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VIA

The ezine for educators, administrators and advocates of arts integration A Quarterly Ezine

Issue No. 3 - July 2011 Creative Dramatics How to discover an use this drama technique within the classroom for engaged student and teacher learning Page 3

Join Us! Join the conversation on Twitter Education Closet

Conscious Creativity Being within the creative moment Page 5

Have an Idea to Share? Contact me to submit a piece for a future issue

Talk it Up! Using music and dialogue to create a deeper learning environment Page 8

All About Via Find out about the vision for this ezine and the authors behind it. Page 2

Image credit: ldvanicreativestudies.blogspot.com

What’s In Your Palette? Connecting to Conscious Creativity Via

The Power of Art 2.0 Online tools for connecting visual art to the 21st century classroom. Page 7

Roll Call! The latest websites and resource list for arts integration topics and ideas. Page 10

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WELCOME! Welcome to VIA - the ezine that is designed for arts integration teachers, administrators and advocates! This monthly ezine will strive to provide you with useful resources, updated programs and conferences and a multitude of activities, programs and networks that can further arts integration in your school, district or state. You will find so many wonderful teacher, administrators and artists converging throughout these pages - it’s hard to contain it all! Each article will also feature the writer or organization contact information in order to further our outreach and community with one another. So....why the name VIA? The best simplified definition I can find for arts integration is “teaching the content areas through the arts” and when you look up synonyms for the word “through”, via is an accurate portrayal. We use the arts as a lens for filtering content knowledge via connections, via technology highways and via teaching artists and educators alike. “Via” is a thoroughfare through it all and so it is fitting that this ezine be a way to gather this information through our multitudes of research and resources. This issue is all about Creativity. It’s about how we use various arts techniques like drama, music, and visual art to tap into the creativity of our students and of ourselves. I am delighted to be able to highlight and share 3 new guest authors with various perspectives and insights into what it means to grow as a professional. Because we never stop learning!

Susan Riley, editor www.educationcloset.com

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July’s Authors Susan Riley www.educationcloset.com

Susan Riley is an author, editor and distributor of VIA ezine. In addition, she write regularly on arts integration and current education topics at her blog www.educationcloset.com where she advocates for working together to educate together. In addition to her blog, she also had written an ebook “The Keys to Making Arts Integration Work” which can be purchased from her website. Susan is a music teacher, an arts integration site coordinator and a teacher development liaison at her public elementary school in Maryland and uses these experiences to influence her ideas and research. In addition to her education expertise, she is also a family portrait photographer, wife and mother to 18 month old Emma. You can contact Susan through her website or via email at sriley81@hotmail.com for more information.

Eric Levin Director of Theatre Education Southern Oregon University

works in such journals as the Journal of American Theatre and Drama, The Eugene O'Neill Journal, Theatre Research International and Theatre Bay Area. Currently, Eric teaches at Southern Oregon University.  He teaches theatre literature in the undergraduate program, supervises theatre Master of Arts in Teaching candidates and is the director of the Master of Theatre Studies program. He holds a BA in Theatre Arts from the University of California at Berkeley, an MAT in Language Arts from Western Oregon University and a Ph.D. in theatre from the University of Oregon.

Yoon Soo Lim www.singimagination.wordpress.com

Yoon Soo Lim is a music teacher and department chair at an independent school in Pennsylvania. She received undergraduate and graduate degrees in piano performance, music history and choral conducting. She found a love for teaching young children and pursued studying Kodály methodology, receiving certification in levels I-IV. She loves instilling love of music in her students and integrating technology in her classroom. She teaches general music classes, guitar classes, advises a guitar club and conducts two choirs. Yoon values global connections and collaborates often with teachers abroad. She is enthusiastic about education, tech, people, food, and life. Get in touch! Email: DoremiGirlMusic@gmail.com Twitter: @DoremiGirl

Eric Levin studied Creative Dramatics at UCLA and has over a dozen years experience developing and implementing creative theatre programs in educational and recreational settings, as Well as teaching Creative Dramatics for elementary school teachers at Dickenson State University. Eric's professional teaching experience includes secondary schools, community college . and universities in Oregon, California, and North Dakota.  He has published

Via, Issue 3. July 2011


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Creative Dramatics -

Creative is aMassa fantastic way —Dramatics Quisque to integrate developing drama skills with core curriculum in K-12 classrooms. A clever teacher can introduce material, expand or reinforce material that has already been taught or even assess learning through creative drama. Creative drama focuses on the skills that intersect the discipline of acting and the natural pretend play through which young children naturally learn. As such, teachers do not need formal acting training to engage their students. Most already participate in VIA July 2011

- Dr. Eric Levin

some kind of dramatic play with their students. Something as simple as hand gestures helps students remember material (how many people don’t remember “I’m a Little Teapot” well into their Alzheimer years?). Of course, some guidance in the art of creative dramatics is helpful. Janine Moyer Buegen maintains an excellent resource site at http:// www.creativedrama.com/. Especially useful is her well annotated list of resources. I personally love anything associated with Dorothy Heathcote and Brian Way, two early theorists.

Both have published extensively. The grand dame of creative drama, Winifred Ward, tends to focus on the dramatization of literature. These kinds of exercises are effective (my

“The key to success is planning and comfort. If you borrow a lesson...be sure to make it your own and refine it to teach to your objectives”

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first starring role was a creative drama activity we performed in 3rd grade, Little Half Chick) but curricular possibilities are endless. Here is an organizational framework to help teachers get started with developing a lesson: First, be sure to clarify your curricular objectives and your behavioral objectives. You can begin just like you would for any lesson. You also want to think about what additional skills or objectives are being met. Look at your state’s or the national standards for visual and performing arts. Any creative drama project can demonstrate a proficiency in one or more of them. All creative drama activities should begin with a warm up. A warm up serves several functions. First, it can introduce material or can serve to segue from something students know to the new material. Second, it provides an intermediate step between traditional classroom activities and a more creative kind of lesson. Saying “we are now going to pretend to be butterflies” is often not well received by even the most innocent of kindergarteners. But if they begin by putting their heads on their desks and visualizing being in a dark, small space (or laying on the floor in a tight ball with their eyes closed), by the time you are ready for them to be butterflies, they will be dying to flit around the room waving their arms. The warm up is also a time to create the correct mood, either energize or 4

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relax your students or just to get them in a creative space. Physical and mental warm ups are standard theatre practice and they are an important part of any performance curriculum.

Students know if they had fun, but they don’t always know if they learned something. Pointing out what they learned is far more valuable because it helps them to associate learning and doing. Some kinds of The actual lesson needs to at least lessons need a bridge from the world nominally scripted or outlined by the of pretend to the real world and the facilitator. Instructions often need to difference between the two needs to be carefully considered. Will you give be explored. instructions in written form, give them orally prior to the activity, piece by The key to success is planning and piece as the activity progresses, comfort. If you borrow a lesson from silently on the chalkboard or provide one of the resources mentioned no oral instruction at all. Too many earlier, be sure to make it your own instructions prior to the activity can and refine it to teach to your lead to lapses of memory. Too much objectives. Be sure you are talking during the activity breaks the comfortable with the process and clear mood and interrupts the continuity of with your aims. Be sure to view my a lesson. Not enough instruction often other articles at EducationCloset.com confuses the student, negating the where we look at some theoretical learning. So the manner in which the perspectives which will provide activity is presented is crucial for its greater flexibility to incorporate success. You need to allow time for creative dramatic in your classroom. each step of your lesson. Some For questions or comments, I can be students need time, some go with reached at levine@sou.edu. instinct. The best lessons allow for Eric Levin both. Often modeling is necessary. “Pretending” in front of others is often Director of Theatre Education inhibiting. If the facilitator seems like a looming figure watching and Southern Oregon University judging, students might be reluctant. So the facilitator needs to join the fun. Finally, you need to make sure that you have a closing activity. It might be a discussion or a final performance or simply a cool down. You want to make sure you tie your activity to your learning objectives. An informal assessment of learning is often appropriate. You want to refrain from focusing on the activity as “fun.” Via, July 2011


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Concious Creativity. — Susan Riley, EducationCloset.com

Lately, I've been reading and watching everything I can get my hands on by Sir Ken Robinson. I have been profoundly touched by his poignant and funny speeches his has given at TED and by his ideas on creativity.  If you haven't seen the videos, please take a moment to watch them.  They are fantastic!  One of the things that totally struck me was his quote that "even Shakespeare had an English teacher".

What tools could an English teacher have given Shakespeare? For that matter, how did that English teacher open Shakespeare up to learning?

Maybe it's not always our job to point the way. Maybe part of our job is instead to recognize when the student knows the way and needs room and opportunity to follow their own path.  I think this is quite possibly one of the hardest jobs of a teacher.  It requires a certain humility and forward thinking I can't seem to get that point out of my to do this part of the job well.  mind for weeks now.  As teachers, our Admitting freely that we don't know whole job is to open our students up to everything and that our students have learning and providing them with the important contributions to make is a tools they need in order to do so.  VIA July 2011

total shift in the hierarchy that is current education. This type of thinking requires us to acknowledge that creativity cannot fit inside of a box. You can't teach creativity through linear methods.  Creativity moves, it dances, flows, experiments, splatters, sings.  It does

“ How do you teach someone how to be creative? Consciously. With direct intent.” 5


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all of this and that is impossible to hold within a single desk inside of a classroom.

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them for yourself. What better way to become better teachers than to practice this as well?  Surrounding Here's the case that I have been ourselves with other model teachers, So when a child in your room is making for years with educators: if creative peers and inspiring leaders humming while working, try to refrain you foster the creativity, the test won't can only make us better educators.  As from telling him to be quiet.  He may matter.  A child that is learning we begin to feel the transformation be the next Einstein (who was also through their talents will ace any test within ourselves, we can testify to its known to hum).  If another student on that subject that you put in front of power and begin bringing in teaching keeps jumping up and down and can't them.  Because the talent and artists, co-teaching with our sit still, try to create a space in your creativity allows them to synthesize colleagues, and bringing arts room for her to do that.  She may be the information and create meaning integration lessons into our the next Anna Pavlova.  This is for themselves.  Thus, any test that classrooms. challenging because in college, we are just wants the straight information is trained in courses like "Classroom easy to them because it's no longer Maybe Shakespeare's English teacher Management" and "Discipline with about the information to them.  didn't teach him anything that year.  Dignity".  Everything in our teacher Instead, it's about what THEY can DO Maybe the teacher was the inspiration training either deals with reading and with the information. for him to continue exploring writing math objectives or with discipline.  and languages.  Whatever the case, People consistently panic in education I'm sure the teacher never forgot There are very few institutions that about how they will be assessed, how Shakespeare as a student.  And for teach us how to foster creativity. we're going to measure learning, and that, the teacher was forever changed.  Sir Robinson also alleges that, "If what new curriculum we're going to So it is with creativity in our you're not prepared to be wrong, need to teach.  I don't let any of that classroom.  When we experience it, you're not prepared to be creative."  really affect me.  Good teaching is we are forever changed.  For good. Perhaps the best way for us to learn good teaching.  Period.  I can teach how to teach creativity is to be any curriculum you put in front of me prepared to be wrong about our and my students will do well on it current teaching practices.  I'm not every single time.  Because I don't suggesting that all of our current teach the information.  I teach the teaching practices are invalid.  I do, students how to use their individual however, believe that we can adjust talents to process and synthesize the our current practices with some information.  The rest just falls into openness and willingness to allow place.  This is the process that will creativity to flow. foster creativity itself. Teaching our students to accept, embrace and What can be so frustrating about acknowledge their individual education sometimes is that we want strengths and how to operate within all of our students to score well on our those strengths is the key to make our singularly-designed tests.  As long as educational system (and our society they are the types of learners who for that matter) strong.  know how to play the game of school, we feel like our schools are making We wonder how to teach creativity to progress.  And if they're not those our children.  How do you teach types of learners and are "bringing our someone how to be creative?  scores down", then we drill the life Consciously. With direct intent. By out of them until they know their placing them in an environment where times tables and can read like a robot.  they are surrounded by creativity, We panic when we see diversity of artists and creative thinkers.  When talent in our classrooms.  Because, you are submersed in that culture, you begin to pick up those skills and use 6

how do we deal with that on those tests?

VIA July 2011


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The Power of Art 2.0

The one constant in our current world is always change. And technology is one of the fastest changing pieces out there!  Almost the minute that I think I've figured out how to upload the software, it's time to update the software to the newest version.  This can be wonderful: the constant hum of activity and innovation almost makes me feel like I'm part of the motion of change itself.  But at the same time, it can be quite difficult when it comes to incorporating technology within the classroom.  Just when I have my "Jeopardy" powerpoint ready to use, along comes the newest, better program that students can use that makes my measly powerpoint look "so 2000 and late" as Fergie would say.  So today's post should only be taken at today's value.  If you come back to this one in a year, or (gulp) even 6 months, these will probably change.  But for TODAY, right now, this minute, here is a list of some of the best software that link arts integration with student accessibility and engagement. Software There's lots of great software out there that I would recommend, but here are some that I use almost constantly in my classroom right now: 1.) Kidspiration - Kidspiration is an elementary school software program that allows students the ability to create organizers using pictures or music, use virtual pattern blocks and tiles to form creations in math, and even has built in activities for reading, math, science and social studies that extend student learning

July 2011, VIA

and allows them to create their own manipulatives. It truly puts the students in the drivers seat for their own learning and that's HUGE when you're a 3rd grader. I like to use it when we're studying composers to synthesize their information, and as a way to create their own listening maps when we do lessons like "The Planets" from composer Gustav Holt.  It's also great for students with special needs because there is a sound tool for student who struggle with reading or communication. 2.) Google Earth - Google is always coming up with new innovative tools and I absolutely love this one.  It brings the earth to life and can be used in so many ways.  From connecting to map writing, to measurement of streets, to figuring out how waterways contribute to land division, this is a fabulous tool for all grade levels to use as both an engagement piece and as a way to process new information in these areas.

patterns, drama, music, order, division - it can all play a part when using this software. 4.) Quicktime Broadcaster - for those of you that don't have Garageband or other comparable software, this is a great alternative! Quicktime Broadcaster allows students to create a radio broadcast of a project and then upload it to a variety of sources: youtube, websites, school TV stations, you name it.  Students love being able to create their own radio broadcast on a variety of subjects - they can outline the format, decide what music they want to play, and determine if they want it to be audio, video or BOTH.  Plus, since they can share it, they take more pride in their work and the details are much for fine-tuned.

5.) FlipShare - Yes, I know that FlipCameras are folding up shop. However, I also know that a bunch of schools (including ours) purchased them.  We're not just going to throw them away!  FlipShare is an awesome tool for editing 3. miXscope - this program is just plain and sharing student videos.  After students down cool.  Here's the scoop from the create their videos, they can edit them, programmer info: "miXscope enables produce them and send them as a greeting microscope and video camera users to take card, youtube video, or email them.  My snapshots, create time-lapse movies, stop students love the greeting card feature motion movies, or image sequences of the they can educate others through an online world around them. Users can also add time greeting card.  When they send it to their stamps, text comments, image overlays, parents, it's a great way for parents to make measurements, add special effects, become involved in what their kids are and/or draw on the live view images."  learning. Basically, we use it during science as a way for students to capture what they are seeing, While there’s definitely more out there, these will give you a great head start on either through the microscope or through bring art 2.0 to your classroom! And for the video camera and splice it together to create a time elapse sequence.  We can then more ideas and techniques, check out our Online Class: There’s an App for You use art to compare the "real life" creations Technology and Arts Integration. to artistically created pieces.  Sequencing,

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Talk it Up! And Design a Deeper Learning Environment ~ Yoon Soo Lim While saying good-bye to a happy 5th grade music class, I engaged in a quick conversation with their teacher about what the kids have been learning in my class (song writing: verse, chorus, lyrics, melody, and accompaniment). And then I asked her, “So what are they learning with you?” That one question led both of us make time to connect again in the teacher’s lounge and talk about what 8

the students are learning in each other to think about the classroom. Through one students’ learning at a more conversation, we discovered in-depth level. The question

Remember that we are in the classroom to guide the young people in good learning. This means you do not have be the performer. Just create the creative spaces for them.

how we can connect and I had to answer was, “Is build on our students’ there anything I can do to learning together. By asking strengthen their learning?” each other questions, we got

Here is a project that resulted out of that conversation: Preamble Project (click on the link to listen). The students were learning the Preamble and the US Constitution in social studies. After talking to the teacher, I had to answer the following questions: ○What would be the best way for the students learn and memorize the words to the Preamble?

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○ Would watching a segment in School House Rock be helpful? ○What musical and thinking skills will the students demonstrate?

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●Keep communications clear (time lines and goals) and start with simple ideas. ●Keep a photo/video journal of the project. ●Remember 2 Things: ○ not all of your conversations will end up as a project. ○Understand that through the conversations your preconceived ideas may change. Keep an open mind!

I concluded that helping the students write their own original Preamble song was the answer. Rather than just memorizing the words to the Preamble, my students sang the words to a tune they composed. Will they remember the words that precedes the US Constitution? Of course. Were they engaged in their learning? Absolutely! Look & Listen for Inspiration. Many teachers in my Professional Learning Network (PLN) share a great If you are looking for ways to wealth of resources and lesson ideas. I incorporate music into your lesson, read blogs posted by these teachers here are some ways you can try: and see how I can apply their project ideas into my classes. You can do this, Don’t be Afraid. too. Look for inspiration in other Being fearful snuffs out learning creative teachers. Also look for opportunities for you and your inspiration in your students. Many students. As you prepare your lessons, think of young students are tech saavy and know really good sites for music. Ask a couple ways you can think them to share their good finds with artistically. you. They will be happy to share Remember that we are in the when they know you are opened to be classroom to guide the young people in good learning. This means you do taught by them. ●Here is an example of how I not have be the performer. Just listened to my students. create the creative spaces for them.

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●Making an iTunes playlist titled, __________ (fill in the blank, i.e. quiet work time). What music would you include and why? ●How about a podcast featuring a student and using music in the background? Whatever the project, give yourself some time to use a specific tool and get comfortable. Here are some links you can start exploring. Have Fun :^) Relax. Take one step at a time and enjoy the process. Your joy of learning will be infectious - even when things just don’t work out. Remember I asked you to journal about your learning process? Now share your journey with other teachers! Yoon Soo Lim Email: DoremiGirlMusic@gmail.com Twitter: @DoremiGirl Blog: http:// singimagination.wordpress.com

Start brainstorming arts-infused projects and make lists of possibilities. Try. ●Did you ever try using applications like GarageBand Start a Conversation. or Audacity to create your Collaborate with an arts teacher at own remixes or mashups? your school. Share what you are ●Have you ever tried playing currently teaching and ask simple music related games like Tap questions to see if there are Tap? What is keeping you possibilities to collaborate on a from learning? particular unit. What would you like to try first? VIA, July 2011

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The Teachers Lounge Resources, Links and Upcoming Events for Arts Integration

EducationCloset.com Offers Online Classes!

Arts Education Partnership Fall 2011 Conference

Registration for Fall Online Classes Going On Now!

Registration and Conference Information

Resource Links

Across the nation, a number of urban school systems are boldly experimenting with arts-based models of whole school reform. Research and evaluation results suggest that these initiatives are revitalizing schools and positively impacting students’ lives. Such programs demonstrate that arts education can engage students and move them toward success in school, work, and life; energize teaching and school leadership, and once again make our schools the dynamic and vibrant hubs of community engagement.

Please visit some fantastic resources to help guide and inspire your arts integration movements.

EducationCloset.com is now offering 5 online classes for Fall 2011. These include focusing on: * * * * *

Technology and Art Integration Arts Advocacy Arts Techniques Arts Integration Coaching and Mentoring

All classes are fully online, just $99 and are 6 weeks in length. Join Our Community and save 30% on your Online Class!

Join us in San Francisco during National Arts in Education Week for a national conversation about how arts learning can help reclaim our urban school systems and re-engineer the future of America’s cities

Sing Imagination http://singimagination.wordpress.com/

The Art of Education http://theartofed.com

Arts Edge http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/educators.aspx

When: September 15-16, 2011

Arts Education Partnership

Where: San Francisco, CA

http://www.aep-arts.org/resources/ integration.htm

Registration: June 20-September 2, 2011; $195 per

person Arts Every Day http://www.artseveryday.org/Educators/ detail.aspx?id=212 10

July VIA

VIA - July Edition  

VIA is the only Arts Integration ezine available on the web today!

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