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The Gourgas Medal

Scottish Rite of Freemasonry Supreme Council, 33° Northern Masonic Jurisdiction


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The following members of the Supreme Council and Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library staff are gratefully acknowledged for their time, support, and sound advice: John William McNaughton, 33°, Sovereign Grand Commander; Richard V. Travis, 33°, Active Member and Executive Director of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, Inc.; Richard B. Burgess, 33°, Supreme Council; Jeffrey Croteau and John Coelho, Van Gorden-Williams Library; and Aimee Newell and Maureen Harper, Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Their contributions made this publication possible.

Supreme Council, 33° Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction Lexington, Massachusetts 02420-0519 © 2015 by Supreme Council, 33° All rights reserved.

Linda Patch Editor

David Gerratt Designer, NonprofitDesign.com

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T h e G o u r gas M edal

The most distinguished award conferred by the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction is the Gourgas Medal. It is named in honor of John James Joseph Gourgas, 33°, the founder of the Supreme Council, the organization’s governing body. Recipients are chosen by the Supreme Council or by the Scottish Rite’s Sovereign Grand Commander. Any member the Scottish Rite’s Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, or Freemasons of any other jurisdiction with which the Scottish Rite has good relations, can be chosen for the award. The Gourgas medal is given in recognition of “notably distinguished service in the cause of Freemasonry, humanity, or country.” Only 38 Gourgas Medals have been awarded since the decoration was established in 1938.

contents 4 Harry S. Truman, 33° (1884–1972) 6 Melvin Maynard Johnson, 33° (1871–1957) 7 King Gustav, 33° (1858–1950) 8 Kaufman T. Keller, 33° (1885–1966) 9 Roscoe Pound, 33° (1870–1964) 10 Winfred Overholser, M.D., 33° (1892–1964) 11 Mark Wayne Clark, 33° (1896–1984) 12 George E. Bushnell, 33° (1887–1965) 13 Christian A. Herter, 33° (1895–1966) 14 Edward W. Wheeler, 33° (1876–1963) 15 Fred P. Corson, 33° (1896–1985) 16 Richard A. Kern, M.D., 33° (1891–1982) 17 George A. Newbury, 33° (1895–1984) 18 John W. Bricker, 33° (1893–1986) 19 Norman Vincent Peale, 33° (1898–1993) 20 Gerald R. Ford, Jr., 33° (1913–2006) 21 Robert P. Taylor, 33° (1910–1997) 22 Stanley F. Maxwell, 33° (1910–1997) 23 George E. Gardner, M.D., 33° (1903–1982) 24 Robert H. Felix, M.D., 33° (1904–1990) 25 Louis L. Williams, 33° (1899–1990) 26 John H. Van Gorden, 33° (1899–2002) 27 Edmund F. Ball, 33° (1905–2000) 28 Warren N. Barr, Sr., 33° (1906–1990) 29 Raymond C. Ellis, 33° (1897–1996) 30 Thomas F. Seay, 33° (1903–1994) 31 Francis G. Paul, 33° (1921–1996) 32 Charles E. Spahr, 33° (1913–2009) 33 Richard B. “Red” Skelton, 33° (1913–1997) 34 Carl H. Lindner, Jr., 33° (1919–2011) 35

robert o. ralston, 3°

36 John h. Glenn, Jr., 33°

(1938-2018) (1921-2016)

37 W. Clement Stone, 33° (1902–2002) 38 Samuel Brogdon, Jr., 33° (1926–2004) 39 Walter E. Webber, 33° (1943–2006) 40

ronald a. seale, 33° (b. 1948)

41

arnold d. Palmer, 33° (1929-2016)

41 John William McNaughton, 33° (b. 1950) 44 About the Scottish Rite 46 Photo Credits

Scottish Rite of Freemasonry | THE GOURGAS MEDAL | 1


John James Joseph Gourgas (1777–1865) “ C onse r v ato r o f t h e S cott i s h R i te ”

T

he Gourgas Medal is named in honor of John James Joseph Gourgas (1777–1865), the founder of the Scottish Rite Supreme Council of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. He is a seminal figure in the history of the organization, and one of the outstanding contributors to the preservation, prestige, and growth of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. At the 125th anniversary of the founding of the Supreme Council in 1938, the year the Gourgas Medal honor was established, Sovereign Grand Commander Melvin M. Johnson stated “. . . the outstanding personality of the founders was John James Joseph Gourgas. It was he who kept the Scottish Rite alive during the years when—but for him—it would have faded out. It was Gourgas . . . who re-vivified the Rite after the great anti-Masonic agitation, and then started our Supreme Council on its career to become the strong, virile, and successful organization which it now is.” Gourgas’s efforts to preserve and safeguard the rituals and records of the organization during the years of anti-Masonic sentiment earned him the title, “Conservator of the Scottish Rite.” J. J. J. Gourgas became a Mason in 1806, and seven years later was elevated to the prestigious 33°. He served as the first Secretary General and as the third Sovereign Grand Commander of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction from 1832 to 1851. Gourgas was born in Switzerland and moved to America in 1803. He lived briefly in Boston then moved to New York City, where he worked as an accountant and later

prospered as a merchant. He died in New York City in 1865 and was buried in Bayview-New York Bay Cemetery in Jersey City, New Jersey. The gravesite fell into neglect, but was rediscovered and rededicated by the Scottish Rite Supreme Council Northern Jurisdiction in 1958. After falling into disrepair again, the site was rededicated in 2009, with the New Jersey Council of Deliberation guaranteeing that the impressively refurbished memorial will receive perpetual care.

The Gourgas medal is given in recognition of “notably distinguished service in the cause of Freemasonry, humanity, or country.”

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The Gourgas Medal Recipients

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Harry S. Truman, 33° (1884–1972) President, United States of America G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 4 5

Harry S. Truman became the 33rd President of the United States upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt in April 1945. Truman, who had only a high-school education and had been vice president for just 82 days before FDR’s sudden death, inherited the monumental task of leading the United States through the end of World War II and the beginning of the Cold War. Under his command during the final months of the war, the United States dropped two atomic bombs— the first to be used in warfare—on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, effectively ending the war. For many Americans, Truman’s legacy as the nation’s leader centers on these controversial decisions. Truman’s legacy also includes the founding of the United Nations, issuance of the Truman Doctrine to contain Communism, and passing the $13 billion Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. He oversaw the Berlin Airlift in 1948, and was instrumental in the creation of NATO in 1949. President Truman was an active Freemason for more than 63 years, and was known to be an enthusiastic ritualist. He joined the Fraternity in Belton, Missouri, in 1909, and belonged to a number of Masonic organizations, including the Scottish Rite. Truman served as Master of lodges while an active politician, and rose to the position of Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Missouri in 1940. He attended Masonic lodge meetings while campaigning, and while he was president, wrote, “The greatest honor that has ever come to me, and that can ever come to me in my life, is to be Grand Master of Masons in Missouri.”

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Harry S. Truman Born in Lamar, Missouri, May 8, 1884 Died in Kansas City, Missouri, December 26, 1972

In 1945 the Scottish Rite honored President Truman with the prestigious 33°. He was, at the time, the only president to be accorded this honor. He was also awarded the Gourgas Medal that same year. Upon his death, a Masonic eulogy was delivered and he was buried with Masonic rites in Independence, Missouri.


M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Truman was raised a Master Mason in Belton Lodge in Missouri in 1909. In 1911, he helped establish Missouri’s Grandview Lodge, and he served as its first Worshipful Master. In 1940, during his Senate re-election campaign, Truman was elected Grand Master of the Missouri Grand Lodge of Freemasonry. He later said that the Masonic election assured his victory in the general election. In 1945, Truman was created a 33° Sovereign Grand Inspector General, Honorary Member of the Scottish Rite Supreme Council. In 1945, he was awarded the Gourgas Medal, the Supreme Council’s highest honor.

“The greatest honor that has ever come to me, and that can ever come to me in my life, is to be Grand Master of Masons in Missouri.” H arry S . T ru ma n

Truman was also a member of Sons of the American Revolution and Sons of Confederate Veterans.

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Melvin Maynard Johnson, 33° (1871–1957) Sovereign Grand Commander, 1933–1953 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 4 6

The scope of Melvin Maynard Johnson’s influence and authority in the Scottish Rite is immeasurable. He is considered by many scholars to be the greatest American Freemason of the 20th century. Johnson was Grand Master of Massachusetts Freemasons from 1913 to 1916, and was elected the Scottish Rite’s first full-time Sovereign Grand Commander, serving in that capacity for 20 years. Johnson led the Scottish Rite through the Great Depression and World War II, stewarding a membership that grew from 208,000 in 1935 to 422,051 in 1953. Johnson established the Scottish Rite Benevolent Foundation and created the Schizophrenia Research Program. Funding for research into this psychological disorder remained one of the Scottish Rite’s central charities for many decades. Johnson was also widely published and was considered expert on the history of early American Freemasonry. His 1924 book, The Beginnings of Freemasonry in America, remains an important work today. Johnson was a practicing attorney who also taught and served as dean at Boston University Law School.

Melvin Maynard Johnson, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, 1933–1953 Born in Waltham, Massachusetts, May 11, 1871 Died in Boston, Massachusetts, December 18, 1957

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Melvin Maynard Johnson was raised a Master Mason in Monitor Lodge in Waltham, Massachusetts, in 1892, and served as its Worshipful Master from 1902–1903. He served as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts from 1913–1916. He was also a member of Waltham Chapter, R.A.M.; Adoniram Council, Royal and Select Masters; and Gethsemane Commandery, K.T. (later affiliating with Sir Galahad Commandery and with St. Bernard Commandery). Johnson was also active in the Shrine, Red Cross of Constantine, and DeMolay. He was Vice President of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association from 1916–1920. Johnson received his Scottish Rite Degrees in 1904–1905 in Boston. He was Thrice Potent Master of Boston Lafayette Lodge of Perfection (1917–1918). He was created a Sovereign 6 | Supreme Council, 33° | Northern Masonic Jurisdiction

Melvin Maynard Johnson is considered by many scholars to be the greatest American Freemason of the 20th century. Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1914, and was crowned an Active Member in 1920. He was named the Scottish Rite’s first full-time Sovereign Grand Commanderand served from 1933–1953. Johnson was awarded the Gourgas Medal, the Scottish Rite’s highest honor, in 1946.


King Gustav, 33° (1858–1950) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 4 9

King Gustav V was personally involved in distributing funds collected by Masons in the United States for the relief of displaced European Masons living as refugees at the end of World War II.

Gustavus V was King of Sweden from 1907–1950, and was a Freemason for more than 73 years. He is remembered in the fraternity for his personal involvement in distributing funds collected by Masons in the United States at the end of World War II for the relief of displaced European Masons living as refugees. He was also instrumental in the rebuilding and restoration of Masonic buildings in Europe damaged in the war. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

King Gustav, 33° Born in Ekerö, Sweden, June 6, 1858 Died in Stockholm, Sweden, October 29, 1950

Gustavus V was raised a Master Mason in 1877 at Den Nordiska Första St. Johanneslogen, the premier St. John’s Lodge in Scandinavia. At the time he joined, Gustav was already the crown prince of Sweden and Norway. He held several high offices in the lodge before becoming Grand Master of Sweden in 1907, upon the death of his father, King Oscar II. Gustav V served as Sweden’s Grand Master until his death. He remained active in Freemasonry throughout his life and was particularly interested in ritual work. In 1947, Gustav V was made an honorary Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of England. In 1949, he received the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction’s highest honor, the Gourgas Medal. He was the third person to be so honored.

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Kaufman T. Keller, 33° (1885–1966) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 5 2

“Father of America’s guided missile,” “giant of the automobile industry,” “patron of the arts, and ardent devotee of Freemasonry” are phrases used to describe the highly accomplished Kaufman T. Keller. Born of Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania, Keller began working at age 13 as a drill press operator. At 25, the nascent automobile industry drew him to Michigan. He worked his way from master mechanic at Buick to chief executive officer at Chrysler Corporation. In 1950, Kaufman was “drafted” by President Harry Truman to direct 15,000 researchers and workers in the development of the guided missile. He remained in that position until the end of the Korean conflict. Kaufman also served the U.S. government by launching a merchant-marine program, and had plans to develop the M-3 tank. Kaufman was a devoted Freemason for more than 47 years. He was a frequent participant in Scottish Rite activities in Detroit, and known as a lively raconteur. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Kaufman T. Keller, 33°, was raised a Master Mason in Fellowship Lodge No. 490, Flint, Michigan, in 1919. He also held membership in Cedar Lodge No. 270 of Oshawa, Ontario, and in Corinthian Lodge No. 241 of Detroit. He was a member of King Cyrus Chapter No. 113, R.A.M.; National Sojourners No. 1 of Detroit; Moslem Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; St. Clement Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine; the Walter P. Chrysler and the Boulevard Shrine Clubs; Detroit Commandery No. 1, K.T.; and the Scottish Rite Bodies of the Valley of Detroit. Kaufman was named a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1942. This “truly dedicated Mason” was awarded the Gourgas Medal in 1952.

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Kaufman T. Keller, 33° Born in Mount Joy, Pennsylvania, November 27, 1885 Died in London England, January 21, 1966

“Father of America’s guided missile” and “giant of the automobile industry” describe the highly accomplished Kaufman T. Keller.


Roscoe Pound, 33° (1870–1964) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 5 2

Roscoe Pound is considered one of the most out- standing legal and Masonic scholars of his day. After receiving his B.A. from the University of Nebraska at the age of 18, he entered Harvard Law School and completed his formal legal education in just one year. He became dean of Harvard Law School in 1916, a position he held for more than 20 years. Pound was made a Mason in 1901 and he devoted more than 50 years to the craft, including serving as Deputy Grand Master of Masons in Massachusetts. He is a universally recognized scholar of Masonic jurisprudence and philosophy, having written a book on each of those subjects. In 1953 the Scottish Rite Supreme Council published a 384-page compilation of his prolific and inspirational lectures in the book, Masonic Addresses and Writings. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Roscoe Pound was raised a Master Mason in Lancaster Lodge No. 54 in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1901, and became its Master in 1905. He affiliated with Evans Lodge No. 524 in Evanston, Illinois, in 1909, and Belmont Lodge, Belmont, Massachusetts, in 1912. He became a Charter Member of The Harvard Lodge at Harvard University in 1923. Pound served the Grand Lodge of Nebraska as Grand Orator from 1906–1908, and in 1949 was elected Past Grand Master of Masons in that state. In 1934 he received the Henry Price Medal from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and in 1939 the Annual Distinguished Achievement Award from the Grand Lodge of New York. The Scottish Rite Degrees were received in the Valley of Lincoln, Nebraska in 1912. He was elected Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1913. Pound was awarded the Gourgas Medal, the highest honor bestowed by the Scottish Rite Supreme Council, in 1952.

Roscoe Pound, 33° Born in Lincoln, Nebraska, October 27, 1870 Died in Cambridge, Massachusetts, July 1, 1964

Roscoe Pound is considered one of the most outstanding legal and Masonic scholars of his day.

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Winfred Overholser, M.D., 33° (1892–1964) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 5 3

Winfred Overholser, M.D. was a psychiatrist, president of the American Psychiatric Association, and for 25 years, the superintendent of St. Elizabeth’s Hospital, a federal institution for the mentally ill in Washington, D.C. For more than 50 years, through its Benevolent Foundation, the Scottish Rite, supported basic research in schizophrenia at leading laboratories, hospitals, and universities throughout the United States and Canada. Dr. Overholser served as the Scottish Rite strategist in support of this research. Together with an advisory group of noted scientists and physicians, Dr. Overholser oversaw the selection of projects in schizophrenia research that would receive funding from the Scottish Rite. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Winfred Overholser was raised a Master Mason in Siloam Lodge, Westborough, Massachusetts, in 1918. He was elected Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1957. He was awarded the Gourgas Medal in 1953. Overholser was also a member of Aleppo Shrine Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., Boston; the National Sojourners at Bethesda, Maryland; Jerusalem Chapter No. 8, R.A.M., New York City, and Boston Commandery No. 1, K.T., Boston, Massachusetts.

Winfred Overholser, M.D., 33° Born in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1892 Died in Washington, D.C., October 6, 1964

Winfred Overholser served as the strategist in support of schizophrenia research that received funding from the Scottish Rite.

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Mark Wayne Clark, 33° (1896–1984) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 5 4

Mark Wayne Clark was an American general who served in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. He was the youngest three-star general in the United States Army. During World War I, he commanded a company of soldiers in the 11th Infantry and was seriously wounded in the Vosges Mountains. In World War II, Clark served as Commanding General of the Corps in England, and Deputy Commander in Chief of the North African Campaign. In 1944, he led the Allied 5th Army, and later commanded the 15th Army Group in the Italian campaign that liberated Rome. General Clark was awarded many medals, including the Distinguished Service Cross, the U.S. Army’s second highest award. Following his retirement from the military, he began a second career as president of The Citadel. In recognition of his distinguished military career and his devotion to Masonry, in 1946 Clark was named a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, and Honorary Member of the Supreme Council. In 1954 he was awarded the Gourgas Medal for his service to our country and to the Fraternity.

Mark Wayne Clark Born in Madison Barricks, New York, May 1, 1896 Died in Charleston, South Carolina, April 14, 1984

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Mark Wayne Clark was raised a Master Mason in 1929 at Mystic Tie Lodge in Indianapolis, Indiana. In 1968, the Grand Lodge of Indiana awarded him the Caleb B. Smith Medal of Honor. He joined the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Indianapolis in 1930, was named a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1946. The Gourgas Medal for notably distinguished service in the cause of “Freemasonry, humanity, and country” was awarded to Clark in 1954.

Mark Wayne Clark commanded the 15th Army Group in the Italian campaign that liberated Rome in World War II.

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George E. Bushnell, 33° (1887–1965) Sovereign Grand Commander, 1953–1965 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 5 6

George E. Bushnell’s professional and Masonic records are long and distinguished. Born and raised in Virginia, Bushnell moved to Detroit as a young man, where he studied law. During World War I, he served as Captain in the United States Army and as a Trial Judge Advocate presiding over many General Courts Martial. In 1933, Bushnell was elected to the Michigan Supreme Court, where he served for 22 years. He stepped down from the bench when he was appointed Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction in order to serve the Fraternity. Bushnell was dedicated to the Scottish Rite’s pioneering support of mental health research, particularly the Schizophrenia Research Program. He was highly effective in building the Scottish Rite’s Benevolent Foundation, which supports the Scottish Rite’s charities and humanitarian services. During his 11 years as Sovereign Grand Commander, he raised more than $3 million for the Foundation.

George E. Bushnell was dedicated to the Scottish Rite’s

George E. Bushnell, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, 1953–1965 Born in Roanoke, Virginia, November 4, 1887 Died in Cleveland, Ohio, September 30, 1965

pioneering Schizophrenia Research Program.

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Bushnell rose through the ranks of Scottish Rite leadership first becoming Grand Lieutenant Commander in 1945, and was then elected Sovereign Grand Commander in 1954 in Boston, Massachusetts. He received the Gourgas Medal in 1956 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

George E. Bushnell was raised a Master Mason in Taylor Lodge No. 23, Salem, Virginia, in 1909. He served as Worshipful Master of Sojourners Lodge No. 483, Detroit in 1925. Bushnell received the Scottish Rite degrees in Detroit in 1924, and was created Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council, in 1925. He was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1934, and appointed Deputy for Michigan in 1936.

Bushnell was also a member of Moslem Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., Detroit; St. Clement’s Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine; Royal Order of Scotland; National Sojourners, Detroit Chapter No. 1; Honorary Member of the Grand United Imperial Council, Red Cross of Constantine; Active Member-at-Large, International Supreme Council Order of DeMolay, and Honorary Life Member of the DeMolay Legion of Honor.

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Christian A. Herter, 33° (1895–1966) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 5 9

Christian A. Herter was a politician and statesman. He served as the 59th governor of Massachusetts from 1953 to 1957, and as United States Secretary of State under President Dwight D. Eisenhower from 1959 to 1961. Under President John F. Kennedy, he was responsible for negotiating the so-called Kennedy Round of Tariffs. Herter worked tirelessly on efforts he believed would create a more peaceful and united world. To that end, he founded the School for Advanced International Studies, which is now considered one of the most important graduate schools at Johns Hopkins University. A Mason for more than 30 years, Herter was elected to receive the Scottish Rite’s honorary 33° in 1953. He spent a lifetime in service to state, nation, and the world community, and in pursuit of the Masonic ideal of universal brotherhood. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Christian Herter was raised a Master Mason in Mount Tabor Lodge, Boston, in 1932, and became a member of Nantascot Lodge, Hingham, Massachusetts, in 1955. He was a member of St. Paul’s Royal Arch Chapter, 1936; St. Bernard Commandery No. 12, K.T., 1937; and Boston Council, Royal and Select Masters in 1938. In 1939, Herter received the Scottish Rite Degrees in the Valley of Boston. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1953, in Chicago. He was awarded the Gourgas Medal for distinguished service in 1959.

Christian A. Herter, 33° Born in Paris, France, March 28, 1895 Died in Washington, D.C., December 30, 1966

As a politician and statesman, Christian A. Herter worked tirelessly to create a more peaceful and united world.

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Edward W. Wheeler, 33° (1876–1963) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 6 3

Edward W. Wheeler’s lifetime of accomplishments have an Horatio Alger quality to them. After his father’s early death, Wheeler was forced to work multiple jobs to help support his family and to pay his way through Bowdoin College. He went on to earn a law degree, serve in the Maine state senate, and as a member the Maine Governor’s Council. He was Town Moderator for Brunswick, Maine, for more than 50 years, and served as Bowdoin’s legal counsel from 1926 to 1952. Wheeler was a Freemason for more than 60 years, with a notable and distinguished record of service in the Scottish Rite, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias. He was an Active Member of the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite and Grand Master of Masons in the State of Maine. A man of keen financial insight, Wheeler served as Treasurer of the Scottish Rite Supreme Council for 12 years, and guided the Scottish Rite’s investment portfolio in his role as Chairman of the Investment Committee. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Edward W. Wheeler was raised a Master Mason in United Lodge No. 8 of Brunswick, Maine, in 1900, holding the rank of Worshipful Master in 1916. He was Grand Master of the state of Maine from 192–1921. He received the Scottish Rite degrees in Portland, Maine in 1907. Wheeler was elected a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1922, and was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council at Indianapolis in 1932. He guided the Scottish Rite’s Investment Committee for many years. Wheeler was awarded the prestigious Gourgas Medal in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1963.

Edward W. Wheeler, 33° Born in Brunswick, Maine, April 12, 1876 Died in Portland, Maine, November 1, 1963

Wheeler held a number of other Masonic offices including Illustrious Master of Mount Vernon Council No. 2, R. & S.M., and Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery, K.T., of Maine. He was a member of Kora Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and the Knights of Pythias.

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Edward W. Wheeler’s lifetime of accomplishments have an Horatio Alger quality to them.


Fred P. Corson, 33° (1896–1985) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 6 4

Fred P. Corson was the youngest man to be elected President of Dickinson College in Pennsylvania in 1934 at the age of 38. He was a distinguished parliamentarian, a master in the art of communication, a champion for the rights of others, and an in-demand commentator on world affairs. He served as religious advisor to the armed forces in Europe and Asia, and made 23 world tours to study conditions in education and government in foreign countries. Corson was a Bishop in the United Methodist Church for 24 years and received the World Outlook Award for Methodist of the Year in 1964. In his Masonic career, which spanned more than 65 years, he received more than 30 earned and honorary Masonic awards. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Fred P. Corson was raised a Master Mason in Madison Lodge No. 93, in Madison, New Jersey, in 1919, and later transferred his membership to Community Lodge No. 1028 of New York, and then to Cumberland Lodge No. 197 of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He served as Chaplain of Community Lodge and Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. He was exalted in Roosevelt Chapter No. 316, R.A.M. in 1921; became a charter member of St. John’s Council No. 5, R. & S.M. in 1944, and was knighted in York Commandery No. 55, K.T., of New York in1929. He later affiliated with the York Rite Bodies of Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Corson completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Philadelphia in 1946, and was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council, in Philadelphia in 1950. He was awarded the Gourgas Medal in Michigan in 1964.

Fred P. Corson, 33° Born in Milleville, New Jersey, April 11, 1896 Died in St. Petersburg, Florida, February 16, 1985

Fred P. Corson served as religious advisor to the armed forces in Europe and Asia, and made 23 world tours to study education and government in foreign countries.

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Richard A. Kern, M.D., 33° (1891–1982) Honorary Sovereign Grand Commander, 1972 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 6 4

Richard A. Kern, M.D. was a physician, Navy admiral, and professor. His career in the United State Navy spanned from World War I to his retirement from the U.S. Naval Reserves in 1955. His accomplishments and commendations, and the committees on which he served in the military are numerous. He was presented with the Department of Defense Distinguished Public Service Medal in 1960. His medical accomplishments, professorships, and committee work are also legendary. Dr. Kern worked tirelessly for 34 years to promote the Scottish Rite’s commitment to schizophrenia research, as evidenced by his statement that “money used for services, no matter how urgent the need for those services, once spent, is gone. But money wisely spent for research produces benefits that work for all people for all time.” He was unanimously elected as Honorary Sovereign Grand Commander in 1972, only the second Active Member of the Supreme Council ever to have been given the honor.

Richard A. Kern, M.D. worked tirelessly for 34 years to promote the Scottish Rite’s commitment to schizophrenia research.

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Richard A. Kern was raised a Master Mason in University Lodge No. 610, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1923. He was elected Worshipful Master of the Lodge in 1930. Kern served as District Deputy Grand Master of District I from 1934–1939. He would later serve as the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. He was exalted in Columbia

Richard A. Kern, M.D., 33° (1891–1982) Honorary Sovereign Grand Commander, 1972 Born in Columbia, Pennsylvania, February 20, 1891 Died in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, July 26, 1982

Chapter No. 91, R.A.M., in Philadelphia; greeted in Philadelphia Council No. 11, R. & S.M.; and knighted in Mary Commandery No. 36, K.T. Kern received the Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1924. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council, in Cleveland, Ohio. He was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1947. He would go on to serve as Grand Minister of State (1960–1965), Grand Lieutenant Commander (1965–1972), and Deputy for Pennsylvania (1966–1972). Kern was awarded the Gourgas Medal in 1966, and in 1972 was elected as Honorary Sovereign Grand Commander, only the second member at that time to be so honored.

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George A. Newbury, 33° (1895–1984) Sovereign Grand Commander, 1965–1975 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 6 8

George A. Newbury was the 15th Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. Universally admired and supported in the Fraternity, Newbury brought to fruition such major undertakings as the acquisition of land for a Supreme Council headquarters in Lexington, Massachusetts. He also inaugurated the jurisdiction-wide magazine, The Northern Light. The project closest to him was the planning, construction, and opening of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, inaugurated in 1975. George Newbury was also greatly accomplished in the worlds of business, law, and banking. He compiled an enviable record of achievements in education, religion, health care, community service, and Freemasonry. Newbury authored two books on the history of the Scottish Rite Supreme Council in the Northern Jurisdiction. He served as a Mason for more than 65 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

George A. Newbury was raised a Master Mason in Summit Lodge No. 219, in Westfield, New York. He was exalted in Adytum Chapter No. 235, R.A.M., of Buffalo; greeted in Keystone Council No. 17, R. & S.M., of Buffalo; and was knighted in Hugh DePaynes Commandery No. 30, K. T., of Buffalo, all in 1939. Newbury received the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Buffalo in 1926. He was Thrice Potent Master of Palmoni Lodge of Perfection in 1931, and Commanderin-Chief of Buffalo Consistory from 1936–1939. Newbury was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1940 in

The project closest to George A. Newbury was the opening of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library.

George A. Newbury, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, 1965–1975 Born in Ripley, New York, November 7, 1895 Died in Sarasota, Florida, March 5, 1984

Cincinnati, and crowned an Active Member in 1947. He served as Marshal of the Camp (1943); Grand Marshal General (1948); Grand Treasurer General (1948–1954); Grand Minister of State (1954–60); Grand Lieutenant Commander (1960–1965); and Sovereign Grand Commander (1965–1975). In 1952, he was elected Deputy for New York, serving in that capacity until becoming Sovereign Grand Commander of the Supreme Council. Newbury was the founder and first President and Director of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. He was awarded the Gourgas Medal in 1968. Newbury was also a member of Ismailia Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; Zuleika Grotto, M.O.V.P.E.R; Buffalo Court No. 22, Royal Order of Jesters; Buffalo Chapter No. 39, National Sojourners, Inc.; and St. Mark’s Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine. Scottish Rite of Freemasonry | THE GOURGAS MEDAL | 17


John W. Bricker, 33° (1893–1986) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 7 1

John W. Bricker was attorney general for the state of Ohio, three-term governor, and a United States Senator. He was also the Republican nominee for vice president in 1944, running with Thomas E. Dewey. In the Senate, Bricker is remembered for proposing a Constitutional amendment to curb the power of the President to make treaties and executive agreements, instead giving Congress this authority. The Bricker Amendment failed by one vote. After leaving the Senate in 1959, Bricker returned to the practice of law in Columbus, Ohio. Bricker had a long and distinguished career as a Freemason for more than 68 years. For 34 years, he was an Active Member of the Supreme Council of the Scottish Rite. He served widely on committees, ranging from Constitution and Laws to Fraternal Relations. Upon his retirement, he was named Dean of Active Membership for the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

John W. Bricker became a Master Mason in Mt. Sterling Lodge No. 269 in Mt. Sterling, Ohio. He was exalted in Community Chapter No. 277, R.A.M in 1927, greeted in Columbus Council No. 8, R.K.T. & S.M in 1936, and knighted in Mt. Vernon Commandery No. I in 1934.

John W. Bricker, 33° Born in Pleasant Township, Ohio, September 6, 1893 Died in Columbus, Ohio, March 22, 1986

Bricker received the degrees of the Scottish Rite in 1922 in Columbus, Ohio. He was a very enthusiastic and talented ritualist, participating in the degree portrayals for 45 years. Bricker was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1937. He was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1942. Bricker was awarded the Gourgas Medal in 1971.

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John W. Bricker was attorney general and threeterm governor of Ohio, and a United States Senator.


Norman Vincent Peale, 33° (1898–1993) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 7 3

Norman Vincent Peale was a minister and author, best known for his work The Power of Positive Thinking. He served as pastor of the Marble Collegiate Church in New York City for 52 years. At the time of his retirement, the church had 5,000 members, and tourists lined up around the block to hear Peale preach. His weekly radio program, “The Art of Living,” was broadcast on NBC for 54 years. His sermons were mailed to 750,000 people each month, and his Guideposts Magazine remains popular today with a circulation of more than 4.5 million. Peale was also called “the best known champion of Freemasonry in America,” and was a proud Mason for more than 60 years. On his feelings about Freemasonry he wrote, “There is, as I see it, nothing like Masonry. It is unique in its fellowship which spreads over much of the earth, in addition to our own country. To me it means a personal relationship with great historical personalities and, taken by and large, also with about the finest body of men whom it is possible to assemble anywhere.” M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Dr. Peale was raised a Master Mason in 1926 in Midwood Lodge No. 1062 in New York. He was Grand Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of New York from 1948 to 1951. He completed the Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Syracuse in 1928, and affiliated with the Valley of New York City in 1934. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1959 at Buffalo, New York. He received the Gourgas Medal, the Scottish Rite’s highest honor, in 1973.

Norman Vincent Peale, 33° Born in Bowersville, Ohio, May 31, 1898 Died in Pawling, New York, December 24, 1993

Norman Vincent Peale was called, “the best known champion of Freemasonry in America.”

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Gerald R. Ford, 33° (1913–2006) President, United States of America G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 7 4

Gerald R. Ford was the 38th President of the United States, and 14th Masonic President. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska, and raised in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He starred on the University of Michigan football team, and then attended Yale, where he earned his law degree. During World War II, he attained the rank of Lieutenant Commander in the Navy. Ford entered Republican politics in 1948 and was elected to Congress where he developed a reputation for integrity and openness. He served in the House of Representatives for 25 years, and was Minority Leader from 1965 to 1973. After Spiro Agnew resigned, Ford was the first person appointed to the vice presidency under the terms of the 25th Amendment. He became president upon Richard Nixon’s resignation on August 9, 1974. A Mason for more than 45 years, Gerald Ford expressed his ongoing dedication to the principles of Freemasonry in this way: “The guidelines by which I strive to become an upright man in Masonry give me great personal strength. Masonic precepts can help America retain our inspiring aspirations while adapting to a new age.”

Gerald R. Ford, Jr., 33° President of the United States, 1974–1977 Born in Omaha, Nebraska, July 14, 1913 Died in Rancho Mirage, California, December 26, 2006

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Gerald R. Ford was raised a Master Mason in Malta Lodge No. 465, in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1951, and took the 2nd and 3rd degrees under the auspices of Columbia Lodge in Washington, D.C. He held dual membership in York Lodge No. 410. Ford completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Grand Rapids in 1957. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1962 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Gourgas Medal was awarded to President Ford in 1974.

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“The guidelines by which I strive to become an upright man in Masonry give me great personal strength.” — Gerald R. Ford, Jr.


Robert P. Taylor, 33° (1909–1997) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 7 5

Robert P. Taylor was a highly decorated American military officer who served as the third Chief of Chaplains of the United States Air Force. He was Chaplain of the 31st Infantry Regiment, Philippine Division, the unit that was transferred to the front lines on the peninsula of Bataan during World War II. Following the surrender of the American forces there, he survived the Bataan Death March to the prison camp at Cabanatuan. Chaplain Taylor was cited for bravery and awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action for his services in the Battle of Bataan. Taylor served as Chaplain in the Cabanatuan prison camp hospital, ministering to more than 10,000 patients. In the summer of 1944, he spent fourteen weeks in solitary confinement for smuggling food and medicine to the patients. He was later taken to Japan and Manchuria on one of the infamous “hellships.” In all, Chaplain Taylor survived the horrors of 42 months of internment in Japanese prison camps. For his bravery, he was awarded the Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Presidential Unit Citation, and the Distinguished Service Medal. Taylor was a Freemason for more than 50 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Robert P. Taylor was raised a Master Mason in Caddo Lodge No. 581, in Caddo Mills, Texas. He was exalted in Montgomery Chapter R.A.M., in 1954 in Alabama. He completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Dayton in 1949. In 1964, he was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33 °, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Detroit. He was awarded the Gourgas Medal from the Scottish Rite in 1975.

Robert P. Taylor, 33° Born in Henderson, Texas, April 11, 1909 Died in Arlington, Texas, February 1, 1997

Robert P. Taylor survived the Bataan Death March and endured, in all, 42 months in Japanese prison camps.

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Stanley F. Maxwell, 33° (1910–1997) Sovereign Grand Commander, 1975–1985 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 7 8

Stanley F. Maxwell served for 10 years in the Scottish Rite’s highest post, that of Sovereign Grand Commander. One of his most notable achievements was overseeing the construction of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library in Lexington, Massachusetts. In 1983, the building’s auditorium was named in Maxwell’s honor. His tenure as Sovereign Grand Commander is marked by his leadership in increasing membership and continuing the Scottish Rite’s sound financial footing. Maxwell crafted a busy and distinguished Masonic career. He served as the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts before becoming Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. In addition to the Gourgas Medal, other Scottish Rite distinctions awarded to him include the Killian H. Van Rensselaer Medal from the Valley of Cincinnati and the Barton Smith Medal from the Valley of Toledo. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Stanley F. Maxwell was raised a Master Mason in Good Samaritan Lodge, in Reading, Massachusetts in 1931, and served as its Worshipful Master from 1944–1945. He was exalted in Reading Royal Arch Chapter in 1946, and greeted in Melrose Council, R. & S.M. in 1957. Maxwell served the Grand Chapter of Massachusetts as Grand Lecturer from 1955– 1965. He was knighted in Reading Commandery No. 50, K.T., and affiliated with St. Bernard Commandery No. 12, K.T. in Boston. Maxwell completed the Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Boston in 1959, going on to serve as First Lieutenant Commander, and Commander-in-Chief of the Massachusetts Consistory. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, in 1965, and crowned an Active Member in 1973. He was elected Sovereign Grand Commander in 1975, while also serving as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts. Maxwell was also a member of Aleppo Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., where he served as Potentate. He was a member of Boston

Stanley F. Maxwell, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, 1975–1985 Born in Reading, Massachusetts, April 27, 1910 Died in Woburn, Massachusetts, October 8, 1997

Stanley F. Maxwell oversaw the construction of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Court No. 103, the Royal Order of Jesters; Red Cross of Constantine; Great Priory of America; and the Royal Order of Scotland. He was awarded the Purple Cross of York Rite Sovereign College of North America, and served on the Board of Governors of the Shriner’s Burns Institute in Boston. Maxwell was also active in DeMolay.

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George E. Gardner, M.D., 33° (1903–1982) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 7 8

George E. Gardner, M.D. was born in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, and lived and worked for most of his life in and around Boston. A pioneer in child psychology research, Gardner received degrees from Dartmouth College, Harvard University, and Harvard Medical School. He served as the first clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the first psychiatrist-in-chief at Children’s Hospital, Boston. As Director of the Judge Baker Children’s Psychiatric Clinic, Gardner was responsible for broadening outpatient and residential services, and for building the center into the largest child guidance clinic in the country. He became a Mason at the age of 38, and remained active in the craft until his passing. He served as a member of the Scottish Rite’s Supreme Council Advisory Committee for Schizophrenia Research for 30 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

George E. Gardner, M.D. was raised a Master Mason in the Belmont Lodge, A.F. & A.M., (now Belmont-Beaver Lodge) in Belmont, Massachusetts in 1941. He received the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Boston in December 1964. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Boston in 1966. Dr. Gardner was as a member of the Supreme Council Advisory Committee on the Schizophrenia Research Program from 1952 until his passing, serving as chairman of the committee from 1964 through 1971, and as an emeritus member from 1978 through 1982. He was elected to receive the Gourgas Medal in 1978.

George E. Gardner, M.D., 33° Born in West Bridgewater, Massachusetts, August 12, 1903 Died in Duxbury, Massachusetts, April 4, 1982

George E. Gardner, M.D. was responsible for building the Judge Baker Children’s Psychiatric Clinic into the largest child guidance institution in the country.

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Robert H. Felix, M.D., 33° (1904–1990) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 0

Robert H. Felix, M.D., a psychiatrist, was the first director of the National Institute of Mental Health. An authority on alcoholism and drug addiction, Dr. Felix was also a former dean of the medical school at St. Louis University, president of the American Psychiatric Association, and a member of the World Health Organization’s (WHO) advisory panel on mental health. He served the WHO for more than 25 years. Dr. Felix was a professor of psychiatry and dean of the medical school at St. Louis University from 1975 to 1985. He was research director of the Scottish Rite Schizophrenia Research Program, a major charity supported by the organization. Dr. Felix was given the Rockefeller Public Service Award in 1961, and he won awards for distinguished service from the American Public Health Association and the American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Felix became a Mason in 1925, and served the Fraternity for 65 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Robert H. Felix, M.D., was raised a Master Mason in Downs Lodge No. 204, Downs, Kansas, in 1925. He completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Norwich in 1944. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Boston, Massachusetts in 1969. In recognition of his many achievements in the area of mental health, Felix was awarded the Gourgas Medal in 1980.

Robert H. Felix, M.D., 33° Born in Downs, Kansas, May 29, 1904 Died in Sun City, Arizona, March 31, 1990

Felix was also a member of Sphinx Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S. of Newington, Connecticut.

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Robert H. Felix, M.D. was the first director of the National Institute of Mental Health.


Louis L. Williams, 33° (1899–1990) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 1

Louis L. Williams, 33°, and John H. Van Gorden, 33°, are inextricably linked with the history of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Both were Active Members of the Scottish Rite Supreme Council and members of the Special Committee on Museum and Library Building that helped conceptualize and plan the new institution. When the Museum & Library opened in 1975, the Van Gorden-Williams Library was named in their honor. In his professional life, Louis L. Williams was an attorney and founder of Williams & Williams law firm. He was president of the McLean Country Bar Association and founder of Champion Federal Savings and Loan Association. He was active throughout his life in many civic and charitable organizations serving as trustee of Illinois Wesleyan University, president of the Withers Public Library for 20 years, and founder of the Bloomington-Normal Symphony Society. Williams was also a researcher, writer, editor, and founder of the Masonic Book Club. He was a valued counselor to Sovereign Grand Commanders George A. Newbury, Stanley F. Maxwell, and Francis G. Paul. He collaborated with Commander Newbury in writing A History of the Supreme Council that was published in 1987. Williams was a Mason for 70 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Louis L. Williams was raised a Master Mason in Arts and Crafts Lodge, No. 1017, Bloomington, Indiana, in 1920. He advanced to Worshipful Master in 1931. He had also been a member of Bodley Lodge No. 1, and was a founder and the first Worshipful Master of Ancient Landmarks Lodge No. 3579 of Bloomington. He was appointed District Deputy Grand Master for the years 1945–1947, served on many committees of the Grand Lodge, and held the position of Grand Orator in 1966–1967. Williams was exalted in Loyal L. Munn Chapter No. 96 in 1926, later becoming a member of Bloomington Chapter

Louis L. Williams, 33° Born in Rockbridge, Illinois, February 11, 1899 Died in Bloomington, Illinois, June 2, 1990

No. 26, where he served as High Priest in 1938. He was greeted in Bloomington Council No. 43 in 1930, and was the Thrice Illustrious Master in 1931. He later became a member of Clinton Council No. 74 in Clinton, Illinois. Williams was knighted in DeMolay Commandery No. 24, K.T., in1931, and served as Eminent Commander in 1937. Williams completed the Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Bloomington in 1927. He served in various offices including Most Wise Master of Mount Calvary Chapter of Rose Croix from 1938–1940, and Commander-in-Chief of Bloomington Consistory from 1939-1943. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1940. He was crowned an Active Member in 1958. Williams served as Deputy for Illinois from 1963 to 1971, and became an Active Emeritus Member in 1973. Scottish Rite of Freemasonry | THE GOURGAS MEDAL | 25


John H. Van Gorden, 33° (1899–2002) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 2

John H. Van Gorden enjoyed a 42-year career with IBM, holding many supervisory and executive positions including serving as national service manager for more than 30 years. In his retirement, he took on the directorship of numerous companies. He was Chairman of the Board of Mutual Electronics and Mutual Designers of Oswego, New York. In addition to business and industrial interests, Van Gorden served as vice president of the Wyoming Conference Home for the Aged and as a trustee of Alfred University. Van Gorden was an early and ardent supporter of the vision to build the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. He guided the development of the institution, served on its board, and became a major benefactor. The library is named in honor of Van Gorden and Louis L. Williams, with whom he collaborated to obtain a number of influential and important Masonic collections. He is also the author of numerous books including Modern Historical Characters in Freemasonry and Masonic Charities, a chronicle of the extensive philanthropic work of Freemasonry. He joined the craft in 1923 and was a member for 79 years.

John H. Van Gorden, 33° Born in Meshoppen, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1899 Died in Johnson City, New York, April 7, 2002

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

John H. Van Gorden was raised a Master Mason in Binghamton Lodge No. 177, in Binghamton, New York, in 1923. He was exalted Binghamton Royal Arch Chapter No. 1394 in 1956, and was greeted in Binghamton Council No. 24 that same year. He was knighted in Malta Commandery No. 21, K.T., Binghamton, in 1957. Van Gorden completed the Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Binghamton in 1950, and served as Thrice Potent Master of Otseningo Lodge of Perfection in 1956–1957. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Boston in 1957, and was crowned an Active Member in Chicago in 1960. He became an Active Emeritus Member in 1974.

The Van Gorden-Williams Library is named in honor of two dedicated Scottish Rite Masons, John H. Van Gorden and Louis L. Williams. Van Gorden was also a member of Kalurah Shrine Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., and the Royal Order of Scotland.

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Edmund F. Ball, 33° (1905–2000) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 3

Edmund F. Ball was the grandson of one of the five brothers who founded the Ball Corporation, a glass jar company that created the Mason fruit jar in the early 20th century. Edmund Ball became a Freemason in 1927 in Muncie, Indiana. He was revered in the area for his philanthropic efforts on behalf of Ball Memorial Hospital. He served as the hospital’s Chairman for 29 years, and Chairman of its Health Services Board for 12 years. In the community, he was a member of the City Park Board, Trustee for the Asheville School for Boys, and Trustee/Treasurer of the Knights Templar Eye Foundation. Ball served in the United States Air Force as a Major, as well as serving in the Infantry during World War II. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Edmund F. Ball was raised a Master Mason in Muncie Lodge No. 433, Muncie, Indiana, in 1927. He was exalted in Muncie Chapter No. 30, R.A.M. in 1929, greeted in Muncie Council No. 16, R. & S.M. in 1928, and knighted in Muncie Commandery No. 18, K.T. in 1929. Ball completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Indianapolis in 1928, and was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1961 in Chicago, Illinois. In September of 1983, he was nominated to receive the prestigious John James Joseph Gourgas Medal, which recognized his several decades of civic, philanthropic, and Masonic service. Ball was also a member of Murat Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; St. James Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine; the Yale Club of New York; and the Columbia Club of Indianapolis.

Edmund F. Ball, 33° Born in Muncie, Indiana, January 8, 1905 Died in Muncie, Indiana, September 30, 2000

Edmund F. Ball was revered in the Muncie, Indiana, area for his philanthropic efforts.

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Warren N. Barr, Sr., 33° (1906–1990) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 4

A plumbing and heating supplier by trade, Warren N. Barr, Sr. is remembered as a driving force behind the growth of the Illinois Masonic Medical Center. Barr was appointed to the Board of the hospital in 1963, became President in 1965, and retired as Chairman Emeritus in 1984. Under his leadership and guidance, the Masonic Medical Center grew from a small neighborhood hospital to a nationally recognized medical complex. Barr was renowned for encouraging the medical center to make constant upgrades based on current and ever-changing research and discoveries, and to add the latest technologies to improve patient care. The Illinois Masonic Medical Center has been enhancing the image of Freemasonry throughout the Midwest for more than 40 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Warren N. Barr, Sr. was raised a Master Mason in Plumb Lodge No. 1116 in Indiana in 1927, which later consolidated with Laurel Lodge No. 1057. He was exalted in Evanston Chapter No. 144, R.A.M., greeted in Augustus N. Gage Council No. 124, R. & S.M., and knighted in Evanston Commandery No. 58, K.T. Barr completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Chicago in 1944, and was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1969 in Boston. In 1984, he was further honored by the Supreme Council when the Sovereign Grand Commander presented him with the Gourgas Medal.

Warren N. Barr, Sr., 33° Born in Gentryville, Indiana, January 4, 1906 Died in Chicago, Illinois, October 7, 1990

Barr was also a member of Medinah Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; St. John’s Conclave; Red Cross of Constantine; the Royal Order of Scotland; and the Royal Order of Jesters. He was the recipient of the DeMolay Legion of Honor.

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Warren N. Barr is remembered as a driving force behind the growth of the Illinois Masonic Medical Center.


Raymond C. Ellis, 33° (1897–1996) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 6

Exceptional gentleman, devoted husband and father, railroad loyalist, orator, author, Freemason and benefactor-—Raymond C. Ellis was active, vibrant, and inspirational. A sought-after speaker and prolific writer, he became of one of best-known Freemasons in the country as an inspirational interpreter of the “Masonic Way.” Ellis was a Mason for 77 years, serving the craft as Grand Master of New York. He was on many committees including the Committee on Benevolence, the Editorial Board, Finance and Nominating Committees, Administrative Council, and Pension and Retirement Plan. Most notably, he co-founded and served as first President of the Masonic Foundation for Medical Research (MMRL) in Utica, New York. Under Ellis’s guidance, the Cardiac Research Institute at MMRL was built into an international center for genetic screening of inherited cardiac arrhythmia diseases. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Raymond C. Ellis was raised a Master Mason in Aurora Grata Lodge No. 756, Brooklyn, New York, in 1919. He served as the lodge’s Worshipful Master as well as District Deputy Grand Master for the 3rd Kings District. In the Grand Lodge of New York, he was Deputy Grand Master of Masons from 1952–1953, and Grand Master from 1954–1956. Ellis completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Aurora Grata Bodies of the Valley of Brooklyn in 1926. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1953. He was crowned an Active Member in 1955 in Detroit, Michigan. Ellis served as Deputy for New York 1965–1977, and was elected Emeritus Member 1979.

Raymond C. Ellis, 33° Born in Brooklyn, New York, February 9, 1897 Died in Setauket, New York, November 9, 1996

Raymond C. Ellis was one of best-known Freemasons in the country as an inspirational interpreter of the “Masonic Way.”

Eliis was exalted in Constellation Chapter No. 209, Brooklyn, New York, in 1955. He was also knighted in DeWitt Commandery No. 14, Brooklyn, in 1955.

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Thomas F. Seay, 33° (1903–1994) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 8

Thomas F. Seay was a well-known leader in banking and real estate in Chicago. His lifelong interest in banking led him to the chairmanship of the Chicago Bank of Commerce. He also served as founding director of the United Bank of America. Despite demanding professional responsibilities, Seay was active in a wide range of civic and philanthropic activities, establishing a distinguished career in the Masonic fraternity. His deep caring for humanitarian issues was shown in the numerous positions he held, including director of the Illinois Masonic Medical Center for more than 16 years. He served as chairman of the Shriners Hospitals for Children, and through the Salvation Army, was instrumental in founding a shelter for the homeless in Chicago in 1970. He was a Freemason for more than 56 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Thomas F. Seay was raised a Master Mason in Cuba Lodge No. 644, in Mayfield, Kentucky, in 1938. He was a member of Logan Chapter No. 196, R.A.M., and was knighted in Chicago Commandery No. 19, K.T., in 1955. He completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Chicago in 1941. In 1966, he was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Boston, Massachusetts. He was further honored for his many humanitarian and philanthropic endeavors by being presented the Gourgas Medal, the highest award of the Scottish Rite Supreme Council, in 1988.

Thomas F. Seay, 33° Born in Lynnville, Kentucky, August 15, 1903 Died in Chicago, Illinois, October 1, 1994

Seay also served as Potentate of Medinah Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., in Chicago, Illinois, but achieved major distinction by serving as Imperial Potentate in 1967. He was a member of St. John’s Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine; the Royal Order of Jesters; El Hajj; and the International Cabiri.

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Thomas F. Seay was instrumental in founding a shelter for the homeless in Chicago.


Francis G. Paul, 33° (1921–1996) Sovereign Grand Commander, 1985–1993 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 8 9

Francis G. Paul came to the Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction from one of the world’s largest business entities, IBM. Before his business career, he served in the ROTC at Cornell University, and was called to active duty in World War II before graduation. He earned an Air Medal from the U.S. Air Force, and his bomber group received the Presidential Commendation Award. After the war, Paul returned to Cornell to complete his engineering degree. Paul joined the Scottish Rite in Binghamton, New York, in 1961 where he devoted himself to the Valley’s Executive Committee and to community service. He was elected Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite in 1985, and is remembered for bringing a Masonic renewal program across the country to make Masonry more visible to the public. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Francis G. Paul was raised a Master Mason in Friendship Lodge No. 153, in Owego, New York, in 1948, where he eventually served as Worshipful Master. He was also active in the York Rite, serving as King of his chapter, and Illustrious Master of his council. He joined Kalurah Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., in Binghamton, New York, in 1961, becoming Potentate in 1986. Paul joined the Scottish Rite Valley of Binghamton in 1961, serving on the Valley’s Executive Committee and devoting himself to community service. He was made a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Detroit, Michigan, in 1973, and elected an Active Member, in 1977 in Pittsburgh. Paul was elected Deputy for the state of New York in 1981, and Grand Lieutenant Commander in 1982. The culmination of his Masonic career was his election as Sovereign Grand Commander of the Supreme Council for the Northern Jurisdiction in 1985. He received the Gourgas Medal in 1989.

Francis G. Paul, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, 1985–1993 Born in Easton, Pennsylvania, September 11, 1921 Died in Vestal, New York, December 4, 1996

Francis G. Paul launched a Masonic renewal program across the country to make Masonry more visible to the public.

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Charles E. Spahr, 33° (1913–2009) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 9 0

Charles E. Spahr had an illustrious career at Standard Oil Company of Ohio. The youngest person to be appointed president in the company’s history, he also served as chief executive officer and chairman. His major achievement was guiding Standard Oil to oil discovery in Prudoe Bay, Alaska, and overseeing the building of the Alaska Pipeline. Spahr also reached the highest levels of Freemasonry, serving as an Active Member of the Scottish Rite’s Supreme Council and Deputy for the state of Ohio. Spahr brought much of his business experience to the affairs of the Supreme Council. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Charles E. Spahr was raised a Master Mason in Heights Lodge No. 663, in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, in 1961. He was exalted in Heights Chapter No. 206, R.A.M., greeted in Windemere Council No. 113, R. & S.M., and knighted in Knights Commandery No. 76, K.T. Spahr completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Cleveland in 1962, and served the Lake Erie Consistory as First Lieutenant. In 1968, he was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in Atlantic City. He was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1978 and served as Deputy for Ohio from 1986–1989. The Gourgas Medal for outstanding service was awarded to Spahr in 1990.

Charles E. Spahr, 33° Born in Kansas City, Kansas, October 8, 1913 Died in Shaker Heights, Ohio, April 7, 2009

A very active Mason, Spahr was also a member of Al Koran Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S.; St. Benedict Conclave, Red Cross of Constantine and Cleveland Court No. 14; and the Royal Order of Jesters.

Charles E. Spahr guided Standard Oil to oil discovery in Prudoe Bay, Alaska, and he oversaw the building of the Alaska Pipeline.

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Richard B. “Red” Skelton, 33° (1913–1997) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 9 5

From the vaudeville circuit to his highly rated TV show, audiences thrilled to Red Skelton’s comedic genius, brought to life through characters like Clem Kaddiddlehopper and Sheriff Deadeye. Skelton performed before the Queen of England, entertained eight presidents, and rendered private performances for three popes. Skelton was a Freemason for more than 58 years. He often recounted that he became interested in Masonry as a small boy selling newspapers in Vincennes, Indiana. A gentleman bought a paper from him with a five dollar bill and told him to keep the change. The young Skelton asked his benefactor why he had given him so much money. The man explained that he was a Mason and Masons are taught to give and help others. Skelton decided that day to join the craft when he was grown. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Richard B. “Red” Skelton was raised a Master Mason in Vincennes Lodge No. 1 in Vincennes, Indiana, in 1939. He completed degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Evansville, Indiana, in 1940. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council on in 1969 in Boston, Massachusetts. Skelton was honored with the Gourgas Medal in 1995 for his outstanding service to “Freemasonry, humanity and country.”

Richard B. “Red” Skelton, 33° Born in Vincennes, Indiana, July 18, 1913 Died in Anza, California, September 17, 1997

A kindness by a Mason to Red Skelton when he was a boy selling newspapers in Indiana led the actor to vow to join the craft.

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Carl H. Lindner, Jr., 33° (1919–2011) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 9 8

Attending high school at night while bringing milk door-to-door during the day, Carl H. Linder, Jr. went on to transform the milk delivery business. He created the United Dairy Farmers, launching himself as a selfmade industrial businessman and entrepreneur. Over the course of his distinguished career, Lindner held controlling interests in organizations as diverse as Hanna Barbera Productions, the Cincinnati Reds, and Chiquita Brands International. Soft-spoken, gracious, and humble, Lindner contributed greatly to the economic and cultural lives of the citizens of Cincinnati through his generous philanthropy and by creating thousands of jobs in that city. He and his family have been major benefactors of the Lindner Center of Hope, the Lindner Family Center for Reproduction of Endangered Wildlife at the Cincinnati Zoo, Shriners’ Hospitals for Children, the Lindner Family Physics Building at Xavier University, and the Scottish Rite Children’s Dyslexia Center of Cincinnati, to name a few. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Carl H. Lindner, Jr. was raised a Master Mason in Melrose Lodge No. 671, Norwood, Ohio, in 1942. He completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Cincinnati in 1944, and was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1984 in Boston, Massachusetts. He was the recipient of the prestigious Killian H. Van Rensselaer Gold Medal by the Valley of Cincinnati in 1988. In 1998, he was awarded the Gourgas Medal by the Supreme Council at their Annual Meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Carl H. Lindner, Jr., 33° Born in Dayton, Ohio, April 22, 1919 Died in Cincinnati, Ohio, October 17, 2011

Carl H. Lindner was a selfmade industrial businessman, entrepreneur, and philanthropist with humble beginnings as a milk delivery boy.

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robert o. ralston, 33° (1938-2018) sovereign Grand Commander, 1993–2003 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 9 8

Robert O. Ralston made his career in manufacturing, eventually becoming vice president of Milacron Corporation and vice president of Mazak Corporation. While completing his MBA at Xavier College, he served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. Ralston was installed as Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite in 1991. The Ralston years are remembered for remarkable energy in changing the internal and external faces of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. He is credited with streamlining the Scottish Rite’s Annual Meeting structure, improving member retention, participating in national and international conferences, increasing the funding of the Scottish Rite Charities, and refurbishing and expanding the Supreme Council headquarters. Ralston also established the 32° Masonic Children’s Learning Centers, now the Children’s Dyslexia Centers. His work toward recognition of Prince Hall Masonry— a branch of North American Freemansonry composed predominantly of African Americans—also stands as one of his major accomplishments. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Robert O. Ralston was raised a Master Mason in EvanstonEversull Lodge, No. 695. F. & A.M. Norwood, Ohio. He went on to serve as Worshipful Master of the Lodge, District Deputy Grand Master of Ohio, and Trustee of the Ohio Masonic Home. He received his Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Cincinnati in 1967. He was named an Honorary 33° in 1981, was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1992, and was elected Sovereign Grand Commander in 1993. The Gourgas Medal was conferred to him in 1998.

Robert O. Ralston, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, 1993–2003 Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, October 5, 1938

Robert O. Ralston established the Children’s Dyslexia Centers and worked to bring recognition to Prince Hall Masonry.

Ralston also belongs to a number of other Masonic bodies including the York Rite, the Red Cross of Constantine, and the Royal Order of Scotland, among others.

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John h. Glenn, 33° (1921-2016) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 1 9 9 9

Famed astronaut and politician John H. Glenn made history in 1962 as the first American to orbit Earth. After graduating from high school in New Concord, Ohio in 1939, he attended nearby Muskingum College. Glenn then joined the American war effort in 1942 by entering into the Naval Aviation Cadet Program. The following year, he was deployed in the Pacific front of World War II with the United States Marine Corps. Glenn flew 59 combat missions during this time. After the war, Glenn remained in the military. He served during the Korean War, working with both the Marines and the Air Force on roughly 90 missions. He then enrolled in the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School. In 1957, the daring pilot set a new speed record for traveling from Los Angeles to New York. In 1959, Glenn took on a new challenge when he was selected for the U.S. Space Program. He and six others, including Gus Grissom and Alan Shepard, went through rigorous training and became known as the Mercury 7. At the time, the United States was locked in a heated race with the Soviet Union over advancements in space technology and research. Glenn made his own significant contribution on February 20, 1962. On that historic day, he piloted the Friendship 7 spacecraft, which was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida. He orbited Earth three times during this mission, which lasted nearly five hours. After this ground-breaking flight, Glenn became an American hero. He was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal by President John F. Kennedy. In 1974, Glenn was elected to the United States Senate from Ohio and went on to serve four consecutive terms. In 1998, soon after Glenn received the Scottish Rite’s prestigious 33°, he wore his Masonic ring when he returned to space in the shuttle Discovery, becoming the oldest American to participate in a NASA mission.

John H. Glenn, Jr., 33° Born in Cambridge, Ohio, July 18, 1921

Astronaut John H. Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth.

M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Glenn is a member of Concord Lodge No. 688, New Concord, Ohio, and DeMolay International, the Masonic youth organization. He was named Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1998. He was awarded the prestigious Gourgas Medal in 1999.

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W. Clement Stone, 33° (1902–2002) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 2 0 0 2

W. Clement Stone once professed, “I have a magnificent obsession. All I want to do is change the world.” His is a rags-to-riches story. After his father died leaving the family in debt, Stone hawked newspapers as a child in Chicago to help support his family. He was forced to drop out of high school to work selling insurance. Within eight years, however, Stone had more than 1,000 agents selling policies for him. He went on to establish what would become the Aon Group, now traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Stone donated more than $275 million to a range of charities including civic groups, and mental health and Christian organizations. Stone was a long-time supporter of the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and the National Music Camp at Interlochen, Michigan. Stone and his wife established the W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation to support humanitarian, mental health, religious, and community causes. He was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1981. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

W. Clement Stone was raised a Master Mason in Monroe C. Crawford Lodge No. 1042 in 1929, and transferred to Evans Lodge No. 525. He was exalted in Evanston Chapter No. 144, R.A.M. in 1967; greeted in Gage Council No. 124, R. & S.M. in 1967; and knighted in Evanston Commandery No. 158, K.T. in 1967. He completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Chicago in 1961, and was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1968 in Atlantic City, New Jersey. He was honored for his many humanitarian and philanthropic endeavors by being presented the Gourgas Medal, the highest award of the Supreme Council, in 2002.

W. Clement Stone, 33° Born in Chicago, Illinois, May 4, 1902 Died in Evanston, Illinois, September 3, 2002

W. Clement Stone was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1981.

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Samuel Brogdon, Jr., 33° (1926–2004) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 2 0 0 3

Samuel Brogdon, Jr. was the Sovereign Grand Commander of the Prince Hall Supreme Council of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. Prince Hall Freemasonry is a branch of North American Freemasonry founded by Prince Hall in the 18th century and is composed predominantly of African Americans. The Scottish Rite Supreme Council formally recognized the Prince Hall Supreme Council in 1995, and Brogdon worked devotedly to maintain warm relations with members of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. Brogdon was a highly decorated Mason, and received many honors and awards for his community service. He was cited in 1984 by the Phylaxis Society as one of the 100 most influential Prince Hall Masons. In 1992 he was named one of Ebony magazine’s 100 most influential organization leaders, and was elected to the Scottish Rite Hall of Fame in 1984. The Urban League named him “Outstanding Citizen” in 1970. Brogdon worked for the United States Postal Service for 33 years and served in many leading roles at the Grace African Methodist Church for more than 60 years. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Samuel Brogdon, Jr., 33°, was Past Master of King Solomon Lodge No. 87, Prince Hall, in Warren Ohio. He served as Past Patron of Mizpah Chapter No. 66, Order of Eastern Star. He was Past High Priest of Excelsior Chapter No. 39,

Samuel Brogdon, Jr. worked devotedly to maintain warm relations between Prince Hall Masons and members of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction.

Samuel Brogdon, Jr., 33° Born March 21, 1926 Died March 10, 2004

Royal Arch Masons, in Youngstown, Ohio. He served as the 39th Grand Master of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Ohio from 1969–1971. Brogdon completed the degrees of the Scottish Rite in the Valley of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1943, and was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1962. He was elected an Active Member of the United Supreme Council in 1974, and served as Deputy for the Orient of Ohio in 1975. He served as Lieutenant Grand Commander for United Supreme Council, and was elected the 16th Sovereign Grand Commander in 1992. He received the Gourgas Medal for “notably distinguished service in the cause of Freemasonry, humanity, or country” in 2003.

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Walter E. Webber, 33° (1943–2006) Sovereign Grand Commander, 2003–2006 G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 2 0 0 6

Walter E. Webber served as Sovereign Grand Commander of the Scottish Rite’s Northern Masonic Jurisdiction from 2003–2006. In his far-too-brief tenure in that position, Webber concentrated his efforts on membership development and retention, member services, and leadership development. He had a special interest in adapting Scottish Rite vision and actions to align with 21st-century technology and thinking. He was responsible for bringing the “Seeds of Liberty” fundraising campaign to fruition, allowing the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library to rebuild its exhibition showcasing the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Commander Webber was an attorney who practiced in Portland, Maine. He was a long-serving trustee of the Maine Conference, United Church of Christ. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Walter E Webber was raised a Master Mason in Casco Lodge No. 36 in 1972. He was elected Worshipful Master of the lodge in 1979, later serving as District Deputy Grand Master of the 17th Masonic District.

Walter E. Webber, 33°

Webber received his Scottish Rite degrees in 1973, and served as Thrice Potentate Master of the Yates Lodge of Perfection for two years. He was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1987 in Boston, Massachusetts, He was elected Commander-in-Chief of the Maine Consistory in 1993. Webber was crowned an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1994, and elected Sovereign Grand Commander in 2003. The Gourgas Medal was awarded to Webber in 2006.

Born in Old Town, Maine, July 31, 1943 Died in Lexington, Massachusetts, April 22, 2006

He was also a Royal Arch Mason in Columbia Chapter No. 35. He joined Portland Council No. 4, Royal and Select Masters in 1994. He was knighted in Portland Commandery No. 2, K.T., in 1991. In 1992 Webber became a member of Kora Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., in Lewiston, Maine.

leadership development.

As Sovereign Grand Commander, Walter E. Webber focused on membership and

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Ronald A. Seale, 33° (b. 1948) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 2 0 0 6

Ronald A. Seale was elected Sovereign Grand Commander of the Supreme Council Southern Jurisdiction in 2003. Together with Sovereign Grand Commanders of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, Seale has focused on creating greater Scottish Rite unity. He was instrumental in the renovation and restoration of House of the Temple in Washington, D.C., the historic building that serves as the headquarters of the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry, Southern Jurisdiction. Seale’s personal and community accomplishments are as varied as his Masonic memberships. He served as a delegate to the Louisiana Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church, on the Board of the First United Methodist Church, as chairman of several commissions, and as a youth coordinator. He taught Sunday school to adults and youth for more than 30 years. Seale served on the American Heart Association Board in Baton Rouge. All the while, he never forgot his DeMolay beginnings, serving a Chapter Advisor for three separate tenures. He is currently an Active Member of the DeMolay International Supreme Council. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

In his youth, Ronald A. Seale became a member of DeMolay International, Pelican Chapter, in Louisiana, in 1962. He served as Master Councilor of the Chapter after being a member for only a year. Named to the DeMolay Hall of Fame, Seale has received many awards and honors from the organization, including the Chevalier, Cross of Honor, and the Active Legion of Honor. Seale was raised a Master Mason in East Gate Lodge No. 452, Louisiana, in 1969, and became Worshipful Master in 1988. He was a member of the Scottish Rite Bodies of Baton Rouge, becoming a member of the degree teams for the 5th, 27th, and 31st degrees. He served on the Masonic Law & Jurisprudence Committee in 1991 and from 1997–2003, and was elected a 33° Inspector General Honorary in 1993.

Ronald A. Seale, 33° Sovereign Grand Commander, Southern Jurisdiction Born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, June 24, 1948

Seale has worked to create greater Scottish Rite unity.

Seale was appointed Sovereign Grand Inspector General in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 1995. He was elected Deputy Grand Commander of the Supreme Council, Southern Jurisdiction in 1999, and was installed as Sovereign Grand Commander of the Supreme Council, Southern Jurisdiction in 2003.The Northern Masonic Jurisdiction awarded him their most prestigious honor, the Gourgas Medal, in 2006.

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arnold d. Palmer, 33° (1929-2016) G o u r gas M edal A wa r ded i n 2 0 1 0

Arnold D. Palmer was selected for the Gourgas Medal for his excellence in his field and for his many charitable endeavors. Palmer is regarded as one of the greatest golfers of all time. With other members of the “Big Three,” including Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player, he helped popularize golf among the general public. Palmer turned professional in 1954, and won the Masters tournament in 1957. In all, he notched 94 professional wins, including four victories at the Masters, the U.S. Open, and the P.G.A. Championship in 1974. Palmer shot 19 holes-in-one over the course of his career. He is a member of the Golf Hall of Fame. In 2004, Palmer competed in the Masters for the 50th consecutive year. “The embodiment of success,” Palmer negotiated to build the first golf course in the People’s Republic of China, and he is one of the founders of TV’s Golf Channel. He was the first golfer to be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2004, and the second golfer to be awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2009. M A S O N I C C A R EE R H I G H LI G H T S

Arnold D. Palmer was raised a Master Mason in 1959 at the Loyalhanna Lodge No. 275, Latrobe, Pennsylvania. He received his Scottish Rite degrees in the Valley of Pittsburgh. Palmer was created a Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 33°, Honorary Member of the Supreme Council in 1998. In 2010, he was awarded the Gourgas Medal, which recognized several decades of civic, philanthropic, and Masonic service.

Arnold D. Palmer, 33° Born in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, September 10, 1929

Arnold D. Palmer is regarded as one of the greatest golfers of all time.

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John William McNaughton, 33° (b.1950) Sovereign Grand Commander, 2006–2017 G O u r G A S M E DA L AWA r D E D i N 2 0 1 3

A native of Fort Wayne, Indiana, John William McNaughton graduated from Indiana University with a degree in forensic studies. He put the degree to work for ten years as a detective in the Fort Wayne Police Department before leaving to join the family business, All Rite Distributing Company, Inc. McNaughton rose rapidly through the ranks of the Scottish Rite. He received his honorary 33° in 1997, serving on several key committees within the Scottish Rite’s Supreme Council. He was elected Sovereign Grand Commander of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction in 2006. Commander McNaughton’s tenure was marked by exceptional business and managerial acumen. He established firm financial footing for the Children’s Dyslexia Centers and the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. McNaughton directed a major reorganization project to renovate the Museum & Library and bring the operations of the Supreme Council and the Museum together under one roof. McNaughton led with an abiding affection for the welfare of the Scottish Rite, and with a keen focus on securing the fraternity’s long-term future. Most notably, McNaughton refocused the fraternity on upholding its fundamental tenet to care for Masons in need through the establishment of the Grand Almoner’s Fund. He worked tirelessly for the retention and continued growth of the membership. He streamlined Scottish Rite ceremonies, initiated work on degree revisions, and spearheaded the presentation of degrees in video format.

John William McNaughton, 33° Born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, January 19, 1950

John William McNaughton refocused the Scottish Rite on caring for the needs of its members.

MASoN iC CAR eeR H iGHliGHTS

A Freemason since 1974, John William McNaughton served as Worshipful Master of Maumee Lodge No. 725, Fort Wayne, Indiana. In the Valley of Fort Wayne, he presided as Thrice Potentate Master of the Fort Wayne Lodge of Perfection

beginning in 1996. He became an Active Member of the Supreme Council in 1998, and was elected Sovereign Grand Commander in 2006. McNaughton was awarded the Supreme Council’s most prestigious honor, the Gourgas Medal, in 2013. McNaughton is was also a member of the York Rite and Mizpah Shrine.

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About the Scottish Rite

F r e e mas o nr y

Freemasonry is a fraternal organization that traces its origins to the local guilds of stonemasons, which from the end of the 14th century regulated the qualifications of these craftsmen. The degrees offered in Blue Lodge Freemasonry retain the three grades of medieval craft guilds—Apprentice, Fellow Craft, and Master Mason. Additional degrees can be earned after the first three degrees by joining other organizations like the Scottish Rite, the York Rite, and the Shrine. The Scottish Rite is one of the two branches of Freemasonry in which a Master Mason may proceed after he has completed the three degrees of Symbolic or Blue Lodge Masonry. The Scottish Rite includes the 4° to the 32°. In the United States, members of the Scottish Rite can be elected to receive the honorary 33° by the Supreme Council. It is conferred on members who have made major contributions to society or to Masonry in general. T h e S c o tt i sh R i t e Or i g i nat e d i n F ranc e , N o t S c o t l and

The use of the word “Scottish” has led many Masons to believe that the Rite originated in Scotland, which is not the case. Actually, the first reference to the Rite appears in old French records where the word “Ecossais,” meaning Scottish, is found. During the latter part of the 17th century, when the British Isles were torn by strife, many Scots fled to France and resumed their Masonic interests there. It is believed that this influence contributed to the use of the word “Scottish.” In 1732, the first “Ecossais,” or Scottish Lodge, was organized in Bordeaux, one of the oldest and most influential Masonic centers in France. The membership included Scottish and English Masons. The years 1738–1740 saw the formation of the first advanced degrees. T h e S c o tt i sh R i t e In A m e r i ca

Stephen Morin of Bordeaux created a system of 25 so-called higher degrees known as the “Rite of Perfection,” which flourished in France. Within a few years, other degrees were added until the Scottish Rite had a ritual structure of 33 degrees. In 1761, Masonic authorities in France granted Morris a patent to carry the degrees to America. In 1763, Morin established these degrees in

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the French West Indies., In 1767, Henry Francken, who had been deputized by Morin, organized a Lodge of Perfection in Albany, New York, the forerunner of what was to become the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite in the United States. During the Colonial period, Morin appointed other deputies who organized Masonic groups to confer the advanced degrees at important points along the Atlantic seaboard. These groups were independent and without centralized supervision or control, agreeing, however, that their authority came from Stephen Morin in the West Indies. T h e S u p r e m e C o u nc i l and th e N o rth e rn and S o u th e rn J u r i sd i ct i o ns

On May 31, 1801, the Supreme Council of the 33° for the United States—the first Scottish Rite Supreme Council in the world—was founded in Charleston, South Carolina. Its aim was to unify competing groups and create order. Eventually, Northern and Southern Jurisdictions were established. The fraternity of the Scottish Rite has spread throughout the world. The Northern Masonic Jurisdiction specifically covers the 15 states east of the Mississippi River and north of the Mason-Dixon Line and the Ohio River, including Delaware. Its headquarters is in Lexington, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston. The Southern Jurisdiction is headquartered in Washington, D.C., and covers the remaining 35 states, the District of Columbia, and the United States territories and possessions. N o H i gh e r D e gr e e than M ast e r M as o n

One important point recognized by all Masons is the belief that there is no higher degree than that of Master Mason. Scottish Rite degrees are in addition to, but are in no way “higher” than, Blue Lodge degrees. Scottish Rite work amplifies and elaborates on the lessons of the craft.

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About the Photos

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John James Joseph Gourgas, 1842–1870. Francis D’Avignon, New York, New York. Collection of the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts at the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. GL2004.0475. Photograph by David Bohl. Pag e 4

Harry S. Truman (1884–1972). Photograph courtesy of the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum, Independence, Missouri. Pag e 2

Melvin Maynard Johnson, 1917. Morrall, possibly Boston. Collection of the Grand Lodge of Masons in Massachusetts at the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. GL2004.6185a. Photograph by David Bohl.

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Edward W. Wheeler (1876–1963). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Pag e 1 5

Fred P. Corson (1896-1985). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Pag e 1 6

Richard Arminius Kern, ca. 1975. V.B. Berry, United States. Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.16. Photograph by David Bohl. Pag e 1 7

King Gustav V. Photograph courtesy of Svenska Frimurare Orden.

George Adelbert Newbury, 1969. Albert F. Murray, United States. Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.18. Photograph by David Bohl.

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Kaufman T. Keller (1885–1966). Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Roscoe Pound (1870–1964). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Winfred Overholser (1892–1964). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Mark Wayne Clark (1896–1984). Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A.

John William Bricker, 1937. Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Norman Vincent Peale (1898–1993). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Gerald R. Ford, (1913–2006). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Robert P. Taylor (1909–1997). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Pag e 2 2

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George Edward Bushnell, 1964. Elias W. Dennis, United States. Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.15. Photograph by David Bohl.

Sovereign Grand Commander Stanley F. Maxwell, 1978. Albert F. Murray (d. 2009), Massachusetts, gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.17. Photograph by David Bohl.

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Christian A. Herter (1895–1966). Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A.

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George E. Gardner, M.D. (1903–1982). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library.


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Robert H. Felix, M.D. (1904–1990). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Louis Lenway Williams in “Proceedings of the Illinois Council of Deliberation,” 1959. Illinois. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 17.9754.I29. Pag e 2 6

John H. Van Gorden, ca. 1955. Burlingame Studio, United States. Gift of United Methodist Homes. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2002.013. Photograph by David Bohl. Pag e 2 7

Edmund F. Ball (1905–2000). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Pag e 2 8

Warren N. Barr, Sr. (1906–1990). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Pag e 2 9

Raymond C. Ellis (1897–1996). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library.

Carl H. Lindner, Jr. (1919–2011). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Robert Odel Ralston, ca. 1995. Jamesway, United States. Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.29. Photograph by David Bohl. Pag e 3 6

John H. Glenn (b. 1921). Photograph, Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Pag e 3 7

W. Clement Stone (1902–2002). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library. Pag e 3 8

Samuel Brogdon, Jr. (1926–2004). Photo courtesy of Lenora Brogdon-Wyatt. Pag e 3 9

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Thomas F. Seay (1903–1994). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library.

Walter Ernest Webber, 2005. James McFarland, American. Gift of the Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.40. Photograph by David Bohl.

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Francis George Paul, 1986. Nancy Koenig, Boston. Gift of the Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library, 2010.042.19. Photograph by David Bohl. Pag e 3 2

Charles E. Spahr (1968). Photograph, Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Pag e 3 3

Richard B. “Red” Skelton (1913–1997). Collection of the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum & Library.

Ronald A. Seale (b. 1948). © Dupont Photographers, Inc., Washington, D.C. Pag e 4 1

Arnold Palmer (b. 1929). Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A. Pag e 4 2

Sovereign Grand Commander John William McNaughton, 2006, Supreme Council, 33°, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, U.S.A.

Scottish Rite of Freemasonry | THE GOURGAS MEDAL | 47


Published to honor the recipients of the Gourgas Medal for their “notably distinguished service in the cause of Freemasonry, humanity, or country.” Supreme Council, 33° Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite Northern Masonic Jurisdiction PO Box 519 Lexington, MA 02421 www. scottishritenmj.org

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The Gourgas Medal  

John James Joseph Gourgas is considered the "conservator of the Scottish Rite." Find out why, and learn more about the men you who have earn...

The Gourgas Medal  

John James Joseph Gourgas is considered the "conservator of the Scottish Rite." Find out why, and learn more about the men you who have earn...

Profile for srnmj