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H E A LT H B U Z Z

Story | SALLY J. CLASEN

MOOV YOUR WORKOUT TO ANOTHER LEVEL

I “BINGO WINGS” SURGERY FIGHTS BARE ARM FLAB

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ummertime means arms get exposure in sleeveless clothing, a seasonal event that makes some women want to run for cover. Diet and exercise may fight “bingo wings” but many are taking another route to get rid of unwanted arm flab. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons reports that upper arm lifts among women have increased by 4,378 percent in the last decade. In 2000, more than 300 women got upper arm lifts, as compared to more than 15,000 in 2012. Part of the surge in the arm-altering surgery is connected to extreme weight loss that leaves excessive skin that is impossible to remove with diet and exercise alone.

s your running stride correct? Are you doing the right amount of reps? A new wearable fitness gadget called Moov answers those burning workout questions and more to make the most out of your exercise routine. Unlike most fitness trackers that just collect and chart data, Moov’s artificial intelligence provides instant feedback in a real-time voice with personal training tips like “pick up the pace” as it monitors workout behaviors. The lightweight, clip-on, water-resistant Moov sensor is enabled through an iOS mobile device (Android coming soon) and offers specially designed training programs for running, cycling, swimming, cardio boxing and body weight via free Apple apps. Available fall 2014.

ACTIVE AGING

HEALING ENERGY

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r. Eric Pearl, founder of Reconnective Healing and pioneer in the field of energy medicine, will be in Houston July 18-20 introducing conference-goers and local practitioners to his innovative new health practice. Reconnective Healing uses energy, light and information, allowing the body to self-correct and create optimal balance. Dr. Pearl’s methods have been featured on “Dr. Oz” and are currently being used by more than 90,000 practitioners around the world. thereconnection.com

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hile many reports suggest that Boomers aren’t in tip-top shape, there’s one area of activity they do embrace: being in the great outdoors. The most popular outdoor activities for younger boomers, age 45 to 55, include walking, swimming, hiking, boating, golf, bicycle riding and backpacking, according to a National Sporting Goods Association survey. Older baby boomers, those aged 55 and over, rank walking, swimming, golf, fishing and canoeing/kayaking as their favorite outdoor activities.

MASSAGE THERAPY GETS A SCIENTIFIC RUBDOWN

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assage therapy has been touted for its numerous health and relaxation benefits but it’s never had solid science on its side—until now. A study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago suggests massage therapy improves blood flow and alleviates muscle soreness after exercise. After study participants exercised on a leg press machine, half of them received Swedish massages. The exercise-and-massage group reported no continuing soreness 90 minutes after massage therapy, while the exercise-only group reported lasting soreness 24 hours after exercise. The scientists also discovered that massage post-exercise not only improves blood flow but also protects vascular function. Researchers measured the brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD) at different intervals post-exercise. The exercise-and-massage group’s FMD indicated improved blood flow at each interval, with improvement tapering off after 72 hours. The exercise-only group showed reduced blood flow after 90 minutes and 24 and 48 hours, with a return to normal levels at 72 hours.

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PRIME Living's 2014 "Food & Wine" Issue