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VIA

The ezine for educators, administrators and advocates of arts integration A Quarterly Ezine

Issue No. 4 - October 2011 Building a School Culture of Blogging Discover how to go beyond communicating and extend to collaborating with a school blog. Page 3

Join Us! Join the conversation on Twitter Education Closet

Have an Idea to Share? Contact me to submit a piece for a future issue

Face Your Fears Head On Acknowledging and pushing past the fears that are holding you back in your classroom. Page 5

All About Via Find out about the vision for this ezine and the authors behind it. Page 2

10 Simple Ways to Integrate Art into your Classroom Page 8

Arts in the Cloud Creativity in a Web 2.0 Culture Via

Web 2.0 Resource Guide Online tools for connecting the Arts to the 21st century classroom. Page 10 Roll Call! The latest websites and resource list for arts integration topics and ideas. Page 11

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WELCOME! Welcome to VIA - the ezine that is designed for arts integration teachers, administrators and advocates! This monthly ezine will strive to provide you with useful resources, updated programs and conferences and a multitude of activities, programs and networks that can further arts integration in your school, district or state. You will find so many wonderful teacher, administrators and artists converging throughout these pages - it’s hard to contain it all! Each article will also feature the writer or organization contact information in order to further our outreach and community with one another. So....why the name VIA? The best simplified definition I can find for arts integration is “teaching the content areas through the arts” and when you look up synonyms for the word “through”, via is an accurate portrayal. We use the arts as a lens for filtering content knowledge via connections, via technology highways and via teaching artists and educators alike. “Via” is a thoroughfare through it all and so it is fitting that this ezine be a way to gather this information through our multitudes of research and resources. This issue is all about Professional Development. It’s about how we grow, connect, develop and personalize the meaning of our own professional learning. I am delighted to be able to highlight and share 3 new guest authors with various perspectives and insights into what it means to grow as a professional. Because we never stop learning!

Susan Riley, editor www.educationcloset.com

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October’s Authors Susan Riley www.educationcloset.com

Susan Riley is an author, editor and distributor of VIA ezine. In addition, she writes regularly on arts integration and current education topics at her blog www.educationcloset.com where she advocates for working together to educate together. In addition to her blog, she also had written an ebook “The Keys to Making Arts Integration Work” which can be purchased from her website. Susan is the Arts Integration Specialist for Anne Arundel County Public Schools in Annapolis, Maryland and uses these experiences to influence her ideas and research. In addition to her education expertise, she is also a family portrait photographer, wife and mother to 2 year old Emma. You can contact Susan through her website or via email at sriley81@hotmail.com for more information.

Teaching Fellow. In addition to a Masters Degree in Reading Education from Appalachian, she also has her Gifted Education licensure from Western Carolina University. Each week, Melissa collaborates with Steven W. Anderson (@web20classroom) to do a podcast where they talk about things related to instructional technology. They talk about tools, ideas, resources, and a little bit of everything! Melissa currently serves as District Instructional Technologist (Instructional Resource Specialist) for Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, Winston-Salem, NC. You can contact her @mwedwards on Twitter or through her website. .

Andrea Erins Get a Masters in Education Degree.

Andrea Erins has been a college professor for 13 years and likes to write about various topics related to education. She is the owner of the site Get a Masters in Education Degree.

Melissa Edwards http://mwedwardstechnology.blogspot.com/

Melissa Edwards is the founder of the website Technology: Figuring Out how the Pieces Fit. Melissa graduated from Meredith College as a NC 2

Via, Issue 4. October 2011


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Building a School Culture of Blogging - Susan Riley www.educationcloset.com

Lots of times, I see teachers and administrators get tripped up over the word “blog”. Many aren’t familiar with what a blog is, what it can do and how it can be used as a powerful engagement tool with our students. Instead, what they hear is “Too Much Information”. They see visions of MySpace, Facebook, Online Journals, and then they generally turn pale and say “no, no no!” before giving a blog a second glance.

There can be places for discussion groups, chats, paper submissions, tutorials, or more. If you’ve visited my website, EducationCloset.com, then you’ve visited a blog. Yes, these blogs can contain too much information, but if used responsibly, they can provide a direct “wired” way for students to interact with each other and with their instructor outside of the classroom on ideas that are being developed WITHIN the classroom.

Blogs are in essence a vehicle for A Place at the Table information. They can look just like a “regular” website, or they can take on We know that our students are the more of a journalistic appearance. most connected generation ever to VIA October 2011

arrive on this planet. They use social media, websites, and other online tools more than printed materials. In 10 years, they won’t know what an encyclopedia looks like. If we are to teach these students, we must use the tools that they know and work with. A blog is simply a tool. Therefore, it must have a place at the table when it comes to educating our children. Educational blogs take on many forms. Often, they are simply a way for the teacher to communicate with parents and students on a regular basis. These blogs are fine if you are looking for yet another way to send 3


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home information about that upcoming field trip or to list your homework assignments. However, a blog has so much more potential than as just another house for class announcements!

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No explicit material can be shared Language must be schoolappropriate Students must stay on-topic when engaging in dialogue No personal information can be shared

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Blogging for Reflective Practice

In this type of blog, you store ideas, share experiences, and collaborate with other educators as a best practice for reflective learning. These types of blogs are not directly connected with Blogging to Collaborate and Extend your school or classroom, but it has a Learning This is not an all-inclusive list, but it direct impact on your teaching style definitely gets you started. You can and ideas. You can truly grow leaps These are the most exciting kind of explain to your students that as the and bounds through this method of blogs for use in the classroom. They teacher, you will be the moderator and blogging. I have learned more in my are also the most work to put together as such can delete anything that years of participative blogging than in at the beginning. However, once you doesn’t follow the rules. any grad class. The wealth of get it set up, it’s very easy to maintain knowledge to be gathered by other because the students do most of the Once you set up your guidelines, the educators is vast and rich. Best of all, work! This blog includes sky really is the limit for these blogs. educators are known for their opportunities to communicate You’ll want to organize it well, just willingness to share and work with information, share resources, submit like you would in the Blogging for each other! By keeping a blog of your work, assess student projects, and Communicating Information section. own experiences, frustrations and have a dialogue with your students. However, your sections might look a triumphs, you are joining a group of These are all important in the 21st bit different. Here’s a few ideas: support, mentoring, coaching and century classroom; one way that we cheering like you’ve never known. know we are engaging students is by Classroom information knowing the learners that sit in front (homework, policies, events, You can organize this type of blog any of us. What better way to get to know information) way that you feel works best for your them than by engaging them in Student portfolios (scanned own reflective practice. You can conversation? Of course, you need to student work samples, essays, art, make it private, public or parts public use measures to keep students safe in music, etc) and parts private. You can choose to this online environment so that the Class forum (great for engaging share these thoughts or not and blog is a fruitful and positive learning students in dialogue about current connect with others who have similar portal. events or things that happen in experiences. Make sure you include class) the disclaimer we talked about earlier, First, you’ll need to set up clear Student rubrics (Student and/or and always be aware of your web guidelines for this type of blog. In teacher designed assessments) presence just as you would with any addition to a mission statement, you’ll Homework submission social media. Use this type of need a “Blog Rules” post on the front Interactive tools for learning blogging responsibly and if you need page. Set up the expectations right (websites from your tech resource to say something that might not be from the start! You can do this alone, list that students and parents can professional, then I strongly or with your student if you really want use) recommend keeping that private. to make it a joint project. Remember....the more that students There are many plugins and widgets Blogging for reflective practice is a have invested into a project, the more to help you facilitate these ideas and wonderful way to reach beyond the they are willing to police themselves. I’ll be going over those step-by-step at bounds of your classroom and school Create rules that protect students, such the end of this lesson. Just know that and gain techniques, perspectives and as: your blog is only limited by your own support from a wide array of fantastic Use first names only imagination. educators! 4

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—Melissa Edwards, image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/adamsfamily-summergreens/sets/72157622825131402/detail/

Do you like change? Do you like to try new things? Do you like to do things the way they have always been done? Do you follow your inspirations? Elizabeth Peterson shares lots of great ideas and resources on The Inspired Classroom blog. Her goal is to inspire you so that you will go and inspire others. Most of the things on her blog are related to Art Integration, and as someone who works in and supports Technology Integration, I find inspiration in many of the things she shares.

VIA October 2011

Now you may wonder what Art Integration and Technology Integration have in common. Well, both phrases share the word "integration" for starters. Her Art Integration FAQs page does a really good job explaining that "arts integration is a way to incorporate the arts into your already existing curriculum." I think you could very easily substitute technology integration in that same definition. I enjoy reading and being inspired by lots of things on Elizabeth's blog, but one article in particular has really stood out. On January 13, 2011,

Elizabeth had a blog post called Face Your Fears of Art Integration. In that post, she listed four common fears about art integration that she hears from teachers and her suggestions for overcoming or dealing with those fears. • Fear #1 – I’m not an artist. • Fear #2 – The TEST is what I need to focus on. • Fear #3 – My administration/ colleagues will think what I’m doing is foolish. • Fear #4 – I will make mistakes.

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The more I read and thought about these fears and ways to deal with them, the more I realized that I hear many of the same fears from teachers when considering attempting technology integration. • Fear #1 - But I don't do Technology ... • Fear #2 - What do we really need to focus on? • Fear #3 - What if it gets messy? • Fear #4 - I am afraid to fail

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around Problem-based Learning. We (the students and I) got to where we felt pretty good about the blog posts and comments we were writing, so we decided to work together and try out some other technology tools. I remember showing my students how to leave typed comments on a VoiceThread project. I was planning to wait a little while before introducing the audio comment feature.

My students did not know or follow my plan. They saw something that Fear #1 – But I don’t do Technology was possible and went for it. I did not want to try that at first since I wasn't I can't count how many times teachers exactly sure how to do it. My students have looked at me and basically said and I learned together. They were "Technology is not my thing." I can proud of our creations and showed relate to that statement because them off. A few students even showed technology was not really "my thing" their parents how to leave comments in the past either. In fact my husband on those projects. who is an engineer thinks it is pretty funny that I am so involved with At one time I was the teacher who educational technology. Hint: It is the wanted to be in control of everything EDUCATIONAL part that makes that happened in my classroom. I sense to me. Technology may not be wanted to know things were going to my thing but teaching and doing work before I tried them. I came to anything possible to encourage realize that I learned more from the student learning is ... things that did not go exactly perfect in my classroom that the things that Although I can relate to the above did (I think students did too). I guess comment, I don't really understand it. those could be called "teachable Start small with technology. Come up moments" or "learning experiences" with an idea or think of a lesson that for the students and the teacher! you want to try in a new way and then just try. You don't suddenly have to There were times in my classroom flip a switch and go to using when I chose to use technology and "technology" all the time. times when I chose not to use When I started using technology in technology depending on what I my class, I began by making thought would best support student powerpoints to go along with my learning. For me that is what teaching writing lessons (very teacher-focused, is all about ... doing whatever is but it was a way to start for me). A needed to help students learn ... even few years later my students began if that means using some technology. responding to blog posts centered 6

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Fear #2.- What do we really need to focus on? As teachers we know our students are going to be tested, and whether we agree with the testing or not ... it is going to happen. The focus of my classroom was not to train good test takers. The focus of my classroom was promoting student learning and thinking. When we talked about the test, which was not very often at all, I told the students that it was just another chance for them to show off what they knew and how well they could think. Teachers need to use various instructional strategies and materials to reach and teach students. There are multiple types of learning and multiple types of instruction. If I need to include Art to teach my students, I am going to. If I need to include Music to reach my students, I am going to. If I need to include hands-on activities to reach my students, I am going to. If I need to play games to reach my students, I am going to. If I need to use technology (even if it scares me), I am going to. As a teacher committed to student learning, I am going to do whatever is needed to engage my students and encourage their learning. Again, I think this goes back to not using technology just of the sake of using technology ... use technology as a way to promote student learning/ thinking ... and student learning/ thinking is what matters (and it even shows up on the test). Fear #3. What if it Gets Messy?

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Learning is a messy process. There are some pieces that fit nicely together, but I think that part of the learning process involves being able to make the connection to make things fit together that don't seem to fit in the first place. Trying to make those connections may appear foolish to others. To have that foolish appearance means you are willing to take chances and not be afraid to fail. Failure is a learning opportunity.

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someone how to add effects to my powerpoint slides. He took the computer, hit a few buttons, looked at me and said it was done. I wanted him to show me how to do it and not just do it for me. From then on, I really tried to figure things out for myself rather than asking since I could learn better that way. When I used technology tools with students, I gave them a few instructions and then let them figure things out on their own if possible. They were building their When one sees "failure" as an own learning (constructivist model). opportunity to gain something (like While I was typing this paragraph, I knowledge) rather than a losing realized the connection between those process, he or she is more willing to events (me wanting to learn instead of try. I think the fear of failure has stood it being done for me and how in the way of great ideas and technology use was in my classroom). inventions for many people and many teachers. In order to grow and support My way of doing things may have the growth of others, you have to be appeared foolish to some, but willing to take chances. Start small appearing foolish to other is not because doing something new or in a necessarily a bad thing, since doing new way is not always a bad idea. things the same way will not get And even if the idea does fail at first, different results. you will learn something (even if it is just not to do that in the future). You will never know what might be Fear #4 - I am afraid to fail possible until you follow through to see what happens. Let me just start off by saying that when you start using technology, YES That is how I got started with you will make mistakes. We will just technology. I saw things in my state that fact so nobody has to worry classroom that were not working. I about it anymore. felt many learning opportunities were being missed. I starting searching for I have been known as a perfectionist, ways to make some of that learning so knowing that I was going to make a possible. I had two old desktops and mistake could have stopped me from one laptop in my classroom, so using even trying, but it didn't. I have technology had its challenges. In my figured out what to do when I make a mind, the potential learning benefits mistake ... I make whatever happens far outweighed the challenges. seem positive. I adjust the plans and go with the flow (now as someone It wasn't until college that I really who liked to have everything wellstarted using the computer. I planned in advanced and things go remember in college when I asked October 2011, VIA

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according to schedule, this is a major step for me). Sometimes I hit the wrong button, but hitting the wrong button could make something happen. Nothing may happen when I may try to open a file or project I have attempted to save, but I will either learn how to save those files in the future or come up with a different way to complete that assignment that does not require those files. A little creativity and critical thinking can help me see the positives in most situation. We learn a lot more by things not going right than perfectly. The changes that are needed for success broadens our learning. It is helpful to remember that when realizing all the new possibilities that may be too overwhelming to even think about trying. If you never attempt to change to do or learn something, you will never know what you might have been able to learn from the success or the potential failure of that attempt. Don't get me wrong, it is frustrating to make mistakes, but the fear of failure would prevent me from ever feeling the enjoyment of success.

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10 Simple Ways to Integrate Art into the Classroom — Andrea Erins, www.mastersineducation.com

Looking for a way to incorporate art into your teaching curriculum? Here are some easy ideas that can be tweaked for almost any subject or age range. 1. Put on a Play – Have your students write a short play about something they’ve just learned – it could be an event in history, a story they’ve read, or even a science concept. They can even design the costumes and set pieces. 8

This would be a great presentation for a parent’s night, or you could video the play and put it on YouTube (with parents’ permission).

2. Sing and Dance – A great way to get younger students to remember a concept is to get them moving. Have them make up a song with movements related to a newlylearned concept. You may want to use a song they already know, such as “Happy Birthday” or a nursery rhyme song.

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3. Publicity Stunt Students can make brochures, posters, or even commercials promoting something they’ve learned about. You could break them up into teams to encourage competition (for example, igneous rocks vs. sedimentary, or Patriots vs. Loyalists). Older students may even be familiar with design software like Photoshop.

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Introduce the tessellations of M.C. Escher and then challenge students to make their own. There are many tutorials about tessellations online to help get you started.

7. Take a Trip – While a trip to the local science or history museum is always valuable, continue taking an art-related trip too! An art museum may have a certain section or special exhibition that goes along perfectly with something you’re learning about. You could also see a play related to your 4. Mini Art Museum – Introduce students to works of curriculum at a local college and community theatre. art that line up with your curriculum. Many famous 8. Writing Prompt – Use a scenes from mythology and piece of art, a photograph, or a literature have been portrayed musical selection as a writing in art, and it’s also a great way prompt. This lets students’ to see how people lived at imaginations run wild and will different times in history. definitely provide a spectrum of responses. 5. Artsy Social Studies – Integrate art, music, or theater 9. Soundtrack – Have history into your social studies students put together clips of lessons. For example, you music to illustrate a story, a could listen to some jazz from historical event, or even a the 1920s while discussing the scientific cycle and have them Harlem Renaissance, or look explain why they chose each at WPA posters as you teach clip. They could also pair the your students about the New music with a slideshow of Deal. photographs, works of art, or abstract images. 6. Tessellations – It seems more difficult to think of a 10. Collage – This is a way to integrate art into a wonderful way for students to math lesson, but tessellations create art even if they can’t are a fun way to do it. VIA, October 2011

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draw. They can make a collage representing any number of topics, such as a time period in history, the culture or environment of a geographic region, a certain family of animals, or a work of literature. The possibilities are endless.

Andrea Erins has been a college professor for 13 years and likes to write about various topics related to education. She is the owner of the site Get a Masters in Education Degree.

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Web 2.0 Resource

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Looking for some new web resources? Maybe you’re looking for some web-based tools to make your teaching easier. Or, maybe you’re looking for some tools to engage your students. Here’s our list of the top websites for Creativity and Innovation in 2011!

Creativity/Innovation http://appinventor.googlelabs.com/about/ - Create your own Apps! http://www.zimmertwins.com/ - Make movies with animation - elementary school http://www.doink.com/ - Create animations http://artsonia.com - Create your own works of art and publish to the museum http://www.littlebirdtales.com - Create story with voice overlay - great for special needs students. http://www.aviaryeducation.com/ Create music, mixes, visual editor for pics and vectors http://www.pixton.com/overview#video - Creating comics online with motion http://www.storyjumper.com/book/create - Create stories with maps, from scratch, or using templates. http://magicstudio.com - Create interactive presentations http://storybird.com - Use master artworks to create stories http://www.glogster.com/ - Pop art posters - be like Andy Warhol http://www.brainpop.com/educators/home/ - Animated movies for teaching materials and assessing students http://www.flashcardmachine.com/ - Create flashcards for students or by students

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The Teachers Lounge Resources, Links and Upcoming Events for Arts Integration

NAEA National Convention

ISTE Conference 2012

Emerging Perspectives

The ISTE 2012 Exposition is your chance to see, touch, and learn about products and services from more than five hundred top ed March 1-3, 2012 tech exhibiting companies in the world! New York, NY Themed to the NETS, these companies and organizations share ISTE's mission of Make it happen! Join thousands of providing information, service, or tools to colleagues from around the world for this help teachers and students expand their epic exploration of visual arts education. horizons in the 21st century. Choose from over 1,000 opportunities for Registration for ISTE 2012 provides you with professional growth and be inspired by access to nearly 700 sessions and informal one of the most culturally rich cities in learning environments, exciting keynote the world. Engage in diverse and dynamic presentations, admission to one of the most exciting ed tech expos in the world, and much sessions exploring the shared vision of more. visual arts education through teaching,

learning, and research; and apply this knowledge in the classroom immediately. Discover new perspectives with inspiring keynotes, hands on workshops, tours, sessions, and events with visual arts education professionals representing all teaching levels. Visit http://www.arteducators.org/news/ convention/welcome for more information!

October, 2011 VIA

Not currently an ISTE member? Your full registration to the conference will automatically enroll you as a new ISTE member! Find out more about ISTE membership! Visit our fees page and keep the important dates handy to take advantage of discounts including the Super Early-Bird rate (by March 31) or the Early-Bird rate (by May 1). Don't forget to secure your housing early via our online reservation system, available after November 2.

Resource Links

Please visit some fantastic resources to help guide and inspire your arts integration movements. Technology: Figuring Out How the Pieces Fit http://mwedwardstechnology.blogspot.com/

Teacher Reboot Camp http://teacherbootcamp.edublogs.org/

Arts Edge http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/educators.aspx

Arts Education Partnership http://www.aep-arts.org/resources/ integration.htm

Arts Every Day http://www.artseveryday.org/Educators/ detail.aspx?id=212

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VIA - October Edition  

VIA is the only Arts Integration ezine on the web today!

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