Strang, founding principal of Strang Design and L eedy protégé, to talk inno vation, ideals and winning over Winter Haven.

DID THIS PUT YOU ON THE PATH TO BECOMING AN ARCHITECT? When I was a kid, I never said I wanted to be

an architect. But, subconsciously, it got into my system. I went to the University of Florida and bounced around a few majors, and it wasn’t until I stumbled across the architecture building there that it all clicked. “Wait a second, architecture.” WAS LEEDY SOMEONE YOU TALKED TO ABOUT THAT PATH? Even before that. My family and Gene

Leedy were neighbors on Casey Key growing up. So, I couldn’t even escape when we le Winter Haven; we’d come to Casey Key and he’d be there. I remember him telling great stories, and as a kid he’d drag me and his son up to the Syd Solomon House—and we met Syd Solomon going through that studio. It was crazy. That was very impressionable, especially on a kid. NOW AN ARCHITECT YOURSELF, HOW DO YOU SEE LEEDY’S WORK? He was a bold innovator. The guts to

take those 70-foot pre-stressed stands and then turn them into a house? He took this industrial material and made it very homey. He took these concrete components and elements that were used to build bridges and warehouses or industrial buildings, and he made them warm and cozy and a pleasure to live inside. He was the rst to do that. That innovation was his biggest contribution, although Paul Rudolph would say that his best work was one of these li le courtyard homes that he did in Winter Haven.

YOU GREW UP IN A LEEDY HOUSE, RIGHT? MAX STRANG:

DID HE BRING THE SAME INDUSTRIAL TOUCH TO THOSE COURTYARD HOMES? Eventually, he did, but his

He designed the house for my parents and my four older siblings, probably in ‘68, ‘69, and I was born in ‘70. In fact, Gene Leedy takes responsibility for my birth. He told my mom that she was going to get pregnant as soon as she moved into the house, because it was such a great house.

very rst ones, and this is the exact same time frame that the Sanderling Cabanas were being built, ‘53, ‘54. He designed the spec homes in Winter Haven, called the Kramey Spec Houses and he lived in one until the day he died—65 years. They’re just li le jewels. Li le courtyard jewels. Very similar to the Paul Rudolph designs that were in the mid-’50s going on here.

WAS LEEDY’S ARCHITECTURE SOMETHING YOU APPRECIATED AT THE TIME? That’s a compli-

cated answer. I grew up in this amazing house, built of pre-stressed concrete, double-tees and exposed block and glass. So, for me that was normal. And, you go down to Winter Haven and he built half the town. He built the City Hall,

FEATURE_MAR19_INTERVIEW.indd 36

the Garden Club, the Country Club, the doctor’s o ces, friends’ houses. Growing up in Winter Haven, you expected this great architecture. It wasn’t until I moved away that I realized how great it really was.

WHY WINTER HAVEN? He recognized that he needed to get out of Paul Rudolph’s shadow pre y early. Or else he would forever be destined to be an apprentice of Paul Rudolph’s. He chose Winter Haven and the impact he made on that one town is enormous. In the ‘50s, when he decided to move there, it was this beautiful li le citrus town, all these orange groves and clear lakes. Winter Haven is such a conservative li le town and somehow he got all these conservative bankers and population in general to do these radical structures. That’s an extraordinary feat unto itself. HOW DID HE DO THAT? He would always dress very conservatively. He said he would go into these banker meetings and developer meetings and dress conserva-

2/19/19 9:26 AM


tively but wow them with radical architecture. They didn’t know what was coming. They just went along. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE HIS PLACE WITHIN THE SARASOTA SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE? He’s pre y much

the one that invented the term. He knew there was something special going on here. He had the art of self-promotion, Gene, and he knew that this movement should have a name. Thank God that he did. WHAT IS THE PLACE OF THAT MOVEMENT NOW? It’s being

deeply appreciated now, with 60 years of hindsight. It’s much more deeply appreciated and cherished. But there are two things going on with the Sarasota School of Architecture now. One, it’s being discovered for the rst time by a lot of people that had no idea about it. Two, there are some rms today that are advancing the same principles and drawing a lot of inspiration from that movement. Our rm included. We’re happy to carry on those ideals. WHAT IDEALS ARE THOSE? One is this enduring intrigue of

modernism and exploration of modernism. A lot of it is rooted in structural expression. Indoor/outdoor connection is another big one. Ongoing experimentation. Trying to push materials in di erent ways. And, underscoring the entire movement was just a great understanding of space. You’re not living inside a house, you’re living inside a space. DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE LEEDY STRUCTURES?

Ironically, I can’t nostalgically say it’s my own house that I grew up in. Those small courtyard homes are clearly some of my favorites. They’re pending Natural Historic Designation right now. Another great one is the Dormon House. WHAT ABOUT THE DORMON HOUSE? That was one of his

rst real explorations with jumping to that industrial material. The concrete double-tees in a three-story house by a lake. It has a raw beauty to it. You have to, maybe, squint hard to appreciate some of his work—because some of it is not for the faint of heart—but that comes with his willingness to push the boundaries. CAN GENERATIONS TO COME GET TO KNOW A LITTLE BIT ABOUT LEEDY, THE PERSON, THROUGH HIS WORK? Abso-

lutely. The boldness of his personality comes through in the boldness of his structures. He evolved this very signature, identi able style and it was bold, like him. WHAT LESSONS DO YOU STILL CARRY ON IN YOUR FIRM TODAY? I remember he was very insistent to keep the

building simple. Don’t try and do everything you know in one building. When you keep it simpler, it’s a much more timeless result. That was true then and it’s true now. — P. Lederer, Portrait by Wya Kostygan Opposite page: Max Strang of Strang Design. This page, clockwise from top:

Max Strang and Gene Leedy in the living room of the Weaving/Thomasson House in Winter Haven. In 2017, Strang organized a tour of signi cant Leedy homes during the American Institute of Architects’ National Convention. The Kaiser Residence in Winter Haven. A slice of life at the Leedy Residence, designed by Gene Leedy, in Winter Haven.

FEATURE_MAR19_INTERVIEW.indd 37

2/19/19 9:26 AM


Ads-MAR19.indd 38

2/17/19 1:24 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 39

2/17/19 1:24 PM


Arts+Culture Performing and Visual Arts | Portfolio | In Studio

CultureCity

WANDERING EYES Dr. Carol Ockman on the vision and voyages of Paul Gauguin.

WITH GAUGUIN: VOYAGE TO PARADISE, the

latest installment of the Jean & Alfred Goldstein Exhibition Series at Selby Gardens, visitors are transported to a tropical Tahitian wonderland, complete with Polynesian plantscapes, a fishing village of bamboo huts and coconut palms, looming tikis in the fern garden, hand-carved masks on the rainforest rock wall and dugout canoes overflowing with orchids in the Conservatory. And in the Payne Mansion, through original prints, woodcuts and lithographs, Selby Gardens celebrates the wandering French post-impressionist painter who inspired it all—Paul Gauguin. SRQ sat down with Selby Gardens Curator-at-Large Dr. Carol Ockman to talk the politics of portraiture, radical color and the myth of Gauguin. WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

CULTURE CITY_SRQMAR19.indd 40

2/19/19 9:31 AM


WOULD WE SAY GAUGUIN FOUND NATURE PARTICULARLY INSPIRING? He’s not the only one. A really interesting dimension of the late 19th century is how many modernist artists actually leave the city. Gauguin is one, Van Gogh is another, you can say that Monet is one. People are looking for an escape from an increasingly industrialized and techno society. And it continues into the 20th century. Chagall went to the Riviera, Matisse went to the Riviera, ton of artists went to the Riviera. Some went to seek refuge during World War II, but some went much earlier. SO WHAT SETS GAUGUIN APART? He had a certain wanderlust that separated him from his contemporaries. I don’t think anybody as famous as an artist traveled that much at this time. He actually had a stint with the merchant marine. He traveled around the world. He went to Antarctica. He was everywhere.

LIKE AN EXPLORER. Part of the allure is that he did go so far away. And so he inserts himself in this discourse of discovery, of voyaging, which goes back to Captain Cook and Louis Antoine de Bougainville and this notion of exploring that’s very tied to ownership and claiming. Captain Cook had illustrators on his voyages. And that’s how we rst knew Polynesia. Gauguin, in a way, ts into that, because he goes to Tahiti at the expense of the French government, to kind of record what he sees.

CULTURE CITY SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

features adorn great tikis throughout Selby Gardens. This page:Smaller tikis dot the pathways and peek out from ferns. Inside the Payne Mansion, Gauguin woodcuts and lithographs await.

41 |

Previous page: Botanical

WHY GAUGUIN? OCKMAN: Gauguin is a natural because his work is all about light and color. And he’s an important maker in terms of what he does with color, which is a very big issue in the late 19th century. He’s the earliest of this group of artists that we’ve studied so far, and, importantly, he spent a lot of time in tropical environments, the most well-known of which would be Tahiti. He was a racted by places that had this component, whether it be true or partially mythic, of paradise. And since all who inhabit Sarasota live in a paradise, where the climate is not unlike these places Gauguin went, we thought he’d be perfect. We have the light, we have the color, we have the botanicals.

HOW DO YOU PARSE THAT LINE BETWEEN APPRECIATION AND CELEBRATION, AND EXPLOITATION OR APPROPRIATION? That’s a big question. And the interpretations of Gauguin range widely. There are a lot of myths that have grown up around him and he played his part in cultivating those myths. In his writings, for example, he described himself as a “savage.” When you’re reading his journal and you read something like that, and then you look at his paintings, particularly at his self portraits, he allies himself in a way with the savage and the primitive and the misunderstood and the tormented. THE TORTURED ARTIST. These are myths that have a history in France already. They go back to Romanticism. It’s not like Gauguin is completely new—he’s shaped by history, as we all are. So he looked back to that tradition of the artist as somehow being misunderstood by the bourgeois public. Van Gogh bought into that too, but his myth is di erent. Gauguin’s ties him to notions of savagery, primitivism, something earlier, simpler, more natural than what we have now. And the exotic, because he goes to Polynesia and he stays there. He spends a total of eight years there, he dies there, he’s buried there on the Marquesas Islands. BUT NOT EVERYONE BOUGHT INTO THE MYTH? There

are many, many people who disagree, who think, “Maybe he behaved in a brash manner, but this is also an educated European man. He’s born in Paris, he lives a good deal of his life there.” And there are certain tensions there. There are tensions between his being somebody who comes at the service of a colonial government. Tahiti was a colony by the time Gauguin gets there. The island had been already completely transformed by the colonial presence, by the missionaries. And so, Gauguin actually is painting and making prints and making wood-carvings, that in some ways show a Tahiti that had already disappeared.

CULTURE CITY_SRQMAR19.indd 41

2/19/19 9:31 AM


BROODING COLORS FOR A TROPICAL LANDSCAPE?

In a way that Van Gogh is not, that Seurat is not, Gauguin’s more of a symbolist, working with the expressive properties, how what we don’t see might be used to express what we see. Gauguin is interested in conveying the felt as well as the seen. He was drawn to that palate because he wanted people to feel the power of color as an expressive means. And he wanted to do the same thing with line. And in this, he was completely in harmony with his generation of vanguard artists.

42 |

CULTURE CITY SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

WHAT OF GAUGUIN’S WORK WILL AUDIENCES SEE?

We’ve concentrated on the prints. Most of these are woodcuts; some are wood engravings. Actually, Gauguin is so experimental as a printmaker, that he will blur the boundaries. I’ve actually borrowed works from collections where they can’t say that it’s a woodcut or a wood engraving. HOW DOES THAT HAPPEN? He combines the two

techniques so that they fuse together. He’s experimenting, and using processes that involve carving into a wood block, which is woodcut, but also techniques that are more related to lithography, which are about drawing on the surface. He’ll do both. And he’ll even incorporate techniques from painting. IS THAT WHY YOU WANTED TO HIGHLIGHT THEM? They

also employ some of the same vocabulary of his other works, like simpli ed direct expression. He uses a lot of very dark and bright white contrast. Sometimes the work is so dark you can barely see what he’s depicting. Sometimes he makes the forms so vague that he creates this extra sense of mystery, which is great in terms of thinking about exotic lands and the unknown. HOW DID GAUGUIN’S WORKS CONNECT WHAT HE SAW WITH WHERE HE CAME FROM? They blend motifs that

This page:

A living wall forms a mural and oa ting coconuts over o w with orchids in the Selby Gardens Conservatory. The dimly lit halls of the Payne Mansion highlight Gauguin’s inspiring artwork.

BUT, IMPORTANTLY, HE’S NOT AN ETHNOGRAPHER. He’s not an ethnographer. Not at all. Some people maybe want to think that he is—that’s highly contested. And people who work on the Paci c would have categorically said that’s not what it is. There’s a dimension of it, but that’s not the whole thing. His engagement with radical form, radical color, is something that works with what he saw, but also trumps what he saw. WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY RADICAL COLOR? In the late 19th

century, all of the great artists—Van Gogh, Seurat, Monet, Cezanne—are working with color and pure hues like primary colors: red, blue and yellow. They’re working a lot with those at their most saturated, so that they’re really intense. The reddest red, the bluest blue, the yellowest yellow. And they’re doing this because they believe that color in its own light can be expressive. Gauguin does something that is somewhat di erent. He works a lot with mixed hues, tertiary hues. And his colors tend to be o en quite brooding.

CULTURE CITY_SRQMAR19.indd 42

come from the West and Anglo-European imagery with Polynesian imagery. So he’s showing us customs or activities of Tahitian people, and then he gra s onto them something like the story of Adam and Eve. We have in one of the prints a “Tahitian Eve.” He changes the iconography. There’s not an apple; there’s a ower. And there’s not a serpent; there’s a huge scary lizard. There’s a kind of hybridity. We also have a print whose subject is the Rape of Europa. Well that subject comes from Western mythology; it doesn’t come from Tahitian belief. But he has Tahitian gods in his print. WHAT IS HE TRYING TO SAY WITH THIS BLENDING?

He’s translating what he knows with what he is encountering. Those are two very di erent things. Nobody’s vision is completely new. It’s always bound up with the culture from which one comes. But he’s really trying, on some level, to show us something that we don’t know. He’s trying to show us something that used to be typical of Tahiti, to the extent that he’s able. SO, IN A WAY, IT’S ALWAYS GAUGUIN’S TAHITI, NOT JUST TAHITI. He’s still an outside observer. He’s both those

things. He’s inside and outside. And people who come from elsewhere can’t ever really be indigenous. SRQ

2/19/19 9:32 AM


Ads-MAR19.indd 43

2/17/19 1:25 PM


Culture City

PORTFOLIO

44 |

CULTURE CITY SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

THE REBIRTH OF JEFF HOSTETLER A late bloomer lays roots in the Sarasota arts scene. WRITTEN BY PHIL LEDERER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

MEETIN G JEFF HOSTETLER IN HIS S TUDIO SPACE at Art Factory 44 off Tallevast Road, one thing becomes instantly clear—there is nothing tortured about this artist. Effusive and light on his feet, he bounces around the studio as his laugh carries to the ceiling and echoes off the walls that bear his sculptural, arboreal art. In the throes of creation, Hostetler beams like a child with a new toy, because in many ways he is. A drywall contractor by trade, art came late—a chance discovery, nurtured in a dark supply closet before being unleashed—but right when he needed it most. “It’s like finding an extension or a separate room in this house that you’ve lived in all your life,” he says. “It’s a rebirth.” Originally born into the drywall business, an industry his father still calls home, Hostetler first learned to use plaster as a tool and a mask—something to patch holes and cover mistakes, a formless blank for restoring someone else’s vision. Unsurprisingly, the experience left him unsatisfied. He found a job in the facilities department at Ringling College, perhaps subconsciously drawn to the creative atmosphere, and things started looking up. Then came the divorce. “You think your life is over,” Hostetler recalls. And, in a way, maybe his old life was. He enrolled in an art class at Ringling College. “I found out I can draw,” Hostetler says, and his eyes still gleam like a Goonie finding buried treasure. “The energy and artistic spirit consumed me and I couldn’t stop.” Specifically, he couldn’t stop drawing trees, their sprawling limbs stretching across his page, seeking and searching. “The trees represent our own lives,” he says. “Struggles, divorce and death, yet you still grow.” And Hostetler had some growing to do yet. “Drywall’s not a medium,” he remembers saying to his Ringling coworkers when they suggested he try his hand with the material he knew so well. They shrugged and showed him a video of a man sculpting underwater scenes from drywall mud. “Everything is a medium,” Hostetler says now, and if that guy on YouTube can make fish, then he can make trees. He cleared out space in a supply closet on the third floor of a Ringling dormitory and began sculpting on the walls in secret. He eventually left that job, but one of his trees remains. Today, Hostetler steadily plants his plaster forest around town. He still works mostly by hand, scooping great chunks of mud and sculpting slender trunks and smooth flowing limbs that fan bone-white across whatever his canvas may be at the moment, whether for a minor installation on the wall at Main Street’s Element, a series of vines and grape clusters for a Kansas City winery or a great 20-foot construction greeting guests at Alinari condominiums off North Tamiami Trail. And as development continues to spread its own concrete roots through the Florida landscape, perhaps, hopes Hostetler, his work can remind folks of what they’re losing. “I can’t control the development,” he says, “but I can bring trees inside.” SRQ

CULTURE CITY_SRQMAR19.indd 44

2/18/19 2:55 PM


Le : Je Hostetler mounts a rope swing installed under plaster branches at Art Factory 44. Smaller framed works can be replanted on any wall.

CULTURE CITY_SRQMAR19.indd 45

2/19/19 3:59 PM


S P R I NG H OM E P ORTFOLIO

S INTERIOR DESIGN, RENOVATION AND FURNISHINGS

POLISHED MEXICAN PEBBLES—BIG EARTH LANDSCAPE SUPPLY

Seeking homespiration? SRQ Magazine’s Spring Home Portfolio connects with local designers and providers for trends on what’s hot in home design, materials, finishes and landscaping this spring. From popular finishes and innovative products to hot new residential spaces, we gathered what you need to know to be impeccably prepared for your next renovation, expansion or move.

ARCOS Located in Sarasota’s vibrant Rosemary District, Arcos accommodates renters who want to live in a desirable downtown location. The upscale apartments have been designed to fit an emerging lifestyle trend—empty nesters are selling their homes in pursuit of a more active, urban lifestyle where shopping, dining, and entertainment are walkable destinations. Developed by Framework Group LLC, Arcos has been designed to upend the concept of a ‘stereotypical rental apartment’ to appeal to new clientele. Arcos provides tenants with oversized kitchens, baths and closets fitted with high-end materiS P E C I A L C O NT E N T M AR K E T I N G S E CT I ON

SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 46

als, finishes and fixtures that would be found in luxury condominiums. President of Framework Group Phillip A. Smith says, “Today’s trends have more to do with where you’re living.” Positioned within the Sarasota arts scene and with downtown a few short blocks away, Arcos looks to provide the highest standard of rental living in an urban environment. The building’s amenities include a heated pool, fitness center, full service spa, and a fully independent public art gallery that exhibits nationally recognized artists. These features offer tenants a chic, urban lifestyle with plenty of cultural experiences available right outside their front door.

| S P R I N G H OM E P ORTFOLIO

|

CALIFORNIA CLOSETS “Exceptional design transforms people’s lives,” says Ken Cleary, General Manager of California Closets Tampa Bay. “When we see home as more than a place, it becomes a source of comfort and refuge, a space for connection and celebration.” California Closets helps homeowners create customized end-to-end home storage solutions to satisfy today’s busy consumer. One popular trend this spring is incorporating functional and thoughtfully placed lighting within home storage elements. In response, California

S RQ MAGAZ I N E | MARC H 20 1 9

2/19/19 9:36 AM


SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 47

2/17/19 1:58 PM


S P E CI AL C ON T E N T MAR K ETI N G S ECTION

| S P R I N G H OM E P ORTFOLIO

|

S RQ MAGAZ I N E | MA R CH 20 1 9

EURO QUARRIES ONYX BENCH — BIG EARTH

TALL MILAN PLANTERS— BIG EARTH

INTERIOR — ARCOS

Closets has expanded its illumination options to provide desirable highlights and lowlights for custom closets, pantries, garages, media centers and laundry rooms. “The addition of lighting to a space changes everything. "The right light can illuminate your clothing within a walk-in closet or accent a stunning display in your entertaining center, adding both function and beauty to a space,” says Cleary. California Closets has also noticed that more people are choosing to contrast light finishes with dark accents. This trending combination has prompted California Closets to collaborate on two specific light wood grain finishes that can be used across all styles of design. A tailored, full-service experience offered by California Closets is key for creating stylish spaces that clients love. Along with a multitude of design options ranging from modern to traditional, California Closets’ team of experts coordinate the design, manufacturing and installation process of each project, offering clients a true white glove experience.

landscape, supports this emerging trend by being the go-to source to create these installations. Imagine a large-scale, sculptural piece of natural stone placed within an elegant grand entryway, or a striking accent table made of rustic, petrified wood. Fuesser says that monoliths, Peruvian beach pebbles and European boulders are popular products making their way indoors. The materials often contrast with their surroundings in ways that lend to modern, design-forward transitional spaces. Big Earth has also seen an increase in customers who are passionate about the environment and interested in xeriscaping. Offering “Florida Friendly” options to help conserve water, Big Earth Landscape Supply provides eco-conscious clients with drought-tolerant sod, native plants, Melaleuca Florimulch, stepping stones and gravel. As one of the area’s largest commercial-grade landscape material suppliers with four retail locations, don’t be surprised to find Big Earth Landscaping Supply bustling with activity when you visit. Fuesser says, “Come as you are; don’t get dressed up to come to Big Earth. Dirt on your hands or mud on your work boots is always welcome. Once the dust settles, you’ll see a variety of materials imported from exotic locations that will make a great addition to your home.”

Molly specializes in interweaving architecture and unique design elements to create customized interiors that are tailored to the vision and individualistic style of her clients. People want to feel an emotional connection to their physical space. In Molly’s mind, nothing demonstrates this relationship better than working with a client to design a home bathroom oasis. Molly says that although lighted bathroom mirrors have been around for ages, the newest most on-trend models offer a high-tech color changing feature which allows the user to “dial-in” their mirror’s color of choice. Homeowners can select from the warmest 2700-Kelvin color to the highest daylight 5000-Kelvin color, helping them envision what they’ll look like in different types of light throughout the day. Contemporary mirror systems also offer built-in dimming, an anti-fogging device, and an integrated music system that uses Bluetooth to connect to a user’s phone or tablet to play music through the mirror’s embedded speakers. The added components allow clients to integrate cutting edge technology into their space, but Molly tells us that several timeless design trends continue to appeal to today’s homeowner. Developing adequate storage to maintain a relaxed uncluttered atmosphere, decorating in a neutral palate but incorporating bold accents, and installing multi-layers of illumination are still popular aspects in bathroom design. With over twenty years of experience in the field, Molly advises clients to always do their homework and preselect their components before beginning a new project. “It is best to choose all of the fixtures, materials, and finishes down to the hardware before the work begins,” she says.

BIG EARTH LANDSCAPE SUPPLY Director of Marketing Ellie Ohlman Fuesser of Big Earth Landscape Supply says that the tropical setting of Florida’s Gulf Coast makes homeowners feel inspired to blend indoor and outdoor living. The ultimate way to integrate these two environments is by creating stunning moments that feature unexpected natural elements where they are not typically found— inside the home. Big Earth Landscape Supply, a premier supplier of quality, commercial grade landscape materials for home, garden, and

SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 48

MOLLY K. LAUB Inhabiting spaces that encourage mindful, experiential living is a lifestyle trend that is in high demand says Molly K. Laub, Owner and Principal Designer of the local full-service interior design firm and decorative services agency.

2/19/19 9:37 AM


SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 49

2/17/19 1:59 PM


S P E CI AL C ON T E N T MAR K ETI N G S ECTION

| S P R I N G H OM E P ORTFOLIO

|

S RQ MAGAZ I N E | MA R CH 20 1 9

Far left and center: ©2019 California Closet Company, Inc. All rights reserved. Franchises independently owned and operated.

CLOSET LAYOUT— CALIFORNIA CLOSETS

PGT INNOVATIONS Black is back and more popular than ever, according to premium window and door manufacturer, PGT Innovations. While the color has always been a classic, today more homeowners are choosing black as a versatile hue to outfit

SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 50

CABINETS AND SHELVING — CALIFORNIA CLOSETS

BATHROOM— MOLLY K. LAUB, ALLIED ASID

their exterior window frames. The trend has prompted PGT to launch black exterior frames as a standard option on all of its PGT© impact-resistant or energy-efficient vinyl products. Another emerging design trend is to bring as much of the outdoors inside as possible. PGT offers WinDoor©, a line of high-performance

doors and windows that help maximize views. Taking in the gorgeous Florida sunrises and sunsets is now even easier due to the distinct, oversized designs of WinDoor© systems. PGT notes that people are interested in living with clean-lined, contemporary design. The newest brand to PGT’s portfolio, Western Window

2/19/19 9:46 AM


SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 51

2/17/19 1:59 PM


S P E CI AL C ON T E N T MAR K ETI N G S ECTION

INTERIOR— MOLLY K. LAUB, ALLIED ASID•

Systems, offers high-quality moving glass walls and windows that essentially disappear when opened, helping homeowners seamlessly blend indoor and outdoor spaces. Also, due to recent hurricanes, PGT Innovations has noticed a heightened awareness from homeowners looking to invest in impact-resident windows

SPRING HOME PORTFOLIO-2019.indd 52

| S P R I N G H OM E P ORTFOLIO

|

S RQ MAGAZ I N E | MA R CH 20 1 9

SINGLE HUNG 7700A & PREFERRED SLIDING GLASS

PREFERRED SLIDING GLASS DOOR 5570. PHOTO FEA-

DOOR 770. PHOTO FEATURES LEE WETHERINGTON HOMES.

TURES LEE WETHERINGTON HOMES. LWHOMES.COM

LWHOMES.COM — PGT INNOVATIONS

— PGT INNOVATIONS

and doors to protect their families from future storms. PGT is the #1 selling brand of impactresistant windows and doors and is ready to offer solutions for nearly any home. PGT has helped many clients as they rebuild from Hurricane Irma in 2017. A recent project in Key West named the Peirya Court has prompted PGT to

launch Sparta by CGI©, a new value-custom, impact-resistant line of products. With Sparta, homeowners can have 24/7 storm-ready protection and can ditch cumbersome plywood coverings and storm shutters once and for all.

2/19/19 9:46 AM


Hunting and Gathering The Goods | Design Dossier | Antiques | Nest Below: A hearty combo of iced co ee

with the signature glazed donut breakfast sandwich, Stephen and Nancie Sheardown embody southern hospitality, create-yourown donut holes, The Farm House’s eclectic decor draws a consistent crowd from early morning to late a ernoon.

Design Dossier

Cargo

SOUTHERN HOSPITALITY HUMBLY PULLIN G HIMSELF UP B Y HIS O WN BOOTSTRAPS, self-made businessman Stephen Sheardown created his furniture-making and

furnishing company SDS Designs, literally from the ground-up. Custom-designed and built furniture was then nailed to an unexpected oddity when his wife Nancie threw out the idea to add donuts to the mix, and the Farm House Donut and Decor store was born.. “My goal is to have a place where everyone feels at home; everybody feels important,” says Stephen. “Notice, there is nobody on their cell phones in here, not a single person. It doesn’t have that typical coffee shop vibe where people are on headphones and laptops in their own bubble. It’s the only real shop I know where people talk to each other.” Now making its mark at three locations, the Sheardowns have opened all within a year’s time. “We did all the construction, all the design and merchandising ourselves,” Stephen notes of each Farm House filled with its own paradise of antiques and decadent nibbles. Meaning, the same folks who come in to shop for some cool novelties for their home can also order a Cow Pattie (chocolate donut with peanut butter drizzle and Reese’s crumbles). Once you pass the industrial light bulb cages and massive swinging couch hanging from the ceiling, find agrarian and artisan goods scattered throughout, including candles, placemats, knitted blankets, throw pillows, natural soaps, cutting boards, birdhouses, coffee mugs, cactus plants and cowhide bags. Upon approaching the distressed wood counter and illuminated display of salvaged WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

CARGO_MAR19.indd 53

2/18/19 3:15 PM


Cargo

DESIGN DOSSIER

CARGO_MAR19.indd 54

2/18/19 3:14 PM


The Farm House bucks up to become Bradenton’s sweetest (in every sense of the word) provider of donuts and decor. A strange combo? Perhaps not, for the gregarious husband and wife duo who value the importance of glazed dough confections as much as wooden herringbone tables and neighborly service. 55 |

CARGO SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

letters spelling out ‘The Farm House,’ the Sheardowns warmly welcome customers, who come from far and wide, to try out their 18 gourmet-weird handheld feasts. From Grandma Myers Oatmeal to Apple Pie, Milk & Cookies and Strawberry Patch, you, your friends and family, are in for one indulgent and quirky hoedown. Settle in for other off-the-grid flavors like the Sweet Squealing Pig (maple glaze, bacon pieces and salted drizzle), Mud Hole (brownie batter and gummy worms), Hay Stack (chocolate, toasted coconut and caramel drizzle) and the Fancy Cowboy (vanilla, Fruity Pebbles and marshmallow). Possibly its most proud conception—the Breakfast Donut Sandwich—sees a sunny-side egg with ham and cheese on a grilled, glazed yeast donut, all with a merciless option to add maple sausage gravy. Leave your calorie counting at the door and feel like a kid again with grilled cheeses and tomato soup, southern-style chicken wings, ice cream cake sandwiches, hot chocolate and flavored coffee fraps. While digesting donuts, meander around the head-swiveling display of handpicked items on sale, while tapping your toe to some good ol’ country music playing overhead. The space lends itself to a rustic yet homey barn, dressed with exposed brick walls and vintage Chevrolet car faces and Western motel signs. The Sheardowns recall driving up, down and around the states the last eight years, scouring mercantiles, junkyards, people’s garages/backyards and abandoned warehouses, gathering statement pieces here and there to deck out The Farm Houses. “We have storage containers and an entire barn that we’ve filled up over the years, traveling around to different shows and different places,” says Stephen. “Then we threw all of our experiences together into our shops.” And these experiences range from climbing ladders up into the creepy attic of an abandoned movie theater for a 200-year-old cash register to fending off overprotective guard dogs in hillbilly country. “Literally, I’d knock doorto-door and say, ‘Hi my name is Stephen. I saw some stuff in your backyard, can I get a look in there and see if there’s anything I want to buy?’” Stephen says, to which Nancie quickly jumps in giggling, “Yeah, and you about got eaten by a dog.” Not just a Bradenton resident’s domain, The Farm House exists as much a local’s hangout as a visitor’s. “If somebody comes to Bradenton, they’re going to the beach; they’re going to The Ringling; they’re going to The Farm House. We want to be a staple in the community—a mustsee attraction on travelers’ itineraries,” says Stephen, to which Nancie nods in sentiment and adds, “We want to be the place that’s a friendly local environment, where people can come by themselves or with their family, and just have the best experience they’ve ever had in hospitality.” SRQ The Farm House & SDS Designs, 902 Manatee Ave. East, Bradenton, 941-713-5222. @thefarmhousedonuts

CARGO_MAR19.indd 55

2/18/19 3:14 PM


Cargo

THE GOODS

LIVING CORAL

56 |

CARGO SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

REEF TO RUNWAY Eugenia Kim ‘Courtney Straw’ fedora, $146, Kayu ‘Mini Lolita’ woven seagrass tote with coral ra a fringe, $145, Issey Miyake asymmetrical pleated blouse, $244, Gucci Urban Round sunglasses, $505. Kate Spade ‘Bon Voyage’ coral cover travel journal, $20 (not-pictured). Sourced from Saks Fi h Avenue, 120 University Town Center Dr., Sarasota, 941-364-5300.

Evocative of the e ervescent, yet unfortunately more elusive, display beneath the sea, coral reefs provide a diverse kaleidoscope of warmth and energy in our ever-changing environment. Now, kindling optimism and lighthearted buoyancy as 2019’s PANTONE Color of the Year, and with a positive shi to more marine awareness and conservation e orts in our watery world, coral’s vivifying color not only lies at the depths of our naturally chromatic ecosystem, but now belongs hanging playfully in our closets. WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

CARGO_MAR19.indd 56

2/18/19 3:12 PM


PROVISIONIST APRICOT LANE OH MY GAUZE S P E C TA C L E G A L L E R Y

LOVE LOCAL SHOPPING MARKETING SECTION TO SRQ MAGAZINE | FEBRUARY 2019

F-SRQMAR19_PROVISIONIST.indd 57

2/17/19 4:53 PM


Cargo

THE GOODS

58 |

CARGO SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019 CARGO_MAR19.indd 58

PLAYFUL PURSUITS Faux coral, $6-$9, The Exchange Inc., 539 South Orange Ave., Sarasota, 941955-7859. BB coral stone and gold wire bracelet, $32, Bows & Arrows Boutique, 5275 University Pkwy Suite 133, Bradenton, 941-210-7158, @bowsandarrowsco. ZAGS Beachy Bandeau 50+ sunwrap bu in ‘Charleston Charm’, $38, King George, @kinggeorgeshop. Intex AquaFlow Sport Goggles, $10, Swim City, 50 North Tamiami Trl., Sarasota, 941-954-8800, @swim_city. Watermelon Jade Gold necklace by Diana K, $119, Swim City. Carmen Marc Valvo ‘Coral Cruise’ one-piece swimsuit, $134, Swim City. Charlo e Osterman ‘Winged Fern’ textile beach clutch, $60, Pansy Bayou Studio, 1533 Dolphin St., Sarasota, 941-413-5115, @pansy_bayou_design_studio.

2/18/19 3:11 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 59

2/17/19 1:25 PM


Cargo

NEST

BIBLIOPHILE BUNKER A sophisticated home o ce retreat inspired and secludes its hideaways from domestic distractions.

THOUGH YOUR HOME OFFICE MA Y BE A DESIGN ATED N OOK for paying bills and or ganizing your schedule, y ou deserve more than an IKEA metal desk and dilapidat ed yard sale chair- nd stu ed into a spar e corner. An o ce that r e ects the design and c omfort of the rest of your home is a plac e you’ll want to burn the midnight oil. This charming and pr actical den not only acts a s a exclusive library for homeowners David and Becky Friedman, but a functional and inspiring spac e to quietly retire from the kids e very once in a while t o unwind and curl up with some page-turning literature. Principal Kristine Bishop Z ubke of Kristine Bishop Design harnessed a timeless, sharp and livable design st ory when an opportunity ar ose from the Friedman family to transform their spare bedroom into a home o ce. Having moved from the Greenwich, CT, area, only an hour outside of N YC to Lakewood Ranch, the F riedmans innately developed a hybrid style—re ective of N ortheast suburbia, where older N e w England Colonial homes f eature rich w ood oors, built-

ins, accents, replaces and detailed trim w ork, while in uenced also by the upscale feel of NYC Upper East Side apartments. “The homeo wners de nitely wanted to keep their roots intact, which was apparent even with the style of home the y moved into—a Colonial home made of brick, shingled roof, dormer windows, front porch and hardwood oors—not exactly the typic al Florida-style home,” sa ys Bishop, who ext ended that aesthetic thr ough the home o ce/library, bringing an older, more traditional New England feel, while maintaining a youthful and fresh living space. “The Friedmans wanted it to not only be a workspace, but a cur ated reading room that felt lived in,” Bishop sa ys of inc orporating the family’s heirloom violin, antiques, books and collection of fr amed artwork displayed sumptuously high on the w alls. The nook is further transformed through wainscoting detail, re ned texture from plaid fabrics and brass nishes, and the most challenging of the makeover—a built-in bookcase out of a former closet. “We completely tore out the standar d bi-fold doors and had the

bookshelves built into the closet,” Bishop says. “There were some s upport beams that couldn’t be moved, so we had to create some clever designs that would hide the be ams and make the bookshelves look like one seamless build.” Notice the shelv es painted a be autiful, dark na vy blue and accented with brass picture lights, perfectly complementing the or ange Oriental ar ea rug from Rugs As Art, which “r eveals a pop of color and grounds the space.” Many of the ex quisite living piec es were sourced locally through the International Design Source, including a custom chestnut leather tu ed sofa, with brass nailhead trim that pulls out into a bed f or guests and r emains the aligning f ocal point. Another standout element in the spac e is the grasscloth wallpaper, adding a layer of texture and warmth. Averting from standard home o ce designs, “I wanted to create a room that captures your a ention and draws you in,” says Bishop, piquing your intellectual hunger and leaving your external stressors at the door. SRQ

WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY NICHOLAS FERRIS

CARGO_MAR19.indd 60

2/18/19 3:11 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 61

2/17/19 1:25 PM


P

R

E

S

E

N

T

S

T

H

E

2019

HOME

OF THE

YEAR

Showcasing immaculate spatial synergies and breathtaking views while employing smart renovation techniques and building strategies, the architects, builders, interior designers and landscape artists who w on in this year’s SRQ Magazine Home of the Year competition collaborated to bring these incredibly stunning Gulf C oast residential spaces to life. From seaside to street-side, inside and out, these exemplars of the local built environment celebrate and contribute to an impressive legacy of award-winning architecture. COMPETITION PRODUCED BY SRQ MAGAZINE. MEET THE JUDGES ON PAGE 86.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 62

2/20/19 9:19 AM


BEST OVERALL HOME — OVER $2 MILLION

BETONHAUS DSDG ARCHITECTS PL ATINUM 63 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

Betonhaus is positioned on a narrow linear site on the Gulf Coast inland waterway. The constraints of this site focused the residential layout into a linear shotgun form. Rather than a det errent, design opportunities exploded with lar ger overhangs, more glass, and sleek, thin roof lines. Intended as a vacation home totaling six bedrooms and six-and-a-half baths, ve guest bedrooms line the exterior, each opening onto a continuous veranda and view. The elevated constraints of the velocity zone allow the home a cantilevered protection from the elements, a s it seemingly oats above the ground. Unlike many stark white boxes spo ed along Florida’s Gulf Coast, Betonhaus uses raw concrete, wood accents and subtle color to warm the overall aesthetic and add additional layers of detail to the design. “Warm modern” is a new modern typology that invites inhabitants to actually live in the spac e rather than feel alienated. It is w arm, family-friendly and easy to live in. The conditioned 5,500 square feet is elevated on the second oor via elevator and features am atrium staircase climbing a polished architectural concrete wall. The rear of the home contains the critical spaces of the home and becomes transparent with sliding glass doors ooding the home with indirect natural light. The kit chen, great room, and ma ster suite comprise the elevated core with an expansiv e covered deck for outdoor living. Drawing inspiration from midcentury design, current modern features and philosophies are evident in this home with oor to ceiling glass walls, pa erns of three, opacity of walls to allow passive ventilation, and a connection to the outdoors. Architect: Mark S ultana, AIA, N C ARB-DSDG Contractor and Builder: Voigt Brothers Construction Interior Design: April Whit e, Allied A SID-DSDG Architects Kitchen Cabinets: Cucine Ricci Bathroom: Cucine Ricci Carpets and Flooring: Sticks and S tones Flooring Landscape: Borden Landscape Design Pool By: Water Design Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 63

2/19/19 10:00 AM


BEST OVERALL HOME — OVER $2 MILLION

GOLD

MODERN ON MOURNING DOVE MU R R AY H O ME S

64 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

This stunning 5,700-square-foot Bird Key bayfront home was originally commissioned as a “spec” home, meaning that it w ould be designed, built and resold as an investment. The challenge was to build a luxury home with wow factor that would achieve optimum investment return and sell quickly on the open market. Murray Homes was charged with overseeing all aspects from design to build, including interior nishes, landscaping and hardscaping. The team researched and considered the highest and best use for the 15,000-square-foot parcel of land using in-depth knowledge and expertise to understand lot limitations, create the perfect aesthetic, and optimize design ow and curb appeal. They assessed Bird Key, the street and the lot, its views and the surrounding homes before assembling a group of the best professionals to cra an exceptional, modern living experience from the ground up that would appeal to the most discerning buyer. Ordinarily, a home design project begins with a general idea of size, style, desired number of bedrooms, garages, etc. However, in this instanc e the initial c oncept was cra ed with no pr econceived boundaries for these elements, supporting Steve Murray and Murray Homes’ ethos that scale is not always relative or relevant to design integrity, vision or quality of cr a smanship. In fact, the home was designed entirely around the outdoor living spac e. As the project moved into its construction phase and the house began t o take shape, a unique twist came about—the investors loved the home so much that they put their own home on the market and moved into this one.

Architect: CADD Design, Shawn Ambrose Contractor and Builder: Murray Homes, LLC. Interior Design: Riley Interior Design, Inc. Kitchen Cabinets: Campbell Cabinetry Designs, Inc. Bathroom: Tile- Sticks and Stones Flooring Carpets and Flooring: International Wood Floors Landscape: Michael A. Gilkey Landscape, Inc. Pool By: Pool Design Concepts, LLC. Photographer: Mark Borosch Photography

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 64

2/17/19 2:31 PM


BEST OVERALL HOME — BETWEEN $1 2 MILLION

SEATHRU HOUSE PL ATINUM

S W E E T S PA R K M A N A R C H I T E C T S

This project started with an e ort to preserve and r estore a mid-c entury modern gem. The original house w as a great example of our loc al mid-century vernacular, but it was in a state of deterioration that required heavy repair. FEMA regulations prevented our e orts. The features that were most a ractive about that old house became important parts of the design program. The house needed a humble frontage, an inviting entrance on the corner lot access, a fantastic view of the waterfront, as well as a courtyard and guest space. It needed to feel close to the ground while meeting FEMA standards. To place the home low on the lot, we created a grade level courtyard access that li s you towards the main space or the guest space, once inside. The spaces are connected by a tectonic series of columns that oat an overhead canopy; an advancement of a detail that is found in the roots of the original home. From the guest space, the street side is shielded while the courtyard is the focus. The main living space is all that stands betw een the guests and the w aterfront. The primary w alls of the gr eat room are nearly solid glass, allowing everyone to appreciate the views of the courtyard and waterfront. When entering the front door, a long art hall, an ked by a stone anchor wall, draws your eye through the cantilevered si ing room and out t o the bay. A walk up the oati ng stairs delivers to you more art space and four main bedrooms. Our client asked us to create a home to raise their family in. It was to be warm, comfortable, inviting, elegant, pay homage to our area and the history of the land itself, all while maintaining an air of timelessness. SeaThru House was our answer.

Architect: Sweet Sparkman Architects, Jerry Sparkman, AIA Contractor: Josh Wynne Construction Interior Design: Finishes, Dwell Interiors; Furniture, Chelsea Dunbar of Blu Homes Kitchen Cabinets: Metro Cabinetry Bathroom: Vanity, Pennenga Creative, Greg Pennenga Landscape: Borden Landscape, Tim Borden Pool By: Pools by Ron, Ron Schulz Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography Other: Project Manager, Jimmy Thornton, Associate, AIA.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 65

2/20/19 9:20 AM


BEST OVERALL HOME — BETWEEN $1–$2 MILLION

OSPREY LANDING DSD G ARCH I T ECTS GOLD

On a site overlooking the widest part of S arasota Bay, the Osprey Landing house masterfully integrates living space and landscape. Approaching the house, you cross a forecourt garden ascending a series of terraces to arrive at the front door. The house is organized as two wings anking a central living space--a soaring great room with oor to ceiling glass, a ording a sweeping panorama of Sarasota Bay. The South wing ha s the kids’ suite and guest room above garages that face a side street. The North wing ha s the master suite including a oating contemplation space that gazes back into the forecourt garden. The bay side of the house is a terraced landscape of outdoor living spac es overlooking a vast lawn that slopes do wn to the water. The main le vel has an outdoor kit chen and dining area with retractable screens. From here, a monumental stair leads down to a multi-level pool with a patio island and re pit, the upper levels include a balcony o the guest bedroom and a roof terrace. Each outdoor space o ers a di erent perspective on the shoreline and across the bay. The interior is punctuated by bright colors and vivid pa erns in wood and tile that r e ect the distinct tastes and personality of the individual family members. The split-level oor plan maximizes the livable space within the allo ed building footprint of this 5000-square-foot tropical modern home.

Architect: Mark Sultana, AIA, NCARB-DSDG Contractor / Builder : Josh Wynne Construction Interior Design: Ana Santa Maria, Apex Studio Kitchen Cabinets: Metro Cabinet Company Bathroom: Metro Cabinet Company Landscape: Borden Landscape Design Pool By: Ron Schultz Pools Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 66

2/17/19 2:32 PM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 67

2019

2/17/19 3:27 PM


BEST OVERALL HOME — UNDER $1 MILLION

RIVETTA RETREAT PL ATINUM

DSDG ARCHITECTS

This lot is carved into the backdrop of a pristine nature preserve. The narrow linear lot on a cul-de-sac offered little street frontage for a big design opportunity. The front façade and door act as a gate to the preserve beyond that it guards. Small design elements were used, like the corner window feature wall clad in cypress, whose frame bends around the window to the ground itself and also forms the entry ceiling. A coquina shell tabby stucco accents the pearly white stucco, which pierces through the entry for a foyer feature wall. The inside volume is larger than it appears on the outside, clerestory windows open to the north to offer natural lighting and untouchable green space views. The clear views allow for the natural landscape to come into the home, bringing the outdoors in. A 20-foot-long-pool and 7-foot-square spa centers on the axial arrangement of the home. The kitchen cabinetry closely matches the coquina tabby color, as the white oak flooring adds warmth to the open space. The great room feature wall, which is also coquina shell tabby, splits the home into two sections of communal and private space. Beyond the fire and media feature wall is the family room, master bedroom suite which opens onto the pool deck, and two guest bedroom suites. Totaling just over 3,000 square feet this home is surely a relaxing retreat. Architect: Mark Sultana, AIA, N CARB-DSDG Contractor/Builder: SRQ Builders, LLC Interior Design: April White, Allied A SID, DSDG Architects Kitchen Cabinets: Main Street Kitchen and Bath Bathroom: Main Street Kitchen and Bath Carpets and Flooring: Sticks and Stones Flooring Landscape: Critter Ridge Landscaping Pool By: Swim, Inc. Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 68

2/17/19 2:58 PM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 69

2/17/19 3:26 PM


BEST OVERALL HOME — UNDER $1 MILLION

THE WHITEHAUS

70 |

HOME OF THE YEAR

GOLD

SO LST I CE P LANNI N G A N D A RC HI T ECT U R E

SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

Located on a Siesta K ey canal, this thr ee-bedroom home articulates numerous narratives, combining scale with c ontext, material with form, and space with light. The challenge w as to provide a s ustainable, cohesive design f or the home, pool, and landsc ape layout that would appear honestly interwoven with the s ubtropical site, while also pr oviding a comfortable indoor/outdoor environment for the family to live and entertain. Honoring the natural open elements of the sit e, the unembellished fr ont yard connects to a compact but open backyard, while the home serv es as a link betw een the two outdoor spaces. The architectural design extends the open landsc ape experience and leads the visitor to the front entry, transitioning to a more responsive sense of sc ale. Once there, shade elements emerge as a fundamental f eature; a clean-lined overhang greets visitors and provides balance with the large rear trellis and terrace. Inside, the openness of the house forms an ideal se ing for entertaining. The living, dining and kitchen ow seamlessly into one another and c ontinue onto the rear terrace. From this public sequenc e of spaces, the oorplan purposely pr ogresses to semi-public, semi-priv ate, and nally private areas, with the bedrooms unfolding as far as possible from the center. Natural light fuses harmoniously with the ar chitecture. Windows bring da ylight into every room - e ven closets and pantries. Through the use of detailed design elements with a focus on nature, the home enhanc es its se ing and is a partner with it. By carefully balancing natur al and man-made elements, this design goes back t o basics with true sustainability using shade, natural ventilation, local materials, and a sympathy with the Florida landscape.

Architect: Jonathan Parks, AIA Contractor: Nick Ferguson, NC Ferguson Construction Photographer: Greg Wilson Photography

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 70

2/17/19 3:07 PM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 71

2/17/19 3:26 PM


BEST KITCHEN Architect: Mark Sultana, AIA, NCARB-DSDG Contractor/Builder: Voigt Brothers Construction Interior Design: April White, Allied ASID-DSDG Architects Kitchen Cabinets: Cucine Ricci Bathroom: Cucine Ricci Carpets and Flooring: Sticks and Stones Flooring Landscape: Borden Landscape Design Pool By: Water Design Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography

72 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

BETONHAUS DSDG ARCHITECTS PL ATINUM

Stemming from its name, concrete is a vital part of this homes’ design. From the columns, oor, and roof constructed entirely of concrete down to the details of a concrete countertop. The kitchen is placed in the rear towards the water frontage of the lot, as the bay view opens on the site. The island is the c enterpiece of the room and is cra ed with white cabinets con ned under a polished c oncrete waterfall countertop. At een-and-a-half feet, the natural color and materiality of the concrete is balanced by surrounding white lacquered Italian cabinetry. The horizontality of the island is echoed with the range hood as the 54-inch wide Italian telescoping “skylight” hood stretches the room’s perspective. The minimalist European design shaves all cabinetry hardware and hides appliances behind its glossy white façade. The upper c abinets are push-activated and motorized to accordion up for access. Symmetry in design is ac complished by adding a glass backsplash to mirror the sliding glass doors opening the kitchen to the outdoors. The addition of glass brings in natural light and transmits light into the demising stairwell beyond. Floor-to-ceiling sliding glass walls open to the south-facing breakfast deck to allow the ow of light into the bright kitchen. Adjacently located in a subtle raised ceiling living room, dining room. These spaces can be partitioned o for privacy for catered entertainment or le open for exibility in any gathering. White oak oors spread through the kitchen to the surrounding rooms, creating a unity in a largely open oor plan as well as warmth to an otherwise minimalist white pale e.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 72

2/19/19 10:01 AM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 73

2/17/19 3:26 PM


BEST BATHROOM

74 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

Architect: Sweet Sparkman Architects, Jerry Sparkman, AIA Contractor: Josh Wynne Construction Interior Design: Finishes, Dwell Interiors; Furniture, Chelsea Dunbar of Blu Homes Kitchen Cabinets: Metro Cabinetry Bathroom: Vanity, Pennenga Creative, Greg Pennenga Landscape: Borden Landscape Design, Tim Bor den Pool By: Pools by Ron, Ron Schulz Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography Other: Project Manager, Jimmy Thornton, Associate.

SEATHRU HOUSE PL ATINUM

S W E E T S PA R K M A N A R C H I T E C T S

Created to preserve the views, the SeaThru house was built with large, expansive windows facing the waterfront to allow everyone to appreciate the vie ws of the S arasota Bay. All spaces in the Se aThru house, e ven the guesthouse at the extreme eastern side of the site, are a orded the same wide open views. The master bathroom is no exception. Designed with uninterrupted glass from bedroom to bathroom, with no wall or door to break the space, the bathroom capitalizes on the waterfront. Together, the master bedroom and bathroom provide broader views than e ach space allows on its o wn. The materials used in the spac e were carefully chosen to continue the same c olor pale e as the ext erior. With muted colors, the a ention is drawn away from the nishes and focus is giv en to the lar ge oor-to-ceiling windows highlighting the waterfront. A custom vanity artfully cra ed out of solid walnut was designed for the space and intended to feel like a freestanding piece of furniture. A low-pro le tub and glass shower give the functionality desir ed of a ma ster bathroom, while sta ying minimal enough t o enhance the large windows and visibility to the outdoors.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 74

2/19/19 10:01 AM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 75

2/17/19 3:25 PM


BEST GREAT ROOM Architect: Sweet Sparkman Architects, Jerry Sparkman, AIA Contractor: Josh Wynne Construction Interior Design: Finishes, Dwell Interiors; Furniture, Chelsea Dunbar of Blu Homes Kitchen Cabinets: Metro Cabinetry Bathroom: Vanity, Pennenga Creative, Greg Pennenga Landscape: Borden Landscape Design, Tim Borden Pool By: Pools by Ron, Ron Schulz Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography Other: Project Manager, Jimmy Thornton, Associate, AIA

76 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

SEATHRU HOUSE S W E E T S PA R K M A N A R C H I T E C T S PL ATINUM

The transparent Great Room, at the core of SeaThru House, simultaneously a ords generous views to the bay from nearly every point on the property, while also seamlessly linking the interior and exterior space. The small guest suite to the east of the site was organized to take full advantage of the site lines through the oor-to-ceiling glass, while the cantilevered den space was “pulled� aside to avoid blocking those same views. The primary walls of the Great Room are nearly solid glass, allowing everyone to appreciate the waterfront. Through the space, you can see the undulating t opography of the backyard that provides sweeping views of the bay and Lido Key in the distance. The oating feature staircase above a monolithic plinth cr eates a beautiful focal point of the r oom, while keeping a thin steel pro le allowing minimal obstruction of views. The furniture with low pro les and open fr ames, complement the light and open intention of the space. The Great Room, with its emphasis on light and views through the layout and oor-to-ceiling windows, allow the concept to carry through the home by connecting physically through architecture and visually through open visibility from main house, courtyard, guesthouse, and backyard ocean views.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 76

2/17/19 3:49 PM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 77

2019

2/17/19 3:24 PM


BEST OVERALL INTERIOR DESIGN

HAWTHORNE RESIDENCE PL ATINUM 78

TRADEMARK INTERIORS

|

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

This 8,500-square-foot home is nestled in the Southside Village neighborhood. The homeowners envisioned a French West Indies style home full of or ganic and textural elements that embrace the open, outdoor lif estyle with several relaxed family gathering areas. Throughout the home, one will nd a uid sophistication through the cohesive and subtle color pale e along with a wide arr ay of textures. From the cobblestone wall panels in the f oyer to the plush sofa in the living r oom, to the beams and wood-beaded xture in the dining r oom, all joined t ogether to accomplish the tr anquility of this estat e home. The huge open indoor /outdoor oorplan was achieved using tw o nano-wall systems on either side of the gr eat room that connect the house with the lush outdoor c ourtyard on one side and the swimming pool and outdoor kit chen on the other. To make these three gathering areas function as one, ooring was the key. Solid hardwood ooring for the interior, wood-look pavers for the courtyard, and wood-look porcelain tile for the terrace all in the same nish provided a seamless ow from room to room. This grand home boasts a secret passageway to the man c ave and wine c ellar, enormous master bedroom suite with her den, a home g ym, custom-built re-pit, two large guest bedrooms with a lounge, sec ondary laundry and kids outdoor living. The house is anchored with a ve-car garage on one side and a 45’ lap pool with a t owering grand Oak on the other , all while k eeping the house and its f eatures discreetly hidden from the street. Built like a fortress is two stories of exterior poured concrete and masonry with interior metal stud walls and impact windows, the house is safe enough for the most daring of hurricanes. Architect: Modis Architects Contractor/Builder: Stellar Development, Inc. Interior Design: Trade Mark Interiors, Inc. Kitchen Cabinets: Campbell Cabinetry Designs, Inc. Pool: Bulldog Pools Photographer: Justin Labadie Other: Smarthouse Integration

GOLD

THE ABACO AT THE LAKE CLUB

R I L E Y I N T ERIO R DES IGN , IN C.

The design dir ective for the Anchor Builder s Abaco model in The Lake Club was to create a very approachable and w elcoming presence with a casual, but tailored, crisp and coastal vibe. The oor plan warrants a feeling of open conceptual design, but yet creates nook areas that provide quaint and charming personal spaces. The very tranquil color pale e of variable blues, grays and fresh whites incorporates the majestic exterior view of the extended lanai pool spaces and the lake. With a passion to design a home using mixed materials such as rich woods, contrasting true white detailed trimwork and a mixtur e of silv er-toned metals, the Abac o Model stands second-to-none in generating the essence of “welcome home”. Architect: Design Lines Contractor/Builder: Anchor Builders Interior Design: Riley Interior Design, Inc. Kitchen Cabinets: The Cabinet Guy Bathroom: The Cabinet Guy Carpet and Flooring: Carpet Corner / Int ernational Wood Rile / Design W orks Landscape: Arctic Palm Company Pool: Water Designs Photographer: Mark Borosch

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 78

2/18/19 12:22 PM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 79

2/17/19 3:50 PM


BEST OVERALL INTERIOR DESIGN Interior Design: Barbara Gardner, Collins Interiors, LLC. Photographer: Nicholas Ferris Photography, LLC.

S I LV E R 80

CALIFORNIA CONTEMPORARY ON THE GULF COAST COLLINS INTERIORS

|

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

These clients had recently extensively renovated a home on the water in south S arasota. Accomplished builders, they had done a marvelous job of improving the ow and taking be er advantage of the wonderful views. They also created a beautiful kitchen that would be the envy of any chef and updat ed all the bathr ooms. They called Barbara Gardner of Collins Interiors to help them complete the home in terms of creating window treatments, nding some new furnishings, reupholstering some treasured antique pieces, and pr oviding options f or area rugs, bedding, lighting, and accessories. Using our copyrighted ten-page “Design Deck” t o best ascertain their needs, ta stes and preferences, we ascertained that they liked what they called a “California Contemporary” style that focused on rich neutrals, accented by fun pa erns and textures. We worked closely with the homeowners to create a comfortable home with an elegant simplicity that re ects their love of casual entertaining for family and friends, emphasizes plenty of privacy for the adults, and reinforces a fun outdoor spac e enjoyed by every member of this activ e family. They were pleased that we were willing to work with a lot of their favorite furnishings—updating some with ne w paint and upholst ery, and re-purposing others to work in di erent rooms. The result is a beautiful home that works well for daily living and entertaining.

OSPREY LANDING

BEST SUSTAINABILITY | GREEN PL ATINUM

DSDG ARCHITECTS

This state-of-the-art new home has many visually striking features. Clean lines, c antilevered structural elements, and a dr amatic rear elevation designed to maximize long w ater views are obvious to anyone who looks at it. Ho wever, this incr edible home is more than meets the e ye; Durability, energy and water e ciency, indoor air quality, healthy site considerations, material selections and w aste reduction were primary pr oject goals in the design and c onstruction of this modern beauty. The vicinity of this site to the airport carried additional testing for sound mitigation int o the home. Incr edible a ention to detail while insulating, and a pr emium glass and fr ame system ensure the tightest envelope imaginable for air intrusion and sound transfer. The pearly white exterior and white re ective roof assembly helped to reduce heat load while a high SEER, v ariable speed HV AC system creates a comfortable indoor en vironment while managing ener gy consumption. The modern pale e uses locally sourced materials with high recycled material content to make statements where intended. Focus was placed on areas that the structur e could be exposed t o reveal its o wn beauty. Energy-saving appliances, ventilation, and tank-less gas water heaters, as well as LED lighting and a lighting control system all help to ensure that no power is wasted. A 11.52KW Solar array makes up the small di erence in consumption. During construction, 90 percent of the construction waste was recycled and most of the major construction materials feature recycled material content. This home is Certi ed Emerald under the National Green Building System and is Certi ed Zero Energy. With a HERS index of minus 7, this home regularly produces more power than it uses.

Architect: Mark Sultana, AIA, N CARB—DSDG Contractor/Builder: Josh Wynne Construction Interior Design: Ana Santa Maria, Apex S tudio Kitchen Cabinets: Metro Cabinet Company Bathroom: Metro Cabinet Company Landscape: Borden Landscape Design Pool By: Ron Schulz Pools Photographer: Ryan Gamma Photography

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 80

2/19/19 10:02 AM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 81

2/18/19 1:37 PM


BEST LANDSCAPE DESIGN | OUTDOORS

Architect: Leader Design S tudio Contractor: JM Meyer Construction Interior Design: SAWA Design S tudio Landscape Architect: DWY Landscape Architects Landscape: Coast Outdoor Services Pool: American Beauty Pools Photographer: Greg Wilson Architectural Photography and Ryan Gamma Photography

82 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

CITRUS AVENUE PL ATINUM

DWY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

Located just south of downtown in a transitioning neighborhood, this new home was inspired by the mid-century modern architecture for which Sarasota is known. The homeowners—avid architecture enthusiasts—selected the design team for their ability to deliver a project that emphasizes their lifestyle and that seamlessly melds architecture with its site. The layering of architecture and landscape on this suburban site facilitates the owners’ lifestyle as active residents of their neighborhood and community, while maintaining a sense of privacy and serenity within the designed landscape. Working vertically, the landscape architect developed the site walls to de ne the point of ac cess to the property, and provide screening from tra c and adjacent properties. The 4’ accent walls at the eastern edge slip int o the hardscape to give form to the main thr eshold. The southern sit e walls envelop an existing tabebuia and are the maximum height allowed by the zoning code. This long element controls the grade di erential between the road and the new structure, retaining nearly 2’ on the interior, and organizes the densely planted landscape screen that de nes this edge and screens the sight lines from the two-story residence across the street. The simplicity of the courtyard is a studied derivative of the relationships that unfold between architecture and landscape. Floor-to-ceiling glazing provides a visual connection to this space. The pool itself was designed for both active and passive use and includes a lap lane, shallow lounge area and a low-pro le “island,” pulled away from the deck by a thin channel of w ater. The landscape architect reinforced the architecture of the landscape with deep pink, Barr aganinspired wall that aligns with the island. The scupper spillway circulates water to mask the noise of tra c less than 20’ away.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 82

2/19/19 4:04 PM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 83

2019

2/17/19 4:00 PM


BEST LANDSCAPE DESIGN | OUTDOORS

84 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

TWO PALMS

DWY LANDSCAP E A RC HI T ECTS GOLD

At the Two Palms Residence – a playful nickname given to the project when, a er the existing structure was razed, there were only two palms le on site – the landscape architect provided input on the siting of the ne w house. He was then able to shape the exterior spaces with respect to the forms of the architecture, emphasizing the link betw een the interior and exterior living spaces. While the organization of the site responds to that of the home, the goal for the overall planting design was two-fold: to create maximum privacy and to provide much needed shade and shadow for the east-west orientation of the home. Addressing concerns of privacy at the perimeter, the landscape design is layered at the street and dense at the side and rear property lines. In contrast, the front entry vestibule is intentionally open and welcoming. The pool terrace is an extension of the architecture, organized with an outdoor sho wer, lap pool, int egral spa, wet-wall, and architectural concrete wall with a line ar re element. Dark porcelain tile gives texture to the wet-wall for pleasing visual and audible a ects while also ext ending the color of the re ective pool basin vertically. The shelltop pool deck itself was detailed to have a minimal coping, creating a tight relationship with the water’s surface, which in turn becomes a tranquil mirror, re ecting the sky and landscape over the uninterrupted plane. A niche set into the perimeter wall at the east end of the pool accommodates lounge seating and a cantilevered umbrella shades outdoor sectional furniture. These arrangements structure the outdoor space and also provide a bu er between the active pool area and the adjacent master bedroom. Each element is distilled to its essential form, resulting in an understated, elegant space. Contractor/Builder: Vizions Construction. Landscape Architect: DWY Landscape Architects Landscape: Coast Outdoor Services Pool By: Freestyle Pool Photographer: EVRMC, Everett Dennison.

CHEROKEE PARK FAMILY

MICHAEL A. GILKEY

S I LV E R

Architect: Clifford M. Scholz, CMSA Architects Contractor/Builder/ Interior Designer: Najjar Construction, Inc. Landscape: Michael A. Gilkey, Inc. Pool By: Designed by Michael A. Gilkey and built by Pool Concepts Photographer: Max Kelly Other: Fire Table Designed by Michael A. Gilkey, Inc. crafted by Jake Brady Concrete; Yoga Garden Designed by Michael A. Gilkey, crafted by Ninzan Studio

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 84

The design int ention for this pr oject was to create an outdoor living experienc e for a y oung family that c omplemented the clean, classic architecture of their home, while r emaining cohesive with its site in one of Sarasota’s oldest neighborhoods. We worked closely with our clients t o identify their outdoor living style, and cr eate a program that met their needs. W e worked with the architect to properly site the home in or der to maximize backyard living, and t o salvage three grand live oaks on the property, thereby making the new residence feel in place in its established context. In the front yard, form and detail took center stage. The facade is highlighted by boxwood gardens with Italian Cypress focal points. The driveway was designed for adequate circulation, while using contrast and pa erning to diminish one’s perspective of the size of the hardscape. The e ect is a charming, courtyard aesthetic, welcoming residents and guests to the front door. In the backyard, the pool, spa and deck spaces allow for separate but cohesive gathering opportunities for children and adults alike. The visual anchor for the family’s outdoor living experience is a be autifully detailed si ing, reading and yoga garden, with a backlit thermally tr eated ash wall, polished poured-in-place concrete stepping stones, and cantilevered steps that complement the silver travertine pool deck. A concrete re table and several planters were custom-designed and created for this space, unifying the elements through scale and a pale e of materials that re ects the honed concrete terraces. Every decision for this project was made in collaboration with the client and architect ,to ensure that this new home felt like it belonged in its historic neighborhood.

2/19/19 10:02 AM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

2019

2019

2019

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 85

2/17/19 4:12 PM


BEST REMODEL | RENOVATION

Architect: Cli ord M. Scholz Ar chitects Contractor/Builder: Jay Anderson, Edgewater Contractors, Inc. Interior Design: Holly Dennis Interiors Kitchen Cabinets: Campbell Cabinetry Bathroom: Campbell Cabinetry, Design Works, The Plumbing Place Carpets and Flooring: Floor SRQ Landscape: Michael A. Gilkey Landscape Architect Pool: Bluewater Pools Photographer: CMS Photography Other: Jake Brady Concrete by Design

86 |

HOME OF THE YEAR SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

EAGLE POINT DRIVE PL ATINUM

EDGEWATER CONTRACTORS

The Eagle Point Drive house project, originally built in 1 997, situated in the Historic Eagle Point Club on Robert’s Bay, has Old Florida Charm surrounded by original 1911 guest co ages, but the owners found it to be non-functional and dated for their outdoor-focused lifestyle. Wanting a completely freshened look and more functional living spaces in a Coastal Contemporary style, the team set out to deliver a re-planned home to meet their active needs, while creating a coastal showstopper within their charming enclave. Originally a 2BR / 2BA home, the int erior was completely re-planned to de-compartmentalize the spaces and create open spaces that lead you right to the outdoors. A er remodel, the home now has three bedrooms, three full bathrooms, and one-and-a-half bath. The home blurs the lines of indoors/outdoors with a fully stacking sliding door, which allows for one large indoor/outdoor living space. The kitchen was created with the thoughtfulness of entertaining for family and friends. The ext erior was updated with new windows, doors, entry and paint scheme. The house originally did not ha ve a swimming pool or tamed landscaping which beaconed for resort like spaces to be created. The outdoor spaces include a private outdoor shower o the master suite, an outdoor kitchen, kayak storage, contemplative areas for relaxing and areas for entertaining. The home retains its Key West styling while capturing new, clean edges framed with modern tropical landscaping.

2019 JUDGES HUGO MIJARES Hugo Mijares is an a wardwinning and ide as-focused design practice established by Hugo Mijar es in Miami in late 2008. In the same y ear the practice was selected by the Americ an Institute of Architects for the ‘Emer ging Young Architects’ Houses Tour and it ha s been widely published, both locally and int ernationally. The pr actice distills a holistic detail design and pr ocess-led approach in the deliv ery of highly cr eative and pr agmatic solutions that resonate conceptual rigor and material invention. A str ong emphasis is plac ed on a critic al synthesis of the opportunities and c onstraints of each site, context and client brief a s a c atalyst for uniquely appropriate design out comes in r esponse to place, landscape and pa erns of use.

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 86

STEPHANIE GAINES Stephanie December Gaines joined Curts Gaines Hall Jones (CGHJ) in 1984 and has been a principal of the rm since 1992. Prior to joining CGHJ, her pr ofessional experience included historic preservation of national landmark buildings, luxury custom residences, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development- nanced housing and stat e government agency pr ojections in L ouisiana. Since joining CGHJ, she ha s been ext ensively involved in residential, commercial, restaurant, and a ssistedliving facility projects for both the private and public sector. Mrs. Gaines’ special interest in urban renewal and historic preservation has led t o an ext ensive personal commitment to the pr eservation and revitalization of historic urban communities.

DAVID POORMAN David Poorman’s childhood was a blend offarm and beach, having moved at an e arly age from Ohio t o N aples, Florida. He interned in carpentry while in high school, then w orked as a c arpenter for two years before enrolling in the ar chitecture program at S t. Petersburg Junior College, going on t o receive a Bachelor of Design from the University of Florida and a Master’s in Architecture from Princeton University. He lived for ten years in downtown Chicago, working and travelling for Perkins and Will and then f or David Woodhouse Architects. In 2 010, David established David Poorman Architect LLC (DPA) in N aples, an award-winning rm specializing in small-scale residential and c ommercial projects inspired and informed by Florida’s natural resources and climate.

2/19/19 10:13 AM


2019

SRQ HOME OF THE YEAR COMPETITION—WINNERS SHOWCASE

2019

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING COMPLEX

FEATURE_MAR19_HOME OF THE YEAR.indd 87

2/17/19 4:27 PM


At the Table Restaurants | Three Ways | Foodarama | Foodie Life

Forage

At the Table

Reverie with Rudolph

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 88

2/18/19 3:28 PM


Surrounded by the pr ogressive panache of the lat e Paul Rudolph, hungry admirers can digest mid-c entury musings at a namesak e restaurant in The Sarasota Modern hotel. WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

EN THUSIASTS OF THE MID-CEN TURY MAVERICK

Le : Charred octopus, sous-vide for up to eight hours and served with squid ink riso o, saffron emulsion and pickled vegetables.

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 89

needn’t feel famished whilst enjoying a meal surrounded by subtle tributes to Sarasota School of Architecture’s master of mindful design. Rudolph’s restaurant comes to SRQ attached to its newest boutique hotel, intriguing creatives, foodies, entrepreneurs, locals, bloggers and visitors alike. “The Sarasota School of Architecture plays a lot with the contrast of light and dark spaces,” says John Markunas, general manager of Sarasota Modern. Suddenly, you recognize a familiar theme as you round the corner from the stark darkness of the bar/lounge area into Rudolph’s bright dining room filled with bouncing natural light. Meanwhile, a 25-foot airwall opens onto the outdoor patio to bring the outside in—inspired by Paul Rudolph’s environmental and vernacular designs. Shedding light on the food and beverage items on hand, Rudolph’s comes alive in the mornings as a hangout coffee shop. Locals are highly encouraged to stop in off the streets for a frothy latte, grab a fresh-baked croissant and sidestep from their standard downtown cafe. Donuts, biscuits, bagels and pastries are made in-house daily, while hotel staff have become christened baristas, trained specially by Bandit Coffee Co. out of St. Pete, which also supplies Rudolph’s with its single-origin roasts. AM hours spent here mean immersing yourself in the visionary vibes of the swanky yet chill milieu—making friends with the hotel staff, feeling inspired by the thoughtful decor while working through emails on your laptop—ultimately bucking the taboo around hanging in the hotel as a nonstaying guest. “We’re breaking that stigma,” says Paul Romero, director of sales and marketing at Sarasota Modern. “We want that coffee shop environment and we want the locals to know it as that.” Past 4pm, Markunas mentions, outside guests and locals are invited to come in free of charge to enjoy the Juice Bar out on the patio. Find light bites, fresh-pressed juices and handcrafted cocktails such as the ‘Umbrella House,’ cheekily garnished with a tropical parasol served poolside. Moving in to the evening, Rudolph’s restaurant opens its airy dining room for a fully immersive menu that fires on all cylinders. Executive Chef Jennifer Salhoff, hails most recently from Philadelphia’s Le Meridien Hotel— appointed to take on the modern ingenuity of Sarasota’s rich history of design and relocate her own culinary flair here. “The techniques that they’re using back there are just mind-boggling,” Markunas says of Chef and her team, whose outside-the-box experimentations have ultimately induced the rebranding of the kitchen to “the lab.” “I don’t really consider this a normal restaurant kitchen,” mentions Chef. “We’ll start on a dish and it’ll go completely left field. We somehow end up on the other side of the road with it, but that’s what I love the most— we just have complete creative freedom to play around

2/18/19 3:32 PM


Forage

RUDOLPH’S

Clockwise, top to bo om: Beets reign supreme in the Rudolph’s salad, featuring beetcured salmon, roasted beets and beet puree. The dimmed and modern milieu of the bar and lounge area calls for cocktails. An inverted alligator on the ceiling o ers that nal Florida touch.

and make some pretty crazy things happen.” Practicing a lot of sous-vide and molecular gastronomy, the team is continually building out Rudolph’s ever-evolving, nouveau menu that changes like the tides—further integrating diners’ artistic experience with an always fresh and new queue of contemporary culinary styles. “With the menu, we really tried to encompass the creativity of architecture,” says Chef Salhoff. “That’s not to say we’re building bridges on the plate, but they are very visual—a lot of height, a lot of texture, bright colors and playing on different temperatures.” The Charred Octopus dish comes plated with a bright purple tentacle on a svelte black plate, with pickled vegetables for acid and texture, and bright yellow dots of saffron emulsion— but that’s only after the octopus has been sous-vide for six to eight hours for extreme tenderization, and then charred in a super-hot cast iron pan with a squid ink risotto and preserved lemon. Florida game meats like Wild Boar Shank, soy-braised then paired with tahini cauliflower puree, caramelized baby bok choy and fennel jus, as well as Popcorn Gator snacks in buttermilk and hot sauce marinade with a black pepper aioli, make appearances on the menu. Seafood dishes take on a whole new level with creations like the Snapper Crudo, smoked with grapefruit and garnished with fennel pollen, fresno pepper and sea salt, collected from Siesta Key waters and curated in-house by Sous-Chef Jess Zellner. Additionally, the Rudolph’s Salad embarks on a coastal design of beet-cured salmon, plated boldly and colorfully with roasted purple and golden candy cane beets, goat cheese fritters and arugula. Be sure to savor this one first visually, then fundamentally. “Literally everything on the menu is made in-house. There is not one product that we bring in that is all ready to go,” says Chef Salhoff, along with mention of plans to partner with local farms, such as Sutter’s Dairy and

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 90

Egg Farm to implement charcuterie boards, as well as Rudolph’s housemade ice creams for desserts like the Waffle-wich, a Belgium waffle topped with blueberry goat cheese gelato and almond crumble. Before calling it a night, head over to the bar for a truly local tribute—an exclusive Brut IPA integrating champagne hops, made in collaboration with Darwin Brewing Company. Or dive into the curated wine menu killing the game in both quality and quantity, as well as a symphony of original craft cocktails such as the Ringling Rio, Poolside Gossip and Midnight at the Marina—all just as dizzying as the massive alligator casually hanging upside-down on the ceiling. SRQ

Daily + monthly access passes are available for purchase for outside guests and locals, granting access to the pool, juice bar, gym, tness classes, discounts on room rates, discounts to the restaurant and other special o ers. Onsite planning and gourmet catering are also available. The Sarasota Modern, 1290 Boulevard of the Arts, Sarasota, 941-906-1290, @sarasotamodern.

2/19/19 9:55 AM


Ads-MAR19.indd 91

2/17/19 1:27 PM


Forage

AT THE TABLE

A NEW SILK ROAD

92 |

The new Silk Road passes through Sage, where a global menu and a restored historic space promise a path to culinary bliss.

FORAGE SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

WRITTEN BY ANDREW FABIAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

IN

THE EARL Y DECADES OF THE 2 0TH CEN TURY,

the former Sarasota Times building brought news of the world, but in the 21st, it brings food of the world. Now, the Mediterranean Revival structure, decadently and lovingly remodeled to look something like a chic monastery, hosts Sarasota’s newest fine dining and spirits establishment, Sage. And inside the dark, romantic space, Chef Chris Covelli—whose career has taken him from the bazaars of Marrakesh to trufflehunting in the Italian Alps—crafts menu items that betray the wisdom of his world travels. “We really want people to get something from each dish, whether it’s the spice or the type of salt, that takes them to another place,” says Covelli, and when diners sample the myriad foreign fare, they may find their spirits traversing a new silk road from the comfort of their stylish seats. The first stop on the globe trot, a Thai Bouillabaisse, transports diners to two seemingly disparate cuisines; Thai and French. Essentially, the dish is a Southeast Asian riff on the traditional bouillabaisse (fish stews) made by Marseille fishermen. Where the French version includes mostly bony rockfish in a briny broth with mixed vegetables, the evolved version at Sage features generous portions of par-poached lobster tail, cod, tiger shrimp and scallops. The cod sears in light oil before Covelli blasts the pan with white wine, inducing a flash fire that locks in the cod’s tender flakiness without overcooking the inside. Then, the shrimp and scallops convene with the cod to exchange stories over medium heat. In a separate pan, Covelli sautés lemongrass, ginger and onion before he adds coconut milk and red curry paste to form the rich, orange broth one typically finds in Thai restaurants. A pinch of mirin, honey and basil join the potion last before some of the prized broth gets tossed with the assorted seafood. The plating looks like an idol for an ocean deity, with a meticulous arrangement that includes a central tower of cod, lobster tail and shrimp placed upright at the pinnacle while the scallops ring the tower to mark the cardinal directions. With so many various textures and levels of brininess, it’d be easy to imagine the dish as a muddled meaty mess, but the silkiness of the red coconut curry blends each cut of seafood in perfect harmony and adds just a hint of heat. From Thailand, one travels West across the Bay of Bengal to India, where food as colorful as it is vibrant has enchanted travelers for centuries. Sage’s Tandoori Lamb—sourced from Colorado, the unofficial lamb capital of the US—evokes the savory complexity of the cuisine. The 1/2 rack marinates in a yogurt and spice blend for 24 hours to tenderize the fibers and infuse the

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 92

2/19/19 9:54 AM


Le to right: The Thai Bouillabaisse swaps briny rock sh for succulent lobster tail, cod, tiger shrimp and scallops. Chef Chris Covelli brings a pr acticed hand and w orldly palate to the Sage kitchen. The Salmon Marrakesh highlights Moroccan spice and the power of plating.

“You have to respect the process, no ma er what.” — Chef Chris Covelli exterior with a rich red hue. Once it’s ready to present to the grill, Covelli induces the Maillard reaction on the rack with an aesthetically pleasing cross-hatch before popping it in a convection oven on low heat to finish the delicate, tender cut. As the lamb transforms, a neat stack of shingled potato slices sizzle in a pan for an elevated expression of an ancient formula: meat + starch. When the rack has donned a perfectly browned crust, Covelli slices it into four individual chops and arranges them into a miniature temple, rib bones gazing skyward with the potatoes inside. The meat falls from the bone without much coaxing and the bold outer crust never overpowers the fundamental flavor of grass-fed lamb that shows a hint of pink in its interior. Continuing Westward, deeper still into the trance of exotic cuisine, diners arrive in Morocco by way of Sage’s Salmon Marrakesh, arguably the most complex and ambitious dish on the menu. The dish starts with a thick cut of salmon seared in olive oil before it, like the lamb, finishes in the convection oven. As it does, onions and tomatoes are lightly sautéed in noisette butter

before Covelli adds his secret blend of ras el hanout, a traditional Moroccan spice mix that includes cardamom, cumin, clove, cinnamon, coriander, peppercorn and lavender, among other undisclosed treasures. “I always try to bring something back [from my travels],” he says, “like the 20 lbs. of spices I brought from Morocco.” Just as the mystical aromatics bloom and release their effulgent bounty, Israeli couscous is introduced to absorb some of the excess mojo. In a separate pan, asparagus spears and wild carrots gently char while seasoned spinach wilts lightly over medium-low heat. “You have to respect the process, no matter what,” says Covelli as he juggles as many as three separate pans at once. The final presentation looks a bit like a pagan earthwork, with the couscous and spinach forming an altar for the salmon, sautéed carrots and asparagus spears laid across the top like tributes and a garnish of beet sprouts and agave curry butter arranged artfully around the rim of the plate, while the aromatics glide into the nose like the serpentine smoke of incense, evoking scenes of a crowded bazaar. SRQ Sage, 1216 1st Street, Sarasota, 941-228-9259, sagesrq.com

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 93

2/19/19 9:54 AM


nosh

LOCALLY SOURCED ALWAYS IN SEASON

SRQ’s Foodie Content Channel

15 SOUTH RISTORAN TE 15 S Boule vard of the Presidents, Sarasota, 941-388-1555. ITALIAN RESTAURANT Right in the hustle and bustle oft.SArmands Circle, 15 South Ristorante is an authentic Italian r estaurant serving primarily Northern Italian fare with additional options to satisfy every craving. Whether you order a homemade pizza baked to perfection in their authentic wood-burning oven or prefer an authentic and fresh pasta dish – options ar e endless. Full Dinner 4:30pm-10pm. Pizza, Light Dinner 4:3 0pm-Closing.

nosh

CROW’S N EST MARIN A RES TAURAN T 1968 Tarpon Center Dr., Venice, 941-484-9551. CASUAL FINE DINING The Crow’s Nest is a c asual ne dining restaurant, serving fresh seafood, steaks and other traditional Florida favorites. Located on the Island of Venice and nestled between the Gulf of Mexico on the west and the Intracoastal Waterway on the north and east, Crow’s N est has become a waterfront xture for surf ‘n’ turf. M–W 11:30am-10pm. Th 11:30am– 11pm. F-Sa 11:30am–12:30am. Su 12–10pm.

nosh

DUVAL’S FRESH. L OCAL. SEAFOOD. 1435 Main St., Sarasota, 941-312-4001. SEAFOOD Duval’s Fresh. Local. Seafood. is ex cited to announce: Duval’s Free. Local. Shu le! Your experience at Duval’s should be what y ou’re expecting. For dinner, try the Chef Selected Fresh Catch, an o ering of the freshest sh in the market, and llet your fresh catch in-house. Featuring a 3-5-7 Happy Hour and late night. M–Th 11am–9pm. F–Sa 11am–10pm. Su 10am– 9pm.

nosh

ELEMENT 1413 Main St., Sarasota, 941-724-8585. MODERN MEDITERRANEAN In the heart of downtown Sarasota, you don’t want to miss the upscale Mediterranean grill, Element. T ry their S ambuca shrimp with bac on crème, crisp prosciu o, tomato fennel compote and pine nuts. For dinner, their 12 oz. bone-in center cut por cini-encrusted veal chop is delectable. For a large party, order the table an entir e roast suckling pig; which serves four to six guests and is cooked with apples, gs and shallots. E quipped with an extensive wine list and an enticing array of cra cocktails, dining at Element is a must -try experience. M-Th 4:30pm-10pm. F-Sa 4:30pm-11pm. Su 10:30am2:30pm, 4:30pm-10pm. F-Sa.

nosh

SRQMAR19_NOSH.indd 94

GECKO’S GRILL & PUB

PBNT

4870 South Tamiami Trl., Sarasota, 941-923-8896. GRILL AND SPORTS BAR The Original Gecko’s—established in 1992—is known for hosting gr eat parties and ent ertaining such sports c elebrities as Michael J ordan and the White Sox, along with S arasota’s locals and visit ors alike. Gecko’s has continued its good fortune and expanded to the following locations: Twelve Oaks Plaza (Interstate–75 and S.R. 70) in 1998, Braden River Plaza (on S.R. 64) in 2002, Palmer Crossing (Clark Road and Honore Avenue) in 2006, Southside Village (Hillview Street) in 2 010, S’macks Burgers and Shak es (Bee Ridge Road and Shade Avenue) in 2013 and Fruitville Road (Fruitville and North Ca lemen Avenue) in 2014.

1409 Main S t., Sarasota, 941-9149955. AMERICAN PBnT is serving up delicious pizzas, burgers, tacos. There are options for everyone, including gluten-free pizza crust and le ucewrapped burgers. PBnT c aters to every craving for America’s favorite foods. Try their When Pigs Fly pizza, which is a BBQ ba se, topped with cheese, roasted pork, chopped bac on, onion and a BBQ drizzle or their Momo burger which is a double pa y, sautéed mushrooms and onions, mo zzarella cheese and mayo. If you are really hungry, try their American Dream, which is a cheese pizza, cheesebur ger and a taco of choice. Fast, fun and friendly – PBnT is the perfect choice. M-Su 11am-10pm.

MARINA JACK 2 Marina Plaza, Sarasota, 941-

PIER 22 1200 1st A ve W, Bradenton, 941-7488087. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN Pier 22 takes waterfront dining to a new level. On the mouth of the Manatee River, the picturesque se ing is relaxing and the perf ect backdrop for any outing. With o ver 26,000 square feet of space, Pier 22 also o ers catering and space for events. They focus on fresh, homemade fare and unique twists on everyday dishes. For lunch, try their so -shell crab sandwich with jalapeno tartar sauce, with a side of poutine. While w atching the sunset on the patio , dine on their fr esh game of the day, sourced from around the w orld and always a surprise. M-Th 11:30am – 10pm. F-Sa 11:30am10:30pm. Su 11am-10pm. Happy hour daily 3pm7pm and Sunday Brunch 11am-3pm.

365-4232. SEAFOOD, STEAKS AND PASTA The Sarasota landmark o ers its cust omers exceptional food and great atmosphere while dining on the w ater. Come to the dining room on the second oor and try some ne w items on the dinner menu. S tart with braised mussels in a choriz o broth or short rib t ostadas, which feature Gouda cheese and pulled slowbraised short rib. Open daily for lunch and dinner. M– Su 11:15am–11pm.

nosh

MORTON ’S GOURMET MARKET 1924 South Osprey Ave., Sarasota, 941-955-9856. GOURMET GROCER It’s the place where you can spend a lazy Sunday morning sipping c o ee and br eaking o pieces of a sc one, a frenetic Friday evening collecting rare cheeses, meat and wine for Saturday’s soiree or a quick lunchtime bite to go. For the la er, Morton’s fresh-made sushi, salad bar or ready-to-go tea sandwiches are longstanding local faves. M–Sa 7am–8pm. Su 9am–6pm.

OPHELIAS ON THE BA Y 9105 Midnight P ass Road, Siesta Key, 941-349-2212. FINE DINING With indoor and outdoor dining options boa sting incredible waterfront views of Li le Sarasota Bay, Ophelia’s On The Bay is the perf ect place to relax and enjoy a delectable meal. From their PEI mussels presented in a sa ron-anise e broth to incredible cocktails such as the Pink Lady , you can’t go wr ong. Happy Hour M–Su 5pm–6pm. Dinner M– Su 5pm–10pm. Sunday Brunch 11am–2pm.

nosh

nosh

SHARKY’SONTHE PIER1600 Harbour Dr. S, Venice, 941-488-1456. SEAFOOD A er just one visit to Sharky’s On the Pier, Fins at Sharky’s or Snook Haven, you’ll understand why all thr ee restaurants have become Venice-area landmarks, smack -dab on the w ater. Boasting unparalleled views of the 72 0-foot long Venice Fishing Pier and Gulf of Mexico for over 30 years, Sharky’s has made a name for itself as Florida’s N o. 1 Be ach Bar with c omplimentary live music and entertainment, family friendly fun and a whole lot of ocean. M–Th 11:30am–10pm. F–Sa 11:30am–12am. Sun 11:30am–10pm.

nosh

nosh

2/20/19 9:21 AM


SRQMAR19_NOSH.indd 95

2/17/19 1:43 PM


SRQMAR19_NOSH.indd 96

2/17/19 1:43 PM


SRQMAR19_NOSH.indd 97

2/19/19 9:56 AM


Forage

FOODARAMA

2

1

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 98

2/19/19 9:54 AM


3

99 |

FORAGE SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

Funky mushrumps are breaking ground all around. Enoki, Chanterelle, Reishi, Cordycep and King Trumpet—these toadstools come chock full of antioxidants and endurance-fueled properties. Having been staples of Eastern medicine for hundreds of years, they’re well overdue to go mainstream in the Western world, now sprouting up in unexpected places like spud-imbued energy bars and cold-brew co ee. Spore or less, fungi is having a moment.

1

Seared Maitake Maitake mushroom laid over Porcini puree with pickled beets, carrots, watermelon radish and parsnip. $15, Louies Modern, 1289 North Palm Ave., Sarasota, 941-552-9688, @louiesmodern. 2

SHROOM BOOM Take a magical trip with us to forage the latest crop of mind-bending mushroom dishes. WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN

4

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 99

Porto“Bellies” Tacos Smoked Portobellos compiled with house slaw, roasted tomatoes, crispy onions and cotija. in corn tortillas. $9, Brick’s Smoked Meats, 1528 State St., Sarasota, 941-993-1435, @bricks_smoked_meats. 3

Mushroom Riso- o Lion’s Mane and Oyster mushrooms sautéed with rice and rico a salata cheese, poured into a Chaga broth. $24.95, Lila, 1576 Main St., Sarasota, 941-296-1042, @lila_srq. 4

Wild Mushroom Bisque Rich, creamy soup avored with dried Porcinis, fresh Shiitakes and earthy Criminis, topped with brown bu er rye croutons and Tru e oil. $8, Indigenous, 239 South Links Ave., Sarasota, 941-706-4740, @indigenouschef.

2/19/19 9:54 AM


Forage

GUILTLESS PLEASURES 100 |

FORAGE SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

CAN OPY ROAD MARKET’S OR GAN IC VEGAN ‘CHEESECAKES’ mount the high dive for a no-splash, picture-book plunge, receiving all 10s across the board from vegans and desserties alike. Each Paleo-derived flavor surprises and delights foodsensitive sweet toothers with gluten-free, soy-free, dairy-free credentials. Combining beauty and decadence all in one score, Cami Gable of Canopy Road curates her crust from a silky blend of cashews and dates bound with coconut oil and maple syrup. With fun fillings created from wholesome, raw materials, appraise every flavor and leave any post-indulgence lamenting at the bottom of the deep end. WRITTEN BY BRITTANY MATTIE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WYATT KOSTYGAN Super Fruit Packing a nutritional punch with dragonfruit (pitaya), acai, blueberry and raspberry in conjunction with a healthful boost of super antioxidants and more than 10g of protein.

Chocolate Trinity Rich chocolate covered with decadent vegan ganache and topped with raw pecans and a dash of Himalayan salt.

Mango Passionfruit Organic mangos, locally harvested passion fruit pulp and fresh lime come together. Topped with passion fruit coulis and decorated with raw raspberry swirl.

Lime Avocado Combines the citrus tartness of limes and bu ery taste of avocados with a coconut whipped cream and shaved lime zest garnish.

Pumpkin Caramel Starting with a pecan crust, spiced pumpkin takes center stage. Topped with coconut milk whipped cream and a caramel sauce drizzle.

Blueberry Lemon Organic blueberries combined with fresh lemon juice for added zest on top of an almond/walnut/ date crust.

WHERE TO BUY 4/$20. Find Canopy Road Market’s toothsome treats every weekend at the Sarasota Farmers Market or at local stops—Owen’s Fish Camp, Artisan Cheese Co., Nutritious You, Veg Restaurant, CROP Juice, D’Lites Shoppe, Lelu Co ee Lounge, The Clever Cup Co ee Shop, Simon’s Co ee House and Co ee Breeze.

FORAGE_MAR19.indd 100

2/19/19 9:54 AM


Ads-MAR19.indd 101

2/17/19 1:27 PM


Collaborative Dialogue Dispatches | Case Study | Agenda | Rattlebag

Reconnoiter

STOPPING THE RED TIDE Tallahassee leaders want to curb another algae explosion in 2019. WRITTEN BY JACOB OGLES | ILLUSTRATION BY WOODY WOODMAN

for state representative last fall, one issue became inescapable. With no-swim advisories, rotting fish and hotel cancellations dominating headlines, the algal blooms savaging Florida’s west coast became an inescapable political issue.

WHEN WILL ROBINSON RAN

“Even at my victory party,” he recalls, “a supporter said to me, ‘Will, do something. Big or small; do something about red tide.’” So when now-state Rep. Robinson, R-Bradenton, arrived in Tallahassee, one of his first acts was the filing of legislation requiring septic tank inspections. He’s not the only lawmaker in Florida’s capital with algae on his mind. State Sen. Joe Gruters, R-Sarasota, quickly

RECONNOITER_SRQMAR19.indd 102

announced legislation to increase fines for sewage spills. Elsewhere, lawmakers filed legislation to fund water management projects around Lake Okeechobee, to fund incentives for septic-to-sewer conversions and to encourage research into the environmental conditions that caused an historic red tide on the coast last year. On top of it all, Gov. Ron DeSantis, 48 hours after his swearing in, signed an executive

order promising $2.5 billion in water quality initiatives over the next four years. In Sarasota, he announced the creation of a chief science officer position in his administration and met with Mote Marine Laboratory leaders about the best way to tackle algae moving forward. As the Florida Legislature prepared to convene for regular session on March 5, it’s clear there’s something new in the water. For Robinson, fighting red tide is more than a campaign promise. He ran for two years on an environmental platform, but things turned somewhat personal this year when the Robinson Preserve, a Manatee County park opened on

2/18/19 2:20 PM


AGENDA

"That would exacerbate a crisis. I just don't think fines, or threats of fines, are fair to the rate-payer and the citizens." —Tom Barwin, Sarasota City Manager

improvements to sewer systems. That means, for example, that the Sarasota spill would have resulted either in a $900,000 penalty, or the city could negotiate with the Department of Environmental Protection to exact $1.8 million in improvements instead. Sarasota City Manager Tom Barwin has looked at the bill, and while he appreciates the sentiment, fears the bill remains too punitive. As far as the spill in December goes, Barwin

says it was simply a failure in a pipe 50 years before it should have been replaced that caused the problem. The city prides itself on constant improvements. Indeed, in 2018, the city performed $12 million in upgrades to a utility that brought in $15 million operating in revenues. It’s not clear whether routine maintenance could count toward the fine alternative. But Barwin says if not for proper bypasses being installed in the city system, the spill could have been much worse, and rather than discharging sewage for hours, it could have gone on for days. If that led to a fine worth tens of millions, it could cripple the city. For a smaller municipal utility, it could bankrupt it. “That could exacerbate a crisis,” Barwin says. “I just don’t think fines, or threats of fines, are fair to the rate-payer and the citizens.” Gruters says he understands concerns. But right now, some major sewage spill gets reported somewhere in Florida each month. “It’s always an accident,” he says. But the consequences of pouring hundreds of thousands of gallons into waters where red tide bloomed a few months ago remain too high. SRQ

103 AGENDA SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

RECONNOITER_SRQMAR19.indd 103

says. But he stresses the focus isn’t on punishment but on finding solutions. The bill has provisions that say a utility, in lieu of a fine, can pay for $2-per-gallon worth of

|

land donated for public use by his grandfather, reported algae in its waterways for the first time. Indeed, no waterway in the region during the fall of 2018 proved immune to blooms, state officials say. Gil McRae, director of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, says a state of emergency ultimately had to be called in coastal counties from Bay County south around Florida’s tip to Broward County based on widespread reports of red tide. Ultimately, the state dumped more than $14 million in emergency spending last year toward cleaning up dead fish from beaches and vacuuming red tide from the sea. But there remains confusion even among scientists about what made last year the worst on record for red tide. Scientists say not since the 1940s has Florida experienced this type of event, but it has happened before. The timing of water discharges from Lake Okeechobee into the Caloosahatchee River in July, something that spawned blue-green algae blooms in the river, fed a widespread concern among environmentalists that nutrients there fed red tide when they hit estuaries and reached the Gulf of Mexico. “We’ve seen the result of bad water management practices,” says Daniel Andrews, executive director of Captains for Clean Water. There’s wide consensus that whatever caused red tide algae to spread to Florida beaches all along the coast, nutrient enrichment did exacerbate problems. But scientists also stressed that lawmakers need to carefully study the issues before jumping to conclusions. “Knee-jerk reactions can lead to bigger problems if we don’t deal with them in proper ways,” says Dr. Michael Crosby, president of Mote Marine Laboratory, to DeSantis during his Sarasota stop in January. And there’s already some concern that legislation proposed by lawmakers looks more toward showing commitment to the issue than solving the problem. Robinson looks to put septic inspections in place that Florida lawmakers a few years ago. And local municipal officials also worry whether Gruters’ proposal to charge $1-per-gallon fines for sewage spills will be too punitive. Gruters, though, after seeing the impacts of red tide, says his priority remains on accountability and on prevention of further environmental disasters. His legislation would institute fines whether a sewage spill comes from a private or public utility. He filed legislation days after a City of Sarasota sewer line rupture resulted in a 900,000-gallon spill into Sarasota Bay. “We need to make polluters pay, and we need to do everything we can to raise dollars to fully fund red tide research,” Gruters

Reconnoiter

2/18/19 2:20 PM


Wanderlust

HUTCHINSON SHORES RESORT & SPA

Barrier Island Zen

THE VIEW FROM OUR ROOM AT HUTCHINSON SHORES RESORT & SPA is a zen expanse of calming endless lines. A whit e band (the beach), a green band (the Atlantic) and a blue and whit e mo l ed band (the sky), each of which extends to the le and right horizons. Whatever worries and cares you had at home will fade into insigni cance. Welcome to a place of peace and restoration. WRITTEN BY WES ROBERTS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WES ROBERTS AND HUTCHINSON SHORES RESORT & SPA

T

he point of arrival for any resort tells you a lot about the experience that lies ahead. By that standard, the Hutchinson makes big promises when you come through the front doors. The lobby is spectacular. A three-story space offers a visual symphony of natural materials and beautiful understated beach colors, all designed around a pair of life-sized glass sailfish suspended from the high ceiling. As dramatic as the sailfish are, don’t let them distract you from the endless subtle touches. The gorgeous white stones that climb the walls, the reclaimed woods and the textured flooring all come together to make exploring the resort a harmonious experience. Tiny features abound, with one of my favorite being the flock of hanging glass globes that separate the bar from the lobby. Each glass orb captures the beach in miniature— white sand, driftwood, spiky shells and bits of dried lichen. Rooms at the Hutchinson are comfortable and spacious. We loved our small private balcony, and views directly onto the beach. In the morning, once we pulled back the smart black-out curtains, radiant sunlight made for a happy

WANDERLUST_SRQMAR19.indd 104

awakening. The breakfast menu is unusually lush, offering everything from french toast to grits, from smoked salmon to short rib hash, and from buttermilk pancakes to “create your own” omelettes. The kids ate with gusto. For adults, the Oceanside Mary is amazing. A signature Bloody Mary made with Tito’s Handmade Vodka, San Marzano tomatoes, lemon and celery juice, balsamic vinegar, grated horseradish, sea salt, Old Bay on the rim, and a garnish of pepper jack cheese, red piri, pepper stuffed olives and colossal shrimp counts as a complete breakfast in our opinion. Everything a relaxing parent needs on holiday. It’s easy to spend your day moving from pool to pool and enjoying the beautiful walk-able beach. There are multiple pools. The one beachside is perfect for sun-worshippers—the rear pool called to us. It’s bright and open to the sky, but for much of the day the building and the nearby palm trees throw some shade over the deck and the water. A pool with a little shade is something we consider to be a great perk. It’s nice to let the kids have all that extra swim-time with a little bit less sun exposure, and in our

2/18/19 6:05 PM


case, that also made it easy for Dad to watch the kids while Mom snuck off to the spa for what she reported to be a wonderful Opal Oasis Body Renewal massage. Be sure to check the beer menu. The Hutchinson stocks a wonderful selection of beers on draft, the best of which are born out of a partnership between the resort and the Clearwater, Florida-based Deep Blue Brewing. The Hutchinson IPA is excellent, with a lovely hint of citrus that captures the Florida spirit. My favorite was the Drift Tangerine Wheat. Wheat malts have been taking off recently with a lot of beer aficionados, and the Drift showcases why—sharp and bright with a clear color and just a touch of acid. The Bar Bites menu offers some excellent upscaled bar food done right, like the Drift Wings and Short Rib Slider. I was especially happy to see that the menu carried some lighter fare too. The Tuna Poke, made with avocado salsa, citrus ponzu, scallions, toasted sesame seeds and spiced orange oil, was as mouth-watering as it sounds. The kids demolished the Roasted Garlic Hummus and Crispy Flatbread. I’d tell you how it tasted, but it was gone before I got a chance to try it! That counts as a very enthusiastic recommendation from the younger set. And, while at the bar, be sure to enjoy one of the Hutchinson’s cocktails. For me, the Whisky Smash, Jim Beam Bourbon Whiskey, muddled mint and lemon, simple syrup topped with club soda, and garnished with mint and lemon, goes perfectly with the ocean view. We were looking forward to dinner on-site, but the hospitality staff insisted that we not miss The Gafford, a family-owned and operated restaurant in historic downtown Stuart. The Gafford has a comfortably casual interior with a creative and exciting menu. We fell in love with the Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower, highly recommended. The humbly named Meat and Cheese Board is expansive and decidedly creative. My eight-year-old son has become a Caesar salad fanatic, and he declared that The Gafford Caesar salad was “perfect!” This time I did manage to get a taste and he was right. The Gafford is known for their signature steak (tender and wonderful), and for Mabel’s

Opposite page: The Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa celebrates the both the Atlantic and the beach with oor to ceiling windows. A drying rack hold hand-cra ed pasta, soon to be ready for that night’s dinner service. This page: A tune poke on premises take a colorful, Florida turn with citrus ponzu, advocate salsa, and a spiced orange oil. The foyer of The Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa is a celebration of open spaces and natural materials.

WANDERLUST_SRQMAR19.indd 105

Fried Chicken (crunchy and traditional), but I am going to dedicate a whole paragraph to waxing poetic about the Salt and Pepper Smoked Sweet Potato. The Salt and Pepper Smoked Sweet Potato is a simple dish, but all by itself, it will bring me back to this excellent restaurant. A jumbo sweet potato is smoked for four hours and then stuffed with roasted local corn, house pico de gallo and avocado. A light ahi amarillo cream is then drizzled over it. Everything was perfectly balanced, and the soft sweet potato will come out of the casing in succulent scoops of your spoon. It warms its way to your stomach with each bite. Light, healthy and truly satisfying, the technique used, cooking by smoking, takes this humble tuber to high places. The sweet potato is offered as vegetarian, but can be adjusted to vegan, if desired. After dinner, be sure to leave time to wander the small shopping district. Many of the shops seem to close early, so we did more window-looking than shopping. Signature Sweets, an ice cream and chocolate shop, offered six(!) different types of over-the-top chocolate ice creams with great varieties like “Captain’s Chocolate” and “Baja Chocolate” to keep us happy. Stuart is a wonderful place for a family to vacation. The softer, slower pace is a welcome change from some more built-up parts of Florida. On the way in, we got off I-95 early and drove smaller roads so as to see more of the area. The wild growth that appears in much of Florida has clearly not swept the area yet. Humble houses do still sit on waterfront views, and areas that would be mega-malls and mega-developments in other regions are still populated with cows and lush grasses. This authentic, traditional Florida feel does not mean there is a lack of activities. Quite the contrary, I think many vacationers will find they cannot get to every destination in a weekend vacation, and there will be more left to do for next time. Children’s Museum of the Treasure Coast is quite near to the resort, and it was a great find for the kids. My fiveyear-old daughter spent almost an hour working hard as a veterinary doctor on an assortment of stuffed animals, while my son found his place on the two-story indoor pirate ship, complete with canons, exhibits and an intricate pulley system that the kids used to transfer “cannon balls” from the ground to the deck above.

2/18/19 6:06 PM


Wanderlust

AMARA CAY RESORT

56

This page, clockwise: Nurse sharks appear to snuggle up at the Florida Oceanographic Coastal Center. Welcoming faces at the Ital Bowls food truck o er all-fruit smoothies.The Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa breakfast bu et includes a delectable assortment of meats and cheeses. Children’s Museum of the Treasure Coast includes a child-sized veterinarian o c e, complete with needy, plushy animals.

WANDERLUST_SRQMAR19.indd 106

The Florida Oceanographic Society may not have a catchy name, but is a great eco-activity center with stingrays, sharks and sea turtles on exhibit. The staff really excels here. They have a passion for the work they do, and for the animals. We left well informed about the sea turtles, about the Everglades and about a recurring algae problem that has troubled local waters. And that’s not even getting started on the lifecycles of black drum fish and mangrove snappers. The kids liked having the freedom to run around as well—the shape and the layout of the park allowed us to give them this freedom to wander without ever really being out of our eyesight. In between attractions, we searched for a highly recommended local food truck called Ital Bowls. The happy young women manning the window were quick to tell us the healthy virtues of the acai and fruit bowls, the all-fruit smoothies and the organic “bullet” coffee, but all we know is that everything was delicious and filling, while leaving you energized. After our acai bowl lunches, instead of wanting to go back to the Hutchinson for a nap, we had the energy to spare. And we needed it; there was more to see. The Elliott Museum is hard to explain, but well worth a visit. Sterling Elliott was a successful mechanical inventor who lived from 1852 to 1922. His creative mind made him a fortune, and a portion of that fortune was turned into a collection designed to inspire. This modern glass building houses a tremendous collection of classic cars, trucks, bicycles and boats, baseball memorabilia, local history, Americana, a variety of art, a tribute to actress Frances Langford, a Foucault pendulum and examples of Mr. Elliott’s inventions. The crowning jewel has to be the

three-story garage housing dozens of classic cars on an open framework. A robot arm lifts the cars, one at a time, and brings them down to be admired for a bit, before swapping the car for another. It’s sort of hypnotizing, and the whole family placed bets on which car was coming down next. Something about the way the space is designed and the overwhelming randomness really snagged the kids’ imaginations. Historical museums can be a hard sell for children, but they were in no hurry to leave the Elliott. The House of Refuge Museum is a home run for any history buff. At the turn of the last century, there were “refuge house” established down the Atlantic coast of Florida. Their purpose was to offer succor to survivors of shipwrecks who managed to find their way to shore. This museum is installed in the only original refuge still standing. Sitting on one of the most beautiful beaches in Florida, the House of Refuge is a deep dive of historical artifacts and information. I could have stayed all day, reading plaques and imagining life in centuries past. Back at the resort, we discovered that the restaurant has a special surprise. A large glass window allows guests to watch the chefs working their pasta-maker, cutting the different varieties and then sending it all straight into a pot of boiling water. Order pasta for dinner and it comes from the freshly made stock of the day. After watching the pasta be made, the kids couldn’t wait for dinner. The chef at the Hutchinson has developed a menu that is consistently good, and surprising creative. I wish we could have tried all the house pastas—they offer spaghetti, rigatoni, penne, linguini, bucatini and pappardelle, each in its own signature dish, and each sounding better than the last. I chose the Old Country Pappardelle, with braised short rib, garden tomatoes, roasted garlic, imported pecorino, and Tuscan kale, and was very happy I did so. The menu also offers Tuscan Chicken—chicken medallions topped with prosciutto ham and fontina cheese, that was perfect for the kids, and a house-brined Duroc Center Cut Pork Chop that came juicy and delicious. We ordered the Rustica woodfired pizza as well. Assessing the menu, we realized that there were five pastas and three pizzas we had not tried, but that’s fine, it just leaves something for next time. An ideal vacation spot is one that you feel calling you to return, even as you pack to leave. Stuart, Florida, and the Hutchinson Shores Resort & Spa had tantalized us with full days and happy tastebuds, but we left knowing there was still more to see, eat, and do. So, fair warning, a trip to the Hutchinson is probably the start of a new family tradition, and that’s very high praise indeed. SRQ

2/18/19 6:06 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 107

2/17/19 1:28 PM


Coconut Telegraph

STORIES FROM OUR CLIENTS AND PARTNERS

108 |

COCONUT TELEGRAPH SRQ MAGAZINE | MARCH 2019

Genoa Debut and Female Veterans NEW STOCK SIGNATURE MODEL DEBUTS IN GENOA Along with the newest luxury enclave, Genoa, The Lake

Club in Lakewood Ranch will be home to eight new Stock Signature Homes’ models later this month. Each of Stock’s eight models will feature three distinct design styles for buyers to choose from and will offer th finest in luxury appointments available. Among the new models is the Easton. Carefully crafted by designers at Robb & Stucky Furniture and Interiors, the interior design combines classic and modern styles with transitional accents and a color palette including beautiful shades of white, grey and teal. The model will offer fou bedrooms, three full and one-half bath, great room, study, and three-car garage within its 2,864 square feet of air-conditioned living space. thelakeclublwr.com long-term disability among Americ ans. In an e ort to enhance the diagnosis and tr eatment of str oke among our ar ea residents, Manatee Memorial Hospital announces the opening of the county’s rst Biplane Int erventional Radiology Suite, featuring the Az urion image guided therapy system from Philips Healthcare. This exible system can aid in the diagnosis and tr eatment of a range of patient conditions including stroke, cancer, biliary disease, or vascular disease, using minimally in vasive procedures. The c atheter-based procedures are designed to reduce some of the risks and r ecovery time found in tr aditional surgical approaches. Among the man y bene ts of catheter-based interventions are shorter hospital stays, reduced recovery time without the pain of a large incision, and less visible surgical scarring. manateememorial.com RINGLING COLLEGE VR PROGRAM LAUNCHES WITH FLIGHT SCHOOL PA RTNERSHIP Ringling C ollege has partnered up with Flight School to create a program that provides students with the opportunity to develop a real, playable, and commercial Virtual Reality (VR) game. Flight School brings expertise in the programming side of the game industry and the groundwork of game mechanics to enable the students to build the aesthetics of a playable game. The students receive handson experience designing for virtual reality and learn about the production of VR a ssets. The added bene t is that the studio gets the fr esh thinking and design skills of the students t o create a beautiful end product. The very rst Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) program in Virtual R eality Development enrolled its rst students in the fall of 2018. As the College forges its Virtual Reality Development program, a major c omponent will be the student collaboration with Flight School. Each year, a select group of students will w ork with the studio t o create a pla yable game. In this inaugural year of the partnership, three Game Art students ha ve been w orking with Flight School t o create a VR game that will be intr oduced at SXSW 2019. In addition, students in the Business of Art and Design, Graphic Design, Illustration, and Motion Design major s will be w orking with the team to brand and market the game thr ough the the Ringling College Design Center and the Ringling College Collaboratory, which connects businesses to Ringling students. In all, more than two dozen students will tackle the project through multiple immersive workshops. ringling.edu FIRST BIPLA NE INTERVENTIONA L RA DIOLOGY SUITE OPENS IN COUNTY According to the Americ an Stroke Association, in the Unit ed States someone s u ers a stroke every 40 sec onds and it is the le ading cause of serious

UPFRONT_SRQMAR19_COCO.indd 108

FEMA LE VETERA NS HONORED WITH DOCUMENTA RY High school sta and cadets at Sarasota Military Academy (SMA), a local public chart er school, r ecently created a documentary to recognize and celebrate female veterans that served in WWII. A er the project was completed, the cadets presented the documentary to local female veterans during a luncheon host ed at Atria Senior Living in Sarasota. Those in a endance were given a photo book and copy of the documentary highlighting their service and stories. “At a time when w omen’s positions in society w ere more de ned and traditional, these strong and inspirational women became role models-not just for those around them, but for our young cadets today,” says SMA Captain Jennifer Vanston, IB/AP US History Instructor. “It was an honor for all of us to meet these amazing women and learn about some of our country’s history through their life stories.” sarasotamilitaryacademy.com INNOVATING A G REENER FUTURE Selby Gardens marks an important moment in its hist ory as the organization strives to preserve its legacy and sustain the future for generations to come with the transformational Master Plan. Upon c ompletion of the Ma ster Plan, the Gardens will add y percent more green space, safeguard and sho wcase the w orld’s best scienti cally documented collections of or chids and br omeliads, accommodate the r apidly growing visitor base, and c onnect underserved families and chil dren in the region to nature and Selby Gardens. It will also set Selby on-course as an int ernationally recognized leader in s ustainable energy as the rst N et P ositive Energy complex at an y botanical garden in the w orld. Since the launch of the c ampaign in October 2018, several new leadership gi s totaling nearly $10 million, have been made to Innovating a Greener Future - Living Inspiration for a Living Museum: The C ampaign for Selby Gardens. A total of $31.5 million has now been secured, which is 74 percent of what is needed to reach the Phase One goal of $42.5 million. selby.org

2/18/19 2:11 PM


STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

STORYPROJECT

CAREEREDGE FAST-TRACK TRAINING NAME GILBERTO TITLE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN EMPLOYER SUNSET AUTOMOTIVE GROUP WHY THIS PROGRAM? Gilberto’s career began in Venezuela, where he had worked his way up to Regional Manager with a distribution company. Gilberto eventually left the company to start his own distribution business, but with Venezuela’s financial and political issues, he was forced out of business. In pursuit of the American Dream and the opportunity to provide for his family, Gilberto moved with his daughter to the U.S. and began working in a factory. After a few months in the factory, he discovered CareerEdge’s Automotive Fast-Track training at Suncoast Technical College. Gilberto recently completed the training and is employed at Sunset Automotive Group as a full-time Automotive Technician. His salary increased 18% after completing the training and making the move to Sunset Automotive Group.

WHAT GILBERTO’S EMPLOYER IS SAYING ABOUT THIS PROGRAM: JENNIFER GARDNER, RECRUITING AND RISK MANAGER

Contact Mireya Eavey, CareerEdge’s Chief Workforce Officer, for ways you can support CareerEdge’s efforts.

CareerEdgeFunders.org careeredgeinfo@uwsuncoast.org (941) 328-6984

SRQMAR19-CareerEdge.indd 109

There is a continued need for trained service technicians in the automotive industry. This program addresses this shortage by connecting individuals with jobs, and then training them using a hands-on, accelerated training model. Once employed, students can take advantage of opportunities to develop professionally and earn a significant income. The number of available positions in the auto technician field exceeds the number of technicians, keeping recruitment efforts a priority for Sunset Automotive. CareerEdge’s Fast-Track training plays a critical role in keeping our companies operating by increasing the size of our skilled workforce, allowing us to serve clients well into the future. Sunset Automotive Group was thrilled to see Gilberto and his family at graduation, and Gilberto was equally excited to introduce them to his new career path.

HOW YOU CAN HELP BUILD OUR LOCAL WORKFORCE? SUPPORT FAST-TRACK TRAINING WITH BETTER FUNDING CareerEdge offers Fast-Track training in HVAC, electrical, plumbing, broadband and automotive fields. Through partnerships with local businesses, these training programs provide the skills and on-the-job training that employers and our community critically need. Join our generous donors in supporting our Fast-Track training to help boost our local workforce.

2/17/19 4:41 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 110

2/17/19 1:28 PM


Ads-MAR19.indd 111

2/17/19 1:28 PM

Profile for SRQME

SRQ Magazine | Love Local March 2019  

Meet the Home of the Year Competition winners for 2019 with gorgeous spreads of immaculate, award-winning, residential spaces, read about th...

SRQ Magazine | Love Local March 2019  

Meet the Home of the Year Competition winners for 2019 with gorgeous spreads of immaculate, award-winning, residential spaces, read about th...

Profile for srqme